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Crazy Busy: A (Mercifully) Short Book about a (Really) Big Problem

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We've all heard it. We've all said it. All too often, busyness gets the best of us. Just one look at our jam-packed schedules tells us that we know how hard it can be to strike a well-reasoned balance between doing nothing and doing it all. That's why Kevin DeYoung addresses the busyness in this book, and not with the typical arsenal of time-management tips, but with the bib We've all heard it. We've all said it. All too often, busyness gets the best of us. Just one look at our jam-packed schedules tells us that we know how hard it can be to strike a well-reasoned balance between doing nothing and doing it all. That's why Kevin DeYoung addresses the busyness in this book, and not with the typical arsenal of time-management tips, but with the biblical tools we need to get to the source of the issue and pull the problem out by the roots.


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We've all heard it. We've all said it. All too often, busyness gets the best of us. Just one look at our jam-packed schedules tells us that we know how hard it can be to strike a well-reasoned balance between doing nothing and doing it all. That's why Kevin DeYoung addresses the busyness in this book, and not with the typical arsenal of time-management tips, but with the bib We've all heard it. We've all said it. All too often, busyness gets the best of us. Just one look at our jam-packed schedules tells us that we know how hard it can be to strike a well-reasoned balance between doing nothing and doing it all. That's why Kevin DeYoung addresses the busyness in this book, and not with the typical arsenal of time-management tips, but with the biblical tools we need to get to the source of the issue and pull the problem out by the roots.

30 review for Crazy Busy: A (Mercifully) Short Book about a (Really) Big Problem

  1. 5 out of 5

    Mark Jr.

    What do you get when you put together a gifted, kind of techie young communicator from the culturally conservative end of the neo-Reformed spectrum with a contemporary topic like our culture's crazy busyness? This book had the feel of one that wrote itself—to take nothing away from that young communicator, Kevin DeYoung. He said all the things he was expected to say and yet managed to hold my interest the entire time. He also managed to write a Young, Restless, Reformed self-help book. And it ac What do you get when you put together a gifted, kind of techie young communicator from the culturally conservative end of the neo-Reformed spectrum with a contemporary topic like our culture's crazy busyness? This book had the feel of one that wrote itself—to take nothing away from that young communicator, Kevin DeYoung. He said all the things he was expected to say and yet managed to hold my interest the entire time. He also managed to write a Young, Restless, Reformed self-help book. And it actually worked. In Crazy Busy , Kevin DeYoung admits to needing the book himself as much as he expects any of his readers to need it. He keeps his advice "mercifully short," which seemed to mean that every paragraph was written right to me. No extraneous chapters. Got the book done in time for the next item on my to-do list. DeYoung also kept his advice gospel-centered without letting the jargon that has developed around that theological meme do the work for him. Without advertising his gospel-centeredness, he applied the same balanced approach to sanctification found in The Hole in Our Holiness to a particular problem, busyness, and he genuinely edified this reader. I'll offer only a small sampling of the thoughts that helped me: • It was helpful, coming at just the right time, to hear that some people will grab for your time until you have to cut them off—and that the most helpful thing you can do for them is to do what no one else has probably done for them: sit down and tell them that there must be limits to your friendship. • It was helpful for DeYoung to expose his own desire to please people that sometimes makes him too busy. He would rather let down the people he loves the most than let down a random person who asked him to do something. • Likewise, I also liked his thought that the compulsion to post regularly, to show up online without big gaps in between, may really boil down to serving a bunch of people who don't really care about you at the expense of those who need you the most. • DeYoung stands a bit to the left of me on the always-obsessed-over theological spectrum, and yet I feel that it is I rather than he who feels more pressure to eschew legalism. He's also more spiritually mature and more life-experienced, so he helped me spot (just as he did in that aforementioned excellent book, The Hole in Our Holiness ) an overreaction to legalism in my own life. He really hammered on the importance of daily devotions, and he carefully denied that doing so was legalism. One helpful additional thought there (that I listened to as I crazy-busily mowed the lawn): he urged that devotions be the immovable rock which dictate other priorities. That is, if you know you are going to get up in the morning and read your Bible, there are some desserts or drinks or TV shows or Internet-rambling sessions that just won't happen. • It was nice listening to a fellow tech-maven complaining about what the Internet has done to our brains while trying to be careful to hold on to baby and rid himself only of bathwater. • I found it helpful that he ended the book by defending the idea that busyness isn't always sinful. Don't let that point erase the truths in the previous portion of the book, he said, but recognize that working till Jesus comes—and even suffering along the way—are to be expected in the Christian life. Readers of DeYoung's blog will pick up on several sections of the book that were either lifted from his blog or posted there, apparently, during his work on the book. But they won't feel cheated. I was glad to be reminded of his words about parenting, for example. If you are Crazy Busy , give this book a read/listen. Note: I received review copies from Crossway, NetGalley, and Christian Audio. I wasn't required to say anything nice; I genuinely liked the book. (Oh yeah, and Adam Verner did a fine job on the audio narration.)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Darla

    Five-plus stars for this one! So glad I read it. A succinct and life-changing book. Highly practical and super short, but packed with a message that will benefit so many. What are you waiting for? You have time. It is only 118 pages.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Cindy Rollins

    I gave this 3 stars, not because it is not a worthy read but because I want to keep my scale realistic. This was not a book to compete with most of my 4 star books. It was worth the time to read and it was helpful as a chat with a friend might be but it was not profound nor was it classic material. It was a solid 3 star book. I liked it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Phil

    The best thing about this book is that it is short. Well, actually, the best thing about this book is that it is good, true, helpful, insightful, down-to-earth, realistic, challenging, and encouraging. And short! DeYoung helpfully brings a biblical analysis of the possible causes of busyness that we all would do well to ponder. He also explains that there is some busyness that is unavoidable outside the convent and cloister. The section on the role of technology and the internet on our increasing The best thing about this book is that it is short. Well, actually, the best thing about this book is that it is good, true, helpful, insightful, down-to-earth, realistic, challenging, and encouraging. And short! DeYoung helpfully brings a biblical analysis of the possible causes of busyness that we all would do well to ponder. He also explains that there is some busyness that is unavoidable outside the convent and cloister. The section on the role of technology and the internet on our increasingly frazzled and fractured minds was especially excellent. Some of my simple takeaways were: Learn to prioritize (and re-prioritize regularly) your life, live intentionally, and keep 'margins' for the unexpected.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Douglas Wilson

    Some really good observations about a really common problem.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Nikki Kamp

    Concise, practical. Really good and succinct. I SO relate to DeYoung on his disposition and struggles. Really good to read as I’m trying to distribute time well and prioritize time.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Caleb

    In his timely book, DeYoung has a necessary talk with us. Many different questions could lead a believer to this book. Is technology dangerous? Should I work for more efficiency in my work, or should I start saying "no"? Is there a Christian view of sleep? Isn't there some busy-ness that's necessary? What does the Bible actually say about all of this? DeYoung addresses each of these questions from different angles in a series of relevant talking-points. He speaks like a good pastor, which means In his timely book, DeYoung has a necessary talk with us. Many different questions could lead a believer to this book. Is technology dangerous? Should I work for more efficiency in my work, or should I start saying "no"? Is there a Christian view of sleep? Isn't there some busy-ness that's necessary? What does the Bible actually say about all of this? DeYoung addresses each of these questions from different angles in a series of relevant talking-points. He speaks like a good pastor, which means he's candid without being sensational or shocking. DeYoung has made this personal journey himself, and this book helps you retrace that journey in your own life, if you're willing to be honest as you read. If believers don't have this discussion with someone, they run the great risk of flowing downstream with a culture secretly eroding from being "crazy busy." You may as well have this talk with DeYoung. Not many other Christians are talking about it.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Dan Schofield

    Far out. Busyness is the smoking of our generation, except it may literally be worse. It can be all-consuming, socially devastating, emotionally draining and spiritually crippling. I've never smoked, but I've heard it's incredibly difficult to quit. I have been busy, however, and I find it very difficult to quit being busy. I can sometimes 'be good' and slow myself down and be more intentional with my time. But I often 'relapse' into a cycle of saying "yes" to everything, not prioritising what's Far out. Busyness is the smoking of our generation, except it may literally be worse. It can be all-consuming, socially devastating, emotionally draining and spiritually crippling. I've never smoked, but I've heard it's incredibly difficult to quit. I have been busy, however, and I find it very difficult to quit being busy. I can sometimes 'be good' and slow myself down and be more intentional with my time. But I often 'relapse' into a cycle of saying "yes" to everything, not prioritising what's important, and allow my entire physical, social and spiritual wellbeing fall by the wayside at the feet of being "productive". This book was a wake-up call and a prescription. It was a don't smoke ad, and a script for nicotine patches. Yeah, OK, I'll drop the analogy... This book is a must read for busy people (i.e. people who are addicted to busyness) (i.e., pretty much everyone) If you are already a Christian, this will speak your language. If you're not, I'd read it anyway.

  9. 4 out of 5

    James Bunyan

    Typical of everything that is good about DeYoung as a writer. Punchy, thoughtful, practical, concise, engaging, prevents you from feeling unnecessarily guilty and helps you to love Jesus more and serve him better. Should definitely use with busy people! Best one I know out there on this topic. Useful quotes “Pride is the villain with a thousand faces” pg 35

  10. 5 out of 5

    ladydusk

    Own. This was helpful in considering business and countering it and remembering our need for it. It took me more than a year to read as it got stuck on the shelf because I was so busy. This was worth reading and had good, pastoral instruction.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

    This tiny little book packs a good punch to our idea that we are "too crazy busy." Learn too take your to-do list to God and make sure you are doing what matters most. This tiny little book packs a good punch to our idea that we are "too crazy busy." Learn too take your to-do list to God and make sure you are doing what matters most.

  12. 5 out of 5

    David

    Crazy Busy! That’s the cry of many people I know. Just this morning, I had breakfast with one of the men from my church. He said, “I’m Crazy Busy!” So, Kevin DeYoung’s book by that title, Crazy Busy! is a short book that does not solve all our problems, but points us in the right direction. DeYoung’s book focuses on three dangers to avoid and then seven points to consider to “de-busy-fy” your life. Three dangers to a too busy life are these. 1) Busyness can ruin your joy, 2) busyness can rob our Crazy Busy! That’s the cry of many people I know. Just this morning, I had breakfast with one of the men from my church. He said, “I’m Crazy Busy!” So, Kevin DeYoung’s book by that title, Crazy Busy! is a short book that does not solve all our problems, but points us in the right direction. DeYoung’s book focuses on three dangers to avoid and then seven points to consider to “de-busy-fy” your life. Three dangers to a too busy life are these. 1) Busyness can ruin your joy, 2) busyness can rob our hearts and 3) busyness can cover the rot in your soul. All items that ought to be of great concern to each of us. From his seven points to consider, I’ll comment on two. First, oftentimes busyness is an expression of our pride. It really isn’t very impressive to tell our friends (especially if you are in ministry like I am) that you are not busy. What? Not busy? I guess you must be lazy or something. So we like to be busy. I have learned that busyness does not equal effectiveness. It is easy for a minister to be busy, It is hard to be effective. In this chapter on pride, he talks about twelve killer “p’s” of pride: People-pleasing, pats on the back, performance evaluation, possessions, proving myself, pity, poor planning power, perfectionism, position prestige, and posting. Then asks the question: Am I trying to make myself look good? Sometimes we are busy because ultimately we want people to think well of us. Pride. Another point DeYoung discusses is, what he calls, kindergarcy! What is that, you ask? Kindergarcy is rule by children. I have seen this often, and perhaps have been guilty of it myself. We want our kids to have the best, to have what we never had, and to make sure they have want they want and, sometimes we convince ourselves they need. And many parents become so busy doing things for their kids that they don’t have time to do anything else. I think Lou Priolo calls this a Child-centered home. Your kids don’t need to be in three different sporting leagues, they don’t need the latest cell phone, they don’t need you to run everywhere for them to find the best clothes money can buy. Yes, all of us must take time to be good parents, to spend time with our kids. That does not mean we have to let them get involved in everything they want. I am convinced that it is good to tell your children “no” at times. They need to hear that from you, because they’ll hear it from others later on in life. DeYoung has five other points and then an excellent conclusion. The book is an easy read, and a relatively short read at that. DeYoung’s writing style is entertaining and enjoyable. I highly recommend this book for busy people in any stage of life. But especially for those who crazy busy.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ivan

    This was a "mercifully short" and wonderfully helpful book for a busy guy like me. DeYoung wants rejects the "busyness as usual" mindset, arguing that a life of constant chaos is far from what God intends. He offers a way forward between doing nothing and doing everything. He writes as one who is trying to “figure out things I don’t know and work on change I have not yet seen.” One early reviewer states it like this: “Fantastically helpful, humorous and holy. This book is the link between Drucker, This was a "mercifully short" and wonderfully helpful book for a busy guy like me. DeYoung wants rejects the "busyness as usual" mindset, arguing that a life of constant chaos is far from what God intends. He offers a way forward between doing nothing and doing everything. He writes as one who is trying to “figure out things I don’t know and work on change I have not yet seen.” One early reviewer states it like this: “Fantastically helpful, humorous and holy. This book is the link between Drucker, Collins and a Christian worldview.” STRUCTURE: (1) Three dangers to avoid: (i) busyness can ruin our joy; (ii) busyness can rob your hearts; (iii) busyness can cover up the rot in our souls. (2) Seven diagnosis to consider: a. You are beset with many manifestations of pride: (i) people pleasing; (ii) pats on the back; (iii) performance evaluation; (iv) possessions; (v) prove myself; (vi) pity; (vii) poor planning; (viii) power; (ix) perfectionism; (x) position; (xi) prestige; (xii) posting on social media. b. You are trying to do what God does not expect you to do: (i) I am not the Christ; (ii) there is good news; (iii) care is not the same as do; (iv) we have different gifts and different callings; (v) remember the church; (vi) I can always pray right now; (vii) Jesus didn’t do it all. c. You can’t serve others without setting priorities: (i) I must set priorities because I can’t do it all; (ii) I must set priorities if I am to serve others most effectively; (iii) I must allow others to set their priorities. d. You need to stop freaking out about your kids. e. You are letting the screen strangle your soul. i. Threats: (1) addiction; (2) acedia (i.e., sloth); (3) desire to never be alone ii. Suggestions: (1) cultivate a healthy suspicion toward technology and ‘progress’; (2) be more thoughtful and understanding in your connected with others; (3) deliberately use ‘old’ technology; (4) make boundaries and fight with all your might to protect them; (5) bring our Christian theology to bear on these dangers of the digital age. f. You better rest yourself before you wreck yourself. g. You suffer more because you don’t expect to suffer at all. i. “the reason we are busy is because we are supposed to be busy.” (3) One thing you must do: spend time every day in the word of God and in prayer.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Casey

    Pg 117: “Making consistent time for the Word of God and prayer is the place to start because being with Jesus is the only thing strong enough to pull us away from busyness.” This is so comforting—knowing I am not strong enough to fix myself but Jesus is! I’m so thankful we can pray for more desire to pray and more desire for God’s word. We are so weak, but thankfully He is strong. So many excellent points in this book. I’m so thankful for the points on the “P’s.” I’m so guilty of people pleasing Pg 117: “Making consistent time for the Word of God and prayer is the place to start because being with Jesus is the only thing strong enough to pull us away from busyness.” This is so comforting—knowing I am not strong enough to fix myself but Jesus is! I’m so thankful we can pray for more desire to pray and more desire for God’s word. We are so weak, but thankfully He is strong. So many excellent points in this book. I’m so thankful for the points on the “P’s.” I’m so guilty of people pleasing, proving myself, perfectionism, pity, and prestige in particular! I needed to be reminded that God made rest. I long for routine and rhythm but never prioritize it or plan for it. Instead of more tips and life hacks, I know I just need more Jesus. I’m thankful to Deyoung for putting it bluntly but gently. I’m crazy busy (not a brag!) and managed to read this in a little over a week—it’s a graciously easy read, light enough for the people who need it the most, but serious and important enough to be worth your oh-so-precious resource of time.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Rebekah

    This is a short and practical book, written by an author who admits he doesn't have it all figured out. Because of the author's personal struggle with busyness, he chose to write this book as a find to find solutions and share them with the rest of us. I enjoyed the practical tips and suggestions and wrote out a list of the takeaways I hope to apply to my life. I am glad he ended the book encouraging the reader to make their walk with God their first and foremost priority. Strengthening my walk This is a short and practical book, written by an author who admits he doesn't have it all figured out. Because of the author's personal struggle with busyness, he chose to write this book as a find to find solutions and share them with the rest of us. I enjoyed the practical tips and suggestions and wrote out a list of the takeaways I hope to apply to my life. I am glad he ended the book encouraging the reader to make their walk with God their first and foremost priority. Strengthening my walk with God is a big goal for me this year, and the helpful reminders in the last chapter were so helpful. I didn't agree with everything in this book, but it's a helpful and short read on the topic of busyness and how to deal with it.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Angel Beeson

    "So much of our busyness comes down to meeting people's expectations..... This is actually a form of pride and narcissism" this book is a helpful exhortation to understanding the the dangers and root causes of our busyness and a practical tool in how to fight against it. "So much of our busyness comes down to meeting people's expectations..... This is actually a form of pride and narcissism" this book is a helpful exhortation to understanding the the dangers and root causes of our busyness and a practical tool in how to fight against it.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Madison

    DeYoung's book on busyness is one that I think many Western Christians would do well to read. It is, indeed, mercifully short. But it addresses some of the key ways that our minds have been shaped by the world that cause us to live lives of meaningless tasks. He counters this by providing some healthy ways to be busy, and some healthy ways to (actually!) rest from our work. My one complaint about this book is that it sometimes felt overly general (to the point that I actually disagreed with some DeYoung's book on busyness is one that I think many Western Christians would do well to read. It is, indeed, mercifully short. But it addresses some of the key ways that our minds have been shaped by the world that cause us to live lives of meaningless tasks. He counters this by providing some healthy ways to be busy, and some healthy ways to (actually!) rest from our work. My one complaint about this book is that it sometimes felt overly general (to the point that I actually disagreed with some of his points because he almost seemed flippant in his resolution to not be busy). DeYoung's goal was to be concise and general, which he certainly achieved. My brain, however, works well with more concrete, specific ideas rather than just generalities, so there were some chapters I didn't feel were fully fleshed out. However, overall, I found this book had some helpful principles that I think will help me in the future as I plan and prioritize my life. I think this book is helpful for people who can't seem to get a grip on their time, and feel exhausted every day.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    I believe the last 2 chapters of the book panned out to be most impactful. What we come to is not a demonization of busyness and glorification of rest. Rather, a conclusion that we are supposed to be busy in the Christian life and it is how we handle this busyness that is crucial. "It is possible to be incredibly busy and feel amazingly stressed yet accomplishing very little. On the other hand, it is possible to live your days in a flurry of hard work, serving, and bearing burdens, and to do so I believe the last 2 chapters of the book panned out to be most impactful. What we come to is not a demonization of busyness and glorification of rest. Rather, a conclusion that we are supposed to be busy in the Christian life and it is how we handle this busyness that is crucial. "It is possible to be incredibly busy and feel amazingly stressed yet accomplishing very little. On the other hand, it is possible to live your days in a flurry of hard work, serving, and bearing burdens, and to do so with the right character and a reight dependence on God so that it doesn't feel crazy busy" (102) A final takeaway that I had was that maybe what we are supposed to learn in seasons of busyness, WHEN they come, is not that we should have scheduled better and managed our time more efficiently (although these are helpful skills) but rather not to be surprised when we face crazy weeks of all kinds, but also not be surprised when God sustains us in the midst of them. When we are weak, He is strong. (2 Cor 12:9&10)

  19. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

    You can tell this is written by a pastor with all his alliterated points. It's not like reading some pastors sermon notes but like reading a sermon written down with all the points, sub-points, and rabbit trails not sure how it it all ties together or where he's really taking you. I picked this book up to read after hearing Mystie Winkler talk about it on her podcasts and after taking her e-course. I think I had higher expectations because of how highly she speaks of this book. It was OK. Not li You can tell this is written by a pastor with all his alliterated points. It's not like reading some pastors sermon notes but like reading a sermon written down with all the points, sub-points, and rabbit trails not sure how it it all ties together or where he's really taking you. I picked this book up to read after hearing Mystie Winkler talk about it on her podcasts and after taking her e-course. I think I had higher expectations because of how highly she speaks of this book. It was OK. Not life changing. A few good take a way points. He ended it well. "What is wrong-and heartbreakingly foolish and wonderfully avoidable -is to live a life with more craziness than we want because we have less Jesus than we need."

  20. 5 out of 5

    David

    Incredibly accurate, necessary, and freeing book. Too many of us overestimate our own power, responsibility, ability, availability, and motivation for our activity every day. This book is a great start down the path of understanding how to control our schedules instead of letting our schedules control us. Above all this book shows us that our schedules tell us what our soul values, and they will also help or hurt our souls. This book challenges the pride in all of us, but frees us up to live wit Incredibly accurate, necessary, and freeing book. Too many of us overestimate our own power, responsibility, ability, availability, and motivation for our activity every day. This book is a great start down the path of understanding how to control our schedules instead of letting our schedules control us. Above all this book shows us that our schedules tell us what our soul values, and they will also help or hurt our souls. This book challenges the pride in all of us, but frees us up to live without the crushing burden of always needing to do more. (I would also recommend "Reset" and "Refresh" by David and Shona Murray as more in-depth looks at this topic.)

  21. 5 out of 5

    Rebekah Johnson

    “You can borrow time, but you can’t steal it...The busyness that’s bad is not the busyness of work, but the busyness that works hard at the wrong things.” This is the first Kevin DeYoung book I’ve read and I hope it’s not the last. Witty, candid, and packed with Biblical insights to help diagnose the wrong kind of busyness. And in the last chapter, Kevin points the reader to “the one thing you must do” (i won’t give it away 🙂). Great stuff!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Chris Collier

    Thought the book was fantastic. It’s not about how to be more efficient so you’re less busy. It’s not about how to change your calendar so you do more things even better. It’s about what in our heart pulls our attention away from the life that sits in front of us. What is distracting us all the time? What expectations are we placing on ourselves or accepting from society to meet some standard? DeYoung points you to your design to be ministered to by God through Jesus.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Cherry Goh

    This is the first Kevin DeYoung book I have read and I regret not knowing his books sooner! This is one of the best books I have read in a long long time. ‘Crazy Busy’ packs a punch in this deceptively short but insightful book. I especially benefitted from Kevin’s analysis of the ‘Different faces of pride’ and this was helpful as a base for self-reflection. This book is practical and acknowledges the busyness that we all face day in day out, and offers a way to avoid the pitfall of being ‘crazy’ This is the first Kevin DeYoung book I have read and I regret not knowing his books sooner! This is one of the best books I have read in a long long time. ‘Crazy Busy’ packs a punch in this deceptively short but insightful book. I especially benefitted from Kevin’s analysis of the ‘Different faces of pride’ and this was helpful as a base for self-reflection. This book is practical and acknowledges the busyness that we all face day in day out, and offers a way to avoid the pitfall of being ‘crazy’ busy. I won’t spoil it for you. If you’re struggling with busyness, go and read this book! High recommended!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ben Rogers

    BRILLIANT BOOK. Best work-life book of the year so far. Some thoroughly life-changing knowledge here. Highly recommended. 5/5

  25. 4 out of 5

    Eric Durso

    Helpful.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Bill Martin

    Nothing earth-shattering here. Just honest. I find the vulnerability of Kevin DeYoung one of the most helpful features of this short book. Readers are invited into the struggle of a pastor who opens both his study and his home to us for a refreshing glance "behind the scenes" at the over-busy life of a popular leader in the midst of his fragmented life. The stance of fellow struggler invites us to put down our defenses and get honest with our own lives. Far from self-indulgent, De Young does his Nothing earth-shattering here. Just honest. I find the vulnerability of Kevin DeYoung one of the most helpful features of this short book. Readers are invited into the struggle of a pastor who opens both his study and his home to us for a refreshing glance "behind the scenes" at the over-busy life of a popular leader in the midst of his fragmented life. The stance of fellow struggler invites us to put down our defenses and get honest with our own lives. Far from self-indulgent, De Young does his homework for this book, incorporating insights from current and classic books on relevant subjects like time management, modernity and post-modernity, cultural criticism and Christian spirituality. My favorite is a quote from Peter Kreeft in the diagnostic section (Ch. 7) that confronts the root of our busy lives: "We want to be harried and hassled and busy. Unconsciously, we want the very things we complain about. For if we had leisure, we would look at ourselves and listen to our hearts and see the great gaping hole in our hearts and be terrified, because that hole is so big that nothing but God can fill it." Crazy Busy aims at application for its readers. For myself, Chapter 8, "Rhythm and Blues" invites further reflection and personal repentance. Building on the biblical idea of Sabbath, DeYoung urges readers to consider the rhythms and routines built into creation and into themselves as creatures. When we fail to honor those given life patterns, we falter in many ways, even anger and depression. DeYoung pulls no punches in confronting those of us who think we're being productive by "burning the candle at both ends." As he reminds fellow strugglers, "Sometimes the godliest thing you can do in the universe is get a good night's sleep. . ." I needed this short read and hope allow it to reshape some of my own pattern and pride.Kevin DeYoungCrazy Busy: A (Mercifully) Short Book about a (Really) Big Problem

  27. 5 out of 5

    Rosie

    This book is practical and short, something I'm sure many busy folks are grateful for. The author recounts his own experiences with busyness and the need for this type of book for himself. There are practical solutions and steps one can take to help get a handle on busy schedule. As a busy college student I definitely plan on utilizing the tips presented in this book. A great start on studying about time management. This book is practical and short, something I'm sure many busy folks are grateful for. The author recounts his own experiences with busyness and the need for this type of book for himself. There are practical solutions and steps one can take to help get a handle on busy schedule. As a busy college student I definitely plan on utilizing the tips presented in this book. A great start on studying about time management.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Brian Taylor

    "The antidote to busyness of soul is not sloth or indifference. The antidote is rest, rhythm, death to pride, acceptance of our own finitude, and trust in the providence of God." (p. 102) This book was helpful and contained some thought-provoking ways to think about busyness. See below for a quick overview of each chapter's main point. (I've put a star "*" next to the ones that I found the most insightful. If you don't have enough time to finish the book, I would suggest reading just chapters 3, "The antidote to busyness of soul is not sloth or indifference. The antidote is rest, rhythm, death to pride, acceptance of our own finitude, and trust in the providence of God." (p. 102) This book was helpful and contained some thought-provoking ways to think about busyness. See below for a quick overview of each chapter's main point. (I've put a star "*" next to the ones that I found the most insightful. If you don't have enough time to finish the book, I would suggest reading just chapters 3, 9, and 10.) Chapters 1 & 2: Busyness is dangerous because it crowds out what really matters in our lives and in our hearts. *Chapter 3: Busyness is partly motivated by our pride -- whether it's a desire to appear successful (and busy) in the eyes of others, or whether our pride leads us to work tirelessly instead of trusting God. Chapters 4 & 5: We must establish our own priorities instead of giving in to the expectations of others, or letting everything and everyone tell us what to focus our time on. (Hello Stephen Covey.) Chapter 6: We don't need to be obsessive parents because it doesn't make any difference. (Hello Freakonomics.) Chapter 7 & 8: We need to keep technology under control and set boundaries for it. We need to carve out time in our lives for rest and being non-productive. *Chapter 9: We need wisdom to know when God is calling us to serve sacrificially and when He is calling us to say no and rest. *Chapter 10: Ultimately we need God and prayer and His Word more than we need anything else, so we should consider making that a fundamental priority in our daily lives and trying to structure other things around that.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Leah Good

    I've been wanting to give this book a try for about a year--ever since several of my Goodreads friends read Crazy Busy and Just Do Something and gave the books rave reviews. When I found Crazy Busy for 99 cents on Kindle, it was a no brainer buy. I liked this book for it's simplicity and brevity. Chapter Four and the topics related to it rubbed me a bit of the wrong way (talking about different things Christians can get involved in and encouraging Christians not to feel pressured to be active in I've been wanting to give this book a try for about a year--ever since several of my Goodreads friends read Crazy Busy and Just Do Something and gave the books rave reviews. When I found Crazy Busy for 99 cents on Kindle, it was a no brainer buy. I liked this book for it's simplicity and brevity. Chapter Four and the topics related to it rubbed me a bit of the wrong way (talking about different things Christians can get involved in and encouraging Christians not to feel pressured to be active in all of them). Obviously that concept is necessary, but having seen a lot of the opposite problem, I tend to be wary of that viewpoint. That said, when understood in the context of the rest of the book (particularly chapter 9), it makes healthy, Biblical sense. All in all, I enjoyed reading this book and am likely to recommend it to several friends who I think would also enjoy it and might benefit from it. Can't say I feel overly inspired to make changes in my life the way I do after reading some books, but maybe that's because doing more is easier for me to stomach than doing less. Some of the principles in this book--like being purposeful, forming healthy habits rather than living helter-skelter, and being careful to avoid addiction to social media--are all things I would like to improve upon. Hopefully having read this will add to my toolbox in reaching those goals.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jason Brubaker

    The timing of this book is spot on with the onslaught of iPhones, social media, etc. There are a lot of very accurate diagnoses to the main problems plaguing American society today. I didn't feel a flow to this book and the outline was a little hard to see a progression from A to Z. My biggest complaint is with chapter six. DeYoung cites only one "expert" in this field (maybe two don't quote me) and surprisingly argues for the somewhat inconsequential role of parenting. I take a major objection The timing of this book is spot on with the onslaught of iPhones, social media, etc. There are a lot of very accurate diagnoses to the main problems plaguing American society today. I didn't feel a flow to this book and the outline was a little hard to see a progression from A to Z. My biggest complaint is with chapter six. DeYoung cites only one "expert" in this field (maybe two don't quote me) and surprisingly argues for the somewhat inconsequential role of parenting. I take a major objection with DeYoung's view here and would cite books like "The Power of a Man" by Rick Johnson to argue the exact opposite point. The negatives of this book are outweighed by chapter ten where DeYoung exhorts the reader to meet God daily in a set aside devotional time and to embrace the rest and comfort that comes from that daily habit. Simply put stop being busy on things that don't matter and get busy on the things that do matter.

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