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Tarkovsky: Films, Stills, Polaroids and Writings

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Andrey Tarkovsky (1932-1986) is one of the eminent film makers of the 20th century. The five feature films he directed in the Soviet Union-among them Andrei Rublev, Solaris, and Stalker-brought him international fame. Evading censorship and mounting pressure by Soviet authorities, he did not return to the Soviet Union after completing Nostalghia in Tuscany in 1983. His fin Andrey Tarkovsky (1932-1986) is one of the eminent film makers of the 20th century. The five feature films he directed in the Soviet Union-among them Andrei Rublev, Solaris, and Stalker-brought him international fame. Evading censorship and mounting pressure by Soviet authorities, he did not return to the Soviet Union after completing Nostalghia in Tuscany in 1983. His final film, The Sacrifice, was shot in Sweden in 1985. Compiled and edited by Tarkovsky's son Andrey Jr., film historian and critic Hans-Joachim Schlegel, and Lothar Schirmer, our book pays homage to a great visionary who though in poetic and, at times, disturbing images of near-biblical intensity. It features stills and documentary photos from each of his films, a rich selection of Tarkovsky's own writings, private photographs from the family album, as well as Polaroids from Russia and Italy. A compilation of prominent voices who have commented on Tarkovsky's work and personality-including Jean-Paul Sartre, Ingmar Bergman, and Aleksandr Sokurov-rounds out the volume.


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Andrey Tarkovsky (1932-1986) is one of the eminent film makers of the 20th century. The five feature films he directed in the Soviet Union-among them Andrei Rublev, Solaris, and Stalker-brought him international fame. Evading censorship and mounting pressure by Soviet authorities, he did not return to the Soviet Union after completing Nostalghia in Tuscany in 1983. His fin Andrey Tarkovsky (1932-1986) is one of the eminent film makers of the 20th century. The five feature films he directed in the Soviet Union-among them Andrei Rublev, Solaris, and Stalker-brought him international fame. Evading censorship and mounting pressure by Soviet authorities, he did not return to the Soviet Union after completing Nostalghia in Tuscany in 1983. His final film, The Sacrifice, was shot in Sweden in 1985. Compiled and edited by Tarkovsky's son Andrey Jr., film historian and critic Hans-Joachim Schlegel, and Lothar Schirmer, our book pays homage to a great visionary who though in poetic and, at times, disturbing images of near-biblical intensity. It features stills and documentary photos from each of his films, a rich selection of Tarkovsky's own writings, private photographs from the family album, as well as Polaroids from Russia and Italy. A compilation of prominent voices who have commented on Tarkovsky's work and personality-including Jean-Paul Sartre, Ingmar Bergman, and Aleksandr Sokurov-rounds out the volume.

30 review for Tarkovsky: Films, Stills, Polaroids and Writings

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan

    disappointing quality to the images (which are just stills from his films) - not sure what the source was but is nowhere near good enough. Polaroids are a smaller selection of those already printed in Instant Light, and there is nothing in the text that is not already elsewhere in other books. So I would suggest looking elsewhere for your Tarkovsky fix (like Instant Light Tarkovsky Polaroids or his diaries) disappointing quality to the images (which are just stills from his films) - not sure what the source was but is nowhere near good enough. Polaroids are a smaller selection of those already printed in Instant Light, and there is nothing in the text that is not already elsewhere in other books. So I would suggest looking elsewhere for your Tarkovsky fix (like Instant Light Tarkovsky Polaroids or his diaries)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Nerita

    Well, to be honest with you, this book doesn't have much value as a work of literature but it is sure interesting for fans of A. Tarkovsky such as myself. ''Ivan's childhood'' left a big effect on me and his other films are also amazing, like poetry on the screen. This books talks about his films, shows photos from the movies and shares some thoughts of the director himself, also praises by others. If you're a film buff or a Tarkovsky fan - this will interest you greatly, otherwise - probably no Well, to be honest with you, this book doesn't have much value as a work of literature but it is sure interesting for fans of A. Tarkovsky such as myself. ''Ivan's childhood'' left a big effect on me and his other films are also amazing, like poetry on the screen. This books talks about his films, shows photos from the movies and shares some thoughts of the director himself, also praises by others. If you're a film buff or a Tarkovsky fan - this will interest you greatly, otherwise - probably not.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Mark Ames

    Such a strange man Mr. Tarkovsky. This book brings out so many of the apparent contradictions or complications, whatever you want to call them. Any road, this also documents that he was capable of creating truly stunning cinema - I don't always like his work but I am always impressed. Such a strange man Mr. Tarkovsky. This book brings out so many of the apparent contradictions or complications, whatever you want to call them. Any road, this also documents that he was capable of creating truly stunning cinema - I don't always like his work but I am always impressed.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Davide

    Пора любить.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Anda

    Lecture entitled the apocalypse in London 18 July 1984 at St James church piccadilly, critique of western analytical mindset which takes away the magic of the creative act p 9 His films can only be experienced by a naïve observer, simply emotional in a direct aesthetic sense Russian symbolist vyacheslav ivanov (inspiration) p 10 The Russian symbolists saw art as an antidote to the 'scientific systematization of ignorance', or as theurgy (divine intervention) which 'revives the power of myth' and Lecture entitled the apocalypse in London 18 July 1984 at St James church piccadilly, critique of western analytical mindset which takes away the magic of the creative act p 9 His films can only be experienced by a naïve observer, simply emotional in a direct aesthetic sense Russian symbolist vyacheslav ivanov (inspiration) p 10 The Russian symbolists saw art as an antidote to the 'scientific systematization of ignorance', or as theurgy (divine intervention) which 'revives the power of myth' and leads to a 'catharsis for the human soul'. P 10 Inspired by german romanticism, wrote a film on the divine aspects of e t a Hoffman Spiritual imagery of the eastern church, icon opened a window onto the divine Logos, raising the spirit to an Ur-image . P 10 ...the invisible within the visible, the inner reality that lies within the outer. P 10 'The search for a style and a form is nothing else but a search for the expression of one's own self's p 11 The Taoist world view was especially meaningful to Tarkovsky because it focuses on the inner self rather than a transcendental Beyond. The idea that the contemplative spirit 'loses itself completely in God, in Nature, in time, and it finds itself again in all of that' formed the basis of his own thinking, and all his films are about the quest for the self - p 12 Andrei Konchalovsky, a friend since their student days and co-author of several film scripts, maintained that Tarkovsky's concern was not with 'istina, eternal truth' at all, but solely with himself. The response of audiences, however, indicated that it was precisely this autobiographical, introverted, mysteriously associative 'mirror' that provided many Russians with a sense of deja vu, with personal recollections that embodied the memories of a generation. And even outside Russia, this hermetic film touched the nerve of it's audiences' subconscious. P 12 'sabi' (japanese) the rust of time inscribed in old, used objects. Above all, I feel that the sounds of this world are so beautiful in themselves that if only we could listen to them properly, cinema would have no need of music at all.' p 15 Film is 'sculpting in time' Locus amoenus And with man's help the creator comes to know himself. This progress has been given the name evolution, and it is accompanied by the agonizing process of human self-knowledge. P 33 ...moral self-knowledge is the only aim in life for each person, and, subjectively, it is experienced each time as something new. ... And so art, like science, is a means of assimilating the world, an instrument of knowing it in the course of man's journey towards what is called 'absolute truth'. P 33 The artist is always a servant, and is perpetually trying to pay for the gift that has been given to him as if by a miracle. P 34 Art is an act of sacrifice - p 34 .the slotted function of art is not, as is often assumed, to put across ideas, to propagate thoughts, to serve as example. The aim of art is to prepare a person for death, to plough and harrow his soul, rendering it capable of turning to good. P 35 Electronic music must be purged of it's 'chemical' origins, so that as we listen we may catch in it the primary nites of the world. P 37 Time is a state: the flame in which there lives the salamander of the human soul. P 37 Memory is a spiritual concept! For instance, if somebody tells us of his impressions of childhood, we can say with certainty that we shall have enough material to form a complete picture of that person. Bereft of memory, a person becomes the prisoner of an illusionary existence; falling out if time he is unable to seize his own link with the outside world - in other words he is doomed to madness. P 37 In a certain sense, the past is far more real, or at any rate more stable, more resilient than the present. The present slips and vanishes like sand between the fingers, acquiring material weight only in it's recollection. P 38 King Solomon's ring bore the inscription 'all will pass' p 38 Saba (jp), as en element of beauty, embodied the link between art and nature. P 38 What is the essence of the director's work? We could define it as sculpting in time. Just as a sculptor takes a lump of marble, and, inwardly conscious of the features of his finished piece, removes everything that is not part of it - so the film-maker, from a 'lumo of time' made up of an enormous, solid cluster of living facts, cuts off and discards whatever he does not need, leaving only what is to be an element of the finished film, what will prove to be integral to the cinematic image. P 38 The situation is worst in the visual arts, which today are almost totally devoid of spirituality. The accepted view is that this situation reflects the despiritualised state of society. And of course, on the level of simple observation of the tragedy, I agree: that is what it does reflect. But art must transcend as well as observe; it's role is to bring spiritual vision to bear on reality: as did dostoyevsky, the first to have given inspired utterance to the incipient disease of the age. P 39 The whole concept of avant-garde in art is meaningless. I can see what it means to be applied to sport, for instance. But to apply it to art would be to accept the idea of progress in art; and though progress has an obvious place in technology - more perfect machines, capable of carrying out their functions better and more accurately - how can anyone be more advanced in art? How could Thomas Mann be said to be better than Shakespeare? P 39 Can one talk of experiment in relation to the birth of a child? It is senseless and immoral. P 39 'Love your neighbour as yourself.' that is, love yourself so much that you respect in yourself the supra-personal, divine principle, which forbids you to pursue your acquisitive, selfish interests and tells you to give yourself, without reasoning or talking about it; to love others. P 40 It is obvious to everyone that man's material aggrandisement has not been synchronous with spiritual progress. The point has been reached where we seem to have a fatal incapacity for mastering our material achievements in order to use them for our own good. We have created a civilisation which threatens to annihilate mankind. P 40 There are moments when one longs to rest, to hand it all over, to give it up, along with oneself, to some total world-view - like the Veda, for instance. The East was closer to the truth than the West; but western civilisation devoured the East with it's materialist demands on life. P 41

  6. 5 out of 5

    Barry Shitpeas

    dece

  7. 4 out of 5

    Olga Perlina

  8. 5 out of 5

    El

  9. 4 out of 5

    Joshua

  10. 4 out of 5

    S.

  11. 5 out of 5

    auiliuinti

  12. 4 out of 5

    Giovanni Lorusso

  13. 5 out of 5

    Henry Virgin

  14. 5 out of 5

    Mark Robinson

  15. 4 out of 5

    Tyler

  16. 4 out of 5

    Steve

  17. 5 out of 5

    Armanda

  18. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Fortunato

  19. 4 out of 5

    Oiseaux Invisibles

  20. 5 out of 5

    Alexander Hart

  21. 5 out of 5

    Diana

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mehrdād

  23. 5 out of 5

    Tiago Queirós

  24. 5 out of 5

    Luka Barajevic

  25. 5 out of 5

    Dariusz

  26. 4 out of 5

    Samah

  27. 5 out of 5

    Alisa Dyundik

  28. 4 out of 5

    Horén

  29. 5 out of 5

    Steven Bakewell

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jelena Solovjova

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