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QBQ! The Question Behind the Question: Practicing Personal Accountability in Work and in Life

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The lack of personal accountability is a problem that has resulted in an epidemic of blame, victim thinking, complaining, and procrastination. No organization—or individual—can successfully compete in the marketplace, achieve goals and objectives, provide outstanding service, engage in exceptional teamwork, or develop people without personal accountability.   John G. Mille The lack of personal accountability is a problem that has resulted in an epidemic of blame, victim thinking, complaining, and procrastination. No organization—or individual—can successfully compete in the marketplace, achieve goals and objectives, provide outstanding service, engage in exceptional teamwork, or develop people without personal accountability.   John G. Miller believes that the troubles that plague organizations cannot be solved by pointing fingers and blaming others. Rather, the real solutions are found when each of us recognizes the power of personal accountability. In QBQ! The Question Behind the Question®, Miller explains how negative, ill-focused questions like “Why do we have to go through all this change?” and “Who dropped the ball?” represent a lack of personal accountability. Conversely, when we ask better questions—QBQs—such as “What can I do to contribute?” or “How can I help solve the problem?” our lives and our organizations are transformed. THE QBQ! PROMISE This remarkable and timely book provides a practical method for putting personal accountability into daily actions, with astonishing results: problems are solved, internal barriers come down, service improves, teams thrive, and people adapt to change more quickly. QBQ! is an invaluable resource for anyone seeking to learn, grow, and change. Using this tool, each of us can add tremendous worth to our organizations and to our lives by eliminating blame, victim-thinking, and procrastination.                                                                                                   QBQ! was written more than a decade ago and has helped countless readers practice personal accountability at work and at home. This version features a new foreword, revisions and new material throughout, and a section of  FAQs that the author has received over the years.


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The lack of personal accountability is a problem that has resulted in an epidemic of blame, victim thinking, complaining, and procrastination. No organization—or individual—can successfully compete in the marketplace, achieve goals and objectives, provide outstanding service, engage in exceptional teamwork, or develop people without personal accountability.   John G. Mille The lack of personal accountability is a problem that has resulted in an epidemic of blame, victim thinking, complaining, and procrastination. No organization—or individual—can successfully compete in the marketplace, achieve goals and objectives, provide outstanding service, engage in exceptional teamwork, or develop people without personal accountability.   John G. Miller believes that the troubles that plague organizations cannot be solved by pointing fingers and blaming others. Rather, the real solutions are found when each of us recognizes the power of personal accountability. In QBQ! The Question Behind the Question®, Miller explains how negative, ill-focused questions like “Why do we have to go through all this change?” and “Who dropped the ball?” represent a lack of personal accountability. Conversely, when we ask better questions—QBQs—such as “What can I do to contribute?” or “How can I help solve the problem?” our lives and our organizations are transformed. THE QBQ! PROMISE This remarkable and timely book provides a practical method for putting personal accountability into daily actions, with astonishing results: problems are solved, internal barriers come down, service improves, teams thrive, and people adapt to change more quickly. QBQ! is an invaluable resource for anyone seeking to learn, grow, and change. Using this tool, each of us can add tremendous worth to our organizations and to our lives by eliminating blame, victim-thinking, and procrastination.                                                                                                   QBQ! was written more than a decade ago and has helped countless readers practice personal accountability at work and at home. This version features a new foreword, revisions and new material throughout, and a section of  FAQs that the author has received over the years.

30 review for QBQ! The Question Behind the Question: Practicing Personal Accountability in Work and in Life

  1. 5 out of 5

    Chris Rock

    It's unfortunate that the system won't let me give this less than one star. Like many business books, this book can be summarized on a postcard: Take more personal responsibility for the problems you encounter. Don't ask questions that blame other people, or express frustration (e.g., "Why is this happening to me?") Instead, ask the "Question Behind the Question (QBQ) (e.g., "How can I improve this?"). The message itself has some value, but the book over-promises on its usefulness and under-delive It's unfortunate that the system won't let me give this less than one star. Like many business books, this book can be summarized on a postcard: Take more personal responsibility for the problems you encounter. Don't ask questions that blame other people, or express frustration (e.g., "Why is this happening to me?") Instead, ask the "Question Behind the Question (QBQ) (e.g., "How can I improve this?"). The message itself has some value, but the book over-promises on its usefulness and under-delivers on how to actually use it. Let me see if I can summarize all the reasons this is a terrible book: Problems with the book itself (not the message): * No evidence. There is nothing, not even an anecdote, that shows anyone applying the QBQ principle and having their life or business improve. * No structure. The book is a string of platitudes and anecdotes. * Ineffective anecdotes. None of the anecdotes correlate directly to the message. None of the anecdotes are of people using the QBQ method. * Asking the "Question Behind the Question" does not directly correlate with the core message of personal accountability (expressions of frustration and blame can be made without asking a question) * Too many logical fallacies (I won't bore you with a list) Problems with the message: * Personal accountability is fine, but this book presents it as a silver bullet for success and doesn't examine the nuances of it. * Huge difference between using personal accountability to solve a problem (which is what the book focuses on) and using personal accountability to initiate a conversation with others about working to solve the problem. Doesn't explain when you'd want to use which approach. * Encourages people to act, regardless of the consequences. This book seems like it would be best for a passive-aggressive manager to give to his employees to read so that he doesn't have to spend time training them. The biggest problem with the book is that ideally, it's unnecessary. If you focus on other aspects of business, such as building a culture of freedom and responsibility, optimism, and open and honest communication, any problems with "personal accountability" will take care of themselves. If people aren't taking personal accountability in your company, you probably have a deeper problem elsewhere in your corporate culture. Unfortunately, this book encourages you, not to look deeper into the root cause of the problem, but to use "personal accountability" to take action and solve the superficial manifestations of the problem.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    This book was required reading at a large retail department store chain, where I worked,when it was taken over by new management. "QBQ" became our new mantra and managers were constantly hounding us to answer the "Question Behind the Question." It's certainly light reading and not much of a challenge intellectually; it does make suggestions that encourage excellent customer service - there is nothing wrong with that, but...the overall premise, that there are no limits to providing such service, This book was required reading at a large retail department store chain, where I worked,when it was taken over by new management. "QBQ" became our new mantra and managers were constantly hounding us to answer the "Question Behind the Question." It's certainly light reading and not much of a challenge intellectually; it does make suggestions that encourage excellent customer service - there is nothing wrong with that, but...the overall premise, that there are no limits to providing such service, is questionable. I believe in civility and respect when dealing with customers, helping them with their needs and making the process as satisfactory as possible, but I also believe that stopping at nothing to give the customer what he/she wants is the best way to create a monster. Customers become arrogant,rude, crazy with power and an attitude that they are entitled to satisfaction at any cost (a cost not to borne by them of course); once you give them what they want, they want - no demand - more. Sorry, I'm going off on a tangent here, but I think books that espouse philosophies such as this book does are actually dangerous. I no longer work for the retail giant, and as far as I know QBQ has fallen by the wayside.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Scott Freeman

    This book painted with such a broad brush that it failed to capture any of the nuance of interpersonal relationships and corporate responsibility. I understand the concept of personal accountability and not shifting blame. However, his major premise that we do not ask why or who but only what I can do misses the mark completely. There are times where it is imperative to look at the actions of others and how the team impacts and effects productivity. The author's desire to prop up his business an This book painted with such a broad brush that it failed to capture any of the nuance of interpersonal relationships and corporate responsibility. I understand the concept of personal accountability and not shifting blame. However, his major premise that we do not ask why or who but only what I can do misses the mark completely. There are times where it is imperative to look at the actions of others and how the team impacts and effects productivity. The author's desire to prop up his business and reduce actions to catch-phrases and slogans misses the idiosyncrasies and nuances of interpersonal relationships.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sara (Empress Pengy)

    This is a hideous, hideous book that I, like many people in shitty low-wage/no benefit jobs was required to read for work. It's main message seems to be how can I help the CEO get richer by groveling and debasing myself in front of ridiculous, over-demanding customers. I take pride in my work and always believe in being polite and helpful but dude, if we're out of milk I'm not running down the street to get you some from the convenience store. This is a hideous, hideous book that I, like many people in shitty low-wage/no benefit jobs was required to read for work. It's main message seems to be how can I help the CEO get richer by groveling and debasing myself in front of ridiculous, over-demanding customers. I take pride in my work and always believe in being polite and helpful but dude, if we're out of milk I'm not running down the street to get you some from the convenience store.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tinea

    This book was pretty annoying, because it sings the tune of a cranky old white guy with bootstrap mentality, and fuck a bunch of horrible humans and oppressive power systems in the deathculture of heterosexist capitalist patriarchy that create structural barriers to people's abilities to be happy, productive, and satisfied or whatever. It's about "personal" accountability, however, so let's assume we get to define for ourselves to what values and standards we are accountable, and that we possess This book was pretty annoying, because it sings the tune of a cranky old white guy with bootstrap mentality, and fuck a bunch of horrible humans and oppressive power systems in the deathculture of heterosexist capitalist patriarchy that create structural barriers to people's abilities to be happy, productive, and satisfied or whatever. It's about "personal" accountability, however, so let's assume we get to define for ourselves to what values and standards we are accountable, and that we possess the self-respect and analytical prowess to push back when warranted. With that in mind, this was a good reminder of the answer to the age old question put to anarchism: Who will take out the trash? I will, natch. Some gems: When faced with a problem that sucks, ask not "Why me??" but instead: 1. Begin with "What" or "How" (not "Why," "When," or "Who") 2. Contain an "I" (not "they," "them," "we," or "you") 3. Focus on action. Stop asking externally focused questions. Creativity is succeeding within the box. Why don't they communicate better --> How can I better understand them? "I'm sure there are reasons we could explore, but frankly, I'd prefer to talk about solutions." It was a timely read because I've been feeling mopey and blamey recently, and as I navigate what's depression and what's self-sabotage, sometimes it's good to have crotchety, completely un-self-aware, story-wandering grandpa at your side saying, "Suck it up." Why the 1 star review? Because dude really loves it when service industry folks go above and beyond (like ingratiating to wack customer needs with their own money), and that is just the worst.

  6. 5 out of 5

    K

    Read this for work. Not impressed. Personal accountability is important, yes. This book just read like a branding and marketing of ideas and concepts that are in lots of other books. Some of it a bit too corporate and (this is an example from the book for teachers): "You feel overworked and underpaid? Well...what can you do to reignite your passion for teaching?" Uh.... Read this for work. Not impressed. Personal accountability is important, yes. This book just read like a branding and marketing of ideas and concepts that are in lots of other books. Some of it a bit too corporate and (this is an example from the book for teachers): "You feel overworked and underpaid? Well...what can you do to reignite your passion for teaching?" Uh....

  7. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Silvert

    There’s big wisdom in this little book. John Miller tackles a big subject, personal accountability, with a surprisingly simple premise: The questions we ask ourselves, “why is this happening again?” “Who is responsible,” and “When will this improve?” determines our emotional response to the difficult situations that life presents. Ask the wrong questions and we move backwards into blaming others, protecting ourselves, and rationalizing failure. Ask ourselves QBQ questions and we’re much more lik There’s big wisdom in this little book. John Miller tackles a big subject, personal accountability, with a surprisingly simple premise: The questions we ask ourselves, “why is this happening again?” “Who is responsible,” and “When will this improve?” determines our emotional response to the difficult situations that life presents. Ask the wrong questions and we move backwards into blaming others, protecting ourselves, and rationalizing failure. Ask ourselves QBQ questions and we’re much more likely to take pro-active action, inspire those around us to do the same, and improve our lives. Miller’s QBQ Rules: 1. Frame questions with ‘what’ or ‘how’ and avoid ‘why,’ ‘when,’ and ‘who.’ 2. The question must contain an ‘I’ to ensure personal involvement 3. The question must be action oriented through words such as ‘build,’ ‘do,’ and ‘make.’ Miller provides a number of business-world examples that illustrate the usefulness of QBQ questions. However, as with many books in this genre, the success examples he cites are not – in fact – using his model. Grafting a system on top of events that have already transpired is not as powerful as testing the theory in real time and documenting results. However, the QBQ logic embodies enough common sense to stand on it’s own. I found myself conducting an internal comparison of successful vs unsuccessful personal challenges and the QBQ premise held up well. Highly recommended.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sonja

    This book was loaned to me by a co-worker (whose boyfriend apparently lives by the "QBQ"). Very short, very quick read. A little too simplistic. Not anything I haven't heard before. Basically espouses personal accountability. Don't blame other people. Instead of asking negative questions, ask questions that start with either "What" or "How," include "I," and include some kind of action. Not bad advice, although it talks about not blaming others or complaining, but doesn't address the issues of n This book was loaned to me by a co-worker (whose boyfriend apparently lives by the "QBQ"). Very short, very quick read. A little too simplistic. Not anything I haven't heard before. Basically espouses personal accountability. Don't blame other people. Instead of asking negative questions, ask questions that start with either "What" or "How," include "I," and include some kind of action. Not bad advice, although it talks about not blaming others or complaining, but doesn't address the issues of not blaming yourself for everything and not feeling like everything is your fault (which seems like a trap you could fall into).

  9. 4 out of 5

    Avolyn Fisher

    This book was introduced to me from my employer who brought in John's daughter to introduce us to the QBQ! method. First off - I have no issues with the message this book is trying to convey, I believe wholeheartedly in the importance of personal accountability and I agree that often times we are too quick to blame in the workplace and don't take enough time looking internally for the solutions to our problems. However, how does one prevent "silos" from happening if every individual is only lookin This book was introduced to me from my employer who brought in John's daughter to introduce us to the QBQ! method. First off - I have no issues with the message this book is trying to convey, I believe wholeheartedly in the importance of personal accountability and I agree that often times we are too quick to blame in the workplace and don't take enough time looking internally for the solutions to our problems. However, how does one prevent "silos" from happening if every individual is only looking at what they can do? OF COURSE I agree that the only person you can change is yourself - and that is why personal accountability is so important because you can't change others, BUT if I don't have a fundamental understanding of WHY my company chose to do X or WHY my company hasn't implemented Y ----- then I probably don't have a very good idea of my employer's vision, direction, goal, target outcome, etc. Sometimes one has to ask those questions to better understand what is even going on. I NEED that information to ensure that when I ask "What can I do to support the organization" or "What can I do to be a more effective employee" I'll be on the right track. While I can't control the people on my team or decide whether or not they will change - if I don't include them in my big picture thinking while I decide how I can contribute - then we aren't acting as a team, we are doomed to become scattered, off track, or duplicate each other's efforts by not realizing someone else has already begun solving X and they're close to finding the solution, so I probably shouldn't start from scratch in my efforts to solve the same thing. I'd probably be better served helping them. But until I ask, What are they doing for the team? I won't know they're working on X, close to a solution, and in need of my help! Your organization will soon become a hackathon, a bunch of people albeit engaged and hard at work, but unknowingly duplicating the same thing and thus wasting energy and wasting efforts that could be put to better use in an orchestrated manner. I think creating rules on what words can start your sentences and what words can't is too simplistic. The root of the issue is the attitude not what word you use. "What was she thinking when she read my email and responded so rudely?" sounds totally different coming from the place of, I am genuinely trying to put myself in her shoes to see why she reacted to me in that way to see the situation from her perspective so I can understand where she is coming from. If you have a positive/calm attitude and the mindset of someone who can only control yourself and wants to do everything possible to be a positive force and contribution to your environment, it doesn't matter what word you use to start your sentences with. I also agree that blame can become toxic but sometimes you do need to address a leaky pipe, rather than do what you can to mop up water but take no action to figure out where the leak is coming from. Overall, I support the main message, I just don't agree with every example or the oversimplification.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Theresa

    This books talks about recognizing personal accountability in all areas of your life...personally and professionally. Favorite Quotes: pg. 23 "How can I do my job better today?" "What can I do to improve the situation?" "How can I support others?" Pg. 39 Most of us have heard the saying, "Creativity is thinking outside the box." There's a lot of truth in that, but to me true creativity is this: Succeeding within the box. pg. 46 Blame and "whodunit" questions solve nothing. They create fear, destroy creat This books talks about recognizing personal accountability in all areas of your life...personally and professionally. Favorite Quotes: pg. 23 "How can I do my job better today?" "What can I do to improve the situation?" "How can I support others?" Pg. 39 Most of us have heard the saying, "Creativity is thinking outside the box." There's a lot of truth in that, but to me true creativity is this: Succeeding within the box. pg. 46 Blame and "whodunit" questions solve nothing. They create fear, destroy creativity and build walls. Instead of brainstorming and working together to get things done, we blame-storm and accomplish nothing. There's not a chance we'll reach our full potential until we stop blaming each other and start practicing personal accountability. pg. 63 A CEO or anyone in leadership should state that... Personal Accountability begins with ME...not with YOU pg. 69 People's minds fill with all kinds of ideas when asked what they would change to improve things. But guess what nobobdy ever says? Me! "I would change me to make our organization run more effectively." Someone once suggested it was a trick question but I don't think it is. Read it again. Our minds simply don't go there. Our thoughts almost always focus elsewhere first. Asking questions that begin with "What" or "How" and contain and "I" brings our focus back to ourselves. pg. 74 The definition of integrity is: "Being what I say I am by acting in accordance with my words." pg. 76 Here's an integrity test for anyone who's part of an organiziation: Does what we say about our organization while we're at work match what we say at home? If it's positive at work and negative a few hours later at home, we have a choice to make. Here's an idea we should all consider: Believe or leave. pg. 84 Even though there are risks involved in taking action, the alternative, inaction, is almost never the better choice. Action, even when it leads to mistakes, brings learning and growth. Inaction brings stagnation and atrophy. Action leads us toward solutions. Inaction at best does nothing and holds us in the past. Action requires courage. Inaction often indicates fear. Action Builds confidence; inaction, doubt. "It's better to be one who is told to wait, than one who waits to be told." pg. 95 "As a leader, I'm here to help you reach your goals." Humility is the cornerstone of leadership. pg. 110 We attend too many seminars. We take too many classes. We buy too many books. We play too many audios in our cars. It's all wasted if we're unclear on what learning really is: Learning is not attending, listening or reading. Nor is it merely gaining knowledge. Learning is really about translating knowing what to do into doing what we know. It's about changing. If we have not changed we have not learned. What Have you learned today?

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jeanette

    another jewelry lady suggested this book to a few of us for our business, so i picked it up and finally decided to read it. it took me less than an hour- a fast, easy read. i have to admit that i was turned off by the second page. "on a cross coountry flight the flight attendant got on the intercom and said, 'Sorry everyone but the movie we promised you will not be shown today. Catering put the wrong one on board.'" He then goes on to use this as an example of people not taking responsibility an another jewelry lady suggested this book to a few of us for our business, so i picked it up and finally decided to read it. it took me less than an hour- a fast, easy read. i have to admit that i was turned off by the second page. "on a cross coountry flight the flight attendant got on the intercom and said, 'Sorry everyone but the movie we promised you will not be shown today. Catering put the wrong one on board.'" He then goes on to use this as an example of people not taking responsibility and accountability. As a flight attendant, this does happen and i thought- well what else was she supposed to do???? i decided to continue on and though i learned a lot and think what he's trying to teach people is great (but i still think he shouldn't have used that example!) some of my favorite things from the book are every day ask yourself How Can I do My Job Better Today? What Can I Do to Improve the Situation? How Can I Support Others? We're going through a merger and a lapse in contract at my job and a lot ,of the employees are anti management and its very much a we vs. them mentality. i admit that i have been sucked into this, and am going to try to change my attitude and position after reading this. A few other key points: Stop playing the victim. Work with what you got. How can you adapt to changes in the workplace? Take Ownership Make Better choices A definite must read for everyone who has kids and has a job!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Katie Leas

    My company used to have a book club in which the entire staff participated. Prior to my becoming a full time employee with the company and being included in this activity, they read "QBQ!" The book continues to be referenced by executive management and our Account Service Department is reading the book together. Well, I couldn't be left out, so I had to buy it and read it for myself. I learned a few of the principles in this book though my own failings earlier in life (okay, within the last 12 y My company used to have a book club in which the entire staff participated. Prior to my becoming a full time employee with the company and being included in this activity, they read "QBQ!" The book continues to be referenced by executive management and our Account Service Department is reading the book together. Well, I couldn't be left out, so I had to buy it and read it for myself. I learned a few of the principles in this book though my own failings earlier in life (okay, within the last 12 years) and truly believe in the power of personal accountability. I take away an even greater depth to some of the basics I've already embraced and something I can share as I coach my team at work. No, I can't change them, but I can share this book. Favorites for me: you always have a choice (I've been saying this for years.) Stress is a choice. Think in "I" terms not them. Do not adopt victim mentality. It's energizing to read a book and flip your thinking.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kristopher Kelly

    Read this for work. Now I'm wondering: How can I never read another book like this? The eponymous acronym is meaningless and seems like simply an attempt to brand the pretty basic idea that one shouldn't look to blame others but should look for a way to help out in any given situation. How that relates to questions, either in front or behind each other, seems a bit unclear to me. Read this for work. Now I'm wondering: How can I never read another book like this? The eponymous acronym is meaningless and seems like simply an attempt to brand the pretty basic idea that one shouldn't look to blame others but should look for a way to help out in any given situation. How that relates to questions, either in front or behind each other, seems a bit unclear to me.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lynette

    I was given this to read in the first 30 days of my new job, and I must say it’s a great way to reset your mind before things get hectic. I unknowingly followed the QBQ life in my last job, until I started doing other people’s jobs. This was a breath of fresh air and I made sure to take my time reading it, even though I wanted to blast through it. At times, the points seemed common sense to me, but they might not be fore every one! Common sense is actually not common....sadly. But! I definitely I was given this to read in the first 30 days of my new job, and I must say it’s a great way to reset your mind before things get hectic. I unknowingly followed the QBQ life in my last job, until I started doing other people’s jobs. This was a breath of fresh air and I made sure to take my time reading it, even though I wanted to blast through it. At times, the points seemed common sense to me, but they might not be fore every one! Common sense is actually not common....sadly. But! I definitely recommend this. Yes yes!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Heidi

    Everyone should read this. I hope I make a few changes in my life that help me be a better leader.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Betty

    This is a rather different book which focuses on the epidemic "blame" game which is rampant today. John Miller attempts to pursuade one to accept responsibility, be accountable and, above all, quit blaming. He suggest we drop questions that begin with "who" and "why" and change them to "show" and "what". He also says to remove the "they" and "them" and replace with "I". So, when a "situation" arises, instead of trying to dodge blame or find an excuse, pose a question like "What can I do to help?" This is a rather different book which focuses on the epidemic "blame" game which is rampant today. John Miller attempts to pursuade one to accept responsibility, be accountable and, above all, quit blaming. He suggest we drop questions that begin with "who" and "why" and change them to "show" and "what". He also says to remove the "they" and "them" and replace with "I". So, when a "situation" arises, instead of trying to dodge blame or find an excuse, pose a question like "What can I do to help?" or "How can I assist?" Miller's reasoning is that when we say "who's doing that?" or "Do I have to?" we should say, "How can I make a difference?" The "ducking responsibility" questions make us a subservient, while the action-oriented questions put us in control. Never fear action. "It is better to be one who is told to wait, than one who waits to be told."

  17. 5 out of 5

    Toofan

    Being accountable and refining from blaming others is in itself a good piece of advice. But the author fails to see that some time taking responsibility means ignoring problems that are not your responsibility or avoiding time consuming creativity during the rush hour in order to accommodate one customer at the cost of several other and/or your already stressed out coworkers. I don't know about the United states but many of the examples in this book are the exacts formula for losing your job, som Being accountable and refining from blaming others is in itself a good piece of advice. But the author fails to see that some time taking responsibility means ignoring problems that are not your responsibility or avoiding time consuming creativity during the rush hour in order to accommodate one customer at the cost of several other and/or your already stressed out coworkers. I don't know about the United states but many of the examples in this book are the exacts formula for losing your job, sometimes even without notice, in some organizations in Europe and Asia. Also when working on a big project with other people/ teams " What can I do" is only a very small part of the equation.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    Snooze

  19. 4 out of 5

    Nathan Masacek

    The book QBQ is not one of my favorites. The book I recently read was “QBQ!”, It stands for the question behind the question. This book was written by John G. Miller. I personally didn’t like this book really because of just the style that it had. I don’t really enjoy this style of book writing where there is short stories, but it depends on what you like. This book is a little short, so it is hard to write about. The basic moral of this book was taking situations that the writer had in his life The book QBQ is not one of my favorites. The book I recently read was “QBQ!”, It stands for the question behind the question. This book was written by John G. Miller. I personally didn’t like this book really because of just the style that it had. I don’t really enjoy this style of book writing where there is short stories, but it depends on what you like. This book is a little short, so it is hard to write about. The basic moral of this book was taking situations that the writer had in his life, and going more in depth in it. He would go and find the question behind the question. One thing I did enjoy in this book was some of the stories in it. There were some short stories in this book that we’re somewhat intriguing and relatable, yet a lot of them I didn’t like very much. Some stories would talk about how what people do and what you think of it. I liked those stories. Yet in this book there were some stories that were either too demanding or too in depth about the Question behind the question. Having this be a short book, I will give it a little bit of sympathy for my rating. I think I would rate this book a 3.5 out of 5 for some certain reasons of good short stories. I think this book has high and lows but deserves this rating for having some decent stories and for how long the book is. I would suggest this book to anyone that likes this style of writings, or a book going in depth in stories. This wasn’t as good as the recent books but it wasn't too bad.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Evie Devries

    Lack of personal accountability is a problem a lot of people struggle with in this day and age. In this book the author John Miller explains how to gain it and the little pieces that goes along with personal accountability in order to gain that skill. Each chapter shows each little puzzle piece that fits into the topic of personal accountability and most chapters include a question like who? what? where? when? or why? For example there are chapters about the Foundation of Teamwork, Making Better Lack of personal accountability is a problem a lot of people struggle with in this day and age. In this book the author John Miller explains how to gain it and the little pieces that goes along with personal accountability in order to gain that skill. Each chapter shows each little puzzle piece that fits into the topic of personal accountability and most chapters include a question like who? what? where? when? or why? For example there are chapters about the Foundation of Teamwork, Making Better Choices, Why me?, the Motor of Learning, etc. He also explains how we should take blame for ourselves instead of blaming others. I think this book was informational in some ways and in others not so much because in some chapters he had really good points and explanations to back it up and in others there was not good evidence supporting his ideas and points. I agree with the author because I think that people should take responsibility for their own actions and not blame other people. I would give this book at 3 out of 5 stars because it was informative yet it was kind of boring.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Rodriquez

    Personal accountability starts with you (this should be said into a mirror). John Miller poses a practical way to focus on what we can do to incorporate personal accountability into our everyday lives. At the same time, his system stomps out the idea of victimhood. Take an afternoon and read this short and focused book on personal accountability and you will start looking at “problems” as opportunities for improvement.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Josie

    Personal accountability (QBQ application) is a standard within our culture at AB&T and I read it once a year to bring it top of mind for myself and my team. Quick and effective read- Love the message of personal accountability and action!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Isaac Foster

    A highly effective, if short, leadership book that gets to the heart of what it means to be a leader. The examples are effective and insightful, as is the punchy writing style. A book that is meant to be digested quickly and read frequently.

  24. 5 out of 5

    John O'Malley

    This book should be a blog post. Doesn’t need 38 chapters to say the same thing over and over again.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

    A good reminder to focus on what we can control and ask questions that drive us to the best, most relevant and useful answers.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Tiffaney

    i read this book for a management leadership class and work and loved it.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    A great book about personal accountability in the business world. I recommend this book.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Nila

    Extremely informative book under the self-help umbrella all about Personal responsibility. There are a lot of problems in today's world that can be boiled down to this books' contents. Everyone blames everything on every BUT THEMSELVES. You can't dance? The floor must be uneven! Can't travel or go on vacation? Your boss doesn't pay you enough! Project not get done in time? Boss didn't give me enough time, he talks too much, I was busy! Work not done right? CEO blames a manager who then blames e Extremely informative book under the self-help umbrella all about Personal responsibility. There are a lot of problems in today's world that can be boiled down to this books' contents. Everyone blames everything on every BUT THEMSELVES. You can't dance? The floor must be uneven! Can't travel or go on vacation? Your boss doesn't pay you enough! Project not get done in time? Boss didn't give me enough time, he talks too much, I was busy! Work not done right? CEO blames a manager who then blames employees who blame the customer or fellow co-workers! What would happen if instead of complaining about what you didn't have or what you needed, what was your part in project or whatever not getting done? We can only work on ourselves. This book is not very long at all but the contents make it worth the read!!!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Tray Tucker

    John Millers perspective on personal accountability is a breathe of fresh air, many people don't think this way in the work place. Definitely some good take aways although I could of used some more on dealing with people that don't feel the need to take on personal accountability. John Millers perspective on personal accountability is a breathe of fresh air, many people don't think this way in the work place. Definitely some good take aways although I could of used some more on dealing with people that don't feel the need to take on personal accountability.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jeph

    QBQ (The Question Behind the Question) is a short but powerful book about personal accountability and asking better, more responsible questions. QBQ and personal accountability revolves around stopping "the blame game" and changing people's minds (namely yourself) from asking questions like "Who dropped the ball?" or "Why didn't so-and-so do this?" to asking more responsible questions like "How can I help?" or "What can I do to make the company more productive" The core strength of QBQ is that th QBQ (The Question Behind the Question) is a short but powerful book about personal accountability and asking better, more responsible questions. QBQ and personal accountability revolves around stopping "the blame game" and changing people's minds (namely yourself) from asking questions like "Who dropped the ball?" or "Why didn't so-and-so do this?" to asking more responsible questions like "How can I help?" or "What can I do to make the company more productive" The core strength of QBQ is that the author breaks the information into small bite-sized chunks and chapters of information. The information is basic, and you've probably heard it before, but the message is strong and clear. An hour or two with this book can really change your outlook on your life at home and at work, and is worth the read, even if it only sticks with you for that day. John G. Miller does a great job of story-telling and using examples and tangents to link his message to real-life situations, and no matter who you are, something in this book will strike a chord with your lifestyle and behaviors. My only fault with this book was that it was very open-ended in how you choose to apply the information you receive from QBQ and personally, I would have liked to have more scenarios. For example, I would have learned more if the author gave you a situation at work or at home, prompted you on how you would react to the situation, and then give a good suggestion or example of how to approach the situation. Overall, this was a very short read and should only take most readers an hour or two (though I and the book suggest that you re-read QBQ at a later point to get the most out of it), but the time spent with this book is very well spent and should make a beneficial impact with each reader, whether at home, office or elsewhere.

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