website statistics The Courtesan Prince - PDF Books Online
Hot Best Seller

The Courtesan Prince

Availability: Ready to download

From two cultures that should never meet, come four people who do: Ann, Von, Di Mon and Ranar. Reetions Ranar (anthopologist) and Ann (pilot)came to check out what the socially primitive neo-feudal people of Sevildom have been up to in the last 200 years. What they discover will threaten their own civilization. Di Mon, Sevolite king-maker, aristocrat and champion for his b From two cultures that should never meet, come four people who do: Ann, Von, Di Mon and Ranar. Reetions Ranar (anthopologist) and Ann (pilot)came to check out what the socially primitive neo-feudal people of Sevildom have been up to in the last 200 years. What they discover will threaten their own civilization. Di Mon, Sevolite king-maker, aristocrat and champion for his beleaguered house under Sword Law, finds the one thing he's avoided at all costs: love. Hot-headed Reetion pilot, Ann, learn that true love has a price. And Von, the sword-dancer and Courtesan, is somehow the key to it all. First book of the character-driven science fiction series called The Okal Rel Saga.


Compare

From two cultures that should never meet, come four people who do: Ann, Von, Di Mon and Ranar. Reetions Ranar (anthopologist) and Ann (pilot)came to check out what the socially primitive neo-feudal people of Sevildom have been up to in the last 200 years. What they discover will threaten their own civilization. Di Mon, Sevolite king-maker, aristocrat and champion for his b From two cultures that should never meet, come four people who do: Ann, Von, Di Mon and Ranar. Reetions Ranar (anthopologist) and Ann (pilot)came to check out what the socially primitive neo-feudal people of Sevildom have been up to in the last 200 years. What they discover will threaten their own civilization. Di Mon, Sevolite king-maker, aristocrat and champion for his beleaguered house under Sword Law, finds the one thing he's avoided at all costs: love. Hot-headed Reetion pilot, Ann, learn that true love has a price. And Von, the sword-dancer and Courtesan, is somehow the key to it all. First book of the character-driven science fiction series called The Okal Rel Saga.

30 review for The Courtesan Prince

  1. 4 out of 5

    Derek Newman-Stille

    Lynda Williams is willing to do deep cultural critiques, exploring the development of different cultural ideas and contrasting them in societies that essentially descended from the same roots. She is willing to interrogate politics, ideas of social equality, the complexity of sexuality, ideas of privacy, biological change, and technology. And she is unwilling to give the readers simple answers, but encourages them to interrogate these issues, think for themselves, and develop their own ideas. Th Lynda Williams is willing to do deep cultural critiques, exploring the development of different cultural ideas and contrasting them in societies that essentially descended from the same roots. She is willing to interrogate politics, ideas of social equality, the complexity of sexuality, ideas of privacy, biological change, and technology. And she is unwilling to give the readers simple answers, but encourages them to interrogate these issues, think for themselves, and develop their own ideas. The Courtesan Prince is a pedagogical text in the best sense of the word, not because it gives answers (as many think that teaching does), but because it asks questions, opens things to debate, and encourages readers to be uncomfortable with any easy answers. Gelacks and Reetions are contrasted with one another in a way that pushes readers into an uncomfortable intergalactic, in-between space, stuck in the limbo between different ideologies. And this is a hugely powerful creative space where readers are made aware of how much their ideas and thoughts are socially defined and they are encouraged to get rid of cultural trappings and question things freely. The Reetions focus on the idea of honesty, and everything being public… but with that comes the limitations on privacy and the sense of living in a panopticon where everything can be easily seen. The Gelacks are more private, but lying is culturally entrenched to maintain secrets. The Gelacks have a population with bodies that are stronger, heal faster, and survive better… but the power of these bodies have meant tight restrictions on mating practices and the social control of “common” people by a small minority of physically stronger people. The Reetions don’t genetically modify people to be stronger, which means they are able to attain an egalitarian civilisation… but because of this their pilots often have short careers, damaged by the ravages of space travel which destroys normal human bodies. The Reetions are more comfortable with technology… but this means that they are also willing to modify people’s minds through psychotherapy. Whereas the Galecks consider certain forms of technology taboo, which prevents healing adaptions… but they are able to reduce the construction of any weapons of mass destruction. Nothing is easy in The Courtesan Prince and neither civilisation is portrayed as the model of perfect human society. Both have flaws, and these challenges make Lynda Williams’ novel more complex, more rich in substance, and portray the idea that the struggle for perfection is culturally defined and that one person’s ideal may be another’s horror. If you are interested in reading a longer version of this review, you can visit my website at http://speculatingcanada.wordpress.co...

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kristene Perron

    Adventure, romance, sword fights, sex, FTL travel, politics, culture clashes, this book has it all! Set in a future of inter-stellar space travel and abandoned earth colonies, The Courtesan Prince is a space opera of the best variety. The story centers around two distinct civilizations, Reetions and Gelacks, and four main characters. The action begins when a small group of Gelacks attempts to reestablish contact with the very distant, (and very different), Reetions, 200 years after their devastat Adventure, romance, sword fights, sex, FTL travel, politics, culture clashes, this book has it all! Set in a future of inter-stellar space travel and abandoned earth colonies, The Courtesan Prince is a space opera of the best variety. The story centers around two distinct civilizations, Reetions and Gelacks, and four main characters. The action begins when a small group of Gelacks attempts to reestablish contact with the very distant, (and very different), Reetions, 200 years after their devastating war. The adventure and romance are enough to keep readers interested but, for me, the heart of this story was the interaction of the two civilizations through the main characters. Ann and Ranar are Gelacks, theirs is an egalitarian world, steeped in equal parts reason and bureaucracy. Von and Di Mon belong to the mysterious Reetions, to whom ancestry is everything and whose society is bound by strict rules of conduct, (often enforced at the end of a sword). Through these characters, Williams touches on issues of gender and social equality, personal responsibility, sexual orientation, and cultural relations. By turns, she titillates and informs, and never leaves the reader with the sense that they are being given the dreaded “message”. I think this novel would appeal to fantasy and sci-fi lovers alike, as it has elements of both genres. Even better, this is only the first in a ten book series, so if you're hungry for more after the final page, you'll have lots to keep you entertained! My only notes would be not to let the prologue fool you. It's quite detailed and lengthy, which I found a bit intimidating, but it's nothing like the rest of the story, which moves at a fast pace. I will definitely be reading more in this series!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Johanson

    It has been a while since I read The Courtesan Prince, but I reviewed it in issue 7 of Neo-opsis Science Fiction Magazine. Here is my review: The Courtesan Prince is a rich tapestry of intrigues, power struggles and affairs. The story is set thousands of years after Earth sent out colonists to the far reaches of space. These colonists have evolved into two distinct and separate societies, Reetions and Gelacks. The Reetions are a mostly democratic society that uses computers and technology to mai It has been a while since I read The Courtesan Prince, but I reviewed it in issue 7 of Neo-opsis Science Fiction Magazine. Here is my review: The Courtesan Prince is a rich tapestry of intrigues, power struggles and affairs. The story is set thousands of years after Earth sent out colonists to the far reaches of space. These colonists have evolved into two distinct and separate societies, Reetions and Gelacks. The Reetions are a mostly democratic society that uses computers and technology to maintain their peace. The Gelacks have a society based on genetic purity, strength, and a complex code of honour that is maintained by the sword. The last time these two cultures met, there was a war that killed many, even destroying planets and space stations. Now the Reetions and the Gelacks are encroaching on each other’s borders again. Ranar, a Reetion scientist and diplomat, wants the interaction between the Reetions and the Gelacks to be official, and delicately handled, so he has enlisted the help of Anne, a young female space pilot, to learn the space jump to Trinket Ring, a space station on the border of Gelack space. The principle character on the Gelack side is Von, a very handsome young courtesan, and sword dancer. Von is so very beautiful that he attracts more attention than is healthy for him and for those whose he cares about. If you have read The Throne Price, by Lynda Williams and Alison Sinclair, the first third of The Courtesan Prince may seem a bit slow. This is because there are explanations of Reetion and Gelack society that you may already know. Don’t let it slow you down, because The Courtesan Prince is well worth the read.

  4. 4 out of 5

    ShaunaLee

    As someone that isn't terribly familiar with sci-fi books, I didn't find this hard to get into. I have the strange experience of enjoying the story but not liking the main character. I don't think that she was written to be disliked, but I found that she rubbed me wrong and I often wanted to tell her to grow up. I would have given this one more star if this character and I hadn't been having this issue, although it was interesting to have. I did however really like the how some of the characters As someone that isn't terribly familiar with sci-fi books, I didn't find this hard to get into. I have the strange experience of enjoying the story but not liking the main character. I don't think that she was written to be disliked, but I found that she rubbed me wrong and I often wanted to tell her to grow up. I would have given this one more star if this character and I hadn't been having this issue, although it was interesting to have. I did however really like the how some of the characters were written who were obviously not supposed to be like. Always good to have a properly detestable character around. Based off the writer's description of the world and different types of characters from when I saw her at When Words Collide this summer, I'm definitely planning on continuing with the series. Lynda had started a great world in this book and I can't wait to get to some of the other subjects that she touched on within the series. It was impossible not to be drawn in when listening to her talk about it.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Amber

    I got into this book by accident. After talking to Lynda on Facebook, she graciously sent me this and one other of her novels. The Courtesan Prince was not what I expected. It was a very deep, very developed scifi. There was space travel, albeit not the kind I was used to - and that was the coolest thing about the book. It kept surprising me. Nothing was as I expected it to be; nothing was predictable. I will grant that the main character is flawed almost to the point that you want to smack some I got into this book by accident. After talking to Lynda on Facebook, she graciously sent me this and one other of her novels. The Courtesan Prince was not what I expected. It was a very deep, very developed scifi. There was space travel, albeit not the kind I was used to - and that was the coolest thing about the book. It kept surprising me. Nothing was as I expected it to be; nothing was predictable. I will grant that the main character is flawed almost to the point that you want to smack some sense into her, but that's what makes it feel like real characters. People aren't perfect and our motives are often selfish. It was an entertaining read, thanks Lynda!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    The author was generous enough to send me this copy of my introduction to the Okal Rel universe, and I'm grateful that she did! The story is entirely self-contained, and a delightful, high-energy space opera with overtones touching on social inequality, racial stereotypes, personal privacy, and social norms of violence. A wonderful middle ground between the light-hearted and thought-provoking, and surprisingly, between science fiction and sword and sorcery. I will definitely be seeking out more i The author was generous enough to send me this copy of my introduction to the Okal Rel universe, and I'm grateful that she did! The story is entirely self-contained, and a delightful, high-energy space opera with overtones touching on social inequality, racial stereotypes, personal privacy, and social norms of violence. A wonderful middle ground between the light-hearted and thought-provoking, and surprisingly, between science fiction and sword and sorcery. I will definitely be seeking out more installments!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lynda

    First book in the Okal Rel Saga, introducing Amel as the prince raised as a commoner who is, unfortunately for his dignity, also the prostitute with the heart of gold. Four characters from two very different cultures come together in this book to kick start the ten-novel saga published by Edge Science Fiction and Fantasy. First book in the Okal Rel Saga, introducing Amel as the prince raised as a commoner who is, unfortunately for his dignity, also the prostitute with the heart of gold. Four characters from two very different cultures come together in this book to kick start the ten-novel saga published by Edge Science Fiction and Fantasy.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Virginia Carraway-Stark

    Lynda Williams gives life to a Very intense culture her okal rel universe. She gives a deep study into the long reaching effects of genetic modification on humans. space travel and a technological dystopia are juxtaposed to give second thoughts about the psychological effects of intergalactic travel. Extremely thought provoking series, the courtesan prince sits in your brain and opens the door to deep seated ethical issues.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Brian Rathbone

    The Courtesan Prince is a space adventure charged with sexual energy and ambiguity. Though not heavily laden with technology, it is clear that Williams possesses a strong technical mind. As a writer and computer programmer, I enjoyed the references to "blits" and other subtle touches that leant to greater believability. I look forward to reading more of the Okal Rel series. The Courtesan Prince is a space adventure charged with sexual energy and ambiguity. Though not heavily laden with technology, it is clear that Williams possesses a strong technical mind. As a writer and computer programmer, I enjoyed the references to "blits" and other subtle touches that leant to greater believability. I look forward to reading more of the Okal Rel series.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sandra Wickham

    I had a chance to meet Lynda Williams at a convention and I learned so much from her about writing great characters, which is evident in her writing. I read this book, I think back in 2008, and I will say it's one of those books that sticks with you! The characters, the world..I highly recommend reading it! I had a chance to meet Lynda Williams at a convention and I learned so much from her about writing great characters, which is evident in her writing. I read this book, I think back in 2008, and I will say it's one of those books that sticks with you! The characters, the world..I highly recommend reading it!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Brownbetty

    I picked up Courtesan Prince by Lynne Williams from the library because the title sounded promisingly sordid. I was not disappointed. I'm afraid this review contains spoilers, but I think that I don't spoil anything that isn't spoiled by the title. However, you have been warned. Courtesan Prince apparently belongs to a universe that Lynda Williams shares with Alison Sinclaire. I caution you not to read any of the background material on this, because Williams suffers from the conviction that not o I picked up Courtesan Prince by Lynne Williams from the library because the title sounded promisingly sordid. I was not disappointed. I'm afraid this review contains spoilers, but I think that I don't spoil anything that isn't spoiled by the title. However, you have been warned. Courtesan Prince apparently belongs to a universe that Lynda Williams shares with Alison Sinclaire. I caution you not to read any of the background material on this, because Williams suffers from the conviction that not only must she know the history of her universe, but she must impart it to her readers. This is incredibly tedious. Skip the prologue! The important thing for you as a reader to know is that the novel works well as a self-contained story. Courtesan Prince is Space Opera, and as such, does quite well. Honour! Betrayal! Lost princes! (Hint: he's working as a courtesan.) Sword fighting! FTL-travel! The story is about two galactic civilizations coming into contact again, after a long separation since the treaty that concluded their last war. It works with a fairly large cast, but manages to keep them all interesting by focusing mainly on four characters, whose motivations are distinct, and quite human. At the same time, they work against the backdrop of intergalactic politics, vast social forces, and the not-quite-unbreakable laws of physics. I was pleased to see queer characters given a romance that was treated almost the same as the heterosexual romance. I say almost, because Williams has not written herself a future free from homophobia. Despite the two romances, these were sub-plots rather than the main dramatic arc: I dislike it when someone's romantic happiness is presented as of greater importance than the future of a civilization, but Williams' characters are capable of both selflessness and selfishness, in narratively interesting ways. In addition to all these things, though, the book touches on culture, racism, sexism, classism, homophobia, and human rights, using the meeting of two long-separated civilizations to highlight the ways in which these two civilizations deal differently with these things. I don't claim it goes into LeGuin-style depth on these topics, but it's nice to see them acknowledged in a novel. I found it particularly nice that the civilization described as brownish was the socially-engineered ultra-practical beta-colony (see Bujold, Lois McMaster) type people, and the consumed-by-honour civilization with their savage ways, homophobia, and heavy social stratification was the white people. (I did find it a bit odd that, as far as I noticed, it was always the Reetian's brown skin that was commented on, never the Gelacks' pale complexion, even though the POV shifts would have allowed it.) Williams has left herself plenty of territory to explore in this universe, which is good news as I understand her to be writing sequels. The cover image even manages to portray a character such that they are recognizable from their in-text description, and brown-skinned. Well, brownish. But this is a fairly rare occurrence as far as covers are concerned. I suspect Williams of personally knowing her cover artist.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    Set approximately one thousand years from now, this is the story of the first two interstellar Earth colonies. They were abandoned by Earth after the failure of early attempts at faster-than-light travel. The problems were solved, but ideological differences concerning genetic engineering caused outlaw scientists to sever all contact with Earth and set up their own worlds. The Reetions of Rire regulate every aspect of their lives with advanced computer technology. The Sevolites of Gelion are much Set approximately one thousand years from now, this is the story of the first two interstellar Earth colonies. They were abandoned by Earth after the failure of early attempts at faster-than-light travel. The problems were solved, but ideological differences concerning genetic engineering caused outlaw scientists to sever all contact with Earth and set up their own worlds. The Reetions of Rire regulate every aspect of their lives with advanced computer technology. The Sevolites of Gelion are much more of an honor-bound people. The wearing, and using, of swords in public is a normal part of daily life. It is also a rigidly class-defined culture, where one is expected to use the proper pronouns when speaking "up" or "down" to someone else. The two civilizations fought a major war about 200 years previously, which left large regions of space uninhabitable. Despite severing all relations with each other, another war between them is increasingly likely. Ann, a Reetion pilot, meets, and falls for, Von, a Sevolite male courtesan and sword-dancer (who Ann calls Beauty), who may be an actual Prince. Ranar, a Reetion archaeologist with dark skin (a novelty in Sevolite society), meets Di Mon, a high-ranking member of Sevolite society, who is also in love with Von. Unintentionally, perhaps they can prevent another major interstellar war. This is a good piece of society-building. Since this is not the usual sort of new world, this novel will require some patience on the part of the reader (it takes a while to get going). It is also the first of a projected ten-book series. It’s very much worth reading.

  13. 4 out of 5

    David Juniper

    An incredible sci-fi epic!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Hrynkiw

    Kwanlen retirement recommendation. 30 Nov 2016 Local (Vancouver) author - SFU

  15. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

  16. 4 out of 5

    Wolfram

  17. 4 out of 5

    Leonid Korogodski

  18. 4 out of 5

    Christel Bodenbender

  19. 5 out of 5

    Nicole Anthony

  20. 4 out of 5

    cenobyte

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sharmon

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jeffrey Doten

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

  24. 4 out of 5

    R.J. Price

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mica Currie

  26. 5 out of 5

    Corinne

  27. 5 out of 5

    Tina Hunter

  28. 5 out of 5

    Charmed

  29. 4 out of 5

    Dishauna

  30. 5 out of 5

    Letoya

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.