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Sanditon and Other Stories

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Readers of Jane Austen’s six great novels are left hungering for more, and more there is: the marvelous unpublished manuscripts she left behind, collected here. Sanditon might have been Austen’s greatest novel had she lived to finish it. Its subject matter astonishes: here is Austen observing the birth pangs of the culture of commerce, as her country-bred heroine, a foolish Readers of Jane Austen’s six great novels are left hungering for more, and more there is: the marvelous unpublished manuscripts she left behind, collected here. Sanditon might have been Austen’s greatest novel had she lived to finish it. Its subject matter astonishes: here is Austen observing the birth pangs of the culture of commerce, as her country-bred heroine, a foolish baronet, a family of hypochondriacs, and a mysterious West Indian heiress collide against the background hum of real-estate development at a seaside resort. The Watsons, begun in 1804 but never completed, tells the story of a young woman who was raised by a rich aunt and who finds herself shipped back to the comparative poverty and social clumsiness of her own family. The novella Lady Susan is a miniature masterpiece, featuring Austen’s only villainous protagonist. Lady Susan’s subtle, single-minded, and ruthless pursuit of power makes the reader regret that Austen never again wrote a novel with a scheming widow for its heroine. The special joy of this collection lies in Austen’s juvenilia–tiny novels, the enchantingly funny Love and Freindship, comic fragments, and a (very) partial history of England–romping miniatures that she wrote in her teens. Their high spirits, hilarity, and control offer delicious proof that Austen was an artist “born, not made.”


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Readers of Jane Austen’s six great novels are left hungering for more, and more there is: the marvelous unpublished manuscripts she left behind, collected here. Sanditon might have been Austen’s greatest novel had she lived to finish it. Its subject matter astonishes: here is Austen observing the birth pangs of the culture of commerce, as her country-bred heroine, a foolish Readers of Jane Austen’s six great novels are left hungering for more, and more there is: the marvelous unpublished manuscripts she left behind, collected here. Sanditon might have been Austen’s greatest novel had she lived to finish it. Its subject matter astonishes: here is Austen observing the birth pangs of the culture of commerce, as her country-bred heroine, a foolish baronet, a family of hypochondriacs, and a mysterious West Indian heiress collide against the background hum of real-estate development at a seaside resort. The Watsons, begun in 1804 but never completed, tells the story of a young woman who was raised by a rich aunt and who finds herself shipped back to the comparative poverty and social clumsiness of her own family. The novella Lady Susan is a miniature masterpiece, featuring Austen’s only villainous protagonist. Lady Susan’s subtle, single-minded, and ruthless pursuit of power makes the reader regret that Austen never again wrote a novel with a scheming widow for its heroine. The special joy of this collection lies in Austen’s juvenilia–tiny novels, the enchantingly funny Love and Freindship, comic fragments, and a (very) partial history of England–romping miniatures that she wrote in her teens. Their high spirits, hilarity, and control offer delicious proof that Austen was an artist “born, not made.”

30 review for Sanditon and Other Stories

  1. 4 out of 5

    Leslie

    Jan. 2020: reread of "Sanditon" I am looking forward to the upcoming PBS dramatization of this unfinished novel. Austen has barely set the stage in the 11 chapters she completed! June 2016: reread of "Love and Freindship" This epistolary novella deserves the title often bestowed upon it of Juvenilia - the spelling errors (I don't really know why they have been preserved!) combined with the melodramatic plot are juvenile! The satire though shows Austen's budding talent. I had to laugh several times, Jan. 2020: reread of "Sanditon" I am looking forward to the upcoming PBS dramatization of this unfinished novel. Austen has barely set the stage in the 11 chapters she completed! June 2016: reread of "Love and Freindship" This epistolary novella deserves the title often bestowed upon it of Juvenilia - the spelling errors (I don't really know why they have been preserved!) combined with the melodramatic plot are juvenile! The satire though shows Austen's budding talent. I had to laugh several times, especially as whenever Laura didn't know what to do, she fainted! I decided to reread this because of the new film "Love and Friendship" only to discover that the movie is actually a dramatization of "Lady Susan", not "Love and Friendship"!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lidya

    Lady Susan was such a fucking riot and probably the sauciest classic I've ever read. The other two were kinda mid, not Austen's fault that she was boutta die tho :/ Lady Susan was such a fucking riot and probably the sauciest classic I've ever read. The other two were kinda mid, not Austen's fault that she was boutta die tho :/

  3. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

    I didn't realise 40% of my edition is actually a sort of dictionary! I enjoyed all three stories. Lady Susan was quite amusing, actually. Such a shame the other two are not unfinished, but actually more like a quarter of the story. It just starts to get interesting and then...that's it. I might read versions finished by other writers but not sure yet. I didn't realise 40% of my edition is actually a sort of dictionary! I enjoyed all three stories. Lady Susan was quite amusing, actually. Such a shame the other two are not unfinished, but actually more like a quarter of the story. It just starts to get interesting and then...that's it. I might read versions finished by other writers but not sure yet.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Annabelle

    Over a decade ago, I took my time reading through all of Jane Austen's books, morsel by delightful morsel, knowing her books were a very limited edition. Thinking I had read all of them, it was a pleasant surprise to realize I was wrong. Sanditon & Other Stories is composed of three stories: Sanditon, Lady Susan, and The Watsons. Lady Susan I had read years ago, but a rereading of Austen's trashiest character (think an older Undine Spragg in Wharton's The Custom of the Country) underscores my ea Over a decade ago, I took my time reading through all of Jane Austen's books, morsel by delightful morsel, knowing her books were a very limited edition. Thinking I had read all of them, it was a pleasant surprise to realize I was wrong. Sanditon & Other Stories is composed of three stories: Sanditon, Lady Susan, and The Watsons. Lady Susan I had read years ago, but a rereading of Austen's trashiest character (think an older Undine Spragg in Wharton's The Custom of the Country) underscores my earlier assessment: it does not reflect her writing style as I know it. Which isn't to say I didn't enjoy it--it still gets my 4 stars. But Sanditon and The Watsons, both distressingly unfinished, bear Austen's trademarks of sensible but economically-challenged/poor relation heroines with multiple sisters, short to extended house visits, handsome, engaging beaus juxtaposed with aloof heir apparents (rule of thumb: if he's too nice he's bound to be penniless, and the moneyed one is usually arrogant). And always, the specifics of annual income and social hierarchy. In The Watsons, Austen's supposedly circumspect protagonist Emma Watson veers from the propriety expected of an Austen heroine and asks her host, a recent acquaintance, if a particularly attentive, attractive man is wealthy. As for Sanditon, I can see why it has been made into a TV series, despite its being unfinished. The seaside setting, as detailed, seemingly in pastels by Austen, is absolutely bucolic. And so conducive for those meandering walks Austen's characters are so fond of. I can almost imagine myself trooping to the library from Trafalgar House after tea, the wind in my hair, and a spring in my step. * Sanditon has a mulatto heiress "of large fortune" from the West Indies and much mention is made of Emma Watson's brown complexion in The Watsons. Since both stories end abruptly without having developed into an angle or plot I could invest in, we'll never know where Austen intended to go with them.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Meghan John

    I always enjoy Jane Austen, but I will admit that I had forgotten that this had her incomplete works (The Watsons and Sanditon). I was left hanging just when it appeared to be getting interesting. That is my only reason for taking away a star. I longed for more.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Janet

    So happy to have read these unfinished stories of Jane Austen. I had read Lady Susan before. The stories written when she was a young girl were charming. The Watsons and Sanditon showed promise. I'm glad, however, that I did not read version finished by other authors. So happy to have read these unfinished stories of Jane Austen. I had read Lady Susan before. The stories written when she was a young girl were charming. The Watsons and Sanditon showed promise. I'm glad, however, that I did not read version finished by other authors.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Abyssdancer

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I am so disappointed that there will never be an end to Sanditon, the last book Jane Austen was writing before she died … such quirky characters and a lovely setting for a novel … it’s definitely worth the time to read the half finished manuscript as an homage to Jane’s truly magnificent development of characters … her wit and irony shine in the few chapters she had completed … I particularly enjoyed Lady Susan, a novella comprised of letters back and forth between the main characters … Lady Susa I am so disappointed that there will never be an end to Sanditon, the last book Jane Austen was writing before she died … such quirky characters and a lovely setting for a novel … it’s definitely worth the time to read the half finished manuscript as an homage to Jane’s truly magnificent development of characters … her wit and irony shine in the few chapters she had completed … I particularly enjoyed Lady Susan, a novella comprised of letters back and forth between the main characters … Lady Susan has a pathological need to be seen as highly desirable to all the men she encounters in her life, and even steals beaus from her teenage daughter … such wicked gossip and delightful twists and turns … The Watsons kind of broke my heart … it is a short story that follows the coming out of debutante Miss Emma Watson … Emma was privileged enough to be raised by her aunt and uncle, away from her large and boisterous family … slowly, Emma’s privileges are stripped away, leading to a melancholy ending that ultimately breaks your heart …

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sian Kerr

    I confess that the only reason I borrowed this from the library is because ITV have just produced a series of Sanditon starring Kris Marshall, my favourite St Marie detective and I wanted to read the source material before I watched the programme. I haven't read any Jane Austen before, I struggle to focus with classics and find my concentration drifting. Nevertheless, I enjoyed Austen's characterisation, particularly Lady Denham who was quite humorous. I only read Sanditon, not the 'other storie I confess that the only reason I borrowed this from the library is because ITV have just produced a series of Sanditon starring Kris Marshall, my favourite St Marie detective and I wanted to read the source material before I watched the programme. I haven't read any Jane Austen before, I struggle to focus with classics and find my concentration drifting. Nevertheless, I enjoyed Austen's characterisation, particularly Lady Denham who was quite humorous. I only read Sanditon, not the 'other stories' so can't pass comment on those. Although I recognise that this isn't my cup of tea, I still appreciate that it is well written and would have liked to find out what happened to Charlotte on her summer adventures.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Leslie Ann

    I only read the unfinished novel, Sanditon, in preparation for the Lizzie Bennet Diaries spin-off, Welcome to Sanditon. Although the excerpt is short (74 pages), I am surprised to barely see a plot. The story is not very engaging and the characters are only average, so I'm very interested to see what the LBD folks do with it. I only read the unfinished novel, Sanditon, in preparation for the Lizzie Bennet Diaries spin-off, Welcome to Sanditon. Although the excerpt is short (74 pages), I am surprised to barely see a plot. The story is not very engaging and the characters are only average, so I'm very interested to see what the LBD folks do with it.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Elda Pappadà

    I enjoyed reading Sanditon and especially liked The Watsons. It was the beginning of another great novel that was sadly never finished. It was great to read her earlier writings and to have everything in one book.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jade

    I just finished reading this collection of Austen’s unfinished and unpublished stories. I see her in a whole new light now, she was such a comic! Sanditon was enchanting, I am devestaed that it was never finished! I particularly loved her “History of England” Jane Austen is just all round brilliant.

  12. 4 out of 5

    aidaandhrhh

    Sanditon and The Watsons showed promise. Too bad Sanditon was an unfinished one. As for Lady Susan it was entertaining enough for me.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Judy

    This has had to go back to the library and I've read all but the last few pages, which include some prayers. I'll borrow it again perhaps to finish it off, as a matter of following through on my mission to read everything Jane Austen wrote that has been published! I really was blown away by this. It's hard to give a short summary because each of the items within the collection is so different. Sanditon, I had read before, but forgotten. It struck me as so very cynical in flavour. I hadn't rememb This has had to go back to the library and I've read all but the last few pages, which include some prayers. I'll borrow it again perhaps to finish it off, as a matter of following through on my mission to read everything Jane Austen wrote that has been published! I really was blown away by this. It's hard to give a short summary because each of the items within the collection is so different. Sanditon, I had read before, but forgotten. It struck me as so very cynical in flavour. I hadn't remembered this. Jane appeared to like no-one at this point. The heroine - who is more the narrator or observer - is unrealistically perfect and sensible in every way, in stark contrast to every other character who is reeking with flaws. Well, some don't reek, but many do. I got the sense that the heroine is Jane Austen herself, observing everybody else's weaknesses with clarity of mind and perfect manners. Lady Susan is a knock-out. Extraordinary. So much like Les Liaisons dangereuses in subject matter. The Watsons was very open ended in its current state and I enjoyed Joan Aiken's finishing off, despite the fact that she did not follow through with Jane Austen's alleged intentions with regards to plot. As to the material written when Jane Austen was a child. There is so much of it! And it's so brilliant and witty and in many cases ambiguous in the comment it makes on society. It made me very thoughtful. One story - The Three Sisters - was presented as a complete farce but made me very sober. It concerned (as is most often the case with JA) the issue of deciding on love vs. material comfort with respect to a marriage proposal. It is very sad to think what options women had available to them. They were likely to be condemned for marrying for wealth 'without affection', OR for refusing an 'advantageous match'. How often or likely would it be that girls were offered the perfect blend of love and financial reward in a proposed match? It must have been most uncommon. This theme is repeated in various ways with various degrees of levity in several of the fragments. Another theme is 'sensibilities' which are lampooned mercilessly by Jane. The sort of scenario where the heroine 'chuses' to leave home and hearth to follow the man she adores (upon 5 minutes introduction) simply because he is the worst possible match for her and her parents would not approve... ending in sleeping in the street, disastrous carriage accidents, lovers bleeding to death tragically in the lover's arms and so on... all told in a highly ironic tone of voice. I could write on for hours. So I won't. Anyway, Jane Austen was quite an amazing woman and natural writer, clearly from a very early age.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lorraine

    This volume contains several of Jane Austen's lesser known works - Sanditon, The Watsons, Lady Susan, The Juvenilia, and other miscellaneous works. I was only interested in Sanditon, the last novel Austen was writing when she died. The 12 chapters (74 pages), introduce the main characters but the plot does not really begin in earnest yet. Her satire is more pointed in this novel than it is in her other novels. The thoughts of the main character, Charlotte, are critical of those who are hypocriti This volume contains several of Jane Austen's lesser known works - Sanditon, The Watsons, Lady Susan, The Juvenilia, and other miscellaneous works. I was only interested in Sanditon, the last novel Austen was writing when she died. The 12 chapters (74 pages), introduce the main characters but the plot does not really begin in earnest yet. Her satire is more pointed in this novel than it is in her other novels. The thoughts of the main character, Charlotte, are critical of those who are hypocritical. She thinks of one character, "Sir Edward's great object in life was to be seductive." Another character is thought of as "Unaccountable officiousness! Activity run mad!" I was interested in seeing how the producers of the tv series would use Austen's unfinished novel. The television production is a rom-com rather than a harsh criticism of Regency society. The criticisms which are included do not fit the time period - racism, labourer's rights, intergenerational discord. In other words, I would love to have read Sanditon as a finished novel; the television series, while entertaining, is not Austen.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Bianca

    Sanditon was definitely set up to take on more class and race issues, but we get only a taste of it. The seaside town is being set up to be the next big destination, but it has some rather foolish people in charge of that future. I wonder if we would have hints of gentrification and how the "West Indies" heiress would have altered how we perceive Austen novels. Sanditon was definitely set up to take on more class and race issues, but we get only a taste of it. The seaside town is being set up to be the next big destination, but it has some rather foolish people in charge of that future. I wonder if we would have hints of gentrification and how the "West Indies" heiress would have altered how we perceive Austen novels.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    A great find for Jane Austen fans. It was nice to read some of her lesser-known works ("Lady Susan", etc.) and her earlier writings. A number of her stories from when she was younger were actually less subtle in the humor and more outrageous in the situations. A great find for Jane Austen fans. It was nice to read some of her lesser-known works ("Lady Susan", etc.) and her earlier writings. A number of her stories from when she was younger were actually less subtle in the humor and more outrageous in the situations.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

    Read only the novella Lady Susan which was amusing and generously quoted in the movie Love and Friendship. not her best but clever.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Maura Heaphy Dutton

    A fascinating collection of lesser known Austen: "Lady Susan," a short, epistolary novel, written when she was about 20 years old, and two unfinished novels, including Sanditon, the novel she was working on when she died. Now, of course, "Lady Susan" and the fragments of Sanditon and The Watsons are not, in themselves, 5-star Austen. But as insights into Austen's evolution as a writer, and where she might have gone with her writing, had she not died so tragically young, this collection is pricele A fascinating collection of lesser known Austen: "Lady Susan," a short, epistolary novel, written when she was about 20 years old, and two unfinished novels, including Sanditon, the novel she was working on when she died. Now, of course, "Lady Susan" and the fragments of Sanditon and The Watsons are not, in themselves, 5-star Austen. But as insights into Austen's evolution as a writer, and where she might have gone with her writing, had she not died so tragically young, this collection is priceless. Written in 1795, "Lady Susan" is fascinating, as a hint of an "Alternative Austen" who might have been: Lady Susan is no Lizzie Bennett, or Elinor Dashwood (or even Emma Woodhouse), she's deeply amoral and narcissistic, she's a home-wrecker and a life-ruiner and she's marvelous fun. In the epistolary format (which is, by it's very nature a bit artificial and difficult to sustain a realistic narrative), Austen demonstrates an uncanny ability to allow her characters (good and very, very bad) to condemn themselves from their own lips, and reveal more about themselves than they realize. Very funny: Austen manages to work in her signature wit, while still giving a unique voice to each correspondent. Austen's youth and inexperience is probably clearest in the male characters, who are just ... there. We're told Lord James Martin is stupid, but we don't actually see him doing or saying much that's that bad. Reginald deCourcy's willingness to be conned by Lady Susan seems inexplicable, because we don't hear anything from his perspective. BUT, I repeat ... 20 years old. Give the girl a break. The Watsons, which was written in 1804 (and unfinished, possibly because the impending death of her own father meant that the subject matter was cutting uncomfortably close to her own reality), is really interesting -- because of it's autobiographical hints and whispers. The main character, Emma Watson, is a young daughter of a large family, which is respectable but of distinctly modest means. Emma has returned home after 14 years separation from her birth-family, living with a wealthy uncle, who had all-but adopted her, and (crucially) all-but made her his heir. (As happened with Austen's brother, Edward, who was adopted by wealthy, childless benefactors of the family.) Unfortunately, the death of the uncle, and remarriage of the uncle's widow, meant that Emma has been returned home with no inheritance, and no prospects. Her invalid father, brothers and sisters are strangers to her, and her interests and the interests of her unmarried and increasingly desperate sisters are clearly on a collision course. It's fascinating because it pushes the envelope on themes we see in Pride & Prejudice and Sense & Sensibility, of women living on the edge of genteel society, offered crumbs (social and financial) from the tables of the wealthy and well-connected in their little worlds, with no hope of liberation except to make a "good" marriage. And Sandition, in my opinion, was warming up very nicely, and offering tastes of everything you love about Austen (her wit, her sharp insights into characters, both good and bad) with some new things: the central character's unexpected involvement in the construction of a "new town," a seaside resort and spa on the coast, and hints at how Austen's world was becoming more diverse (one character is a twice-widowed woman who has made her fortune by "marrying up," and has two families dancing attendance on her by dangling possible inheritances; another character who hasn't yet been introduced, but has been talked about a lot, is heiress to a tidy West Indian fortune, and is described as a mulatto. I thought the recent BBC adaptation had cheated, making Miss Lamb black, to make the text a bit more hip & happening, but no -- that's Austen ...) Austen's witty take on the obsessive health cures, hypochondria, and self-medication that some of her characters indulge in (and some hope to profit from) feels very , very modern. Makes me grieve that we don't have Austen to write the history of 2020 for us, because based on what I see here, it would have been awesome ... If I have one quibble, it's about this edition: it's been done on the cheap. The introduction (with no author credited ... ) is basic to the point of insulting, and could have been pinched from Wikipedia. The Glossary at the end is eff-in' useless, a cut-n-paste list of words that don't actually appear in any of the three texts. Given that this is HarperCollins pretending to go back to their roots, back to an imprint established around the time that Austen was writing Sanditon, this is an actual disgrace. But back to Austen. I guess you could say that the ultimate accolade is that I keep finding myself thinking "Oh, I must finish Sandition, I must finish The Watsons." And then I remember that they must remain unfinished, forever, and I am a little sad.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Gabby

    3.5 stars for some, 1 or 2 stars for other sections. I picked up my copy of Sanditon and Other Stories after having watched "Sanditon" on PBS. Wow! How they managed to even make a series of that story is beyond me! There's very little in the manuscript -- most of what's there is the opening scene of the story. It barely introduced any characters, so I was disappointed by that. BUT, it now makes sense as to why some of the things happening in series seemed a little un-Austen-esque. I actually enj 3.5 stars for some, 1 or 2 stars for other sections. I picked up my copy of Sanditon and Other Stories after having watched "Sanditon" on PBS. Wow! How they managed to even make a series of that story is beyond me! There's very little in the manuscript -- most of what's there is the opening scene of the story. It barely introduced any characters, so I was disappointed by that. BUT, it now makes sense as to why some of the things happening in series seemed a little un-Austen-esque. I actually enjoyed "The Watsons" more. I felt the characters were a little more fleshed out right from the beginning. And, there is a little information as to what Austen had intended to do with the story. So, someone should try to put that one as a miniseries. And, of course, Lady Susan is a lot of fun and ... really, an interesting take on a different character that Austen usually reserved for a side character. I do remember seeing the version of it with Kate Beckinsale, but I feel the letter format in the store is a little more fun. I confess, toward the end I found myself skimming the half-stories and weird, sometimes comical writings, but ... in the end, I didn't completely finish the last few pieces.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Krys

    Sandition - Slow start but started to get more entertaining with the introduction of Mr. Parker's sisters and brother. The interactions with Arthur were hilarious but then boom done... :( Lady Susan - Tad bit confusing at first but then got really interesting...again the funny interactions with characters but then it just kind of concludes. The Watsons - Such a shame it was unfinished because this could have been my favorite Jane Austen story. Her writing is so much more developed and confident th Sandition - Slow start but started to get more entertaining with the introduction of Mr. Parker's sisters and brother. The interactions with Arthur were hilarious but then boom done... :( Lady Susan - Tad bit confusing at first but then got really interesting...again the funny interactions with characters but then it just kind of concludes. The Watsons - Such a shame it was unfinished because this could have been my favorite Jane Austen story. Her writing is so much more developed and confident than her other stories. The dictionary section was just filler in my opinion. Overall so, so glad I read this compilation. Jane Austen is my hero but it is also tantalizing to not know what would have happened next! I feel like if Jane lived in modern day she would be this amazing screen play writer. Oh well...

  21. 4 out of 5

    Nichola

    I just reread Sanditon, as I believe a movie is coming soon. This was the last work she undertook before her death, 75 pages were written before she abandoned it, and died 3 months later. The tag on this book is it may have been the greatest novel she has ever written if she had finished it: I find that hard to support. Of course whatever exists is a first draft, but I felt uncomfortable as to the number of times she mentions money, income, and inducing people to buy things in it. Also there are I just reread Sanditon, as I believe a movie is coming soon. This was the last work she undertook before her death, 75 pages were written before she abandoned it, and died 3 months later. The tag on this book is it may have been the greatest novel she has ever written if she had finished it: I find that hard to support. Of course whatever exists is a first draft, but I felt uncomfortable as to the number of times she mentions money, income, and inducing people to buy things in it. Also there are several hypochondriacs in it who loved to complain about how sick they are, then get up and do whatever they actually want, but excuse themselves from anything else. It was hard to care about any of the characters, which is usually a bad sign.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Megan Kelosiwang

    This is one case where I am pleased to have already seen the TV adaptation. It's such a bittersweet process to read un-finished writings of one of your favourite writers but having seen Sanditon I can rest easy that the characters have been rounded out their stories resolved. As un-finished works I did find these a little harder to read than normal - the sentence structure is complex and almost opposite to now. Maybe it would have been tighter writing if completed. The letters series was scathin This is one case where I am pleased to have already seen the TV adaptation. It's such a bittersweet process to read un-finished writings of one of your favourite writers but having seen Sanditon I can rest easy that the characters have been rounded out their stories resolved. As un-finished works I did find these a little harder to read than normal - the sentence structure is complex and almost opposite to now. Maybe it would have been tighter writing if completed. The letters series was scathing in criticism of a certain type of woman that seems petty for Austen. It's one thing to make fun of someone but to heap such distaste on a person reeks of a personal affront. Such a blessing to be reading new Austen after so many years - that wit is unmistakeable.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jane

    I love Sanditon, it's a pity she did not finish it. Who knows what she would have written about. This woman was remarkable. I am satisfied by Sanditon itv drama, I am a fan, I am hooked, I love it so much. And I was amazed that the first episode of the series followed quite accurately the plot of the 11 chapters of the book. I am sure this book after the heroine went through some trouble would have had a happy ending. Just as Austen says: "Let other pens dwell on guilt and misery". If you want t I love Sanditon, it's a pity she did not finish it. Who knows what she would have written about. This woman was remarkable. I am satisfied by Sanditon itv drama, I am a fan, I am hooked, I love it so much. And I was amazed that the first episode of the series followed quite accurately the plot of the 11 chapters of the book. I am sure this book after the heroine went through some trouble would have had a happy ending. Just as Austen says: "Let other pens dwell on guilt and misery". If you want to know why I love Austen so much, here it' s a video about it on youtube by Iseult Gillespie https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NSL55...

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ginny

    A fun compilation with some highlights. (Although, why keep the misspellings and old grammar styles on two-thirds of the works?!) - "Sanditon" and "The Watsons" drop off right as the action builds, which is unfortunate because they both could have been great novels. - "Lady Susan" is hilarious and has the most delightful villain. - The early writings are melodramatic and amusing, but there are a few too many in the collection. - The opinions on her various novels read like GoodReads reviews from p A fun compilation with some highlights. (Although, why keep the misspellings and old grammar styles on two-thirds of the works?!) - "Sanditon" and "The Watsons" drop off right as the action builds, which is unfortunate because they both could have been great novels. - "Lady Susan" is hilarious and has the most delightful villain. - The early writings are melodramatic and amusing, but there are a few too many in the collection. - The opinions on her various novels read like GoodReads reviews from people she must have esteemed. There were lots of funny ones, but my favorite was: "Displeased with my pictures of Clergymen" on a review of "Emma."

  25. 4 out of 5

    Isabel

    This was so much fun!! Absolutely loved Lady Susan! A totally, hilariously perfect novella. I am so, so curious about how she would have continued Sanditon. Charlotte is such an interesting and unique character and the rest of the cast so silly and ridiculous. I also had so much fun reading The Watsons. I wish there was more! Emma’s personality felt really unique among Austen’s other heroines. I’m glad we get the note from Cassandra’s recollections of where Jane wanted the story to go. I’ll alwa This was so much fun!! Absolutely loved Lady Susan! A totally, hilariously perfect novella. I am so, so curious about how she would have continued Sanditon. Charlotte is such an interesting and unique character and the rest of the cast so silly and ridiculous. I also had so much fun reading The Watsons. I wish there was more! Emma’s personality felt really unique among Austen’s other heroines. I’m glad we get the note from Cassandra’s recollections of where Jane wanted the story to go. I’ll always feel sad, however, that she was unable to continue these stories to their end.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Threasa

    It is really sad that Ms. Austen didn't get to finish Sanditon. I would really love to see where she would have taken it. One of the other stories was Lady Susan. She was not likable at all. She was a beautiful woman, so she thought she could get what she wanted with her looks. The Watsons didn't really make any sense to me. I wonder if it was unfinished also, because I didn't understand the ending. It is really sad that Ms. Austen didn't get to finish Sanditon. I would really love to see where she would have taken it. One of the other stories was Lady Susan. She was not likable at all. She was a beautiful woman, so she thought she could get what she wanted with her looks. The Watsons didn't really make any sense to me. I wonder if it was unfinished also, because I didn't understand the ending.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    I honestly get so sad sometimes that Jane Austen didn't live longer, that we don't have more work from her. She was a brilliant mind. The first and third titles in here, are fragments, I assume of just first drafts. The editor/s have cleaned up spelling, punctuation, added paragraph breaks, but the words are Austen's. That precision, and astute observation, that's all here in incomplete rough drafts. I honestly get so sad sometimes that Jane Austen didn't live longer, that we don't have more work from her. She was a brilliant mind. The first and third titles in here, are fragments, I assume of just first drafts. The editor/s have cleaned up spelling, punctuation, added paragraph breaks, but the words are Austen's. That precision, and astute observation, that's all here in incomplete rough drafts.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    I bought this for Sanditon. The other stories are Lady Susan, which I have in paperback, and The Watsons, which is totally new to me! This is not a Hardcover, it is a Nook book. I wish whatever puts the edition up would at least pay attention to the ISBN! Made it through Sanditon. This was her last novel, and the ending was rather abrupt, as if she was in a hurry to finish it. It was interesting, if a bit slow, and a very cutting look at various types of personalities! It primarily deals with a fa I bought this for Sanditon. The other stories are Lady Susan, which I have in paperback, and The Watsons, which is totally new to me! This is not a Hardcover, it is a Nook book. I wish whatever puts the edition up would at least pay attention to the ISBN! Made it through Sanditon. This was her last novel, and the ending was rather abrupt, as if she was in a hurry to finish it. It was interesting, if a bit slow, and a very cutting look at various types of personalities! It primarily deals with a family in a wannabe seaside resort. Not going to review Lady Susan although I'm skimming it just as a refresher. Entirely written in letters between various characters. Also very good understand of personalities, both good ones and bad ones. The Watsons follows the life of a young woman whose family is not well-to-do, who goes to stay with relatives. A lot of it deals with the financial plight of unmarried women. Her personal life may have contributed to the story, since it was written after her father died, leaving Austen and her sister in reduced circumstances. It was never finished, possibly because she decided that the poverty of her heroine and family might 'degenerate into [vulgarity]". The narrative never really go ing, or perhaps I just lost interest too soon.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Bethany

    Most of the stories in here I liked. Some of them, were not my favorite. I read a long with an audiobook, but they didn't have all the stories this book had so I had to keep finding an audio version. I found one, but the readers made it boring for me..... Overall I enjoyed it. Jane Austen doesn't disappoint :) Most of the stories in here I liked. Some of them, were not my favorite. I read a long with an audiobook, but they didn't have all the stories this book had so I had to keep finding an audio version. I found one, but the readers made it boring for me..... Overall I enjoyed it. Jane Austen doesn't disappoint :)

  30. 4 out of 5

    Julia

    Fascinating to see Jane's style as a young writer. Her short stories are amazing, cheeky, and never ever ever have a happy ending. I feel like this just proves how her writing really isn't mainly about the romance but about caricaturing human nature in a way that's amusing and enlightening. Fascinating to see Jane's style as a young writer. Her short stories are amazing, cheeky, and never ever ever have a happy ending. I feel like this just proves how her writing really isn't mainly about the romance but about caricaturing human nature in a way that's amusing and enlightening.

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