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Sleeping Murder

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In Agatha Christie’s classic, "Sleeping Murder," the indomitable Miss Marple turns ghost hunter and uncovers shocking evidence of a very old crime. Soon after Gwenda moved into her new home, odd things started to happen. Despite her best efforts to modernize the house, she only succeeded in dredging up its past. Worse, she felt an irrational sense of terror every time she c In Agatha Christie’s classic, "Sleeping Murder," the indomitable Miss Marple turns ghost hunter and uncovers shocking evidence of a very old crime. Soon after Gwenda moved into her new home, odd things started to happen. Despite her best efforts to modernize the house, she only succeeded in dredging up its past. Worse, she felt an irrational sense of terror every time she climbed the stairs. In fear, Gwenda turned to Miss Marple to exorcise her ghosts. Are they dredging up a “perfect” crime committed many years before? Librarian's note: this is one of thirteen books in the Miss Marple series, which includes twelve novels and one collection of short stories - "The Thirteen Problems." There are a total of twenty short stories about Miss M, seven of which can be found in other collections. Entries for each of the novels and short stories can be found on Goodreads.


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In Agatha Christie’s classic, "Sleeping Murder," the indomitable Miss Marple turns ghost hunter and uncovers shocking evidence of a very old crime. Soon after Gwenda moved into her new home, odd things started to happen. Despite her best efforts to modernize the house, she only succeeded in dredging up its past. Worse, she felt an irrational sense of terror every time she c In Agatha Christie’s classic, "Sleeping Murder," the indomitable Miss Marple turns ghost hunter and uncovers shocking evidence of a very old crime. Soon after Gwenda moved into her new home, odd things started to happen. Despite her best efforts to modernize the house, she only succeeded in dredging up its past. Worse, she felt an irrational sense of terror every time she climbed the stairs. In fear, Gwenda turned to Miss Marple to exorcise her ghosts. Are they dredging up a “perfect” crime committed many years before? Librarian's note: this is one of thirteen books in the Miss Marple series, which includes twelve novels and one collection of short stories - "The Thirteen Problems." There are a total of twenty short stories about Miss M, seven of which can be found in other collections. Entries for each of the novels and short stories can be found on Goodreads.

30 review for Sleeping Murder

  1. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    Since I've been recommending this to everyone, I thought I'd listen to the audio version and see how it held up. Yep. Still (to me) the best! What's my favorite Agatha Christie novel? Well, I'd have a hard time picking between Murder on the Orient Express and Sleeping Murder. But this one is more, um, realish? The idea that what happened in Murder on the Orient Express could actually happen...is pretty far-fetched. And, yes Sleeping Murder is (by today's standards) kinda outlandish, too. BUT. Less o Since I've been recommending this to everyone, I thought I'd listen to the audio version and see how it held up. Yep. Still (to me) the best! What's my favorite Agatha Christie novel? Well, I'd have a hard time picking between Murder on the Orient Express and Sleeping Murder. But this one is more, um, realish? The idea that what happened in Murder on the Orient Express could actually happen...is pretty far-fetched. And, yes Sleeping Murder is (by today's standards) kinda outlandish, too. BUT. Less outlandish than MotOE. <--MY OPINION Plus, I love me some Miss Marple! The main characters are newlyweds Gwenda & Giles, but Jane Marple is introduced early on as the elderly aunt of Giles's cousin (some of you will recognize Raymond West from other books!). And when Gwenda begins to think she's losing her mind due to some startling coincidences at her newly purchased house, and a frightening reaction to the line of a play... *rubs hands together* Well, naturally, Miss Marple sticks her nose (delicately) into Gwenda's troubles, and steps in to help her sort things out. If you're a fan of Miss Marple mysteries, this is one that you definitely don't want to skip. I think it shows a different side to her intellect and personality by having her play as a secondary character. While the two main characters bumble around to the best of their ability, this little old lady is gently nudging them in the right direction. And, ultimately, she's also the one who steps in to save the day. God bless the tough chicks who knit!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    Sleeping Murder (Miss Marple #13), Agatha Christie Sleeping Murder: Miss Marple's Last Case is a work of detective fiction by Agatha Christie and first published in October 1976. Newlywed Gwenda Reed travels ahead of her husband to find a home for them on the south coast of England. In a short time, she finds and buys Hillside, a large old house that feels just like home. She supervises workers in a renovation, staying in a one-time nursery room while the work progresses. She forms a definite ide Sleeping Murder (Miss Marple #13), Agatha Christie Sleeping Murder: Miss Marple's Last Case is a work of detective fiction by Agatha Christie and first published in October 1976. Newlywed Gwenda Reed travels ahead of her husband to find a home for them on the south coast of England. In a short time, she finds and buys Hillside, a large old house that feels just like home. She supervises workers in a renovation, staying in a one-time nursery room while the work progresses. She forms a definite idea for the little nursery. When the workmen open a long sealed door, she sees the very wallpaper that was in her mind. Further, a place that seems logical to her for a doorway between two rooms proves to have been one years earlier. She goes to London for a visit with relatives, the author Raymond West, his wife, and his aunt, Miss Jane Marple. During the play, The Duchess of Malfi, when the line "Cover her face; mine eyes dazzle; she died young" is spoken, Gwenda screams out; she saw an image of herself viewing a man saying those words strangling a blonde-haired woman named Helen. عنوانها: «جنایت خفته»؛ «جنایت از یاد رفته»؛ «جنایت خفته قتلی در گذشته های دور»؛ «قتل خاموش»؛ نویسنده آگاتا کریستی؛ آنتشاراتیها (ارغوان؛ هرمس - کتابهای کارآگاه؛ نشر روایت؛ ثالث؛ میلاد؛ نشر کهن)؛ تاریخ نخستین خوانش ماه آوریل سال دوهزارودو میلادی عنوان جنایت خفته با ترجمه جناب عبدالحسین شریفیان، تهران ارغوان، سال 1372؛ در 311ص؛ موضوع داستانهای نویسندگان بریتانیایی - سده 20م عنوان جنایت خفته با ترجمه خانم گلرخ سعید نیا؛ تهران، هرمس، کتابهای کارآگاه، 1381؛ در 250ص؛ چاپ دوم 1384؛ و چاپ پنجم 1393؛ عنوان جنایت از یاد رفته با ترجمه جناب عباس خیرخواه، تهران، نشر روایت، 1373، در 316ص؛ تهران، ثالث، 1393؛ در 259ص؛ عنوان جنایت خفته قتلی در گذشته های دور با ترجمه خانم پروین ادیب، تهران، میلاد، 1374؛ در 280ص؛ عنوان قتل خاموش با ترجمه جناب علی سجادپور؛ مشهد، نشر کهن، 1373؛ در 285ص؛ در این داستان «گواندا رید»، و همسرش «جایلز رید»، سه ماه است ازدواج کرده‌ اند، آن دو تصمیم دارند از «نیوزلند»، به «انگلستان» برگردند؛ «جایلز» کارهایش را باید در «نیوزلند» تمام کند، او همسر خویش «گواندا» را، پیشاپیش می‌فرستد، تا خانه ی مناسبی، در «انگلستان» پیدا کند؛ «گواندا»، به ویلای کوچکی، متعلق به دوره ی «ویکتوریا»، با نام «هیلساید» برمی‌خورد؛ که برای فروش گذاشته شده، و ویلا را می‌خرد؛ پس از خرید ویلا، رخدادهای شگفت انگیزی، برای «گواندا» رخ می‌دهد، و او چیزهایی را در ویلا کشف می‌کند، که انگار پیشتر نیز، از وجودشان خبر داشته است؛ دری مخفی شده، در بخشی از خانه، طرحی از کاغذ دیواری، که حالا زیر کاغذ دیواری‌های جدید ویلا، پنهان شده و ...؛ «گواندا» از این رخدادها ترسیده، و نگران می‌شود؛ تصمیم می‌گیرد مدتی از خانه دور شود، به همین دلیل به دعوت «ریموند وست»، و همسرش «جوآن»، که از دوستان «جایلز» هستند، به «لندن» میرود؛ «گواندا» به همراه میزبانانش، و خاله «ریموند»، که پیرزن جالبی، به نام «جین مارپل» است، به تماشای نمایشنامه‌ ای به نام «دوشس دالفی» می‌روند؛ اما در صحنه ی پایانی نمایش، آنگاه که یکی از بازیگران جمله‌ ای را بر زبان می‌آورد، «گواندا» یکباره فریادی می‌کشد، و از سالن بیرون می‌رود؛ و ادامه ی داستان ...؛ نقل از متن برگردان خانم گلرخ: (هرچه می‌دانم ‌می‌گویم عزیزم؛ «کلوین» مدتی در حالت عصبی به سر میبرد؛ او پیش من آمد و گفت که کابو‌س‌های مختلفی می‌بیند؛ او می‌گفت که این رؤیاها همیشه مثل هم هستند و به یکجا ختم می‌شوند، خفه کردن «هلن»؛ سعی کردم که به ریشه‌ ی مشکل بپردازم؛ حتما این اوهام، حاصل درگیری‌های دوران کودکی اش بوده است؛ پدر و مادرش، حتما زوج خوشبختی نبودند؛ خوب، به تمامش نمی‌پردازم؛ برای یک پزشک جالب خواهد بود؛ به «کلوین» پیشنهاد کردم، که با یک روان‌پزشک متخصص، مشورت کند، اما او توجهی نکرد، فکر میکرد که تمام این حرف‌ها بیهوده است؛ فکر می‌کردم، که او و «هلن» زندگی خوبی ندارند؛ اما او هرگز، راجع به آن حرفی نمیزد، و من هم دوست نداشتم، که از آن‌ها سئؤال کنم؛ مسئله وقتی بالا گرفت، که او یکروز عصر، به خانه‌ ی ما آمد؛ جمعه بود؛ یادم می‌آید، که من تازه از بیمارستان به خانه رسیده بودم، و او در اتاق انتظار، منتظر من بود؛ حدود یک ربع به یک بود؛ به محض رسیدن من به داخل اتاق، سرش را بالا گرفت، و گفت: من «هلن» را کشتم به حرف‌هایش زیاد اهمیت نمی‌دادم؛ فکر می‌کردم تمامش خیالات است؛ «لی‌لی» هیچوقت دنبال حقایق ساده نمی‌رفت؛ خیلی لاطائلات برایم تعریف می‌کرد؛ راجع به این‌که آقای خانه، خانمش را کشته، و احتمالا جسد را در زیرزمین گذاشته، و یک دختر فرانسوی، که از پنجره به بیرون نگاه می‌کرده، و چیزهایی و یا کسانی را دیده؛ به او گفتن، عزیز جان به خارجی‌ها توجه نکن، همه ‌شان دروغگویند، مثل ما نیستند؛ وقتی زیادی حرف می‌زد، دیگر به حرف‌هایش گوش نمی‌دادم، چون که از کاه کوه می‌ساخت؛ «لی‌لی» از جنایات زیاد هم بدش نمی‌آمد؛ همیشه روزنامه ‌ی «ساندی نیوز» را می‌گرفت، که درباره‌ ی قاتلین مشهور مطلب می‌نوشت؛ کله ‌اش از این چیزها پر بود، و دوست داشت فکر کند، در خانه ‌ای زندگی می‌کرده، که در آن قتلی اتفاق افتاده، خوب فکر می‌کرد، با این فکرها به کسی صدمه نمی‌زند؛ اما وقتی نظر مرا راجع به آگهی پرسید، به او گفتم «بی‌خود دنبال دردسر نرو.» اگر به حرف من گوش کرده بود، حالا زنده بود.)؛ پایان نقل تاریخ بهنگام رسانی 21/12/1399هجری خورشیدی؛ ا. شربیانی

  3. 4 out of 5

    Luffy

    Miss Marple appears scantily in this particular story. Here, the murder dominates the scene. I've noticed that the murders that Agatha Christie places in the relative past, that is prior to the current investigation, well these murders always have the bodies tumbled out of the cupboard. Books of Agatha Christie that use this device appeal to me, and also to many others, judging by the several mysteries where the author uses this trick. It is a trick after all, a very solid gimmick that engenders Miss Marple appears scantily in this particular story. Here, the murder dominates the scene. I've noticed that the murders that Agatha Christie places in the relative past, that is prior to the current investigation, well these murders always have the bodies tumbled out of the cupboard. Books of Agatha Christie that use this device appeal to me, and also to many others, judging by the several mysteries where the author uses this trick. It is a trick after all, a very solid gimmick that engenders macabre feelings like there was no tomorrow. I scarcely noticed that Miss Marple was not being her usual self, she didn't draw too much parallel with human psychology when explaining her thoughts at the end. In fact there's little proof that Miss Marple knew with certainty of the murderer's identity. There's no proof of the murderer's crime even. Thankfully it's not one of those stories where the frail Miss Marple derails the mind of a hardened serial killer, with cheap tricks, like in "A Murder Is Announced" for example. So yeah I solved this case. However, the case was very deceiving and I was up against a palpable wall of fog. There was not much to latch onto. There is no slow start to this book, which was one of the reasons for the five stars I gave it. I was completely baffled by the events leading to the bewilderment of one Gwenda Reed. Along with the sense of evil there's a forbidding atmosphere and a hint of regret and a pining at the waste of life. There were two things that put me on the right track. First the action of cutting that tennis net to shreds. Secondly, the murderer is mostly the one who is able to influence the case and distort facts to his advantage. I didn't pick on the wound that Helen got on her foot. I only knew that the culprit didn't have a brain teaser of an alibi. I absolutely loved the quote from the Duchess of Malfi. The quote, which I can't paste because it's too much of a bother to go look for it in my ebook, defines the galling evilness of the crime. It also gave away the fact that the murderer was insane to a degree. I would have wanted for Miss Marple to rant against the wicked nature of the crime, but she was surprisingly passive in this book. If I remember correctly there was one moment where her eyes expressed anger but that was in the middle of the book and at that time she wasn't sure of the solution to the murder. Another reason for liking this book so much is the vivid depiction of the characters. Among all the pure and innocent characters that Agatha Christie has thrust upon our readership, the young Reed couple was one the most believable. It's very difficult to make decent, innocent characters come to life. The author presents Gwenda and her husband in their non British simplicity. They are so pure that the finicky English countryside people warm up to them with no trouble. It's unclear whether the main protagonists had a New Zealand accent and how strong it was. But the Reed couple were life like and they hid the fact that they were cogs in the story which I enjoyed very much. This is, I regret, already the last Marple book that was unread uptil now. The book called Nemesis had a similar strong presence of evil and a murder set in the past, with a close person as the murderer. Miss Marple books are as fine as Alice In Wonderland or Sherlock Holmes stories. They are the finest simple sustenance that the English literature can impart to the young and not so young. They are to be cherished.

  4. 5 out of 5

    daph pink ♡

    3.75✨ AUGUST 2020- book 23 (I don't review her books, never could because honestly I will be bias because I love her. ) For all who don't know , I am in love with Agatha Christie ever since I started reading her books( 5 years ago) and I planned to read a book of her each month so that I don't run out of her books ! 3.75✨ AUGUST 2020- book 23 (I don't review her books, never could because honestly I will be bias because I love her. ) For all who don't know , I am in love with Agatha Christie ever since I started reading her books( 5 years ago) and I planned to read a book of her each month so that I don't run out of her books !

  5. 4 out of 5

    mark monday

    You Chose Your Own Adventure! You have reached the end of your story, and it is like so many stories that have come before: a story of a murder long-buried, now reaching out to haunt those who live today. As always, you read this story with care, and you read it with a warning to the young: do not believe what you are told - and do not open old graves! Alas, they never listen. You shall guide them on their journey, and in the end, you will come to their rescue. That was ever to be your fate and y You Chose Your Own Adventure! You have reached the end of your story, and it is like so many stories that have come before: a story of a murder long-buried, now reaching out to haunt those who live today. As always, you read this story with care, and you read it with a warning to the young: do not believe what you are told - and do not open old graves! Alas, they never listen. You shall guide them on their journey, and in the end, you will come to their rescue. That was ever to be your fate and your role; you are a rescuer. But now it is time for you to sleep, old dear. All your missions have been accomplished. If you wish to awake in a new shape, choose https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

  6. 5 out of 5

    Nandakishore Varma

    In the beginning, a personal anecdote: As a child, I was troubled intermittently by a nightmare. I am walking around the compound of my maternal grandfather's ancestral home, when I reach a dilapidated building in a secluded corner. I open it and enter, even though my better sense counsels against it. Inside, it is a prayer room dedicated to evil gods. Their pictures are hung all over the walls, and their ugly idols leer up at me. Also, the place is full of the images of the tortured victims of t In the beginning, a personal anecdote: As a child, I was troubled intermittently by a nightmare. I am walking around the compound of my maternal grandfather's ancestral home, when I reach a dilapidated building in a secluded corner. I open it and enter, even though my better sense counsels against it. Inside, it is a prayer room dedicated to evil gods. Their pictures are hung all over the walls, and their ugly idols leer up at me. Also, the place is full of the images of the tortured victims of these deities, their silent screams, mutilated bodies and blood. I wake up in a cold sweat. The mystery of this dream was solved later. It was only a poster of Naraka (the Indian hell) which I saw as a child, in that house, which left a lasting impression on me. I will not dwell on the Freudian aspects of this incident: just point out the fact that childhood traumas, however trivial, have lasting impacts. I speak from personal experience. Onward with the review. *** What if one has witnessed a murder as a toddler? What if one's childhood psyche had repressed that incident, until it came back to haunt one as a distorted vision in one's beautiful new home which one suddenly realises is none other than the venue of that Sleeping Murder? One would go mad...that is what nearly happened to Gwen. Fortunately, she had Miss Marple to help. Gwenda and Giles Reed return to England from New Zealand. She has no memories; as far as she knows, she has never been in England. However, buying the dream home she had set her eyes on, Gwen begins to be troubled by memories, which she thinks are from another life. She runs away to London to escape. However, watching a performance of the Duchess of Malfi, and hearing the words “cover her face; mine eyes dazzle; she died young” brings a terrifying image into her mind… the blue strangled face of a beautiful young girl, and she herself watching it through the bannisters… and the monkey’s paws… Gwen is convinced that she is mad. But thankfully, she had chosen to stay with Raymond West, who most fortuitously had his Aunt Jane Marple on the premises. The old lady is not ready to go for a supernatural explanation. She has a much more prosaic one: Gwen has actually seen somebody murdered in the same house, where she has stayed as a child – a memory which has been suppressed. The young lady and her husband soon find out that Miss Marple had hit the nail on the head. Gwen had stayed in the house as a little child, along with her father and her flighty stepmother Helen, who had disappeared, presumably run away with one of her many young men. However, Gwen’s father was convinced that he murdered her, and ultimately was committed and died in an asylum. But it is now possible that he may not have been mad – that Helen was actually murdered (though not by him). However, the tantalising question arises… if she was murdered, who is the killer? Thus begins a murder investigation into the past by the young couple, against the counsel of Miss Marple to “leave sleeping murder lie”. Once she is convinced that they will not let go, Miss Marple agrees to join them, if only to keep them safe. And thus begins a rollercoaster ride, one of Christie’s most suspenseful novels. *** As a mystery, Sleeping Murder is rather predictable. There was no “aha!” moment at the end, because I already had a good idea who the murderer was. But I give the novel four stars for its structure and breakneck pace, rather like a Hitchcock movie… and also for the personal experience I quoted at the beginning. I could sympathise with Gwenda.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂

    I thought I had read this Miss Marple before, but maybe I hadn't. I would have thought the heroine (Gwenda) being both a New Zealander and having the same name as one of my childhood friends would have stuck in my mind if so. Although this book stretches coincidence just about to breaking point and did lose momentum near the middle, I still enjoyed it. Some of Christie's earlier novels have a sly wit (in this book the scene with Miss Marple and her physician) and she evokes a long gone world of a I thought I had read this Miss Marple before, but maybe I hadn't. I would have thought the heroine (Gwenda) being both a New Zealander and having the same name as one of my childhood friends would have stuck in my mind if so. Although this book stretches coincidence just about to breaking point and did lose momentum near the middle, I still enjoyed it. Some of Christie's earlier novels have a sly wit (in this book the scene with Miss Marple and her physician) and she evokes a long gone world of a quiet English seaside town. I felt like I really knew the victim by the end of the book. I guessed the murderer early on as for me one line made it obvious. But as nearly always, Christie plants her clues and red herrings with considerable skill. Overall entertaining and well worth a read.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Beverly

    I love Miss Marple; she is wise and knows human nature and knows that people can not be taken at face value, they lie. This is her last murder mystery in the series, which don't have to be read in order to enjoy them, but I prefer to see her more in the picture than in this story. She hovers in the background, helping the nice young couple afflicted by a ghostly vision from the past, but she's not really present in the story literally and figuratively. I love Miss Marple; she is wise and knows human nature and knows that people can not be taken at face value, they lie. This is her last murder mystery in the series, which don't have to be read in order to enjoy them, but I prefer to see her more in the picture than in this story. She hovers in the background, helping the nice young couple afflicted by a ghostly vision from the past, but she's not really present in the story literally and figuratively.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    Although this is listed as the thirteenth Miss Marple novel, and was published in 1976, it was actually written during WWII and shows her as a fairly sprightly lady, compared to some books. According to the Agatha Christie website, it should sit between “The Moving Finger,” and “A Murder is Announced,” and that is where I have positioned it in my re-reading of these books. Gwenda Reed has arrived from New Zealand, charged with buying a house for her, and her new husband, Giles; who is due to join Although this is listed as the thirteenth Miss Marple novel, and was published in 1976, it was actually written during WWII and shows her as a fairly sprightly lady, compared to some books. According to the Agatha Christie website, it should sit between “The Moving Finger,” and “A Murder is Announced,” and that is where I have positioned it in my re-reading of these books. Gwenda Reed has arrived from New Zealand, charged with buying a house for her, and her new husband, Giles; who is due to join her soon. She falls in love with a house in Dillmouth, called Hillside, and buys it. However, aside from a disconcerting feeling of fear when she stands at the top of the stairs, soon there are other familiar things that she should not know about. She senses a door should be leading from a room, and finds it has been closed up, she imagines a wallpaper and finds it in an old cupboard… Unnerved, she goes to stay with cousins of Giles, who just happen to be Raymond West, Miss Marple’s nephew, and his wife, Joan. Then an event brings back the memory of a dead body, lying at the bottom of the stairs in her house. Fearing she is going mad, she confides in Miss Marple, who not only believes her, but decides go and stay in Dillmouth to keep an eye on things. Some years before, Gwenda discovered she had lived in the house, as a small child. Her step mother was rumoured to had run off with another man, but what if she hadn’t? Giles and Gwenda set out to investigate, but will raking up the past prove dangerous and can they really discover what happened so long ago? This is an enjoyable murder mystery, with Miss Marple heavily involved in events. There are a number of possible suspects and, although I actually guessed the correct one, it was still an interesting read, with good characters and Miss Marple really investigating the crime.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nikkila

    Woohooo!! Does finding the murderer in the second last chapter count? Any Agatha Christie fan would be able to able to find out ""Who" I guess. But what I did not find out was the "Why". Although, I must agree the clues were present all along. DAMN, I will pay more attention next time This one does not have twist after twist after twist in the last chapter. There is a murder -> Investigation-> Answer. No non sense. Nothing like you-could-have-never-imagined-this stuff. It is a structured murder my Woohooo!! Does finding the murderer in the second last chapter count? Any Agatha Christie fan would be able to able to find out ""Who" I guess. But what I did not find out was the "Why". Although, I must agree the clues were present all along. DAMN, I will pay more attention next time This one does not have twist after twist after twist in the last chapter. There is a murder -> Investigation-> Answer. No non sense. Nothing like you-could-have-never-imagined-this stuff. It is a structured murder mystery, where Miss Marple and her friends Gwenda and Giles investigate a murder that happened 18 years ago. They are not even sure if there was a murder or not in the first place. Pretty good premise to be honest. Over the years, many books have taken the same premise, for example "The girl with the dragon tattoo". But, what differentiates Christie is that, she uses realistic tools to unravel the truth. This one was totally worth reading because the book has a fast pace throughout. Especially the beginning was something I did not expect. It took off like Horror. I loved the beginning and I was sure I am going to finish the book no matter what. It is simple but still fun. Overall, Christie rocks. What else to say

  11. 4 out of 5

    Herbie

    I've got to admit, I'm way too proud of myself that I actually guessing the ending of this one. And come on, it's Agatha Christie, that never happens 😆 Normally figuring out a twist ruins a book for me, but it was not at all the case this time. The tension in this book is fab and I found myself genuinely scared at some points. I've got to admit, I'm way too proud of myself that I actually guessing the ending of this one. And come on, it's Agatha Christie, that never happens 😆 Normally figuring out a twist ruins a book for me, but it was not at all the case this time. The tension in this book is fab and I found myself genuinely scared at some points.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mara

    4.5 stars - While, yes, I knew who probably dunnit from almost the jump in this one, I don't care. This gave me the CLASSIC first-read feels of a really good Christie. I'm not sure this one is actually as good as something like A POCKET FULL OF RYE, but the sheer joy this gave me throughout the experience bumps this up to me. A very fitting send off for good old Miss Jane Marple 4.5 stars - While, yes, I knew who probably dunnit from almost the jump in this one, I don't care. This gave me the CLASSIC first-read feels of a really good Christie. I'm not sure this one is actually as good as something like A POCKET FULL OF RYE, but the sheer joy this gave me throughout the experience bumps this up to me. A very fitting send off for good old Miss Jane Marple

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jack Heath

    3 Stars. Written in the 1940s, "Sleeping" was only released after Christie's death. Why? No idea. It's good but not one of her greats. Some of the clues are not as well hidden as in "The Body in the Library." Recently married in New Zealand, Gwenda Reed preceded her husband back to England where they plan to settle. While waiting, she bought a house for them in Dillmouth. It seemed vaguely familiar and they discover that she had lived there for a while in her youth before her father had a breakd 3 Stars. Written in the 1940s, "Sleeping" was only released after Christie's death. Why? No idea. It's good but not one of her greats. Some of the clues are not as well hidden as in "The Body in the Library." Recently married in New Zealand, Gwenda Reed preceded her husband back to England where they plan to settle. While waiting, she bought a house for them in Dillmouth. It seemed vaguely familiar and they discover that she had lived there for a while in her youth before her father had a breakdown, and her step-mother Helen took-off with another man. Gwenda was sent to N.Z. to be raised with relatives. She recalls seeing a body in the hall. Does anyone believe her? With Miss Marple's aid, "Gwennie" and Giles set out to find Helen who is no longer in touch with her older brother, Dr. Kennedy. A second tragedy occurs. Miss Marple cautions the young couple about re-opening the matter. She says this may be "murder in retrospect;" that is, one only realized as such many years later. A sleeping murder. But the question is whether a crime has actually been committed. Miss Marple's instincts should never be ignored. (June 2018)

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    One of the more enjoyable Christies I’ve read. Miss Marple is a wonderful character who is sometimes weirdly used or shoved into plots that are really too much. This one might have contrived her initial involvement, but it used her well and organically and that makes all the difference. It’s also aged rather well given that this is one of the few Christie mysteries I’ve read that isn’t shot through with at least some random moments of offhand racism. There’s also the fact that its haunted, evil One of the more enjoyable Christies I’ve read. Miss Marple is a wonderful character who is sometimes weirdly used or shoved into plots that are really too much. This one might have contrived her initial involvement, but it used her well and organically and that makes all the difference. It’s also aged rather well given that this is one of the few Christie mysteries I’ve read that isn’t shot through with at least some random moments of offhand racism. There’s also the fact that its haunted, evil suburban house theme with buried memories/a woman who has seen too much fits in pretty well with the current psychological domestic thriller/chick noir trend. All done in a very mild, with the doilies and tea manners on sort of way, obviously. The only thing I will say is that I guessed the murderer about halfway through just by the structure and content of the discussions. If you’ve ever read a mystery and know how they try to provide you with a surprise-not-surprise through the kind of info they give/withhold/choose to discuss/not discuss/have turn up at just the right moment, you might also. And you’ll obviously need to be up for a little “...but IS the house haunted...?!?!” sort of writing. I clearly was and so finished it in a long, lazy afternoon. You’re likely to as well, I expect.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Obsidian

    Well I found this one very interesting. I have had this book on my shelf for a while, just didn't get around to reading it. This is the last of the Miss Marple standalone novels. She doesn't quite go out with a bang, but seems content with helping a newly married couple. "Sleeping Murder" follows a newly married young woman named Gwenda. Her husband Giles is still abroad and she has been told to find a home for the two of them to settle into. When Gwenda finally finds what she considers "their" h Well I found this one very interesting. I have had this book on my shelf for a while, just didn't get around to reading it. This is the last of the Miss Marple standalone novels. She doesn't quite go out with a bang, but seems content with helping a newly married couple. "Sleeping Murder" follows a newly married young woman named Gwenda. Her husband Giles is still abroad and she has been told to find a home for the two of them to settle into. When Gwenda finally finds what she considers "their" house, she is astonished that she knows what the wallpapers in certain rooms should be, thinks about putting in a door (and finds one has been plastered in) and feels she is losing her mind. She eventually goes away to visit family of her husband. While there she meets Miss Jane Marple and after a night out where the script in a play scares her, tells Miss Marple everything. From there the book follows Gwenda, her husband Giles, and Miss Marple trying to get to the truth of an old memory of Gwenda's. I liked Gwenda, she is reminiscent of some of Christie's other female characters. Not quite a Lucy Eyelesbarrow, but no slouch. When Gwenda realizes she may have witnessed a murder when she was a child, she decides to go ahead to find out who could have done it. She is very fast on her feet and has a way of making people talk to her too. I found Giles to be a pain though. He constantly talked over both Gwenda and Miss Marple. I was happy when the one inspector sent him away, even he knew things would go easier if he wasn't in the room. Miss Marple though I was slightly puzzled by, she knew pretty early on who was the one behind everything, why she didn't feel the need to tell Gwenda and Giles made no sense. One of the reasons why I gave this four stars. There are also so many plot points that are never tied up to my satisfaction. For example, we hear about the one character Jackie, and Gwenda makes a comment that his wife is afraid of him, and then nothing. Same issue with the character of Walter Fane. There are just too many strange men moving about in this story. Also I think I found an error in this book. Miss Marple talks to Colonel Bantry's wife and he is mentioned too. I could have sworn in "The Mirror Crack'd" he was dead. There is mention of Miss Marple solving "The Murder at the Vicarage" and "The Moving Finger." The writing was typical Chrisite. I have to say though it was fairly easy to see who had done this murder if you took your time with if. Probably because nothing else made sense. The flow started off pretty slow. Things really don't get moving until Gwenda goes off to London to visit Raymond West and his wife and meets Miss Marple.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Lady Clementina ffinch-ffarowmore

    Book 5 for the Miss Marple challenge. I was excited to read this one as this is the first of the books in the Miss Marple challenge that I had not read before. I also only discovered because of the challenge that though this book was published last, it was written much earlier and chronologically also falls early in the series. This one was in a way Miss Marple’s Five little Pigs, a murder that has happened years ago, without even clarity on whether it was a murder but based on a (then) child’s Book 5 for the Miss Marple challenge. I was excited to read this one as this is the first of the books in the Miss Marple challenge that I had not read before. I also only discovered because of the challenge that though this book was published last, it was written much earlier and chronologically also falls early in the series. This one was in a way Miss Marple’s Five little Pigs, a murder that has happened years ago, without even clarity on whether it was a murder but based on a (then) child’s memory of events. Gwenda Reed arrives in England to find a house for herself and her husband and ends up finding the “perfect” house, only to have some mysterious things happen. It turns out that she has been there before, and lived as a child in that very house, but not only that she may have also witnessed a murder. Miss Marple urges Gwenda and Giles to leave matters be but the two set out to investigate, and she soon joins them using her “social network” (the kind there was before the days of Facebook and such) to get introduced to Dillmouth society. They identify and look up people from Gwenda’s family’s past, meet and interview them trying to pick up clues into what happened all those years ago and whether Gwenda’s memories were all real or mixed with fancy somehow. The mystery/puzzle itself was very enjoyable and I would have been entirely surprised by whodunit (only I remembered suddenly from a TV adaptation that I’d seen some time ago) since for most of the book I was thinking on the wrong track. That did slightly spoil the surprise element for me but I nevertheless enjoyed the characters and how once again it is what people are “inside”—their true natures—that holds the key to how they act, irrespective of the facade they put on for us to see in everyday interactions. Miss Marple in this one I found getting closer to the image of Miss Marple one has in one’s mind—using the same skills and still grey haired and rather frail but not as lacy and fluffy as in the earlier books. Also, she has a far more active part in this one, getting herself to Dillmouth, and participating in the investigation. Needless to say, I enjoyed it very much!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    “No,” said Miss Marple. “You believed what he said. It really is very dangerous to believe people. I never have for years.” I reread this one because it's on H.R.F. Keating's list of the 100 best crime and mystery books, which I'm using to find more classic mystery novels. I actually didn't even look up HRFK's bona fides before blindly buying a bunch of books off the list, but in the last 5 minutes I've discovered that he was the previous president of the Detection Club. Also, he wrote a book “No,” said Miss Marple. “You believed what he said. It really is very dangerous to believe people. I never have for years.” I reread this one because it's on H.R.F. Keating's list of the 100 best crime and mystery books, which I'm using to find more classic mystery novels. I actually didn't even look up HRFK's bona fides before blindly buying a bunch of books off the list, but in the last 5 minutes I've discovered that he was the previous president of the Detection Club. Also, he wrote a book called Death of a Fat God. These two facts together mean that I am now an HRFK stan and you can't tell me otherwise!! Anyway, there are three Christie books on the HRFK list. The other two are Roger Ackroyd and Orient Express, both of which are rather gimmicky and yet obviously have staying power. I find it interesting that this is the third, because I'm not even sure this is the Miss Marple book I would have picked. What this book does have going for it is that it works on two levels. The first is the murder mystery, which is a neat little puzzle with a good reveal. I love Christie books where you come to the end and everything just makes sense. The second level is the psychological drama that envelopes Gwenda Reed when she moves back to England with her new husband, Giles. Gwenda is a sympathetic character, and I liked the overall atmosphere of the book; it allows for Christie's usual message about murder as a real evil to come through naturally. Miss Marple is a side character in this book, which is pretty fun. She meets Gwenda and Giles through her nephew, Raymond West, who unfortunately appears very little in this book (as he is second only to Ariadne Oliver in the minor character canon). She's in fine form in this book. There's a great scene where she dictates her own prescription for sea air so that she can get out to Dillmouth and supervise the investigation, and I loved watching her gossip in the Dillmouth shops. And of course (view spoiler)[she saves the day by saving Gwenda from Dr. Kennedy (hide spoiler)] . I liked having her pop in and out of the story - it feels more natural that the reader is following along with the more gullible Gwenda and Giles. Verdict: so good, will reread in 10 years when I've forgotten all the details. I can't believe how simple all of Christie's clues are in retrospect. The one I liked the most in this book was the handwriting sample.

  18. 4 out of 5

    BrokenTune

    Her words held all the pointed innuendo that elderly ladies are able to achieve with the minimum of actual statement. I had low expectations for this one. Nemesis broke me. Nemesis was the book that obliterated any regards I may have harboured for Miss Marple. It seems, however, that Sleeping Murder was written well before Nemesis, even if it was published last in the series, and that the Miss Marple of Sleeping Murder is not as annoying as her older self, yet. As becomes clear at the end of this Her words held all the pointed innuendo that elderly ladies are able to achieve with the minimum of actual statement. I had low expectations for this one. Nemesis broke me. Nemesis was the book that obliterated any regards I may have harboured for Miss Marple. It seems, however, that Sleeping Murder was written well before Nemesis, even if it was published last in the series, and that the Miss Marple of Sleeping Murder is not as annoying as her older self, yet. As becomes clear at the end of this book, the Miss Marple in Sleeping Murder still has some spring in her step. Yet, as far as Dame Agatha's books are concerned, this one is not her finest. There is a lot of repetition in the discussion of the mystery and the repetition makes it easy to predict the murderer fairly early on. All in all, there isn't really anything about the story or the book that stands out but it is a light and quick read for the Christie completist.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Vikas Singh

    The last of Miss Marple mysteries, Agatha had saved the best for the last. Of all Miss Marple's mysteries, this is the best. For a change we do not find Miss Marple relapsing into her past or comparing with other incidents from her village. Instead she is working as a full fledged sleuth. The plot is with its usual twist and turns with a brilliant end. The best of Miss Marple cases. Great read The last of Miss Marple mysteries, Agatha had saved the best for the last. Of all Miss Marple's mysteries, this is the best. For a change we do not find Miss Marple relapsing into her past or comparing with other incidents from her village. Instead she is working as a full fledged sleuth. The plot is with its usual twist and turns with a brilliant end. The best of Miss Marple cases. Great read

  20. 5 out of 5

    Cyndi

    I finally guessed the murderer early in the book! Whew! I was beginning to fear I'd lost my edge. 🤔lol! I finally guessed the murderer early in the book! Whew! I was beginning to fear I'd lost my edge. 🤔lol!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Adrian

    Well I accidentally read this out of order, my own fault as I forgot what month I was in, doh ! Anyway that said, I don't think it mattered much. It's funny of all the Miss Marple books I've read so far for this challenge, this is the story I have remembered the most, and to such an extent that within about 50 pages I had remembered who was the guilty party. This didn't really detract much from my enjoyment as the book is well written and it's interesting to spectate as Agatha Christie sends you Well I accidentally read this out of order, my own fault as I forgot what month I was in, doh ! Anyway that said, I don't think it mattered much. It's funny of all the Miss Marple books I've read so far for this challenge, this is the story I have remembered the most, and to such an extent that within about 50 pages I had remembered who was the guilty party. This didn't really detract much from my enjoyment as the book is well written and it's interesting to spectate as Agatha Christie sends you up the wrong path. I've given it 4 stars as I enjoyed it, was it is good as some of the other Miss Marple books so far, hmm, maybe, maybe not, but still a great escapist read.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Erin *Proud Book Hoarder*

    “One always has hope for human nature” Although I'm more of a Poirot groupie, I tried Sleeping Murder and Miss Marple's detective input on for size to see how it went. Better than the one I read with her salivating over rose gardens, it focused on a young couple who moved into a house and needed help solving a mystery, mainly of a memory of a murder that doesn't make sense. It's not the classic whodunnit with a modern murder, and Miss Marple warns not to stir up the hornet's nest that is the pas “One always has hope for human nature” Although I'm more of a Poirot groupie, I tried Sleeping Murder and Miss Marple's detective input on for size to see how it went. Better than the one I read with her salivating over rose gardens, it focused on a young couple who moved into a house and needed help solving a mystery, mainly of a memory of a murder that doesn't make sense. It's not the classic whodunnit with a modern murder, and Miss Marple warns not to stir up the hornet's nest that is the past in the first place. When her advice is ignored, she feels obligated to help avoid future tragedy while old bones are dug up and laid to rest. This extra depth of psychology that sometimes the past is left buried even when it reveals the truth was potent. It's a slower paced novel that focuses mainly on the couple with Miss Marple simply in the background as a supportive voice, ready to pop up in the end to offer an explanation when the villain is unmasked. I felt more of her personality was shown and she comes across likable in comparison than other stories I've read with her as lead crime-solver. One thing that worked especially well was the surreal feel while the main viewpoint Gwenda goes from worrying she's losing her mind and questioning reality to being convinced a mystery is genuinely there. It takes awhile to know for sure, which was interesting since there are a few misleads and questions on her parentage and the house they're staying in. It's definitely a mystery that makes the house come alive as a focus point of the story, which adds an almost gothic charm. The villain isn't impossible to guess, but the point of this mystery is more in the telling and discovering whether than the big reveal.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Veronique

    Last Marple story. After a slow start, this novel picks up in an engaging way. Was there a murder? And how do you find out nearly 20 years later? Marple is present but rather in the background, as as guiding presence, with her down-to-earth, common sense logic. As always, I am fascinated how events can be interpreted in such different ways, and how by turning a little bit, the picture becomes totally different. The wrong clothes clue really spoke to me and reminded me of Glaspell's A Jury of Her Last Marple story. After a slow start, this novel picks up in an engaging way. Was there a murder? And how do you find out nearly 20 years later? Marple is present but rather in the background, as as guiding presence, with her down-to-earth, common sense logic. As always, I am fascinated how events can be interpreted in such different ways, and how by turning a little bit, the picture becomes totally different. The wrong clothes clue really spoke to me and reminded me of Glaspell's A Jury of Her Peers where women were able to 'read' certain clues while the men just disregarded it. Very smart. Lovely crime classics read. Need more...

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sketchbook

    A young woman friend, TV reporter at US network, was recently working on a metoo.movement/ sex abuse story when, unexpectedly, a situation surfaced that jarred open her own sex abuse as a child; she had repressed the incident for years and collapsed. A jolt from the past that involves memory and mind is the crux here of a new wife who suddenly remembers witnessing a murder as a child. She is confused, doesn't know what to do, but with the help of her husband and Miss Marple, she is soon up to he A young woman friend, TV reporter at US network, was recently working on a metoo.movement/ sex abuse story when, unexpectedly, a situation surfaced that jarred open her own sex abuse as a child; she had repressed the incident for years and collapsed. A jolt from the past that involves memory and mind is the crux here of a new wife who suddenly remembers witnessing a murder as a child. She is confused, doesn't know what to do, but with the help of her husband and Miss Marple, she is soon up to her neck on a dangerous sleuth. Written during the Blitz but published in 1976 after Christie's death, Dame Agatha's mystery, I find, is one of her very best. There are no tricks, cheats or red herrings. The Dame gets into psychological territory (a rarity) and makes some highly personal comments about love and how some marriages work -- or don't. With the publication of a new Christie bio, I decided to re-enter her two billion dollar oeuvre with a Christie I hadn't read. Her beguiling writing, which captures you with the first sentence, even when some plots and characters are absurd, never ceases to amaze me. Here, I also appreciate the connection to Webster's play, "The Duchess of Malfi," that tragedy of family blood and horror, which causes the heroine to scream during a West End performance. The play's the thing, but her predicament is real.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    Vintage Agatha Christie. I figured this one out well in advance of the ending, but I still enjoyed the read and remember why Christie was so popular in her time. At the time this was written, it probably wouldn't have been so easy to solve the who-done-it. Christie and others have honed my sense of possibilities. Miss Marple is a very subtle character in this novel, more a guide than a detective. A nice break from some heavier reading...I'm in the process of reading Middlemarch and needed some a Vintage Agatha Christie. I figured this one out well in advance of the ending, but I still enjoyed the read and remember why Christie was so popular in her time. At the time this was written, it probably wouldn't have been so easy to solve the who-done-it. Christie and others have honed my sense of possibilities. Miss Marple is a very subtle character in this novel, more a guide than a detective. A nice break from some heavier reading...I'm in the process of reading Middlemarch and needed some air.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kim Kaso

    Coming to the end of Ms Christie's works, I started with the group somewhere in the middle, so will be circling pack to the beginning soon. The last of the Miss Marple novels is ending on a high note, the misdirection was in full flower in this story, although years of reading Christie has taught me to think like Miss Marple, trust no one and accept nothing as truth without verification. She gives a nice bunch of red herrings in this one, and a lovely newlywed couple. A very enjoyable story of m Coming to the end of Ms Christie's works, I started with the group somewhere in the middle, so will be circling pack to the beginning soon. The last of the Miss Marple novels is ending on a high note, the misdirection was in full flower in this story, although years of reading Christie has taught me to think like Miss Marple, trust no one and accept nothing as truth without verification. She gives a nice bunch of red herrings in this one, and a lovely newlywed couple. A very enjoyable story of murder, I always enjoy my time with a Christie. Highly recommended.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Anze

    “It's very dangerous to believe people, I haven't for years.” Gwenda is a young newlywed, in England looking for a home for her and her husband Giles. She comes upon one that she likes immediately, in Dillmouth. Its a charming house that feels quite familiar. Until Giles arrives, Gwenda takes care of remodeling the inside. In the process, Gwenda begins to remember eerie things. To escape, she goes to visit Gile's cousin Raymond West, where she meets Miss Jane Marple. Miss Marple helps Gwenda rea “It's very dangerous to believe people, I haven't for years.” Gwenda is a young newlywed, in England looking for a home for her and her husband Giles. She comes upon one that she likes immediately, in Dillmouth. Its a charming house that feels quite familiar. Until Giles arrives, Gwenda takes care of remodeling the inside. In the process, Gwenda begins to remember eerie things. To escape, she goes to visit Gile's cousin Raymond West, where she meets Miss Jane Marple. Miss Marple helps Gwenda realize that the reason she remembers the house is because she lived in it as a child and may have witnessed a murder eighteen years ago. This is the last book in the Marple series (I have read these in sequence except for the short story collection), and, in my opinion, one of the best. Gwenda and Giles Reed are a young couple seeking to settle in England, Gile's place of birth. Gwenda goes ahead and picks a house for them. After seeing a few, she comes upon the one in Dillmouth called Hillside. She loves it right away. She buys it and in the process of remodeling, she begins to remember things about the house that turn to be true. Overwhelmed, she seeks respite with a visit to the home of Gile's cousin, Raymond West, nephew of Miss Marple. A trip to the theater triggers a memory in Gwenda that frightens her for she recalls seeing a woman being murdered in the house. Needing answers, Gwenda and Giles embark on an investigation to learn what really happened in their house. This is another great whodonit work by Agatha Chistie. The uncertain atmosphere is set by Gwenda and her recollections of this house. Upon establishing the potential victim, we are introduced to a list of people with motives and opportunities. The plot is complex and the meting out of clues and red herrings masterfully done. Overall, the plot is intruguing and the reveal satisfying. While Miss Marple is not as active in this book as she is the the earlier ones, she is very much present. Her trademark wit and keen eye help the young couple. Sleeping Murder was published in 1976 but written much earlier, in early 1940's during WWII. Both this book and the last installment of Hercule Poirot, Curtain, were written this early for Agatha Christie was in London, during the Blitz and wanted those written in the event she did not survive (thankfully that was not the case). I now have only the short story collection left to read and it will be a wrap on Miss Marple for me. It has been a pleasure.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Simona B

    I would probably find something else if I reread now all the (numerous) Christie novels I've read in the past decade, but I believe this is the first Christie book of which I can say the fault lies in the craft. (view spoiler)[The identity of the criminal is obvious since the beginning for the simple reason that there is effectively no one else who, as a character, has a prominent enough role to qualify as an acceptable culprit. (hide spoiler)] In short, the last Miss Marple investigation has do I would probably find something else if I reread now all the (numerous) Christie novels I've read in the past decade, but I believe this is the first Christie book of which I can say the fault lies in the craft. (view spoiler)[The identity of the criminal is obvious since the beginning for the simple reason that there is effectively no one else who, as a character, has a prominent enough role to qualify as an acceptable culprit. (hide spoiler)] In short, the last Miss Marple investigation has done nothing to redeem this (to me likable but not particularly beloved) character to my eyes.

  29. 4 out of 5

    ♥Rachel♥

    One of my all-time Agatha Christie favorites. Tragic. The murderer was an evil, evil person, and I wished there was more in the way of retribution. Listened to the audio this time around and really enjoyed it! Stephanie Cole did an excellent job with the voices and accents.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ardent Reader

    This is the first book that I have read from this author although this is the last book in this particular series. A very intriguing story. Agatha Christie will be one of my favorite author for sure.

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