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High Price: A Neuroscientist's Journey of Self-Discovery That Challenges Everything You Know About Drugs and Society

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A pioneering neuroscientist shares his story of growing up in one of Miami's toughest neighborhoods and how it led him to his groundbreaking work in drug addiction. As a youth, Carl Hart didn't realize the value of school; he studied just enough to stay on the basketball team. At the same time, he was immersed in street life. Today he is a cutting-edge neuroscientist—Columb A pioneering neuroscientist shares his story of growing up in one of Miami's toughest neighborhoods and how it led him to his groundbreaking work in drug addiction. As a youth, Carl Hart didn't realize the value of school; he studied just enough to stay on the basketball team. At the same time, he was immersed in street life. Today he is a cutting-edge neuroscientist—Columbia University's first tenured African American professor in the sciences—whose landmark, controversial research is redefining our understanding of addiction. In this provocative and eye-opening memoir, he recalls his journey of self-discovery and weaves his past and present. Hart goes beyond the hype of the antidrug movement as he examines the relationship among drugs, pleasure, choice, and motivation, both in the brain and in society. His findings shed new light on common ideas about race, poverty, and drugs, and explain why current policies are failing. Though Hart escaped neighborhoods that were dominated by entrenched poverty and the knot of problems associated with it, he has not turned his back on his roots. Determined to make a difference, he tirelessly applies his scientific research to help save real lives. But balancing his former street life with his achievements today has not been easy—a struggle he reflects on publicly for the first time. A powerful story of hope and change, of a scientist who has dedicated his life to helping others, High Price will alter the way we think about poverty, race, and addiction—and how we can effect change.


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A pioneering neuroscientist shares his story of growing up in one of Miami's toughest neighborhoods and how it led him to his groundbreaking work in drug addiction. As a youth, Carl Hart didn't realize the value of school; he studied just enough to stay on the basketball team. At the same time, he was immersed in street life. Today he is a cutting-edge neuroscientist—Columb A pioneering neuroscientist shares his story of growing up in one of Miami's toughest neighborhoods and how it led him to his groundbreaking work in drug addiction. As a youth, Carl Hart didn't realize the value of school; he studied just enough to stay on the basketball team. At the same time, he was immersed in street life. Today he is a cutting-edge neuroscientist—Columbia University's first tenured African American professor in the sciences—whose landmark, controversial research is redefining our understanding of addiction. In this provocative and eye-opening memoir, he recalls his journey of self-discovery and weaves his past and present. Hart goes beyond the hype of the antidrug movement as he examines the relationship among drugs, pleasure, choice, and motivation, both in the brain and in society. His findings shed new light on common ideas about race, poverty, and drugs, and explain why current policies are failing. Though Hart escaped neighborhoods that were dominated by entrenched poverty and the knot of problems associated with it, he has not turned his back on his roots. Determined to make a difference, he tirelessly applies his scientific research to help save real lives. But balancing his former street life with his achievements today has not been easy—a struggle he reflects on publicly for the first time. A powerful story of hope and change, of a scientist who has dedicated his life to helping others, High Price will alter the way we think about poverty, race, and addiction—and how we can effect change.

30 review for High Price: A Neuroscientist's Journey of Self-Discovery That Challenges Everything You Know About Drugs and Society

  1. 5 out of 5

    Petra-X is

    “I have to make sure I don't engage in conversations with people who don't abide by the rules of evidence.” Dr. Carl Hart, professor of psychology and psychiatry at Columbia University (and eye candy, which is never a bad thing). Dr. Hart has written a dual-subject book. Part of it is his biography, of how he grew up in a poor, culturally-impoverished, abusive home in Miami and lived the life of the hood but managed to avoid crime, addiction and became a scientist. He isn't tooting his own horn, “I have to make sure I don't engage in conversations with people who don't abide by the rules of evidence.” Dr. Carl Hart, professor of psychology and psychiatry at Columbia University (and eye candy, which is never a bad thing). Dr. Hart has written a dual-subject book. Part of it is his biography, of how he grew up in a poor, culturally-impoverished, abusive home in Miami and lived the life of the hood but managed to avoid crime, addiction and became a scientist. He isn't tooting his own horn, but more trying to work out what it was that saved him and propelled him him forward and the lessons that can be learned from that. What saved Carl Hart was sport and good teachers. And his first class brain, but he didn't discover that for quite a while. The other part of the book is debunking popular myths about drugs and drug addiction. His web site, headed by the quote I began this review with, is a scientist's view of cocaine, marijuana and all the other will ruin your life and fry your brain drugs. One of the most interesting discussions in the book is about Portugal. All drugs have been decriminalised there for up to 10 days supply. People caught with drugs have to attend a drug-addiction committee with several concerned professionals (but no police) where they all sit around the table and discuss the drug problem and how they can help. If there isn't any problem, then there is a small fine to pay and that's that. Much akin to a parking citation! Portugal has less criminals, less people with criminal records, less addiction and dealing of hard drugs and more or less the same number of marijuana smokers as it ever had. Really, everywhere, the majority of people prefer alcohol over street drugs. The book would have got 5 stars but it was too short! I wanted more. I look forward to reading more of Carl Hart's well written books. ______ Notes on reading the book. So the "this is your brain on drugs" and you'll end up a toothless meth addict and all the rest turns out to be mostly untrue. Not even the nurses in the research hospital can tell who is a research subject for heart problems and who for cocaine addiction. I hope the book stays this good, I love having fake preconceptions from spin doctors shattered, especially when I had no idea that's what they were and thought they were the truth.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Erica Mauter

    Overall, I appreciate the story, and the point Dr. Hart is getting at about research and drug policy. What I wanted was less memoir and more critical commentary. The two mostly worked together, but this book really needed tighter editing; it didn't come together for me until about two-thirds of the way through. Side note: I used to work in the pharmaceutical industry. I left for a variety of reasons including ethical concerns about marketing. So I was sort of shocked to see an image of Dr. Hart p Overall, I appreciate the story, and the point Dr. Hart is getting at about research and drug policy. What I wanted was less memoir and more critical commentary. The two mostly worked together, but this book really needed tighter editing; it didn't come together for me until about two-thirds of the way through. Side note: I used to work in the pharmaceutical industry. I left for a variety of reasons including ethical concerns about marketing. So I was sort of shocked to see an image of Dr. Hart presenting some of his findings, which I'm pretty sure is research that directly supported a product that my former company developed and marketed/sold. That product is the specific example I use to illustrate my concerns about the ethics of pharmaceutical marketing.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Riya

    Before I begin my review of this book, I want to mention that I was provided with a free advanced copy of this book by Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. This book will be released June 11th of this year. The digital copy of this book that I read had the title of "High Price" while on Goodreads it is called "The Pleasure Paradox"; both books have the same cover but I am not sure what the official title will be once it is published. My rating: 4.5 out of 5 stars. My summary of the book: Ca Before I begin my review of this book, I want to mention that I was provided with a free advanced copy of this book by Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. This book will be released June 11th of this year. The digital copy of this book that I read had the title of "High Price" while on Goodreads it is called "The Pleasure Paradox"; both books have the same cover but I am not sure what the official title will be once it is published. My rating: 4.5 out of 5 stars. My summary of the book: Carl Hart is a man that grew up in some of the most dangerous neighborhoods of Miami in the 1980's; from a young age he was exposed to family violence, random shootings, drugs, poverty, and racism. While most young men in his situation turned to crack cocaine and gangs, Carl was fortunate enough to learn the value of hard work (through his love of basketball) and was able to join the air force, which provided him with the opportunity to experience different cultures and attend college. Despite Carl's background and all the trials and tribulations he faced and conquered while pursuing his education, he managed to become a psychology professor in a prestigious school while specializing in neuropsychopharmacology. Now how about that for an uplifting, great success story? My review: Not only is this a great memoir about achieving your dreams and pursuing your passions despite early hardships, this is an incredibly informative book about the research Carl Hart has initiated in the study of drugs, particularly crack cocaine and methamphetamine. The revelations in this book will completely change your view on some of these illegal substances and will show that much of the information the media, schools, and DARE programs have taught us about drugs is inaccurate and even dangerous. The hysteria that surrounds some of these drugs is so intense and creates so much fear in the public that people forget to be compassionate to those that are addicted, and instead of creating a harm reduction or decriminalization approach for those that use these drugs, we lock them up for years in prisons that fail to rehabilitate these individuals and instead leave them no other choices but a life of crime, for who really wants to hire a felon or a person that has no job skills and education because he has spent his early twenties living in a cell? This book will definitely change the way you view drugs and the people who choose to use them. Things I learned: * Most drug users never become truly addicted, especially if they have a good social support network consisting of caring friends and family. "Indeed, a great deal of pathological drug use is driven by unmet social needs, by being alienated and having difficulty connecting with others." * We've all heard of the experiment where rats will push a lever that gives them a dose of cocaine over and over again until they overdose and die, but did they ever tell you that these particular rats were kept in total isolation so that they had no better alternatives in their lives than to dose themselves with copious amounts of cocaine. Rats that are raised in a social environment with positive reinforcers prefer those healthy alternatives to drugs. * Contingency Management is a new and effective therapy that is used in changing addictive behavior in users by providing alternative positive reinforcers. Punishments (such as incarceration) don't help the drug addict at all and actually hurt him because of the criminal record and gaps in their work history. More patients in contingency management programs complete their treatment plans and stay drug free than those in the traditional 12-step programs. I highly recommend this book to those that are interested in learning about new ways to approach the drug problems in this country and help those that are addicted - truly help them, instead of ineffectively punishing them like the current drug laws dictate today. There are now better ways of treating addiction, and we should not stick with those old methods that have proven themselves to be a complete failure. It is time to try something new if we want to really help, instead of demonizing those that are either users or are addicted.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Glennchuck

    The first 50 pages or so were pretty stiff and I didn't think I'd finish this one. But then, every other page or so, he'd take one of my preconceptions about drugs, behavior, or society and smash it into teeny tiny bits. Also, as he progressed through his own amazing life story, the book flowed better for me. By the time he got to the science that has transformed his own ideas about how we mishandle drug use/abuse in America, I was completely on board. The science wasn't too dense for me, a non- The first 50 pages or so were pretty stiff and I didn't think I'd finish this one. But then, every other page or so, he'd take one of my preconceptions about drugs, behavior, or society and smash it into teeny tiny bits. Also, as he progressed through his own amazing life story, the book flowed better for me. By the time he got to the science that has transformed his own ideas about how we mishandle drug use/abuse in America, I was completely on board. The science wasn't too dense for me, a non-scientific reader. One of the best things Hart did was make clear to a lay reader the difference between public policy based on anecdotal (often hysterical) "evidence" and policy based on thorough, dispassionate science. He shines a light on some forms of drug research for which the data don't remotely support the dire conclusions--which are then hyped into charicature by the media. My favorite example: Have you heard about the experiments in which rats will perform a task, such as tapping a bar, in order to get a hit of cocaine or heroin, and they just tap-tap-tap that bar until they die? Sure, I'd heard of that one. But those rats, Hart points out, were isolated in a distinctly un-rat-like environment. They were the rat equivalent of bored/scared/pissed. When the same type of experiment was performed on rats that lived more naturally with other rats, having sex, burrowing in dark places, driving tiny race cars (OK, I made that last one up), and otherwise having plenty of meaningful stuff to do, they often didn't tap that bar enough to even be considered addicted, much less to OD. Haven't heard of that experiment before? Me neither. Hart says some drug research is skewed because reinforcing the demonization of drugs helps researchers compete for grants. It also happens because the researchers truly believe--as Hart once did--the underlying myths about the nature, extent and effects of drug addiction. Hart doesn't crusade for legalizing drugs. It's a nuanced argument I won't even try to summarize, other than to say he makes a strong case for at least decriminalizing drugs and devoting more resources to studying the potential effects of legalization/decriminalization. His point is that we have to stop the cycle of incarcerating drug users, thus making it nearly impossible for them to get jobs, parent their children, and generally have a stake in a civil society. Drugs and addiction do shatter lives, no question. But the underlying problem isn't the drugs, it's the misguided war on drugs.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    Dr. Hart is a brilliant person with both real world knowledge, and years of clinical and scholarly research to bolster his research. This book was largely a memoir of his childhood and youth in Miami, his education, and his research in neuroscience and the effects of drugs on the brain. This book, written a few years ago now, could easily have a follow up with more information on his research projects and his activism and advocacy.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Cindy

    Updated 11/2016: The thing that most annoys me about this book, isn't actually the book, but the reviews that say it's not good enough because it's a memoir. Yes, it IS a memoir (as it clearly says) but it is also a book about race, drugs and drug policy. People who are reviewing the book have had a tendency to assume the pages should be filled with more evidence and science. That's a mistake. The author has worked hard to indicate that the book is in no way a scientific journal article. This bo Updated 11/2016: The thing that most annoys me about this book, isn't actually the book, but the reviews that say it's not good enough because it's a memoir. Yes, it IS a memoir (as it clearly says) but it is also a book about race, drugs and drug policy. People who are reviewing the book have had a tendency to assume the pages should be filled with more evidence and science. That's a mistake. The author has worked hard to indicate that the book is in no way a scientific journal article. This book totally entertained me. I will ALWAYS remember the author's retelling of his first experience hanging out with Melissa and smoking pot. I laugh every time I think of it. Although I would consider myself more left than right on drug policy, I do have serious concerns (and close familial addiction/destruction) about drug use. I should mention one issue I had with the writer. I am a fairly liberal female and was somewhat taken aback by his own perceptions of his super slutty behavior. I think he believes it makes him look manly - it doesn't, it just makes him look creepy. Did this book change the way I view drugs and drug policy? Absolutely. Does Dr. Hart perseverate on the race issue? No way. Although this book is about his findings on drugs, it's also completely and totally about his own experience being a black man. Excellent and very highly recommended!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Maryam

    I read this book for a local book club and well it made think of many facts that I believed so strongly in. This book has two parts, at first Dr. Hart talks about his past, him growing up in a black poor neighborhood in Miami, Florida where there were always violence, drugs and poverty. He talks how he was good in math but never cared for, how in those areas education was known as a burden for black people and the only thing aside from drug was sport and he chose Basketball. He believe it was pu I read this book for a local book club and well it made think of many facts that I believed so strongly in. This book has two parts, at first Dr. Hart talks about his past, him growing up in a black poor neighborhood in Miami, Florida where there were always violence, drugs and poverty. He talks how he was good in math but never cared for, how in those areas education was known as a burden for black people and the only thing aside from drug was sport and he chose Basketball. He believe it was pure luck that he never were engaged in armed robberies and drug dealing. Among his sibling he and only one sister were brought up by a grandmother which emphasized nonstop about importance of education. He opens his way to arm force and then following his girlfriend to another city and a local college where he meets three mentor who change his life and he follows a carrier in education and science. In the other part of the book he uses his studies to deflect the belief about how truly harmful are drugs. We always heard that Cocaine, Crack Cocaine and many other drugs are immediately addictive and even being a random drug user will lead to addiction. Dr Hart doesn’t believe in this saying. There are interesting statistics in the book like how decriminalization of drug in Portugal has decreased the crimes and even drug addiction there and how most of criminalizing drug in US is aiming only a poor minority of society. I’d recommend this book,we need to hear this side of story of drugs and justice system around it.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Po Po

    Dr. Hart claims we need to calm the fuck down about crack and meth (in other words, de-stigmatize recreational drug use). Using drugs occasionally doesn't necessarily produce a non-functioning unproductive member of society. It's a common misconception that once you start using a "hard drug", you will become instantly addicted. Hart proves this isn't so. In Hart's research, he has also debunked another myth-- that occasional use of drugs destroys brain cells and lowers cognitive function. * * * D Dr. Hart claims we need to calm the fuck down about crack and meth (in other words, de-stigmatize recreational drug use). Using drugs occasionally doesn't necessarily produce a non-functioning unproductive member of society. It's a common misconception that once you start using a "hard drug", you will become instantly addicted. Hart proves this isn't so. In Hart's research, he has also debunked another myth-- that occasional use of drugs destroys brain cells and lowers cognitive function. * * * Drug laws disproportionately target black people (possession of crack cocaine is much more harshly punished than powder cocaine). * * * The military gives amphetamines to soldiers in order to increase energy, focus and concentration. Amphetamine is also the active ingredient in the prescription medication known as Adderall which is routinely given to kids to treat ADHD. The chemical structure of amphetamine is nearly identical to that of methamphetamine. In fact, the effects of meth are increased energy and enhanced focus and concentration just like that of amphetamines. So, why the social stigma on meth?! * * * Unfortunately the majority of this book is an unglorified autobiography, rather than an in-depth study on drugs and society. The drug research material comprises only about 20 pages (probably less) out of a 300+ page comprehensive examination and dissection of the life and times of Cool Carl.* *His actual DJ alias.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Todd

    Well, this didn't challenge everything I know about drugs and society.. The authors story was interesting, however, Dr. hart's battle of being addicted to being cool was the biggest challenge of the story as far as I could see. Well, this didn't challenge everything I know about drugs and society.. The authors story was interesting, however, Dr. hart's battle of being addicted to being cool was the biggest challenge of the story as far as I could see.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    This book does have some truly interesting content and observations on the correlations between race and drug culture. I have found myself thinking often about the very (now) obvious message. The issue is that I wanted it presented in much less of an auto-biographical (and opinionated) way. I think I'll be looking for some essays written by Carl Hart instead of completing this book. I read through most of it but found myself quickly skimming through pages that seemed to talk about small anecdote This book does have some truly interesting content and observations on the correlations between race and drug culture. I have found myself thinking often about the very (now) obvious message. The issue is that I wanted it presented in much less of an auto-biographical (and opinionated) way. I think I'll be looking for some essays written by Carl Hart instead of completing this book. I read through most of it but found myself quickly skimming through pages that seemed to talk about small anecdotes from his teenage sex life or dialogue from decades ago. I understand his pride and wanting to write this book given the circumstances in which he grew up, but at times it felt like the message of the book was lost to his reminiscing of the past. I'm not sure that I understand the need for him to describe his experiences in the first grade in vivid detail- these anecdotes quickly begin to blur the line between science and opinion.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    I will forever think about drugs, addiction and poverty in a different way. I really enjoyed the memoir part of the book, and although I don't think I would really like the author, and I certainly would not have liked him as a young man, he makes his point very convincingly when he talks about the potential decriminalization (as opposed to legalization) of drugs. I will forever think about drugs, addiction and poverty in a different way. I really enjoyed the memoir part of the book, and although I don't think I would really like the author, and I certainly would not have liked him as a young man, he makes his point very convincingly when he talks about the potential decriminalization (as opposed to legalization) of drugs.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Dominick Quartuccio

    Did you know that crack cocaine and powder cocaine are chemically the same drug? As are Meth and the prescription drug Adderall? Then why are crack cocaine and meth believed to be such horrifyingly devastating drugs, while cocaine and Adderall are often seen as recreational drugs of high society? Dr. Carl Hart enlightened me to these questions in High Price. High Price is a book with many layers: - A scientific assault on what we've been conditioned to believe about drugs. While Dr. Hart does not min Did you know that crack cocaine and powder cocaine are chemically the same drug? As are Meth and the prescription drug Adderall? Then why are crack cocaine and meth believed to be such horrifyingly devastating drugs, while cocaine and Adderall are often seen as recreational drugs of high society? Dr. Carl Hart enlightened me to these questions in High Price. High Price is a book with many layers: - A scientific assault on what we've been conditioned to believe about drugs. While Dr. Hart does not minimize the dangers of drugs, he exposes a number of myths steeped in unfounded anecdotal evidence and racial biases, which he believes has led to the continued losing battle of the War on Drugs. - A direct and provocative dialogue on the role of public policy, social standards, race and drugs...and why our policies are contributing to the problem, not the solution. - A biography of an infinitely interesting, talented and flawed man - Dr. Carl Hart - who grew up around drugs and violence. His storytelling allows the reader to follow his evolution of consciousness, from the streets, to the Air Force, to Columbia University as a Dr. of Neuroscience. I find myself wanting to seek out and meet after finishing reading his story. I recommend this book to anyone who is: - Seeking a rich dialogue on the true scientific effects of drugs (and blowing away commonly held perceptions) - Unafraid to explore their own social/racial biases and blind spots - Interested in reading the biography of a fascinating man who beat the odds, is breaking down decades of scientific mis-truths, and who continues to struggle to find his home while caught between the worlds of his past and present

  13. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    I really enjoyed this eye opening book. In this memoir laced with scientific discovery, Dr. Hart demonstrates a lot of the ideas we have been sold in the war on drugs culture we inhabit. He talks about race and how our views on drugs, the media coverage, and the scientific ignorance about them have all lead to a social construct that devastates communities. In his unique perspective, in which he tackles the role of race in science and drug perceptions based on his personally lived story and his I really enjoyed this eye opening book. In this memoir laced with scientific discovery, Dr. Hart demonstrates a lot of the ideas we have been sold in the war on drugs culture we inhabit. He talks about race and how our views on drugs, the media coverage, and the scientific ignorance about them have all lead to a social construct that devastates communities. In his unique perspective, in which he tackles the role of race in science and drug perceptions based on his personally lived story and his story as a scientist, the reader is able to to see how many myths can be decoded and demonstrated to be false. I did feel that there was an overabundance of bravado in the book. I realize much of it was intentional as the author's point about defending his reputation and having a lot of pride speaks to a motivational factor but at other points it felt like just bragging. When he makes a point to debunk the idea that scientists are "antisocial" (read nerdy), I didn't feel like there was any relevance to his thesis other than letting the reader know that he was very popular, athletic, etc. Aside from this I really enjoyed the format because I love memoir and the science was very methodically inserted into the story being told.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Bob Gustafson

    This is an autobiography of an African-American who grew up in a working-class neighborhood in Miami and, as a consequence of fortuitous opportunities, peculiar decision-making and athletic and intellectual ability, became a professor of neuroscience at Columbia University. He combines this latter credential with his background to make a statement about the foolishness of the War on Drugs. The book is a pleasant read. The author was interviewed on Book TV. It was that interview which induced me t This is an autobiography of an African-American who grew up in a working-class neighborhood in Miami and, as a consequence of fortuitous opportunities, peculiar decision-making and athletic and intellectual ability, became a professor of neuroscience at Columbia University. He combines this latter credential with his background to make a statement about the foolishness of the War on Drugs. The book is a pleasant read. The author was interviewed on Book TV. It was that interview which induced me to purchase the book. My personal views are libertarian/anarchist, so I was prejudiced in favor of the book before I started reading. Now I know there exists at least one neuroscientist who agrees with me. What is a little bit puzzling is who the author's intended audience is. I am a baby-boomer. I hope that the Generation X and Millenial Generation professional classes will read this book and build their drug laws and law enforcement and rehab procedures with Hart's conclusions in mind. Will they read this book in the first place?

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lucy

    Dr. Hart's persuasively argued memoir delivers. I have been having serious doubts about the "War on Drugs" and I have always been outraged by sentencing disparities. Hart demonstrates that the drug narrative we've been listening to for decades is supported neither by science nor by his own experience growing up in a community disproportionately affected by drug policy. While I did not find his writing style to be as elegant as my mother did (she was in raptures)he wrote competently and accessibl Dr. Hart's persuasively argued memoir delivers. I have been having serious doubts about the "War on Drugs" and I have always been outraged by sentencing disparities. Hart demonstrates that the drug narrative we've been listening to for decades is supported neither by science nor by his own experience growing up in a community disproportionately affected by drug policy. While I did not find his writing style to be as elegant as my mother did (she was in raptures)he wrote competently and accessibly, which is an even greater feat for a neuroscientist writing for the general public. This was the tipping point for me in my view of the criminalization of drugs. Like Hart, I think we need to move toward decriminalizing drugs (yes, even the "hard" ones)long before we can talk about legalizing them. As Hart points out, humans have been finding ways to alter their consciousness since there were humans--a drug-free America is not just unrealistic, the policies put in place to enforce that pipe dream have been devastating.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Tori

    This book really pissed me off. I loved Dr. Hart's segments in The House I Live In, and I was really looking forward to reading this book. I think my views are extremely close to his views, but I felt like he was pushing an agenda too hard. The book felt manipulative to me. It also came across like he was talking down to the reader. I didn't realize that so much of the book was going to be his personal story. Some of his research results seemed too oversimplified, and I wish he had discussed the This book really pissed me off. I loved Dr. Hart's segments in The House I Live In, and I was really looking forward to reading this book. I think my views are extremely close to his views, but I felt like he was pushing an agenda too hard. The book felt manipulative to me. It also came across like he was talking down to the reader. I didn't realize that so much of the book was going to be his personal story. Some of his research results seemed too oversimplified, and I wish he had discussed the results more and his personal story less. I thought he made great points about the problems with our criminal justice system, but it seemed like the drug policy he was advocating would not address the racial disparities that he had pointed out that need to be addressed.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Drew

    Loved Hart's memoir-cum-drug scientific book. The research here is sound and employs the oft-argued scientific method (will we ever evolve as a species, collectively?) Also, I loved the struggle from the hood to the lab, great inspiration for anyone who starts out in the trailers of sub-continuation public schooling. I related because I too occupied those same trailers when I was a confused adolescent. Now, I teach at an Ivy League school, despite what the naysayers proselytized. From that persp Loved Hart's memoir-cum-drug scientific book. The research here is sound and employs the oft-argued scientific method (will we ever evolve as a species, collectively?) Also, I loved the struggle from the hood to the lab, great inspiration for anyone who starts out in the trailers of sub-continuation public schooling. I related because I too occupied those same trailers when I was a confused adolescent. Now, I teach at an Ivy League school, despite what the naysayers proselytized. From that perspective, I found Dr. Hart to be a kindred spirit.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Austin Bash

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. To sum it up: your high school principal, the late Nancy Reagan, and the DEA/law enforcement have consistently misrepresented drug use and addiction to the American public. With that being said, I'm not suggesting that you should start shooting up heroin in some grimy back alley. There are plenty of real dangers associated with drug use; science-based public education on these dangers is a critical element of public health policy and harm reduction that has been overlooked for far too long. Scare To sum it up: your high school principal, the late Nancy Reagan, and the DEA/law enforcement have consistently misrepresented drug use and addiction to the American public. With that being said, I'm not suggesting that you should start shooting up heroin in some grimy back alley. There are plenty of real dangers associated with drug use; science-based public education on these dangers is a critical element of public health policy and harm reduction that has been overlooked for far too long. Scare tactics, however, have not been overlooked; the problem is they're bullshit. Contrary to what D.A.R.E wants you to believe, there is no horror drug that will turn you into a psychotic flesh eating zombie. There's also essentially no evidence that trying cocaine once will transform you into a compulsive, paranoid cocaine fiend; lots of factors play into drug addiction that are ignored because they don't fit a certain agenda. To put it frankly, D.A.R.E and related campaigns are pretty effective at targeting kids who grew up in white middle class suburbia; at least for a while. Kids who grew up outside of that bubble, who have seen drugs used in their neighborhoods and/or by family members from a young age, will not only *not* fall for the hysteria, but they will also be highly skeptical of any legitimate harm reduction advice given by any governmental or medical authority, due to the fact that they've been lied to before. As for the white suburban kids? Maybe their first interaction with drugs will be a Vicodin prescription from a sports injury. Or what they think is "ecstasy" at a college party. Regardless, they will probably run into drugs someday, and will realize they've been lied to, but without any education about harm reduction or responsible drug use. Excellent. Truly, our government is comprised of highly intelligent individuals who are excellent at understanding the long-term effects of policy decisions. What really made this book "click" for me was when Dr. Hart described his studies testing psychoactive drugs on rats. Here's the gist of it: if you put a rat in a cramped, tiny, dirty cage, completely isolate it from the other rats, limit its access to food, water, entertainment and exercise, and then give it the option of pushing a button to administer a dose of a drug to itself; it will, often frequently and compulsively. On the flip side, if you put a rat in a large, spacious cage with adequate food and water supply, lots of other rats to socialize with, means of exercise and entertainment, and *then* give it the option of getting high; it might push the button a few times for fun, but the compulsion and desperation for escape are absent. I am acutely aware of the parallels between the good cage/bad cage studies done in rats and the actual reality that many people face in our society and across the world. Some people might point out that the limitations of rat studies, and claim that they should not extrapolated in an attempt to explain a human problem. I understand that point. But I also believe those same people need to work on examining their own biases; it is far too easy to deny that a problem exists or ignore it when you haven't been through it personally or known others who have. Oversimplifying issues like drug addiction, viewing it in a black and white fashion, either as a moral failure in one extreme or as a simple flaw in brain chemistry in another, helps no one. We owe it to those who are suffering to base our beliefs and arguments in actual science; discussions of drug policy must include the actual pharmacological effects of drugs. There is no scientific basis for the sentencing disparity between crack vs powder cocaine arrests. We must also acknowledge the neuroplastic nature of the brain, and consider how early life experiences, lack of stable housing, lack of access to education, and many more complex environmental factors and sociocultural issues affect not just the choices we make but also *how* we make choices. To borrow a quote from D.H. Lawrence, "What the eye doesn't see and the mind doesn't know, doesn't exist." As I write this review, my home state of Michigan has just recently legalized recreational cannabis sales. Seemingly almost overnight, a cultural transformation has occurred. As you scroll through social media, you're bombarded with advertisements for different cannabis strains. Soccer moms are now making extra money by selling edibles made in their own ovens. As I witness this transformation taking place, I can't help but think of those who have been left out of it: the man who racked up a felony charge selling weed as a teenager who now can't find anyone willing to hire him. The mother who lost a child from an accidental drug overdose: a simple mistake, a mixture of two CNS depressing substances resulting in death by cardiac and respiratory arrest; that was never warned about during those D.A.R.E lectures. Where is their cultural transformation? Where is their justice? I believe that justice will come when Americans are educated on issues like drugs, poverty, mental illness and racism; perhaps by reading this book and others like it. But for now, our drug policy is broken for everyone *except* for a key group of individuals who profit by keeping it that way.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Lumos

    “Instead, the adults around us saw school as a quest for a certificate, a stamp of approval you could show around later in life. Rather than valuing the process of education itself and the essential critical thinking skills that can be gained from it, they saw school as a means to an end.” This book really did change my perspective on drugs and society. Since I grew up in a religious family that prohibited drugs and alcohol, I was pretty ignorant about drug addiction. Dr. Hart made me realize “Instead, the adults around us saw school as a quest for a certificate, a stamp of approval you could show around later in life. Rather than valuing the process of education itself and the essential critical thinking skills that can be gained from it, they saw school as a means to an end.” This book really did change my perspective on drugs and society. Since I grew up in a religious family that prohibited drugs and alcohol, I was pretty ignorant about drug addiction. Dr. Hart made me realize that so many of the stereotypes I had about drugs were false. This book is a well-researched and introspective hybrid - a cross between the science, memoir, and sociology genres. After I finished After reading High Price: A Neuroscientist's Journey of Self-Discovery That Challenges Everything You Know About Drugs and Society, I was left inspired not just by Hart's commentaries on drugs and society but his personal journey. How did Hart go from a low-income neighbourhood in Florida to becoming a professor of neuroscience at Columbia University? This was a question that also perplexed him for years, and by writing this book, he hoped to understand why his life turned out so different from some of his peers. He credits most of his success to a logical sequence of events that led him in the right direction: participating in basketball, joining the army, traveling abroad, and positive social influences. Hart studied addiction because he thought drugs were the bane of black communities. But when he analyzed the data, he realized most of the information perpetuated to us about drugs was false. Here was an interesting fact I read in this book: 80-90% of people who use drugs do not become addicted to them. The scary stories we hear about on the news or see in documentaries only represents 10-20% of drug users. When drugs policies are not backed by pharmacological evidence, they do more harm than good. In the long run, our drug policies incarcerate black men at disproportionate levels, even though whites are more likely to sell drugs. If a person acquires a non-violent drug offence than it can make it difficult for them to reintegrate into society. Since our current war on drugs is an epic fail, Hart believes America should try to decriminalize drugs like Portugal did in 2001. After reacting this new law, if authorities caught you with drugs in Portugal, they took you to a healthcare facility instead of a prison. Portugal’s new drug policies were beneficial and actually resulted in drug use dropping for youth 24 and under. This book contained A LOT of information about drug policy, neuroscience, and pharmacology. While I cannot cover it all in this review, I will say that Dr. Hart is one heck of a human being. It was good to see somebody with a similar upbringing to mine achieve academic success. I am glad Hart used his experiences to advocate for an issue that often makes people uncomfortable. Also, Hart has a stunning grasp on the vernacular. He was able to turn a dry subject like drug policy into something fascinating. If you want to learn more about American drug policies, then this book is a great place to start.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Isabelle Leventhal

    Second reading: The material came across like it was definitely by someone in the sciences, who spends a lot of time thinking about the mechanisms that influence human behavior. That being said, still an A+ read. The way he uses the personal to provide anecdotes is effective and reminds me of what Ibram X. Kendi does in how to be an anti racist but with an attention to our racist/classist understandings of behavior, drug abuse, and debunking the myths. A must read for anyone who: 1) provides heal Second reading: The material came across like it was definitely by someone in the sciences, who spends a lot of time thinking about the mechanisms that influence human behavior. That being said, still an A+ read. The way he uses the personal to provide anecdotes is effective and reminds me of what Ibram X. Kendi does in how to be an anti racist but with an attention to our racist/classist understandings of behavior, drug abuse, and debunking the myths. A must read for anyone who: 1) provides health and human services 2) is a white person who uses recreational drugs 3) interested in understanding beyond just why the war on drugs is bad but in fact the result of racist propaganda and misinformation

  21. 4 out of 5

    Warren.Piece

    i think this would have been four stars to someone unfamiliar with the misinformation surrounding various drugs and drug policy. i was left wanting more clear information from the authors own studies. biggest gripe is feeling like a lot of things were repeated rather than going deeper. still a good book and this would be a great book to get someone started on understanding how mislead we are on the true nature and dangers of drugs.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ben Cole

    Enlightening and enjoyable to read.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sleepless Dreamer

    It seems that the drug conversation is getting bigger and bigger nowadays. At least in Israel, legalization is taking up a lot of room in the elections discussions now. It feels like our generation will be the one that will legalize, at least marijuana but perhaps more. So I found this book pretty good. It goes both into his own biography and into his research on drugs. I wanted him to dig deeper into the race issue but yeah, it wasn't quite the topic of the book. It's a broad book though, he go It seems that the drug conversation is getting bigger and bigger nowadays. At least in Israel, legalization is taking up a lot of room in the elections discussions now. It feels like our generation will be the one that will legalize, at least marijuana but perhaps more. So I found this book pretty good. It goes both into his own biography and into his research on drugs. I wanted him to dig deeper into the race issue but yeah, it wasn't quite the topic of the book. It's a broad book though, he goes into a lot of parts of his life. I was in a party in Berlin a few weeks ago and it was my first time being around people who were using things more serious than weed. It was fascinating for me because I found myself challenging a lot of what I had thought about the influence of drugs. I enjoyed the conversations with the people there and it was eye opening. Quite humorous too, they kept teasing me for being sober and saying that they could never imagine going to a party like this sober. Within an American context, it seems somewhat obvious that the black neighborhoods need education and social help more than anything else. That by being a closed off area, the youth don't have options and automatically join the narrative. All in all, this book is well written. I wouldn't say it challenges everything but it's definitely insightful, especially if you're very against drugs. I appreciate science that goes against the mainstream thought. The conversation about how politics and social context influence research is an important one. What I'm taking with Me • Much of the research done with animals is irrelevant because they are in isolation or they are given huge amounts of the drug. Of course this influences how much they use and the impact on the brain. • Having a stake in the society is in many ways more important than simply fighting against drug use. • In Portugal, if you get caught with any drug, you simply have to pay a fine and go to a meeting with various professionals (but no police) who are there to help you if there's a drug abuse problem. If not, you just pay the fine and that's it.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mitchell

    Fantastic storytelling of Dr. Hart's journey from (view spoiler)[seeing a man beat his mom nearly to death and being sent to live with relatives in the ghetto as a little boy, driving the getaway car for friends in robberies, narrowly avoiding arrest as a teen delinquent and storing cash for a drug dealer. Meeting his son who he wasn't told about and continued down that bad path, was a useful device for echoing the journey and tying together the vignettes. But turning it all around with the help Fantastic storytelling of Dr. Hart's journey from (view spoiler)[seeing a man beat his mom nearly to death and being sent to live with relatives in the ghetto as a little boy, driving the getaway car for friends in robberies, narrowly avoiding arrest as a teen delinquent and storing cash for a drug dealer. Meeting his son who he wasn't told about and continued down that bad path, was a useful device for echoing the journey and tying together the vignettes. But turning it all around with the help of mentors and 10 years later was in a prestigious graduate laboratory performing brain surgery on the nucleus accumbens of rats to study dopaminergic activity, and is now teaching in the Ivy League and consulting government agencies and pharma companies, (hide spoiler)] as one of the nation's substance use/abuse medical experts. I believe Carl Hart succeeded not just in spite of growing up in the 'school of hard knocks' but that those formative experiences were integral to the empathy and compassion he brings to studying drug addiction, and pioneering new tools and theories about how to break the chains that bind substance addicted people to crack cocaine, heroin, alcohol, methamphetamine, and the rest. That being said, a few of the things he says about methamphetamine addiction (one of my areas of focus as a behavioral health psychology student @ AU) are outdated or just untrue. He says that 'black people do not use meth, because it's a white drug' however methamphetamine use by people of color, especially MSM, sex workers and living on the street, has been increasing out here on the west coast as crack use is declining at a similar rate. This is pronounced to the point where if you picked 100 patients with stimulant use disorder, probably only 20 would be crack and/or cocaine to 70 meth and 10 Adderall / 'bath salts' / mdma etc, and those groups would all be racially diverse with only a slight bias toward more Black Americans in the crack group (powder cocaine is very expensive here and seems mostly used by middle-upper class white and Latinx men, women in the sex industry, especially those involved in the night club scene. Crack has fallen out in favor of meth because to stay high on crack all day and night long would require hundreds of dollars since its duration of action is brief, roughly an hour per $5 'rock' if my information is correct, whereas the user can get a $20 bag of methamphetamine 'shards' and stay much higher for 24+ hours straight, possibly several days their first time, since that can be split into 8-10 doses of equivalent strength to a 15mg Adderall, but lasting 6-8 hours compared to amphetamine's 4-5. This may just be different out on the east coast where he is working and living or it might be a recent change, but it seems to have been trending this way in the Pacific Northwest for a while, I remember crack being around equally or more than meth when I was in high school in the early 2000s but have no idea what it was like before then. The more pernicious error though is a section where Dr. Hart describes methamphetamine in a presentation to med students / faculty as an effective treatment for ADHD and downplays the differences between pharmaceutically sourced mixed amphetamine salts like Adderall or Vyvanse with street methamphetamine. He describes the difference as being analogous to cocaine vs crack (a subject on which he is far more knowledgeable than myself) when in reality the difference is much more like OxyContin vs heroin. While the chemical difference is subtle, the latter is smoked and injected leading to a more dangerous and higher bioavailability with peak levels in the bloodstream and brain, the former is swallowed in a pill form or snorted as a ground up pill where it gets partially digested in the stomach and takes sometimes as long as an hour to feel the effects. Pharmaceutically diverted Desoxyn is very rare because most pharmacies don't stock it and most doctors don't prescribe it due to the stigma. Also, batches of 'crystal' on the street can range from an oily, stinky brown salt containing ammonia and other toxic byproducts, red tinged from the cold medicine used to produce it, contaminated with fentanyl, and all sorts of other impurities due to the DIY production of the drug (in motel bathtubs, by cartels, etc) with no quality control unlike big pharma. This is not Walter White level chemistry we are talking about here. "I think the safest plan is to grind this gram of crank up and carefully titrate it into oral doses of exactly 10mg each and put those inside cellulose capsules so that my customers can swallow it before doing their homework" Said no meth dealer ever. Theoretically it would be possible for an extremely careful user under medical supervision to treat their ADHD with methamphetamine (and probably also sleeping pills and something appetite-stimulating to maintain their circadian rhythm and body weight), in practice, the inconsistency, route of administration, and peer pressure of the culture surrounding methamphetamine (where most people use it to 'party' or to help them stay awake in unsafe situations like being homeless or working overnight) lead even the experienced and best intentioned users (just trying to replace the 'honeymoon' before a high Adderall tolerance developed) to start smoking or injecting it, sadly leading to a similar downward spiral as we see with heroin in many people for similar reasons. I feel bad about shooting Hart down (no pun intended) since we are allies in the fight to educate people about methamphetamine and help users practice harm reduction and get sober, but I worry that dismissing meth as being "not that different from Adderall" will lead people who lose their Adderall prescription or develop too high of a tolerance to approach meth from a street dealer without commensurate evaluation of the risk that they are taking by doing so. I am far from a prude but we need to think about that it isn't only industry folks who will be reading books like this but also teenagers and people browsing Erowid and etc before engaging on making themselves guinea pigs for dangerous combinations and high doses of chemicals, many of which like the 'bath salts' and ersatz-thc 'spice mixes' sold in legal high markets or ordered from overseas, are far less studied and seem more prone to precipitating psychotic, paranoid, deranged and manic breaks from reality than the amphetamines, psychedelics, cannabis and cocaine we have been researching from the 1950s and earlier. The book is so close to being perfect, politically and scientifically, and I would love to see another edition with these issues remedied.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    In this fascinating memoir/science book/political call to action, neuroscientist Carl Hart tells his story of growing up in a poor part of Miami with a father and mother who split up early and friends who later lapsed into the drug trade and other dead end lives. He originally thought he might become a youth counselor, but his own experiences with drugs and the impact he thought they were making on his hometown led him into scientific research, often the lone black in the labs he worked in. Over In this fascinating memoir/science book/political call to action, neuroscientist Carl Hart tells his story of growing up in a poor part of Miami with a father and mother who split up early and friends who later lapsed into the drug trade and other dead end lives. He originally thought he might become a youth counselor, but his own experiences with drugs and the impact he thought they were making on his hometown led him into scientific research, often the lone black in the labs he worked in. Over the years, he developed a number of experiments that led him to his strong belief that drugs are not the reason America's African American communities have been devastated, but the poverty and discrimination and lack of education that creates conditions that are ripe for people to turn to drugs for solace or profit. His lab experiments have shown that hard core cocaine and meth users will choose monetary payments over the chance to use their drug of choice much of the time, and it has led him to the belief that drugs are not addictive for most people, or at least not to the extent that people can't move away from them if given the right incentives. He doesn't favor legalizing drugs, he says, but rather switching to a system like Portugal's, where most drug arrests are treated as misdemeanors and committees decide on treatment or light imprisonment. The one flaw in this book, I thought, was that he never explained how that approach would get rid of the profiteering and related killings that go with the illicit drug trade.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Morgan Blackledge

    Once and a while a book reaches into your heart. For me, this is one of those. This book resonated with me in a way that felt uncanny, almost as if the author was speaking directly to me. For reasons I can't easily describe, this book moved me to tears again and again. Reading some of the negative and lukewarm reviews was equally odd for me. Did we read the same book? The answer must be yes. So I'm left to conclude that the book is particularly resonant with me for some very personal reasons. As a Once and a while a book reaches into your heart. For me, this is one of those. This book resonated with me in a way that felt uncanny, almost as if the author was speaking directly to me. For reasons I can't easily describe, this book moved me to tears again and again. Reading some of the negative and lukewarm reviews was equally odd for me. Did we read the same book? The answer must be yes. So I'm left to conclude that the book is particularly resonant with me for some very personal reasons. As a man. As a father. As an aspiring professor that spent time in the learning disability "trailer" too. As a hard core functional contextual big B cognitive behavioral therapist. As a neuroscience fanatic. As a clinician working with dual diagnosed, low SES, substance dependent populations. As a human that strives and struggles, I relate to this part memoir, part neuroscience, part behavioral analysis, part political critique, part sociological analysis part confused rant book. Will everyone love this book? Fuck no! Obviously not. But for me, reading it was an immensely powerful, validating, invigorating, transformative experience. Dr. Carl is a fucking ROCK STAR. Thank you for sacking up and giving voice to this dangerous and important perspective. It needed to be said, and it took huge balls to say it. I don't agree with every little utterance. But this book is a game changer and I'm grateful to have read it.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    High Price is a brilliantly written memoir that will challenge everything you think you know about race, drugs, crime, and even academia. Dr. Carl Hart began life in inner-city Miami, one of eight siblings raised by his mother and grandmothers. He did not take school seriously and did the bare minimum in order to participate in football and basketball. Upon graduation, he joined the Air Force, and his life began a long journey of challenges that ultimately led him to become an accomplished neuros High Price is a brilliantly written memoir that will challenge everything you think you know about race, drugs, crime, and even academia. Dr. Carl Hart began life in inner-city Miami, one of eight siblings raised by his mother and grandmothers. He did not take school seriously and did the bare minimum in order to participate in football and basketball. Upon graduation, he joined the Air Force, and his life began a long journey of challenges that ultimately led him to become an accomplished neuroscientist. Dr. Hart is not only a neuroscientist, but also an educator and activist. His book does justice to all three areas of focus. It is not merely a narrative of the changes in scientific understanding of substance use, but also a history lesson -- and current events lesson -- about the dynamics of race and criminal justice relating to substance use. Even in his experiences in academia, he recounts the obstacles he faced as a black man "with dreads and three gold teeth." For sure, you will learn plenty about pharmacology and neuroscience -- but also about social issues surrounding young black men. This book affected me in a very positive way. I am pursuing my master's in social work and have been struggling to overcome my biases against people who use substances. Reading this book has helped me put substance use into perspective and respond in a compassionate, effective way when working with clients who use substances. I highly recommend this book!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    I know less now than I did when I started the book, and that it's a good thing. I no longer "know" that meth is particularly destructive to the brain. (Studies with that conclusion, were on animals under much higher doses than humans use.) Many of the things we "know" about the dangers of drugs simply are not borne out by facts. Do people become addicted and experience problems? Yes, but putting users in the criminal justice system doesn't help. Should drugs be legalized? Not necessarily, but pos I know less now than I did when I started the book, and that it's a good thing. I no longer "know" that meth is particularly destructive to the brain. (Studies with that conclusion, were on animals under much higher doses than humans use.) Many of the things we "know" about the dangers of drugs simply are not borne out by facts. Do people become addicted and experience problems? Yes, but putting users in the criminal justice system doesn't help. Should drugs be legalized? Not necessarily, but possession can be decriminalized without making it fully legal. It is interesting to compare High Price to Clean, which I read earlier this year. The authors have vastly different attitudes towards drugs, informed by their personal experience and education, but both agree that drugs are not the real problem. They are the symptom: of poverty, of mental illness, of racism, of lack of opportunity. People with healthy lives don't need drugs. As long as we treat the cough but not the cancer, we are doomed to fail.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Joshua

    Incredibly well-constructed and insightful. Hart merges a discussion of the clinally-proven psychological effect of street drugs (much of which he has conducted) with his own story coming from an impoverished background in Florida, going into the armed forces, and going on to college, grad school, and eventually becoming a tenured professor at Columbia. Professor Hart makes abundantly clear that the effect of (often racist) drug policy and enforcement decisions has had a much more negative impac Incredibly well-constructed and insightful. Hart merges a discussion of the clinally-proven psychological effect of street drugs (much of which he has conducted) with his own story coming from an impoverished background in Florida, going into the armed forces, and going on to college, grad school, and eventually becoming a tenured professor at Columbia. Professor Hart makes abundantly clear that the effect of (often racist) drug policy and enforcement decisions has had a much more negative impact than the drugs themselves. He also clearly establishes that stresses like poverty, discrimination, and mental health issues make people not only more likely to become addicted, but to lose control and stop functioning. He less effectively argues that these drugs are far less dangerous than perceived; he emphasizes the addicts who are able to function and maintain control, but the world of drug addiction is far more than two camps, one functioning, the other a victim of circumstance. Still, excellent book, and a must-read.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mary Cummings

    Toward the beginning stages of the publishing process of High Price, an editor dropped the ball in a big way. Someone should've said, "Dr. Price, you're trying to tell two completely different stories here: your memoir of growing up and out of the projects in Florida to eventually become a respected scientist and professor, and an unrelated story about drugs, drug policy, and addiction." How in the world did this book get published like this? Dr. Price has a good narrative to tell about his rise Toward the beginning stages of the publishing process of High Price, an editor dropped the ball in a big way. Someone should've said, "Dr. Price, you're trying to tell two completely different stories here: your memoir of growing up and out of the projects in Florida to eventually become a respected scientist and professor, and an unrelated story about drugs, drug policy, and addiction." How in the world did this book get published like this? Dr. Price has a good narrative to tell about his rise to success. And he has a great point to make about why drug policy in the US is completely wrong. However, these two topics have very little to do with one another and make reading them within one book really difficult. Until the last couple chapters of the the text, it's mainly about race relations in our country and Dr. Hart just tooting his own horn -- which makes the title and description very misleading.

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