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The Life and Death of Captain Marvel

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The legendary cosmic warrior called Captain Marvel was an agent of the alien Kree, humanoid beings who commanded a galaxy-spanning empire. While stationed on Earth, Mar-Vell's sympathy for the planet's people caused him to disobey a direct order. His punishment: death! Escaping execution, Mar-Veil found himself stranded in the Negative Zone, an anti-matter universe existin The legendary cosmic warrior called Captain Marvel was an agent of the alien Kree, humanoid beings who commanded a galaxy-spanning empire. While stationed on Earth, Mar-Vell's sympathy for the planet's people caused him to disobey a direct order. His punishment: death! Escaping execution, Mar-Veil found himself stranded in the Negative Zone, an anti-matter universe existing alongside Earth. There, he telepathically contacted Rick Jones -- previously a companion of the Incredible Hulk, the most powerful man-like creature ever to walk the Earth, and Captain America, star-spangled Sentinel of Liberty. Mar-Vell instructed the teenager to don a pair of extraterrestrial bracelets -- and when Rick slammed the golden Nega-Bands together with all his might, his atoms traded places with those of the exiled Kree. The hero materialized on Earth, while Rick was surrounded by a protective aura that allowed him to survive in the Negative Zone. Captain Marvel wielded his cosmic powers in defense of the galaxy ... and Earth, his adopted homeworld. But after many an awesome adventure and countless victories, Mar-Vell's exposure to a carcinogenic nerve gas took its toll. Ultimately, he succumbed to the one enemy he proved unable to defeat: an incurable systemic cancer. Mar-Vell died not on the field of battle, but on a sickbed -- surrounded by an awesome assemblage of adventurers, gathered to pay tribute to the legacy of their fallen friend!


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The legendary cosmic warrior called Captain Marvel was an agent of the alien Kree, humanoid beings who commanded a galaxy-spanning empire. While stationed on Earth, Mar-Vell's sympathy for the planet's people caused him to disobey a direct order. His punishment: death! Escaping execution, Mar-Veil found himself stranded in the Negative Zone, an anti-matter universe existin The legendary cosmic warrior called Captain Marvel was an agent of the alien Kree, humanoid beings who commanded a galaxy-spanning empire. While stationed on Earth, Mar-Vell's sympathy for the planet's people caused him to disobey a direct order. His punishment: death! Escaping execution, Mar-Veil found himself stranded in the Negative Zone, an anti-matter universe existing alongside Earth. There, he telepathically contacted Rick Jones -- previously a companion of the Incredible Hulk, the most powerful man-like creature ever to walk the Earth, and Captain America, star-spangled Sentinel of Liberty. Mar-Vell instructed the teenager to don a pair of extraterrestrial bracelets -- and when Rick slammed the golden Nega-Bands together with all his might, his atoms traded places with those of the exiled Kree. The hero materialized on Earth, while Rick was surrounded by a protective aura that allowed him to survive in the Negative Zone. Captain Marvel wielded his cosmic powers in defense of the galaxy ... and Earth, his adopted homeworld. But after many an awesome adventure and countless victories, Mar-Vell's exposure to a carcinogenic nerve gas took its toll. Ultimately, he succumbed to the one enemy he proved unable to defeat: an incurable systemic cancer. Mar-Vell died not on the field of battle, but on a sickbed -- surrounded by an awesome assemblage of adventurers, gathered to pay tribute to the legacy of their fallen friend!

30 review for The Life and Death of Captain Marvel

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ray

    The original Jim Starlin Thanos story is still one of the best. Ostensibly this book is titled Captain Marvel, and he is the main protagonist, but we all know who the real star is: that iconic now cinematic villain of the ages. With the mad Titan's newfound fame, hopefully more people will read up on how it all started. Back from a time when all dialogue in comics ended in exclamation points, there is so much energy in this early Starlin! Both the art and writing are among the best of that early The original Jim Starlin Thanos story is still one of the best. Ostensibly this book is titled Captain Marvel, and he is the main protagonist, but we all know who the real star is: that iconic now cinematic villain of the ages. With the mad Titan's newfound fame, hopefully more people will read up on how it all started. Back from a time when all dialogue in comics ended in exclamation points, there is so much energy in this early Starlin! Both the art and writing are among the best of that early 70s Marvel fun. So, the Kree warrior gets cosmic fast, trips with Eon, and the Avengers are there too. Just before the Infinity Gems, back then Thanos used the Cosmic Cube. It's a very enjoyable read, especially if you choose to continue from the Warlock saga to the 90s Infinity Wars and even the current graphic novels. Mar-Vell, you are missed but not forgotten, and the world thanks you for the beginnings of a cosmic mythology still impacting pop culture today...

  2. 5 out of 5

    Stewart Tame

    Starlin's run on Captain Marvel is deservedly considered a classic. Many authors attempt cosmic storylines, the fate of the entire universe at stake, that sort of thing. Few manage to pull it off as well. It's tricky to get the tone right. Most writers--Roy Thomas' Kree/Skrull War, for instance--go bombastic. Everyone strains to their uttermost and sprinkles their speeches liberally with exclamation points. Starlin is, by comparison, almost restrained. It helps that he's the artist as well, so t Starlin's run on Captain Marvel is deservedly considered a classic. Many authors attempt cosmic storylines, the fate of the entire universe at stake, that sort of thing. Few manage to pull it off as well. It's tricky to get the tone right. Most writers--Roy Thomas' Kree/Skrull War, for instance--go bombastic. Everyone strains to their uttermost and sprinkles their speeches liberally with exclamation points. Starlin is, by comparison, almost restrained. It helps that he's the artist as well, so there's a better synthesis between words and visuals. The grandeur is already present in the art, so the writing can back off just a bit. (I don't mean to sound like I'm picking on Roy Thomas, by the way. The Kree/Skrull War story in Avengers is another classic tale. Between it and Captain Marvel, though, I think CM has aged better.) Captain Marvel battles Thanos, despite the latter's ascension to outright godhood. It just doesn't get any more cosmic than this. One scene made me chuckle. Drax, the Destroyer has barged into the Avengers' mansion. They start to fight, thinking it's an attack. Things are, of course, soon set right, but what made me laugh was a throwaway line of dialogue, one character (I've forgotten who, and the book's already back at the library) calls Drax a "fils d'un chien-mere." Surprised that made it past editorial ... This book also contains The Death of Captain Marvel, the very first Marvel Graphic Novel, back in the days when the industry was still figuring out just what the term "graphic novel" meant. I hadn't read it in a long, long time, and had forgotten how deeply affecting it can be. The title sums it up nicely. Captain Marvel dies. Of cancer. It's extremely well-written and moving. This book is a shining example of how to do a trade paperback well. These stories originally ranged across three or four separate titles, but now the entire thing is complete under one cover so you can just sit down and read it without juggling a dozen different comic books. Recommended!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Richard Guion

    A couple of weeks ago, Marvel had a fire sale on many of their Kindle / Comixology digital collections. I grabbed many of them (too many) and one of the first that I re-read was Captain Marvel by Jim Starlin: The Complete Collection. This retails now for $9.99, during the sale it was $4, but it's a great trip down memory lane regardless of the price. This could be called Thanos Volume 1, because it not only includes Captain Marvel #25-34 by Starlin and others, it also includes Iron Man 55 by Sta A couple of weeks ago, Marvel had a fire sale on many of their Kindle / Comixology digital collections. I grabbed many of them (too many) and one of the first that I re-read was Captain Marvel by Jim Starlin: The Complete Collection. This retails now for $9.99, during the sale it was $4, but it's a great trip down memory lane regardless of the price. This could be called Thanos Volume 1, because it not only includes Captain Marvel #25-34 by Starlin and others, it also includes Iron Man 55 by Starlin and Mike Friedrich (first appearances of Thanos and Drax the Destroyer), Marvel Feature 12 (The Thing and Iron Man vs the Blood Brothers, working for Thanos), Moondragon's origin from Daredevil 105. The collection ends with the first and probably the best Marvel Graphic Novel ever, The Death of Captain Marvel. Plus covers and material from various reprints over the years. Naturally reading the original comics is great, but let's face it, unless you've got them perfectly preserved they degrade over the years / decades. Reading these digital versions is a blast because the colors and details really pop. Take the cover to Captain Marvel 25 as an example - I doubt the copy I have in my longbox looks that good. I bought the original off a newsstand in 1973, knowing nothing about the character other than the Avengers held him in high regard. I did know a lot more about Rick Jones, having read about him in reprints where he was Captain America's sidekick. The collection doesn't start with Captain Marvel. It begins with Iron Man 55, where Drax and Thanos enter the Marvel Universe for the first time. Starlin's artwork is a bit rough in this story and the first few CM issues. He doesn't write the dialogue for these stories, but he's clearly the plotter and designer of all these new characters. Starlin introduces so many great new characters in these stories, I suspect in hindsight it's incredulous that he developed them for Marvel. His debut issue of CM involves Mar-Vell facing a horde of enemies, which is really a test conducted by Super-Skrull to report back to Thanos on the Kree warrior's abilities. Starlin's artwork is a bit rough in these first few issues. But he's improving with each one of them. I loved issue 26, where The Thing fights Captain Marvel. The fight is due to mistaken identity - Mar-Vell believes The Thing is really Super Skrull; The Thing can't explain the situation because his vocal cords have been silenced. Flimsier excuses have been used before! It's the beginning of a beautiful partnership between Starlin and The Thing. Jim Starlin really ratchets up to the next level with Captain Marvel 31. This is the issue where he writes the full story for the first time, and he has Al Milgrom inking him for the first time. The cover is iconic and was used on slurpee cups and other stuff. Mar-Vell transformed from a Kree warrior to a the Protector of the Universe by becoming "Cosmically Aware". This was a very 1970s concept, like if you meditated enough or became one with nature you could improve things more than with just sheer violence. But it seems Starlin had a plan for this character from the start. In the early stories, Mar-Vell is a very capable warrior but a bit reckless and prone to mistakes. A very strange, almost Ditko-esque being named Eon helps Mar-Vell walk through his past mistakes and to transform into something new. And into someone with blond hair instead of silver, because the latter made him look too old! See my full review, illustrated with images over on my blog: http://www.giantsizemarvel.com/2017/0...

  4. 5 out of 5

    Richard Gray

    The Road to Avengers: Infinity Wars begins! Having just finished a massive rewatch of the MCU, I thought I'd revisit (and in some cases just plain visit) some of the comics that inspired it. This collection brings together the first appearances of Thanos and Drax the Destroyer, as well as the point where Jim Starlin's revamped Captain Marvel into the cornerstone of his unfolding cosmic universe. What Starlin does here is both remove many of the complications of Mar-Vell's history while making him The Road to Avengers: Infinity Wars begins! Having just finished a massive rewatch of the MCU, I thought I'd revisit (and in some cases just plain visit) some of the comics that inspired it. This collection brings together the first appearances of Thanos and Drax the Destroyer, as well as the point where Jim Starlin's revamped Captain Marvel into the cornerstone of his unfolding cosmic universe. What Starlin does here is both remove many of the complications of Mar-Vell's history while making him far more focused on the cosmic. It's all here from the beginning: an enigmatic Thanos, a vengeance-filled Drax, and the personifcation of Death that would become a recurring motif throughout Starlin's work. Ironically, there's several references to an encroaching 'cancer' in the Captain Marvel issues that makes you wonder how long Starlin had been toying with the idea of the character's ultimate demise. Then there's Starlin's stunning artwork, which is comparable to the psychedelia of Steve Ditko or Frank Brunner's Doctor Strange work. Over the course of the next 30 years, Starlin's characters would be joined by a ragtag bunch of losers and heroes who faced the biggest threats in the galaxy. What is surprising is just how fully-formed some of these ideas are from the beginning, and are still recognisable in the modern comics and films. Fun aside: we also get some early appearances of future Ms/Captain Marvel Carol Danvers in some of these issues, and it's amazing how the characterisation has changed over the decades. The collection wraps up with The Death of Captain Marvel, which I will deal with in a separate review entry. It's a nice bookend for this series, but as Marvel first official 'graphic novel' it's so much more than that. Apart from being one of the finest Marvel cosmic books ever written, it's a clear indication of the type of stories Starlin had in his head. We'd see this kind of work on a more ambitious scale years later with Thanos: The Infinity Revelation and its sequels. So now it's onwards and upwards to Warlock: The Complete Collection before slamming down Infinity Gauntlet: Omnibus before the cinematic adaptation of this world.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Brian Rogers

    Follow me back to the days of yesteryear, when untested plotters could be given control to create totally Chiroptera-Guano crazy plot arcs that ran through multiple random titles, and are recognized later as being the pinnacle of a character. Mad, glorious fun, and you can watch Starlin's art get better every issue. The standout of the series is, no surprise, the reprinting of the Death of Captain Marvel graphic novel at the end of the book, which is such a heartfelt working through of Starlin's Follow me back to the days of yesteryear, when untested plotters could be given control to create totally Chiroptera-Guano crazy plot arcs that ran through multiple random titles, and are recognized later as being the pinnacle of a character. Mad, glorious fun, and you can watch Starlin's art get better every issue. The standout of the series is, no surprise, the reprinting of the Death of Captain Marvel graphic novel at the end of the book, which is such a heartfelt working through of Starlin's father's death and the best example of Starlin's unfiltered voice. It's a bold decision in the comics to allow a character to definitively end - one that Starlin has never shied away from - and it pays off.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Dogan

    It is a great comic collection owing to origin stories of the important characters such as Captain Marvel and Thanos, a cosmic saga as a work of high creativity, and Marvel's first graphic novel which is one of the most gloomy stories of Marvel. Jim Starlin knows how to create a cosmic story as both writer and artist, and apparently sad stories (e.g. A Death in the Family) too. When I read that he wrote the Death of Captain Marvel inspired by his father's death after this event, the story became It is a great comic collection owing to origin stories of the important characters such as Captain Marvel and Thanos, a cosmic saga as a work of high creativity, and Marvel's first graphic novel which is one of the most gloomy stories of Marvel. Jim Starlin knows how to create a cosmic story as both writer and artist, and apparently sad stories (e.g. A Death in the Family) too. When I read that he wrote the Death of Captain Marvel inspired by his father's death after this event, the story became more meaningful to me. I'm going to read Jim Starlin's other works immediately. Next station is Warlock: The Complete Collection.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Graham

    The writing over the main storyline is clunky and repetitive, with pompous and/or cringeworthy dialogue, whilst the artwork ain’t all that either. But, that said, the comics featured still retain a certain charm in colour and style of my favourite era (after the 1960’s). Plus, it gives a great insight and background into the force that was/is Thanos. But, for my money, the best thing about this collection is the genuinely affecting standalone ‘The Death of Captain Marvel’. Sensitively handled wi The writing over the main storyline is clunky and repetitive, with pompous and/or cringeworthy dialogue, whilst the artwork ain’t all that either. But, that said, the comics featured still retain a certain charm in colour and style of my favourite era (after the 1960’s). Plus, it gives a great insight and background into the force that was/is Thanos. But, for my money, the best thing about this collection is the genuinely affecting standalone ‘The Death of Captain Marvel’. Sensitively handled with real emotion; this is an outstanding piece of storytelling which sadly, neatly but effectively brings the whole thing to an end.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Hannah Givens

    I actually really enjoyed this book. It's everything you expect from the 70s -- maudlin dialogue, excessive narration, and surface-level characterization at best. Yet, it's a lot of fun, if you can embrace that over-the-top declarative style. (Which, being a comics nerd, I can). I don't think you need any background for this, maybe just a general familiarity with Marvel superheroes. You'll probably want to go on to Carol Danvers' Ms. Marvel, and/or the Annihilation series, both of which I highly I actually really enjoyed this book. It's everything you expect from the 70s -- maudlin dialogue, excessive narration, and surface-level characterization at best. Yet, it's a lot of fun, if you can embrace that over-the-top declarative style. (Which, being a comics nerd, I can). I don't think you need any background for this, maybe just a general familiarity with Marvel superheroes. You'll probably want to go on to Carol Danvers' Ms. Marvel, and/or the Annihilation series, both of which I highly recommend. There's some fun meta-humor, with Thanos referencing his own gloating, saying Drax is easy to beat because he literally announces every move before he makes it, etc. The idea that anyone can LOSE while possessing the cosmic cube is shaky -- mostly it makes sense that Thanos takes a while to learn its use and/or wants to keep people around to boast at, but they also fall back on the "Why is he creating weird earth monsters to kill us instead of winking us out of existence? Because he's insane!" explanation. I mean, I know he's the Mad Titan, but really. He comes off more like the Stupid Titan. Hopefully the movie version will be smarter, incorporate Thanos' love for death, and possibly have those glimmers of self-awareness. (I really liked that angle!) The collection's construction is weird. It's one long Thanos story, then at the end there's a story from seven years later about Captain Marvel's death from cancer. It just didn't make much sense to skip over the intervening Thanos battles and whatnot -- maybe it should've been several volumes. The death story really is touching, though... the long death of a hero beloved across the galaxy. Lastly, the female representation in this book is laughable. I know it's an old book, I'm not particularly angry about it, but it was so awful I started keeping track. In the first half, there are three women: Scarlet Witch, who barely speaks, she's just drawn in Avengers backgrounds; Lou Ann, Rick Jones' perma-damsel sexpot "female friend"; and Una, Mar-Vell's fridged ex-lover. Lou-Ann is the only one who even talks, and that's not a huge improvement! The second half is better. Moondragon appears -- mostly standing around being corrected, getting injured, and having a gendered power, but she's there and gets some narrative hyperbole like everybody else! There's a brief (but useful) appearance from the Avenger Mantis, a snappy woman of color who sings with Rick, the brilliant Carol Danvers pre-Ms. Marvel, and a sexy (but alive) girlfriend named Elysius for the older Mar-Vell. So... even with Moondragon and Carol Danvers being slightly important, it's still a miserable showing. Just gotta remind myself how awesome Carol will be! (And yeah, as long as you can laugh about the women, it's a fun book).

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jean-Pierre Vidrine

    This book has a lot of ingredients that should make for a comic I would absolutely love. High flying cosmic adventure, colorful psychedelic imagery, nigh godlike entities from mind-bending other dimensions, and a cast of beloved superheroes should all mix into a 5-star read for me. The problem here is the title character. I just can't find him that interesting. He comes off as a pale shade of so many other noble hero archetypes. Even after his supposed metamorphosis, the only change I can detect This book has a lot of ingredients that should make for a comic I would absolutely love. High flying cosmic adventure, colorful psychedelic imagery, nigh godlike entities from mind-bending other dimensions, and a cast of beloved superheroes should all mix into a 5-star read for me. The problem here is the title character. I just can't find him that interesting. He comes off as a pale shade of so many other noble hero archetypes. Even after his supposed metamorphosis, the only change I can detect besides his hair color is a slight rewording of his overwrought speeches. The narration also suffers a bit from often superfluous wordy captions. I think the hero just needs a bit more grounding to be interesting. The Shazam homage connecting him to Rick Jones has potential to do just that, but it doesn't quite pull it off. To understand the ultimate defeat of the villain, it took me a couple of rereads of the moment and some serious thought. I'm still not sure I get what exactly happens right then. This is where one of those wordy captions would have been welcome. All that being said, I don't dislike the book greatly. And it is an important read for Marvel continuity and concepts.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Fraser Sherman

    Kree warrior Captain Mar-Vell was whipped up in a hurry (DC was about to revive the Golden Age Captain Marvel and Marvel Comics wanted to trademark the name) and it showed. It was an uninspired series until Jim Starlin took it over and launched a plotline involving the Death-loving god Thanos, the Cosmic Cube (as Thanos notes, this is the first time it was used to its full potential), mind control, alien armadas ... and in the middle of it, "Marv" acquires cosmic awareness and becomes more thoug Kree warrior Captain Mar-Vell was whipped up in a hurry (DC was about to revive the Golden Age Captain Marvel and Marvel Comics wanted to trademark the name) and it showed. It was an uninspired series until Jim Starlin took it over and launched a plotline involving the Death-loving god Thanos, the Cosmic Cube (as Thanos notes, this is the first time it was used to its full potential), mind control, alien armadas ... and in the middle of it, "Marv" acquires cosmic awareness and becomes more thoughtful about punching people. I prefer Starlin's Warlock run from this era, but this is the second best thing he ever did. And then he returned to the character in "The Death of Captain Marvel," included here. Inspired by the death of his own father, Starlin has Mar-Vell expire from cancer. No miracle cure, no magical solutions, just facing death and dealing with it (as must his friends). It's gut wrenching. And even after 30-plus years, nobody's tried to undo it and resurrect him.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    One of the great things about going to Comic Book Conventions (boy, do I miss them~!) is the chance to meet a Creator that you really like and have a chance to talk with them... to interact with them... I once had a chance to meet Jim Starlin, it was a busy convention and he was busy, but he did sign my books and I told him how much I enjoyed his stories. I then mentioned that I bought his current book (BREED) and how I liked the art... That's when he stopped and looked up at me and said: "thanks One of the great things about going to Comic Book Conventions (boy, do I miss them~!) is the chance to meet a Creator that you really like and have a chance to talk with them... to interact with them... I once had a chance to meet Jim Starlin, it was a busy convention and he was busy, but he did sign my books and I told him how much I enjoyed his stories. I then mentioned that I bought his current book (BREED) and how I liked the art... That's when he stopped and looked up at me and said: "thanks for that. So many fans bring me copies of my work from 30 years ago. I'm proud of all my work, but I've grown so much since then... some of those poses are painful to look at" This Story is a great story~! And, yeah, if I look at it carefully, I can see where the poses or anatomy is a little bit off....but none of that takes away from the sheer joy and pleasure of reading this book. Check it out~!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Malum

    I came to this volume knowing nothing about Captain Marvel. I just wanted to see some early Thanos material (and I wasnt disappointed!). Even though I wasn't invested in Captain Marvel in any way, I still had a lot of fun with these issues and even felt the emotional weight of the "Death of Captain Marvel" story. As an added bonus, the art was fantastic. The only thing that was cringy was Rick Jones jive talking left and right (everything is groovy, you dig?). Overall, though, i found it more fun I came to this volume knowing nothing about Captain Marvel. I just wanted to see some early Thanos material (and I wasnt disappointed!). Even though I wasn't invested in Captain Marvel in any way, I still had a lot of fun with these issues and even felt the emotional weight of the "Death of Captain Marvel" story. As an added bonus, the art was fantastic. The only thing that was cringy was Rick Jones jive talking left and right (everything is groovy, you dig?). Overall, though, i found it more funny than annoying. As an aside: To me, Jim Starlin shares a place among names like Stan Lee and Jack Kirby. Without Starlin, there would be no Thanos and no Infinity Gauntlet (thus no Infinity War movie that will likely make a trillion dollars), no Drax or Gamora (thus no rebooted Guardians of the Galaxy), no Mongul over at Dc, and the list goes on and on.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ed

    I've read this before, but I liked it even more on my second read. The first few issues are a bit slow, but once it hits it's peak it is as good as superhero comics get. Starlin is singularly able to combine utterly insane art and ideas with punchy, exciting storytelling. It's just beautiful. Near the end Steve Engleheart comes in to help with scripting and I don't like it quite as much. It's still good, though. My only real beef is that the ending is pretty rushed and Thanos is defeated by Capt I've read this before, but I liked it even more on my second read. The first few issues are a bit slow, but once it hits it's peak it is as good as superhero comics get. Starlin is singularly able to combine utterly insane art and ideas with punchy, exciting storytelling. It's just beautiful. Near the end Steve Engleheart comes in to help with scripting and I don't like it quite as much. It's still good, though. My only real beef is that the ending is pretty rushed and Thanos is defeated by Captain Marvel karate chopping the Cosmic Cube. I mean, that's kind of awesome, but it's also totally dumb. This also has the Death of Captain Marvel which is an all time classic superhero comic. It's beautifully done (probably the best art Starlin ever did) and intensely moving.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Adam

    Starlin's art remains phenomenal but for the most part, this simply reminded me why I could never get into Capt. Marvel as a kid. Mar-Vell himself is one of the most humorless and drab characters in the Marvel Universe, even after he becomes "cosmically aware". Ironically, he only really comes to life in the surprisingly moving graphic novel, The Death Of Captain Marvel. That alone makes this collection worth checking out. Starlin's art remains phenomenal but for the most part, this simply reminded me why I could never get into Capt. Marvel as a kid. Mar-Vell himself is one of the most humorless and drab characters in the Marvel Universe, even after he becomes "cosmically aware". Ironically, he only really comes to life in the surprisingly moving graphic novel, The Death Of Captain Marvel. That alone makes this collection worth checking out.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Adam Osth

    Jim Starlin is like a one man cover band of the Marvel classics. Draws just like Jack Kirby and has some big crazy psychedelic moments just like Steve Ditko. The main story is a bit goofy, and Captain Marvel was a rather dull character, but the big moments in it, like Mar-Vell being granted cosmic awareness and the hallucinations he experiences while dying, hit pretty hard.

  16. 4 out of 5

    B

    More interesting for historic reasons than anything else. It's weird. Because Mar-Vell never REALLY, REALLY, REALLY came back from the dead, his death is actually less meaningful. There's not much reason for a modern reader to care about Mar-Vell or Rick Jones at all. There are a couple of great scenes in here, but I don't know if it really holds up. More interesting for historic reasons than anything else. It's weird. Because Mar-Vell never REALLY, REALLY, REALLY came back from the dead, his death is actually less meaningful. There's not much reason for a modern reader to care about Mar-Vell or Rick Jones at all. There are a couple of great scenes in here, but I don't know if it really holds up.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    One of the greatest books of all time, it kickstarted a trend of elseworld stories like the dark knight returns old man logan the death of Wolverine the death of Superman except this one is in canon and follows the main character dying to something so human as cancer, not some supervillain and breaks down the true purpose of a superhero and the meaning of life itself.

  18. 5 out of 5

    David

    Some of the greatest, time-tested comics ever printed. I've read these a million times and I can read them a million more. Love these guys. Some of the greatest, time-tested comics ever printed. I've read these a million times and I can read them a million more. Love these guys.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jamie Connolly

    This is what comics are all about. When it comes to this medium, this collection is the basis to compare every classic. 5 stars.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Melih Manisalıgil

    Tells "Thanos War" which is the one of the most important events in Marvel Universe, must read though... Tells "Thanos War" which is the one of the most important events in Marvel Universe, must read though...

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ekenedilichukwu Ikegwuani

    Some interesting stories along the way, but over all Starlin's run is magnificent. And "The Death of Captain Marvel" is truly touching and emotional. Some interesting stories along the way, but over all Starlin's run is magnificent. And "The Death of Captain Marvel" is truly touching and emotional.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Rodney

    The only Captain Marvel that matters.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jim Fulner

    Captain Marvel, this book only reminded me, "The only reason you exist is due to archaic copyright law to ensure that D.C. Comics can't call Shazam 'Captain Marvel' " Captain Marvel, this book only reminded me, "The only reason you exist is due to archaic copyright law to ensure that D.C. Comics can't call Shazam 'Captain Marvel' "

  24. 4 out of 5

    Mhorg

    simply the best run on Captain marvel ever. and it includes the great graphic novel, the death of Captain marvel.

  25. 4 out of 5

    João

    Mentor, son of Kronos, decided to continue his father's peaceful legacy and build his version of Mt. Olympus in Titan. A long tradition of familial struggle weighs hard on him and his own son Thanos ruins everything by falling in love with Death herself. Thanos, for course, has a brother, Eros. Jim Starlin is carving a name for himself, doing the same thing (and by this I do not mean copying, just going along the same path) as Jack Kirby, dusting off the old western mythological points of refere Mentor, son of Kronos, decided to continue his father's peaceful legacy and build his version of Mt. Olympus in Titan. A long tradition of familial struggle weighs hard on him and his own son Thanos ruins everything by falling in love with Death herself. Thanos, for course, has a brother, Eros. Jim Starlin is carving a name for himself, doing the same thing (and by this I do not mean copying, just going along the same path) as Jack Kirby, dusting off the old western mythological points of reference, finding ways to build characters out of metaphors, pairing them with future technology and massive powers so they do look advanced and scary. Eros and Thanatos are also two main passional drives in freudian psychology, and within this dialectic Starlin has to carry a character, itself made of doubles (Captain Marvel, switching places with Rick Jones, just like Billy Batson and his superstrong counterpart), whose ego is expanded and cosmically aware. Next to a godly incompleteness, Starlin posits a spiritual unity that seems eastern in origin, if not farcical in its introduction (a magical girl moment, 8 billion years in the making). You see, Captain Marvel is just a pawn. He realizes this himself during the story, when his mean Kree warrior ways are analysed, and he realizes he's been doing everything wrong. To say that this is influenced by its age is maybe an understatement; not only is there an explicit critique of war, when Vietnam was just wrapping up, but also a no-easy-way-out solitude, which seems like a post-60s afterthought. This would still be a rigid and instrumental approach to Starlin, who needs to be commended for his attention to scale, continuously alluding to different realities and pathways to victory, which do not envolve being smarter anymore (pick any Batman comic) but rather being aware, a word that remains vague up until the very end of this paperback. I remember later on reading the lush Death of Captain Marvel, and it seems the latest Marvel collection includes both "the life" and "the death". They're two very different animals, with the latter confirming Starlin as the lunar side of Jack Kirby, and still you can anticipate the cold early on, with the ever-present stark yellows, contaminating the first 50-100 pages, assuming dubious meanings. Marvel did not get the hint, adding a computer-colored cover that doesn't have any pull or artistic verve. This is the exact color Captain Marvel's hair is turned into, once he becomes aware. It is then a sight of renewal, but also a contrast, something shining in the dark, swimming against the darker and rather obvious blues and reds, assuming both their qualities at times. Whether this is intentional or not is irrelevant; the hair color is probably stated in the script, but its meaning within the 4 color production system is not to be missed.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Petergiaquinta

    Pure genius from Jim Starlin, the master of the cosmic comic... Does it get any better than this, True Believer? Well, maybe it does a couple years later when Starlin teams up Adam Warlock with Thanos, Gamora, and Pip the Troll to defeat the Magus and the Universal Church of Truth but, skipping all that, this is pretty goshdarn excellent and shows the early Starlin laying the cosmic foundations for some of the themes and characters that get more developed in his later work on Strange Tales, the re Pure genius from Jim Starlin, the master of the cosmic comic... Does it get any better than this, True Believer? Well, maybe it does a couple years later when Starlin teams up Adam Warlock with Thanos, Gamora, and Pip the Troll to defeat the Magus and the Universal Church of Truth but, skipping all that, this is pretty goshdarn excellent and shows the early Starlin laying the cosmic foundations for some of the themes and characters that get more developed in his later work on Strange Tales, the rebooted Warlock title, and the much later Infinity Gauntlet and the other storylines it inspired. Here, although hardly "complete," much of the Mar-vell early lore has been collected, culminating in his exposure to Compound 13 during his fight with Nitro in Captain Marvel #34 and concluding with the brilliant graphic novel The Death of Captain Marvel almost a decade later. I owned Captain Marvel #34, buying it off a kid I went to church with back in the '70s, along with some early Iron Fist. It was one of my favorites and was well thumbed even before I got it. Rereading it here 40 years later, I'm reminded of how much I liked that comic and how much of its art has stuck with me over the decades: the close-up on Mordecai Boggs' face, Rick in the distance through the window leaving Lou Ann, Dandy recoiling from Nitro, and Nitro recombining in the smoke...Starlin's work on Captain Marvel from the '70s is for the ages, if you can look past what a putz Rick Jones can be sometimes. One thing I hadn't recalled about Captain Marvel 34 was its cameo by Carol Danvers, whom the rest of the world will soon enough know as Captain Marvel when the next blockbuster Avengers movie comes out. It's too bad the Marvel Cinematic Universe couldn't have found some way to introduce the real Captain Marvel into its Guardians of the Galaxy franchise. That would have been beautiful, and Mar-vell would have fit in nicely with the Guardians' cast of cosmic characters, but ah well...

  27. 5 out of 5

    Andy Dainty

    I read this book as an introduction to Thanos, (due to his appearance in Guardians of the Galaxy and future role as the Big Bad in Avengers 3) and in this respect it does provide. The big problem is that whether Captain Marvel is a warrior or a buddist he remained a boring superhero whose every speech bubble was filled with bland cliches. However also included in this collection is Marvel's first graphic novel, in which Captain Marvel dies of cancer. The introduction to the book explains that the I read this book as an introduction to Thanos, (due to his appearance in Guardians of the Galaxy and future role as the Big Bad in Avengers 3) and in this respect it does provide. The big problem is that whether Captain Marvel is a warrior or a buddist he remained a boring superhero whose every speech bubble was filled with bland cliches. However also included in this collection is Marvel's first graphic novel, in which Captain Marvel dies of cancer. The introduction to the book explains that the author was using this as a means of dealing with his own grief, it is therefore unsurprising that the best scenes are those by his bedside with friends (I found Spiderman's response really got to me) as opposed to the sections where his superhero friends try to fight cancer with fantasy-tech. As far as I am aware this is a one-of-a-kind for super-hero stories; therefore, although I'm sure there will be much better books out there dealing with the same issues, this would be a good starting point for any comic fans (or others who just don't have the reading bug) who are having to face cancer.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jerry Durrwachter

    Jim Starlin is my favorite superhero artist His artwork is the perfect synthesis of Jack Kirby, Steve Ditko, and Gil Kane. He is also among the medium's greatest writers and his work on Marvel's CAPTAIN MARVEL is my favorite, followed closely by his work on WARLOCK. Starlin's THANOS is one of comics' greatest villains, rivaling Kirby's DARKSEID, who surely inspired his creation. Starlin also created THE DESTROYER within this series and I drastically prefer his version of the character to the one Jim Starlin is my favorite superhero artist His artwork is the perfect synthesis of Jack Kirby, Steve Ditko, and Gil Kane. He is also among the medium's greatest writers and his work on Marvel's CAPTAIN MARVEL is my favorite, followed closely by his work on WARLOCK. Starlin's THANOS is one of comics' greatest villains, rivaling Kirby's DARKSEID, who surely inspired his creation. Starlin also created THE DESTROYER within this series and I drastically prefer his version of the character to the one on display in the GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY films.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    A really good read especially for fans of cosmic powered super-heroes of the 1970s. I really liked some of the big ideas Jim Starlin plays with. There was a lot about accepting things that are bigger than yourself and the importance of being self reflective and acknowledging your mistakes mixed in with the admittedly corny melodrama. It shows the limitations of the comics of its time but still a lot of fun.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ben

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. For the most part, my review of this is pretty similar to my review of Warlock Volume 2. It is interesting that both end with the death of the main character. However, Captain Marvel's death is extremely unusual among superheroes, not only because he has never been resurrected, but also because he dies from cancer, and not at the hands of a supervillain. For the most part, my review of this is pretty similar to my review of Warlock Volume 2. It is interesting that both end with the death of the main character. However, Captain Marvel's death is extremely unusual among superheroes, not only because he has never been resurrected, but also because he dies from cancer, and not at the hands of a supervillain.

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