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Digital Revolutions: Activism in the Internet Age

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From Occupy to Uncut, from the Arab Spring to the Slutwalk movement, few questions about recent activism raise as much controversy as the role of the internet. This book suggests that the internet is a tool, not a cause, of social change. It has profoundly affected the way people communicate, making it easier to find the truth, to learn from activists on the other side of From Occupy to Uncut, from the Arab Spring to the Slutwalk movement, few questions about recent activism raise as much controversy as the role of the internet. This book suggests that the internet is a tool, not a cause, of social change. It has profoundly affected the way people communicate, making it easier to find the truth, to learn from activists on the other side of the world, to co-ordinate campaigns without hierarchy and to expose governments and corporations to public ridicule. But it has also helped those same governments and corporations to spy on activists, to disrupt campaigns and to create illusions of popular support. Focused on the real-life experiences of activists rather than theory or abstract statistics, Digital Revolutions asks how the internet has affected activism, how it has allowed movements to go global more quickly and what the future holds for corporations and social movements that are doing battle online. Symon Hill has campaigned on the arms trade, religious liberty, same-sex marriage, disability rights, and economic injustice. He has worked with the Campaign Against Arms Trade and the Fellowship of Reconciliation, and was a founding member of Christianity Uncut. He has trained hundreds of activists in campaigning skills and media engagement. In February 2012 he was dragged by police from the steps of St. Paul's Cathedral during the eviction of Occupy London Stock Exchange. He is associate director of the Ekklesia think tank and associate tutor at the Woodbrooke Quaker Study Centre. He writes for The Guardian, Morningstar, The Friend, and Third Way. His first book was The No-Nonsense Guide to Religion.


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From Occupy to Uncut, from the Arab Spring to the Slutwalk movement, few questions about recent activism raise as much controversy as the role of the internet. This book suggests that the internet is a tool, not a cause, of social change. It has profoundly affected the way people communicate, making it easier to find the truth, to learn from activists on the other side of From Occupy to Uncut, from the Arab Spring to the Slutwalk movement, few questions about recent activism raise as much controversy as the role of the internet. This book suggests that the internet is a tool, not a cause, of social change. It has profoundly affected the way people communicate, making it easier to find the truth, to learn from activists on the other side of the world, to co-ordinate campaigns without hierarchy and to expose governments and corporations to public ridicule. But it has also helped those same governments and corporations to spy on activists, to disrupt campaigns and to create illusions of popular support. Focused on the real-life experiences of activists rather than theory or abstract statistics, Digital Revolutions asks how the internet has affected activism, how it has allowed movements to go global more quickly and what the future holds for corporations and social movements that are doing battle online. Symon Hill has campaigned on the arms trade, religious liberty, same-sex marriage, disability rights, and economic injustice. He has worked with the Campaign Against Arms Trade and the Fellowship of Reconciliation, and was a founding member of Christianity Uncut. He has trained hundreds of activists in campaigning skills and media engagement. In February 2012 he was dragged by police from the steps of St. Paul's Cathedral during the eviction of Occupy London Stock Exchange. He is associate director of the Ekklesia think tank and associate tutor at the Woodbrooke Quaker Study Centre. He writes for The Guardian, Morningstar, The Friend, and Third Way. His first book was The No-Nonsense Guide to Religion.

45 review for Digital Revolutions: Activism in the Internet Age

  1. 5 out of 5

    Matty-Swytla

    Just the book I needed for my thesis on globals civil society. :D It gives a very nice explanation of the events that shaped the last few years; the Arab Spring, the European Summer and all the campaigning, demonstrations and other revolutions we see happen around the world. It does a good job explaining the ways internet, social media and mobile phones changed the way people get together for a cause, and where the pitfalls lie as well. It is a balanced view on the strenght of internet as a tool Just the book I needed for my thesis on globals civil society. :D It gives a very nice explanation of the events that shaped the last few years; the Arab Spring, the European Summer and all the campaigning, demonstrations and other revolutions we see happen around the world. It does a good job explaining the ways internet, social media and mobile phones changed the way people get together for a cause, and where the pitfalls lie as well. It is a balanced view on the strenght of internet as a tool of social change. it can help create interest and spread information but ultimately people need to take to the streets, lobby in parliament etc. But be warned - clicking a few like buttons is not enough because you can never know how long before the government or a company blocks a site. Not to mention how they can use the same methods to undermine the message - PR companies and fake profiles, anyone? Recommended for everyone!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ruth Stokes

    A really interesting, informative and thought-provoking read.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Simon Sweetman

    A comprehensive summary of whinging and entitlement as the Fortune Cookie sentiment of this day and age

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    Khouloud Khammassi

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    Samm Nordstedt

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    ♥Scout Paige♥

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