website statistics Immortal Diamond: The Search for Our True Self - PDF Books Online
Hot Best Seller

Immortal Diamond: The Search for Our True Self

Availability: Ready to download

Dissolve the distractions of ego to find our authentic selves in God In his bestselling book Falling Upward, Richard Rohr talked about ego (or the False Self) and how it gets in the way of spiritual maturity. But if there's a False Self, is there also a True Self? What is it? How is it found? Why does it matter? And what does it have to do with the spiritual journey? This Dissolve the distractions of ego to find our authentic selves in God In his bestselling book Falling Upward, Richard Rohr talked about ego (or the False Self) and how it gets in the way of spiritual maturity. But if there's a False Self, is there also a True Self? What is it? How is it found? Why does it matter? And what does it have to do with the spiritual journey? This book likens True Self to a diamond, buried deep within us, formed under the intense pressure of our lives, that must be searched for, uncovered, separated from all the debris of ego that surrounds it. In a sense True Self must, like Jesus, be resurrected, and that process is not resuscitation but transformation. Shows how to navigate spiritually difficult terrain with clear vision and tools to uncover our True Selves Written by Father Richard Rohr, the bestselling author of Falling Upward Examines the fundamental issues of who we are and helps us on our path of spiritual maturity Immortal Diamond (whose title is taken from a line in a Gerard Manley Hopkins poem) explores the deepest questions of identity, spirituality, and meaning in Richard Rohr's inimitable style.


Compare

Dissolve the distractions of ego to find our authentic selves in God In his bestselling book Falling Upward, Richard Rohr talked about ego (or the False Self) and how it gets in the way of spiritual maturity. But if there's a False Self, is there also a True Self? What is it? How is it found? Why does it matter? And what does it have to do with the spiritual journey? This Dissolve the distractions of ego to find our authentic selves in God In his bestselling book Falling Upward, Richard Rohr talked about ego (or the False Self) and how it gets in the way of spiritual maturity. But if there's a False Self, is there also a True Self? What is it? How is it found? Why does it matter? And what does it have to do with the spiritual journey? This book likens True Self to a diamond, buried deep within us, formed under the intense pressure of our lives, that must be searched for, uncovered, separated from all the debris of ego that surrounds it. In a sense True Self must, like Jesus, be resurrected, and that process is not resuscitation but transformation. Shows how to navigate spiritually difficult terrain with clear vision and tools to uncover our True Selves Written by Father Richard Rohr, the bestselling author of Falling Upward Examines the fundamental issues of who we are and helps us on our path of spiritual maturity Immortal Diamond (whose title is taken from a line in a Gerard Manley Hopkins poem) explores the deepest questions of identity, spirituality, and meaning in Richard Rohr's inimitable style.

30 review for Immortal Diamond: The Search for Our True Self

  1. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Andrew

    I can’t remember the last time I finished a book, thought to myself, “I will never be the same again,” and began rereading to figure out why. Richard Rohr’s Immortal Diamond did this to me. What changed? Rohr reframed the story of Jesus—the Christian story—as an invitation for human transformation. Writing this makes it sound obvious, but the real implications are huge, for Christians and everyone who has to live in our pseudo-Christian culture. To Rohr, birth, death, and resurrection aren’t just I can’t remember the last time I finished a book, thought to myself, “I will never be the same again,” and began rereading to figure out why. Richard Rohr’s Immortal Diamond did this to me. What changed? Rohr reframed the story of Jesus—the Christian story—as an invitation for human transformation. Writing this makes it sound obvious, but the real implications are huge, for Christians and everyone who has to live in our pseudo-Christian culture. To Rohr, birth, death, and resurrection aren’t just events that happened to Jesus. They’re a path humans travel. Christians tend to believe this literally: We’re born (as bits of incarnated Spirit), we live, we die, we go to heaven. What Rohr did for me was frame this path figuratively, as a spiritual journey bringing us ever nearer to our best and truest selves—if we participate with intention. We can die to that which stands in the way of life. We can let go of what’s false and experience the “revelation of our True Selves”—Rohr’s interpretation of resurrection. The False Self—who we are on the surface—sees in parts, hierarchies, and only in reference to itself. The True Self—who we are at our core—sees in wholeness and communion; it shows itself when we’re deeply silent or in love. None of this has anything to do with what we believe or don’t believe. It’s the way the world works. Our job is to die to falsehood and be born in truth. The great gift of Christianity’s teaching is divine incarnation, the union of holiness and matter. Jesus is divine and human—sure; Christians say this all the time—but to Rohr the risen Christ is emblematic of, or rather is, our True Self, our essential nature, what’s possible for you and me when we’re fully conscious. In the paradoxical way of our world works, this union is what we long for and it already exists. We know endless life when we know love. We shamelessly, beautifully, want more and more love. This longing for love is divinity in us, aching to come alive. I won’t ever see the faith of my upbringing the same. And I’m deeply grateful. --Elizabeth Jarrett Andrew

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lee Harmon

    Ready to experience the mystical side of Christianity with a Franciscan friar? Here’s a journey that Father Richard Rohr promises will secure a happier existence. It’s the quest for your True Self … the resurrected self, the “immortal diamond” deep within you, which he says is neither God nor human, but both at the same time. It took me a little longer than usual to get into the book, which keeps it below a five-star review, but it was worth the persistence. My problem was that Rohr writes with a Ready to experience the mystical side of Christianity with a Franciscan friar? Here’s a journey that Father Richard Rohr promises will secure a happier existence. It’s the quest for your True Self … the resurrected self, the “immortal diamond” deep within you, which he says is neither God nor human, but both at the same time. It took me a little longer than usual to get into the book, which keeps it below a five-star review, but it was worth the persistence. My problem was that Rohr writes with a sort of matter-of-fact authority that left me wondering if I missed the proof text somewhere along the way. Perhaps I did; Rohr has published around two dozen books since his first in 1976, and this is the first I’ve read. Rohr’s target is those who sense God is closer than they’ve been told. If you find yourself “in recovery from religion,” you’re in Rohr’s crosshairs. He wants to introduce you to a deeper meaning to life, deeper even than the surface Christian tradition that has been your paradigm to date. While Rohr’s heritage is clearly Judeo-Christian, and many of his quotes come from the Bible, he aims at uncovering the perennial truths that all religions share. Resurrection is key, both of our Lord and of ourselves. Resurrection is necessary for new life, life in unity with God. As “children of the resurrection” (Luke 20:36), our relationship with God changes … we “breath God in and out—much more than we ‘know’ God, understand God, or even talk to God.” There is an intimacy with God at this level that we never reach within our selfish, base existence, the “False Self.” A deep read, if you’re ready to take the leap.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Shelie

    I confess to being a Richard Rohr fan. I enjoyed Falling Upward but found this book to be much deeper. He speaks from a Christian perspective but only in that he references scripture to back up his points. His concepts are far broader in scope and if you have more Buddhist leanings you will see that he is only trying to show that Christianity is saying the same thing, if you know where to look. He is also very frank about where Christianity has gone wrong in their teachings and he tries to recla I confess to being a Richard Rohr fan. I enjoyed Falling Upward but found this book to be much deeper. He speaks from a Christian perspective but only in that he references scripture to back up his points. His concepts are far broader in scope and if you have more Buddhist leanings you will see that he is only trying to show that Christianity is saying the same thing, if you know where to look. He is also very frank about where Christianity has gone wrong in their teachings and he tries to reclaim its original good purpose. I highly recommend it.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Theodore

    For most people, the book is going to fall on one of two ends of the spectrum for people.... Either you are going to find the book truly uplifting, life changing and/or affirming or you are going to be unable to appreciate the book in any way, shape or form. A small subsection of people are probably going to be like me.... on the fence on this book. Firstly know that this book is first and foremost completely and utterly of a SPIRITUAL/RELIGIOUS nature. I did not know this when I originally got t For most people, the book is going to fall on one of two ends of the spectrum for people.... Either you are going to find the book truly uplifting, life changing and/or affirming or you are going to be unable to appreciate the book in any way, shape or form. A small subsection of people are probably going to be like me.... on the fence on this book. Firstly know that this book is first and foremost completely and utterly of a SPIRITUAL/RELIGIOUS nature. I did not know this when I originally got the title and I can assure you probably wouldn't have gotten it if I had known. I seldom, if ever, venture into this particular type of books for a number of reasons. If you are into these types of books and specifically you are a Christian, this book will be absolutely perfect. The author, Richard Rohr, was able to draw on biblical verses as well own life experiences to bring across his point regarding finding one's 'True Self'. He goes into defining what he means by this and also what he means of 'False Self', as well. The entire book speaks highly of 'transformation' and speaks a lot of the 'soul', 'love' and 'God'. The book has a number of ‘gems’; moments that made me really sit back and think. That being said there is a lot of 'God talk' which might just be where the book will lose a lot of people. And the God talk does increase as you proceed into the book, especially when you get to the Appendixes at the end of the book (you have at least 5 or 6 Appendix I believe). For those who are atheist, anti-Christianity or anti-religion in any way they will find this book completely annoying, uninspiring and the very narrator will seem irksome to them. Veer far from this title if you are in any of the previously mentioned categories, simply save your credit and your time. The book was pretty short and to me flew by quickly (I literally spent just one day to listen the entire thing). I found some useful things in the book, some interesting sections that had me think a bit more. There were also sections that I found completely irrelevant and essentially common sense. This is simply one of those hit or miss books. It's very pigeonholed if you ask me. It was mostly miss for me, but the hits were good enough for me to not be too vicious while reviewing.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Hoyt

    Rohr wants to do something he says can't be done in his previous book, Falling Upward. In the previous book, it was highly doubtful that anyone in the first half of life could appreciate the second half. In the current title, his purpose is precisely to push his readers into that realization. In Falling Upward, Rohr used too many parenthetical asides which simply interrupted the flow of the book. In Diamond, he has largely managed to avoid those distractions, and the reading is more fluid for it. Rohr wants to do something he says can't be done in his previous book, Falling Upward. In the previous book, it was highly doubtful that anyone in the first half of life could appreciate the second half. In the current title, his purpose is precisely to push his readers into that realization. In Falling Upward, Rohr used too many parenthetical asides which simply interrupted the flow of the book. In Diamond, he has largely managed to avoid those distractions, and the reading is more fluid for it. However, the book doesn't seem to have gone through a good edit. For instance, on page 112, we find this: "...into a recent "desert of nonparticipation," as Barfield calls it." Then, on page 115 we read this: "...they also ushered in the "Desert of Nonparticipation," as Barfield called it..." Not only do we have differences in capitalization, but in three pages we have almost a verbatim repetition of what is essentially an introductory statement. OK, not a show stopper but indicative of the seeming lack of final editing these last two books seem to have suffered. Rohr is enthusiastic, almost effusive of the love of God. Surely, this is a good thing but in Rohr's case it results in a book that might fit in Brueggemann's psalms of Orientation or distant Re-orientation. For instance, we find this on page 157: "..any notion of God not giving, not outpouring, not surrendering itself, not totally loving is a theological impossibility and absurdity. God only and always loves. You cannot reverse, slow down, or limit an overflowing waterwheel of divine compassion and mercy." It seems to me that a not-quite convinced reader might find that statement and others like it to not match well with stories of the same God in the Hebrew Scriptures that in fact do posit a God that doesn't seem overly loving if you happen to be an Edomite. There are other seemingly naive passages, and we will look at one more. On page 131, Rohr resorts to the standard Catholic saw of having held "...that which has been believed everywhere, always, and by all. This alone is truly and properly "catholic," Rohr seems to be saying that Vincent was acknowledging beliefs held around the world as catholic, when it is apparent that Vincent was arguing specifically against Christian heresies rather trying to fit the Catholic church into the flow of history. The Vincentian Canon further reveals a clear duality - one of avoiding the "morbid and corrupt limb." There is no room in the Vincentian Canon for those who fail to follow the ancient Christian faith. Vincent goes so far as to argue for the abandonment of the entire extant Catholic Church if she becomes corrupt, preferring to cling to the ancient teachings of the Catholic church--which apparently must be correct. Having said all that - and these are not minor points in either the book's production or in Rohr's argument, there are in fact some gems which are common insights in the world of mysticism. Here are a handful of statements that can benefit any reader. "Your True Self is that part of you that knows who you are and whose you are, although largely unconsciously. Your False Self is just who you think you are--but thinking doesn't make it so." (vii-viii) "...there is a capacity, a similarity, and a desire for divine reality inside all humans." (xii) "Spirituality seems to be more about unlearning than learning. And when the slag and dross are removed, that which evokes reverence is right there waiting!" (xviii) "We must return to practice-based spirituality where the vantage point switches from looking at God to looking out from God." (xxiv) "Perfect spirituality is just to imitate God." (xxv) "But do know this: every time you choose to love, you have also just chosen to die." (65) "Jesus did not come to change the mind of God about humanity but to change the mind of humanity about God." Good stuff there, and plenty more, and worth the read for those who know what's coming. As an intro book though, as Rohr seems to think this one might be, the problems mentioned at the beginning may well be off-putting. For those who have cut their teeth on Merton and Nouwen, and who are familiar a bit with some of the more arcane mystics in the Christian tradition, this book will ring largely true and provide enough nuggets to justify reading it. Diamond seems to be the second half of Falling Upward and the two books complement each other. Both would have been better if a better editing process had been employed. As they are, they seem to have been published straight from Rohr's stream of consciousness. In that aspect, they could be better. I suspect my hesitancy about this book is a sense of a lack of discipline in its writing which is revealed in the comments above and other aspects of the book which are similar.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Vianey H

    When I began this book-it seemed simple and fairly straightforward. But the depth of meaning in his words, thoughts and beliefs...I was often left in doubt of what I thought I knew. I began to question my own beliefs and what has been driving me. At one point in the book—I stopped reading. It was too much. But I returned because I felt too challenged and unclear to walk away. Page 150–whoa! Huge turning point for me. This book is about love and life. It is about finding that we are what we seek! When I began this book-it seemed simple and fairly straightforward. But the depth of meaning in his words, thoughts and beliefs...I was often left in doubt of what I thought I knew. I began to question my own beliefs and what has been driving me. At one point in the book—I stopped reading. It was too much. But I returned because I felt too challenged and unclear to walk away. Page 150–whoa! Huge turning point for me. This book is about love and life. It is about finding that we are what we seek!! I will read this again because I know I didn’t get it all. And there is more to uncover. But as he wrote.. Amor vincit omnia! Love will win!!! Contemplate on that.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Greer

    14th book of 2017. Checked out from the Dallas Public Library. Recommended by good friend Gil Stafford. When I began my year of reading, I reached out to a few close friends who are avid readers for books that were important to them. I left the request broad so each friend could decide how to respond. For Gil, the response came from our chats during the Pilgrimage journey we took in 2015. Those conversations in Ireland have stayed with me, and this book is a continuation of the dialogue. On his we 14th book of 2017. Checked out from the Dallas Public Library. Recommended by good friend Gil Stafford. When I began my year of reading, I reached out to a few close friends who are avid readers for books that were important to them. I left the request broad so each friend could decide how to respond. For Gil, the response came from our chats during the Pilgrimage journey we took in 2015. Those conversations in Ireland have stayed with me, and this book is a continuation of the dialogue. On his website, Richard Rohr describes himself as "a globally recognized ecumenical teacher bearing witness to the universal awakening within Christian mysticism and the Perennial Tradition." He is a Franciscan priest and I feel a strong leaning towards his theology and spiritual nature. Had I read a book like this 20 years ago, I would have considered it remarkably liberal and heretical. In my present life, I consider it confirming much of my thoughts and beliefs on life. It's hard to put into words a book that leads the reader to great introspection. But Rohr's use of the terms "True Self" and "False Self" spoke volumes to me. It was a great reminder of the lessons I learned about my own journey while on that Pilgrimage in 2015 and certainly is a good book for preparation for my journey this year. Highly suggested read. I will be buying this book simply because I'll need it to gently remind me of the truth of finding my "True Self". Certainly makes me want to read more of Rohr.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Robert D. Cornwall

    Richard Rohr has a way of bringing to the fore ways of understanding spirituality that is both future oriented, broad in concept and outreach, and revelatory. He has a way of connecting as well with a person like me who isn't by inclination contemplative. He challenges me, pushes me, and enlightens me. In this book Rohr speaks of a search for our true self -- that is union with God. Too often we're satisfied with a false self, a self that is disconnected from the divine that has been implanted w Richard Rohr has a way of bringing to the fore ways of understanding spirituality that is both future oriented, broad in concept and outreach, and revelatory. He has a way of connecting as well with a person like me who isn't by inclination contemplative. He challenges me, pushes me, and enlightens me. In this book Rohr speaks of a search for our true self -- that is union with God. Too often we're satisfied with a false self, a self that is disconnected from the divine that has been implanted within us. It is the false self that gives place to greed, pride, anger, vanity, whereas the true self allows the love and grace of God to burst forth from our lives. Although Rohr's thinking is rooted in his Christian faith, he seeks to draw from other traditions, what he calls the Perennial Tradition, that builds bridges across our religious boundaries. I should note that while Rohr addresses traditional Christians, the community he truly desires to reach is that which lies beyond the church walls, seeking to connect with their own search for intimacy with God. I do recommend it highly.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Julia Alberino

    As anyone who follow me knows, I am a huge Richard Rohr fan. I was fortunate enough to read this book slowly as part of an online course that features a lot of video discussions with Fr. Richard. This book particularly resonated with me because it deals with the search for the True Self, which is a task of the second half of life, where I definitely am at present. The True Self is the "Immortal Diamond"of the title; it's always there waiting to be "mined" like a diamond in the present. Each of t As anyone who follow me knows, I am a huge Richard Rohr fan. I was fortunate enough to read this book slowly as part of an online course that features a lot of video discussions with Fr. Richard. This book particularly resonated with me because it deals with the search for the True Self, which is a task of the second half of life, where I definitely am at present. The True Self is the "Immortal Diamond"of the title; it's always there waiting to be "mined" like a diamond in the present. Each of the nine short chapters gives the reader plenty of material upon which to reflect. For anyone who has read "Falling Upward," you'll find "Immortal Diamond" to be a sequel, but it's equally possible to start with the latter.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Marc Arlt

    I find Rohr to be very helpful in conversations on podcasts but quite difficult to grasp in his written form. This is my second Rohr book and this was again my experience. He is an exceptional gift to spiritual seekers but if I’m honest, I have benefited more from reading those whom he has referenced than his own writings.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Barbara Conn

    Father Richard's masterpiece, in my opinion. Father Richard's masterpiece, in my opinion.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mark Johnson

    This is a soul-searching explanation of the difference between our “false self” (how we present ourselves, who we perceive ourselves to be) and our “true self” (who God has created us to be) and an exposition of how to let go of the former and embrace the latter. Like Rohr always seems to do, this one will force you to step back, reflect, and do some serious internal work in light of the truth he shares.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Colin Timbrell

    Such a mind and soul stretching work from Richard Rohr. There are quotable quotes on nearly every page, and I found myself doing a lot of note taking and journaling to soak up the insights. Do I agree with everything he says? Not sure. My brain hurts just thinking about it. But my spirit feels uplifted nonetheless.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    The distinction between false and true selves is useful and so was the reminder not to hate our false self, but to go beyond it. However, I’m not sure what the rest of the book was about, other than rooting the notion of truth telling and knowing oneself into the Christian tradition.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Nathan

    Rohr is definitely one of my favorite authors. Here he explains our True Selves and how it is both different from our False Selves and connects us to God. In short, it is an important paradigm shift for me in how I understand my faith, my relationship to God and Jesus Christ, and how I hope to grow as a person. A beautiful book! I could go on and on with quotes, but toward the beginning of the book he identifies the "four major splits from reality that we have all made...to create our False Self Rohr is definitely one of my favorite authors. Here he explains our True Selves and how it is both different from our False Selves and connects us to God. In short, it is an important paradigm shift for me in how I understand my faith, my relationship to God and Jesus Christ, and how I hope to grow as a person. A beautiful book! I could go on and on with quotes, but toward the beginning of the book he identifies the "four major splits from reality that we have all made...to create our False Self:" 1. We split from out shadow self and pretend to be our idealized self. 2. We split our mind from our body and soul and live in our minds. 3. We split life from death and try to live out live without any "death." 4. We split ourselves from other selves and try to live apart, superior, and separate. Overcoming these four splits is the primary message of the book. (p. 29) I hope to read it again after reading a few more of his others!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jess

    I loved and admired Richard Rohr for awhile before reading this book, based mostly on receiving his daily email meditation from the Center of Action and Contemplation. I grew up in the Catholic church, fell away for a long while, disillusioned by negative experiences with bigotry and hypocrisy (especially lack of love + care in my close church community as a youth). Recently, I've been deep in spiritual seeking and have been trying slowly to make peace with my religion-of-origin, starting with t I loved and admired Richard Rohr for awhile before reading this book, based mostly on receiving his daily email meditation from the Center of Action and Contemplation. I grew up in the Catholic church, fell away for a long while, disillusioned by negative experiences with bigotry and hypocrisy (especially lack of love + care in my close church community as a youth). Recently, I've been deep in spiritual seeking and have been trying slowly to make peace with my religion-of-origin, starting with the things that are beautiful and good. Rohr is considered by some to be quite a radical, and outside of the teachings of the church, but I found his messages -- which have a mystical flavor and tend to be both rooted in text and in everyday reality -- really resonated with me. The book centers on our lifelong quest to uncover our True Self, which is really God within all of us. Throughout life, we construct False Selves, which are not necessarily evil or wrong, so much as incomplete versions our whole selves that we use as masks to get by in everyday life. Some of these identities can be useful (daughter, Catholic, runner, partner, Asian-American), but we also should realize that they are not everything. These identities change, they are fluid, they sometimes need to "die" or fall away in order that we can become closer to who we really are. I loved the message and many of the examples. I didn't mind (or even really notice) the non-linear style of writing (I read this book with a friend and the roundabout style without clear beginnings or ends bugged her). But I did get weary of Rohr's anti-establishment rhetoric and his preachy tone with regards to traditional Catholicism. I react strongly to preachiness -- perhaps because I'm judgmental myself by nature, I prefer learning by positive example rather than learning from what "not to do."

  17. 5 out of 5

    Rhodelta

    Rohr starts by discussing “What is the True Self” in Chapter 1 and “What is the False Self” in Chapter 2. However he does not seek first to establish that these are valid psychological concepts. Although popular in folk psychology these concepts have little acceptance in professional circles. Although they have some intuitive appeal, at least to me, whether they can be extended to a full fledged theory of self perception and improvement is doubtful. Rohr claims to be a Christian and remains a Fran Rohr starts by discussing “What is the True Self” in Chapter 1 and “What is the False Self” in Chapter 2. However he does not seek first to establish that these are valid psychological concepts. Although popular in folk psychology these concepts have little acceptance in professional circles. Although they have some intuitive appeal, at least to me, whether they can be extended to a full fledged theory of self perception and improvement is doubtful. Rohr claims to be a Christian and remains a Franciscan Friar so we can assume that he still thinks he is. The book is peppered with quoted from the Bible saying in the preface “”I will cite Scripture generously to demonstrate that these are not just my ideas. I am standing on the Judeo-Christian tradition and in that light will also be quoting scholars, saints, theologians, and poets to get us to the perennial truths that all religions share.” That reference to “perennial” is not accidental; through the book Rohr makes it clear that he follows perennialism which views all of the world's religious traditions as sharing a single, metaphysical truth or origin. Perennialism has also been described as “the most common false teaching that no one's ever heard of”. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HxpLp... When reading this book it is handy to have a Bible or Bible App to hand to check Rohr’s references, making sure to include the preceding and following text so the qoute can be seen in context. When this is done it will be found that many of the references do not actually support the claims that Rohr is making. This is something I had noticed before reading this book while watching some of Rohr’s videos on YouTube. In “What is “The True Self?” talking about the True Self he says “What else would be “good news for all the people,” which is what the angels promised the Bethlehem shepherds (Luke 2:10)?”. Of course the reference is not talking about the True Self but about the birth “this day in the city of David a Savior, who is the Messiah, the Lord.” (NRSV) (Rohr does not use any particular translation. He says, “the edited form I use is often my own translation or a combination of the versions I have noted”.) It becomes pretty clear after a while that Rohr is not just selectively the Bible to support his ideas but he is actively reinterpreting the Bible to match his theories. The above was written at the end of Chapter 2 to capture my thoughts. I am now about ½ way, “Thou art that” and it continues to get worse. It would be tedious to document all of Rohr’s misquotes from the Bible so let’s look at some other things. Here’s one I couldn’t resist. In “The knife ede of experience he says, “True symbols somehow are the thing itself”. Sorry Richard, but if it is the thing itself it is not a symbol, from the definition of the word. In that chapter he asks, “Why do we read novels, have belaboured conversations, go to movies, or have sex? Is it not to seek an answer to that most human of questions: “What does this this thing called my life mean?” ” Speaking for myself I can do all those things without considering that existential question at all. What does it all mean? Perhaps Rohr should read “Man’s Search for Meaning” by Viktor Frankl. So far I have discovered that Rohr thinks Jesus was a good person who only became Christ on his death (What dies and who lives). I’m currently in a study group on the Gospel of Mark and this is NOT what the gospels say. More specifically in the reference used by Rohr above Jesus is identified as a Saviour, the Messiah, from his birth. Rohr says that “Once we made Jesus only divine, we ended up being only human, and the whole process of human transformation ground to a halt.” and “Christianity lost its natural movement and momentum … when it pulled Jesus out of the Trinity” (Thou art that). Perhaps this is a Franciscan thing but speaking as an Anglican we regard Jesus as fully human AND fully divine, and Jesus remains firmly in the Trinity. Rohr disparages those who disagree with him as atheist or fundamentalist/literalist. Here he falls into the type of dichotomy and stereotyping he rails against elsewhere. I disagree with him and I describe myself as a traditional Christian who follows a Historical- Grammatical exegesis, versus Rohr’s eisegesis. i.e. neither atheist nor fundamentalist in the modern pejorative sense nor literalist. Conclusion: This is a book to be strenuously avoided by anybody who holds to a traditional Christian faith. You could stop there but here’s a few more examples of how Rohr twists things to suit his story. In “What Dies and Who Lives” Rohr says “Biblically it is foreshadowed in the killing of the innocent Passover lamb, which had already been taken into the home and likely already named by the children.” This is clearly an attempt to tug on our heartstrings -just picture that cute little lamb being cuddled by the children. Being the Biblical scholar he tells us he is would know that this lamb is a year old sexually mature ram and nowhere does it say it would be taken into the home. In “If It Is True It Is True Everywhere” Rohr refers to the Vincentian Canon which says to hold that which has been believed everywhere, always, and by all. I had never heard of the Vincentian Canon so I looked it up, just as you can. Reading the canon we find “everywhere” means the whole Church throughout the world; “always” means held by our holy ancestors and fathers; and “by all” means all, or at the least of almost all priests and doctors. By this standard of the Vincentian Canon Rohr’s book and ideas would be heretical and what should we do but “prefer the soundness of the whole body to the unsoundness of a pestilent and corrupt member?” In “Intimate with Everything” Rohr retells the road to Emmaus story as “he joins in an easy walk with two ordinary travellers, invites them to tell their story of heartbreak, and accepts their invitation to stay with them; when he leaves them it is with ‘burning hearts.’ He explains to them his own life narrative - he ‘opens up,’ as we say - and sure enough, “their eyes are opened up too.” This is is a significant rewriting of this event. Jesus does not share his life narrative, rather he first berates them as being foolish and slow of heart then “beginning with Moses and all the prophets, he interpreted to them the things about himself in all the scriptures.”; hardly ‘opening up’ to them.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Robin Carlo

    As always, Rohr provides thought-provoking gems and a refreshing and renewing look at the value of our lives. Immortal Diamond didn't grab me as firmly as did Falling Upward but that may be because some of the content was material I'd read in Rohr's daily devotions. As always, Rohr provides thought-provoking gems and a refreshing and renewing look at the value of our lives. Immortal Diamond didn't grab me as firmly as did Falling Upward but that may be because some of the content was material I'd read in Rohr's daily devotions.

  19. 5 out of 5

    James

    I like Richard Rohr and have read several books. I especially like his books on Masculine spirituality (the journey from wild man to wise man). This book was just okay for me. Rohr explores the True Self, the immortal diamond we discover if we are willing to go deep enough, and move beyond our false self. Some good stuff on how the false self is just smallish, and a starting point. Rohr emphases our true self shows our connection to others, the world and the Triune God. He makes good use of the l I like Richard Rohr and have read several books. I especially like his books on Masculine spirituality (the journey from wild man to wise man). This book was just okay for me. Rohr explores the True Self, the immortal diamond we discover if we are willing to go deep enough, and move beyond our false self. Some good stuff on how the false self is just smallish, and a starting point. Rohr emphases our true self shows our connection to others, the world and the Triune God. He makes good use of the language of resurrection (and dying) as a metaphr for the discovery of the True self, and he writes this book with a wide audience in mind (Catholics, Protestants, spiritual-but-not-religious folks, buddhists, hindus, atheists, etc). As such, though he is clearly writing from a Christian perspective, he bends over backwards to show common ground (even co-opting the Vincentian canon: "always everywhere and by all," to illustrate what all religions in the 'perennial tradition' hold in common). I feel like I can only go part way with Rohr but appreciate a number of his insights.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    Connecting with your truly divine inner self and the ground of all being is the theme of this book. From a very Christian perspective. Recommended by my Spiritual Director, I knew that I should read it. I have self-doubts, image problems and the perspective of this book was to help me recognize that I am love, loved, lovable, loving. I need to let go of my 'false self' and find the part of me (soul, heart) that is real and unconditionally loved. It worked in part, but I really had a difficult ti Connecting with your truly divine inner self and the ground of all being is the theme of this book. From a very Christian perspective. Recommended by my Spiritual Director, I knew that I should read it. I have self-doubts, image problems and the perspective of this book was to help me recognize that I am love, loved, lovable, loving. I need to let go of my 'false self' and find the part of me (soul, heart) that is real and unconditionally loved. It worked in part, but I really had a difficult time getting over the literal resurrection part. I suggest that you read this if you can integrate the metaphor of resurrection into your own theology. We must all die to ourselves if we are to deepen our understanding that we are part of the whole. Not an easy read, but ultimately I think worth a try if you are trying to let go of your ego.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Anita

    I guess I highlighted about 1/3 of the book which I want to go back and look over taking my time and meditating. I got the e-book from the library, so I'll buy a copy. Just one example of what grabbed me was his explanation of the error in the thinking that God required the sacrificial death of Jesus to atone for sin. I've always felt that this just could not be a necessity for the Source of all that is. But don't get the impression that this book is about head knowledge. I see it more as a weav I guess I highlighted about 1/3 of the book which I want to go back and look over taking my time and meditating. I got the e-book from the library, so I'll buy a copy. Just one example of what grabbed me was his explanation of the error in the thinking that God required the sacrificial death of Jesus to atone for sin. I've always felt that this just could not be a necessity for the Source of all that is. But don't get the impression that this book is about head knowledge. I see it more as a weaving of a trail enticing the reader to go up to and through a gateway that they might not have been afraid to approach. Richard Rohr seems to care a great deal more about the reader than he does of himself. How wonderful to run into that. Second reading was during a course on the Immortal Diamond at cac.org and so it was a slow reading of a chapter per week.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Vukmirovich

    Once Again Once again Richard Rohr shows us what it means to be fully present and embrace the fullness of a God breathed humanity - inherently sacred. This contrasts significantly with a sin-based starting point that many people struggle with all their lives. As we embrace this freedom, we live into the fullness of the “imago Dei” (image of God) implanted in all of us. We see each person differently, especially ourselves. Grace becomes abundant and not just for “our team” or the people most like Once Again Once again Richard Rohr shows us what it means to be fully present and embrace the fullness of a God breathed humanity - inherently sacred. This contrasts significantly with a sin-based starting point that many people struggle with all their lives. As we embrace this freedom, we live into the fullness of the “imago Dei” (image of God) implanted in all of us. We see each person differently, especially ourselves. Grace becomes abundant and not just for “our team” or the people most like us. Thanks a Richard for pointing us towards a path of greater peace and wholeness.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ken

    A refreshing look at Christianity I enjoyed Fr. Rohr's rich appreciation of the New Testament and the life of Jesus. He looks at its stories free of judgment and rich in love. I had a sense of the essence of Francis of Assisi that I have come to be aware of in the persona of Pope Francis. A refreshing look at Christianity I enjoyed Fr. Rohr's rich appreciation of the New Testament and the life of Jesus. He looks at its stories free of judgment and rich in love. I had a sense of the essence of Francis of Assisi that I have come to be aware of in the persona of Pope Francis.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Patrik Olterman

    If i where to recommend one christian book to read. It would be this one. It seems Richard Rohr manages to sum up my every sermon this last year in this beautiful book. If you wonder what I teach or believe. This book will set you on that path.

  25. 5 out of 5

    anil s menon

    Game changer I read this book on a recommendation and was surprised by how profound it was. It's good for Christians and non Christians alike but probably easier to follow with an understanding of the bible. Game changer I read this book on a recommendation and was surprised by how profound it was. It's good for Christians and non Christians alike but probably easier to follow with an understanding of the bible.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Phew! This book is a tough read! Good, definitely good, but with its high popularity I hadn't expected it to be so deep. It IS accessible, but you can't fly through it because it requires a good bit of thought along the way. Phew! This book is a tough read! Good, definitely good, but with its high popularity I hadn't expected it to be so deep. It IS accessible, but you can't fly through it because it requires a good bit of thought along the way.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Kern

    I liked this book a lot. I took a lot of quotes down. The hard part is how to apply it. It is one of those reads that you wish you could just assimilate all of the teachings, but at the same time you don't know where to even start. The ideas were compelling, but distant for me. Father Roar both inspires me and also makes me wonder if I even understand what he is saying. He is a mystic and I struggle with silence. My mind races, well more like jogs, and it is hard to make it take a seat. Contempla I liked this book a lot. I took a lot of quotes down. The hard part is how to apply it. It is one of those reads that you wish you could just assimilate all of the teachings, but at the same time you don't know where to even start. The ideas were compelling, but distant for me. Father Roar both inspires me and also makes me wonder if I even understand what he is saying. He is a mystic and I struggle with silence. My mind races, well more like jogs, and it is hard to make it take a seat. Contemplation asks you to take a seat while life is rushing around you. Anyway...about that book. It's basic premise is that you are a piece of God in a way. Yes, you are you, but you are also divine. Religion tends to ask its adherents to find God out there, but God is really in you...once you get rid of your "false self." As he says, "That God is both utterly beyond me and yet totally within me at the same time is the exquisite balance that most religion seldom achieves..." A good portion of the book takes shots, with good reason in my opinion, of the way religion is done today. "The religious False Self can even justify racism, slavery, war, and total denial or deception and feel no guilt whatsoever, because “they think they are doing a holy duty for God” (John 16:2). The ego has found its cover, so be quite careful about being religious. If your religion does not transform your consciousness to one of compassion, it is more a part of the problem than any solution." He is open to truth from wherever it comes from, which I find very appealing. I really like this analogy of finding the Way without being a "true believer." "I also know that being a Christian today does not demand that you walk this map or recognize this deep pattern to reality. It is too often just a club to join. Indeed, many non-Christians see it, honor it, and live it much better than those who claim to be true believers. You have not been to Russia just because you have a correct map of Russia, and you can fully experience Russia without ever owning the map." Anyway, read it if you are a seeker. Rohr will intrigue you if nothing else.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ann Yeong

    I have known of this book for more than 5 years now and have heard glowing reviews from friends who have read it. But I did not feel prompted to read it until this year which turned out to be a blessing because the message of this book echoes my own personal journey of the last 12 months, so when I read it, I found that Rohr's words helped me articulate what I have been experiencing but could not quite describe. "the True Self is not moral perfection or even psychological wholeness. Many masochis I have known of this book for more than 5 years now and have heard glowing reviews from friends who have read it. But I did not feel prompted to read it until this year which turned out to be a blessing because the message of this book echoes my own personal journey of the last 12 months, so when I read it, I found that Rohr's words helped me articulate what I have been experiencing but could not quite describe. "the True Self is not moral perfection or even psychological wholeness. Many masochistic saints, eccentric prophets, and neurotic mystics are more than a bit strange, and they almost always have serious blind spots, but THEY KNEW WHO THEY WERE IN GOD and they knew how to return there." (emphasis mine) This quote hits the nail on the head for me in articulating what I have been coming to realise in my own search for my True Self. Another quote that accurately describes a shift I have been finding myself needing to make in this quest for authenticity is the change from "drivenness" to "being drawn". "It is not our rule-following behavior but our actual identity that needs to be radically changed. This is a major change of position and vantage point. You do things because they are true, not because you have to or you are afraid of punishment. Henceforth you are not so much driven from without (the False Self method) as you are drawn from within (the True Self method). The generating motor is inside you now instead of a whip or a threat outside." I feel that whether or not you like this book would depend a lot on whether or not you have started on or desire to begin your search for your True Self. For some readers, this book would be enlightening and inspiring. For others, it would be disturbing and uncomfortable. And maybe for some it could be both. This book found its way to me at a very apt time - if I had read it more than a year ago, I doubt I would have appreciated it even half as much as I do now. If you should read it, may it be at the right time for you too.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy Randall

    I have loved Richard Rohrs voice and style on podcasts for the last 5 years so it was nice to grab on of his books to look through. His depth of understanding philosophy, theology and psychology comes across so smooth in this medium. He discusses a false self and a true self. And I love that he flows through the false self being not bad, but inevitable. That we are the false self because of defense mechanisms and up bringing and because of trying to prove and rail against and pull things toward I have loved Richard Rohrs voice and style on podcasts for the last 5 years so it was nice to grab on of his books to look through. His depth of understanding philosophy, theology and psychology comes across so smooth in this medium. He discusses a false self and a true self. And I love that he flows through the false self being not bad, but inevitable. That we are the false self because of defense mechanisms and up bringing and because of trying to prove and rail against and pull things toward us when - throughout the book - it is discussed that our true self is the ability to be pulled toward, to be in awe of, to survive and become the diamond. The diamond that may or may not have always have been there. The diamond that we see in each other but won't admit to ourselves. He talks about resurrection, how one needs to experience death to understand life. When the false self dies and the true self lives. When we have hit rock bottom. When we have seen that we are not bullet proof but neither are we made of glass. That life and existence flows from death into a new beginning. An interesting book that could be read slowly over years or in a few sittings to get a jolt of something already known but seldom discussed. I enjoy his writing style. I enjoy his references. I think he and this book are a wonderful part of history.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Pastor2112

    Who are we? Truly, not according to our own devising? For Rohr, the goal is to live from our "true self" rather than "false self". The "true self" is a life "centered" in God rather than ego: "in finding your True Self, you will have found an absolute reference point that is both utterly within you and utterly beyond you at the very same time." It is to inhabit Jesus' frame of reference: "Jesus never knew himself or operated as an independent 'I' but only as a 'thou' in relationship to his Fathe Who are we? Truly, not according to our own devising? For Rohr, the goal is to live from our "true self" rather than "false self". The "true self" is a life "centered" in God rather than ego: "in finding your True Self, you will have found an absolute reference point that is both utterly within you and utterly beyond you at the very same time." It is to inhabit Jesus' frame of reference: "Jesus never knew himself or operated as an independent 'I' but only as a 'thou' in relationship to his Father and the Holy Spirit, which he says in a hundred different ways." By doing this, "He overcame the [world's] system's seduction and illusion by living inside an utterly different frame of reference, the eternal 'Reign of God.'" Thus, sin is an "ego trip" - "sin is a mistake about who you are and whose you are." "The Risen Christ represents the final perspective of every True Self: a human-divine one that is looking out at God from itself—and yet knowing that it is God-in-you seeing God-who-is-also-beyond-you—and enjoying both yourself and God as good and as united." This book is filled with wonderful insights to grow and learn what it means to live in union and communion with God as one's chief ground of being. Highly recommended!

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.