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The Messenger Reader: Stories, Poetry, and Essays from The Messenger Magazine

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The Messenger was the third most popular magazine of the Harlem Renaissance after The Crisis andOpportunity. Unlike the other two magazines, The Messenger was not tied to a civil rights organization. Labor activist A. Philip Randolph and economist Chandler Owen started the magazine in 1917 to advance the cause of socialism to the black masses. They believed that a socialis The Messenger was the third most popular magazine of the Harlem Renaissance after The Crisis andOpportunity. Unlike the other two magazines, The Messenger was not tied to a civil rights organization. Labor activist A. Philip Randolph and economist Chandler Owen started the magazine in 1917 to advance the cause of socialism to the black masses. They believed that a socialist society was the only one that would be free from racism. The socialist ideology of The Messenger "the only magazine of scientific radicalism in the world published by Negroes," was reflected in the pieces and authors published in its pages. The Messenger Reader contains poetry, stories, and essays from Paul Robeson, Zora Neale Hurston, Wallace Thurman, and Dorothy West. The Messenger Reader, will be a welcome addition to the critically acclaimed Modern Library Harlem Renaissance series.


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The Messenger was the third most popular magazine of the Harlem Renaissance after The Crisis andOpportunity. Unlike the other two magazines, The Messenger was not tied to a civil rights organization. Labor activist A. Philip Randolph and economist Chandler Owen started the magazine in 1917 to advance the cause of socialism to the black masses. They believed that a socialis The Messenger was the third most popular magazine of the Harlem Renaissance after The Crisis andOpportunity. Unlike the other two magazines, The Messenger was not tied to a civil rights organization. Labor activist A. Philip Randolph and economist Chandler Owen started the magazine in 1917 to advance the cause of socialism to the black masses. They believed that a socialist society was the only one that would be free from racism. The socialist ideology of The Messenger "the only magazine of scientific radicalism in the world published by Negroes," was reflected in the pieces and authors published in its pages. The Messenger Reader contains poetry, stories, and essays from Paul Robeson, Zora Neale Hurston, Wallace Thurman, and Dorothy West. The Messenger Reader, will be a welcome addition to the critically acclaimed Modern Library Harlem Renaissance series.

31 review for The Messenger Reader: Stories, Poetry, and Essays from The Messenger Magazine

  1. 4 out of 5

    Evie

    This book is a collection of writing from The Messenger Magazine, founded by A. Philip Randolph, and Chandler Owen. The Messenger Magazine served as an intellectual and cultural outlet for African-American artists in Harlem during the 1920′s. This served an important role in the Harlem Renaissance, being the third most popular magazine. This magazine, unlike the two most popular above it, was not tied to a civil right’s organization. The founders of the magazine, Philip Randolph and Chandler Owen This book is a collection of writing from The Messenger Magazine, founded by A. Philip Randolph, and Chandler Owen. The Messenger Magazine served as an intellectual and cultural outlet for African-American artists in Harlem during the 1920′s. This served an important role in the Harlem Renaissance, being the third most popular magazine. This magazine, unlike the two most popular above it, was not tied to a civil right’s organization. The founders of the magazine, Philip Randolph and Chandler Owen, created the magazine in 1917 with the intent to push the cause of socialism to the black community. The two had the belief that a socialist society would be the only society that would free the African-Americans from racism. It is unique and interesting look on how African-American culture is put into literature during the Harlem Renaissance. With an introduction by Editor Sondra Kathryn Wilson, one can catch a glimpse on the artistic minds that worked in the 1920′s African-American community. I have listed some of my personal favorite poems, stories, and essays below, and keep in mind that most of these writings have not been published outside of the magazine. Poetry:
Pagan Prayer- Countee P. Cullen
Gods- Langston Hughes
Your Voice Keeps Ringing Down the Day
Toy
Crucifixion
Disenthralment- Georgia Douglas Johnson
Confession- Wallace Thurman Fiction:
The Unquenchable Fire- Robert W. Bagnall
The Young Glory of Him- Langston Hughes
The Spring of ‘65- William Moore Essays:
Colored Authors and Their Contributions to the World’s Literature- Irene M. Gaines
Survey of Negro Literature- Thomas L. G. Oxley 
Black Mammies- Chandler Owen I highly recommend this book, as it gives an insightful look on how strong the power of African-American communities are, even one hundred years ago. And more so, proves how strong the desire for liberation and education is.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jo

  3. 5 out of 5

    Douglas

  4. 5 out of 5

    zingha.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Paul

  6. 5 out of 5

    Aberjhani

  7. 4 out of 5

    Charles

  8. 4 out of 5

    Reggie Williams

  9. 5 out of 5

    Tasheika B.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Wamble white eagle

  11. 5 out of 5

    Wendy

  12. 4 out of 5

    dusty

  13. 5 out of 5

    Deana

  14. 5 out of 5

    Michael Strode

  15. 4 out of 5

    Nikhil P. Freeman

  16. 5 out of 5

    Yasmin

  17. 5 out of 5

    Terri

  18. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Jones

  19. 4 out of 5

    Booktalk

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Werner

  21. 5 out of 5

    Tasasha

  22. 5 out of 5

    Dawn

  23. 4 out of 5

    W Harris

  24. 4 out of 5

    Rob

  25. 5 out of 5

    DCarr Phoenix

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

  27. 5 out of 5

    Hannah Facknitz

  28. 4 out of 5

    Michael

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ann

  30. 4 out of 5

    Amy Pauwels

  31. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin Fasching-Gray

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