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In the Tall Grass

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Mile 81 meets N. in this e-book collaboration between Stephen King and Joe Hill. In the Tall Grass begins with a sister and brother who pull off to the side of the road after hearing a young boy crying for help from beyond the tall grass. Within minutes they are disoriented, in deeper than seems possible, and they’ve lost one another. The boy’s cries are more and more despe Mile 81 meets N. in this e-book collaboration between Stephen King and Joe Hill. In the Tall Grass begins with a sister and brother who pull off to the side of the road after hearing a young boy crying for help from beyond the tall grass. Within minutes they are disoriented, in deeper than seems possible, and they’ve lost one another. The boy’s cries are more and more desperate. What follows is a terrifying, entertaining, and masterfully told tale, as only Stephen King and Joe Hill can deliver. In the Tall Grass was originally published in two parts in the June/July and August 2012 issues of Esquire magazine. This is their second collaboration since the novella Throttle, published in 2009.


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Mile 81 meets N. in this e-book collaboration between Stephen King and Joe Hill. In the Tall Grass begins with a sister and brother who pull off to the side of the road after hearing a young boy crying for help from beyond the tall grass. Within minutes they are disoriented, in deeper than seems possible, and they’ve lost one another. The boy’s cries are more and more despe Mile 81 meets N. in this e-book collaboration between Stephen King and Joe Hill. In the Tall Grass begins with a sister and brother who pull off to the side of the road after hearing a young boy crying for help from beyond the tall grass. Within minutes they are disoriented, in deeper than seems possible, and they’ve lost one another. The boy’s cries are more and more desperate. What follows is a terrifying, entertaining, and masterfully told tale, as only Stephen King and Joe Hill can deliver. In the Tall Grass was originally published in two parts in the June/July and August 2012 issues of Esquire magazine. This is their second collaboration since the novella Throttle, published in 2009.

30 review for In the Tall Grass

  1. 5 out of 5

    Trudi

    Well, well, well, what do we have here? A bona fide horror story my friends and Constant Readers, sprouted from the father/son imagination team of Stephen King and Joe Hill. This story is not without its problems (and won't be suited to everyone's tastes). It is ghoulish and a tad gory, and depending on your sensibilities you may be disgusted, even offended. But before it goes there it is a magnificent piece of storytelling steeped in dread and what I like to call, epic creep. One reviewer has l Well, well, well, what do we have here? A bona fide horror story my friends and Constant Readers, sprouted from the father/son imagination team of Stephen King and Joe Hill. This story is not without its problems (and won't be suited to everyone's tastes). It is ghoulish and a tad gory, and depending on your sensibilities you may be disgusted, even offended. But before it goes there it is a magnificent piece of storytelling steeped in dread and what I like to call, epic creep. One reviewer has likened it to Open Water meets The Ruins and that's not inaccurate. There is a Mile 81 vibe as promised, but I was reminded more of King's earlier classic short stories such as "Children of the Corn" and "The Raft" and if I had to pick a movie, The Blair Witch Project. Getting lost in tall grass is one of my most primal fears. And I don't mean grass that comes up to your waist (icky enough), but grass that is over your head and obscures the view of what's in front of you. Stuff lives in grass. Entire ecosystems of crawly, stinging biting things. Then there's mud and dew and pollen and mice and snakes and well... you get my point. I don't want to be there. No way. The first half of this 60 page short story is so very strong in the way it taps into our claustrophobic fear of becoming lost. As humans we are very good at -- not to mention very attached to -- knowing where we are at any given moment in space and time. Our evolutionary sense of well-being depends on it. Strip it away and we quickly lose our shit. Panic, fear, frustration, they all come bubbling to the surface as we projectile rage against the environment that has conspired against us in such an unforgivable betrayal. What is that tree doing there? That wasn't there before. I thought the river was to the east of us. I'm sure the car is just over the next hill there. As much as we hate it, getting lost is pretty much a universal human experience. It's probably happened to all of us at one time or another, even if it was for a very short period of time in a new city or on a short hike in a national park. King and Hill take that germ of an idea and run with it like mad lunatics in an asylum. This is a supernatural horror story, so if you like realism and stories that "could really happen" this might not be your thing. I wasn't entirely satisfied with the explanation of what is really going on in the tall grass, but enjoyed the first half of the story so much I'm willing to overlook that here. Plus, the story is just so well-written. It's tightly coiled prose with some great phrasing and sentence structure. These guys know what they're doing, okay? Imagine being a fly on the wall for the father/son conversation such a collaboration requires. There are a few things that happen in the story where I was like: "Okay, whose idea was that?! Fess up!" I guess part of the fun is in trying to guess, and perhaps never knowing. These guys work good together though, and I'm looking forward to many more collaborations (fingers crossed). Note: If you buy this as an ebook for three bucks it also comes with sneak previews of Doctor Sleep (King's sequel to The Shining) and Hill's novel NOS4A2. Let me just say that these previews have got me so revved up to read the books next year. If I thought I couldn't wait before, now I'm positively slavering to get my hands on them. At least Hill's book is coming in April; King's Doctor Sleep has been pushed to September! Almost another whole year! And what if the Mayan calender is right and we all go boom in December? What then people? What then?

  2. 5 out of 5

    Trish

    MUHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA! This short story, written by the King of horror (sorry, couldn't resist) and his son, was scrumptious. *evil grin* America has places so far "out there" that you don't even get cell phone reception. I know, right! ;) Places where ancient evils can lurk and even something as seemingly mundane as grass may turn out to be about as healthy as calling an armed redneck a dumbass. The Kings (or the king and the prince, I should say) are very good at making even supernatural elements see MUHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA! This short story, written by the King of horror (sorry, couldn't resist) and his son, was scrumptious. *evil grin* America has places so far "out there" that you don't even get cell phone reception. I know, right! ;) Places where ancient evils can lurk and even something as seemingly mundane as grass may turn out to be about as healthy as calling an armed redneck a dumbass. The Kings (or the king and the prince, I should say) are very good at making even supernatural elements seem realistic and plausible. And they are the reason I'll be very careful about where I'll stop and whom I'll help should I ever go on a roadtrip in the US. *lol* I can not only wholeheartedly recommend this little horror tale, I also need to point out strongly that everyone needs to read this in the audio version because "Papa Dragon" turned out to be a chameleon with voices and one of the best narrators I've ever been listening to!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Debra

    This short story asks the question "What would you do if you heard a child calling for help?" Would you stop and help? Would you stop and call for help? What if a child is calling for help but his Mother is warning you against helping? In this short story, brother and sister, Cal and Becky, are driving when they hear a boy in the tall grass asking for help. He is lost and can't find his way out. Of course they want to help him, wouldn't you? But wait! The boy's Mother is warning you against helpi This short story asks the question "What would you do if you heard a child calling for help?" Would you stop and help? Would you stop and call for help? What if a child is calling for help but his Mother is warning you against helping? In this short story, brother and sister, Cal and Becky, are driving when they hear a boy in the tall grass asking for help. He is lost and can't find his way out. Of course they want to help him, wouldn't you? But wait! The boy's Mother is warning you against helping. She is warning her son to be quiet or "he" will hear you. Who is this "he" she is referring to. Wanting to help, the brother sister duo both enter the tall grass...... This short story can easily be read in one sitting and evokes a feeling of dread. Will they find the boy? Will they find each other as they were instantly separated? More and more I am enjoying books that evoke that feeling of dread; ones that get your heart beating because you don't know what is going to happen next. You know something is going to happen....but what? Ahhhh, that anticipatory anxiety. I think Hill and King were successful in this. But then once the "reveal" if you can call it that occurred, I felt a little let down. This is where the short story lost a little of it's magic for me. Sometimes I think it is better to never see the source of terror is. That is what makes it terrorizing. We use our own minds to create the "evil" that would scare us the most. Yes, that is my fan fiction take on this. In the Tall grass is still enjoyable. Definitely worth reading. See more of my reviews at www.openbookpost.com

  4. 4 out of 5

    Johann (jobis89)

    Can these two PLEASE write a book together?! Great short story... disturbing and gory.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kelly (and the Book Boar)

    Find all of my reviews at: http://52bookminimum.blogspot.com/ “He wanted quiet for a while instead of the radio, so you could say what happened was his fault. She wanted fresh air instead of the AC for a while, so you could say it was hers.” What can I say? I can say “boy oh boy this was a humdinger of a little thrillride.” Cal and Becky pull off of the highway to stretch their legs, but could never imagine what would happen next. On their side of the highway is the Black Rock of the Rede Find all of my reviews at: http://52bookminimum.blogspot.com/ “He wanted quiet for a while instead of the radio, so you could say what happened was his fault. She wanted fresh air instead of the AC for a while, so you could say it was hers.” What can I say? I can say “boy oh boy this was a humdinger of a little thrillride.” Cal and Becky pull off of the highway to stretch their legs, but could never imagine what would happen next. On their side of the highway is the Black Rock of the Redeemer Church, on the other? A little boy screaming for help from beyond the tall Kansas grass. The two know right away they have to help the boy, but when they enter the grass they discover finding their way out is impossible . . . unless they do one thing. I don’t know if it’s embedded in my psyche after reading so many Stephen King books over the years or if this one was really as good as I think it was, but I was freaking out almost immediately upon starting this story. The first sentence grabbed me and by the time they heard the voice of little lost Tobin crying for help I was on the edge of my seat – where I firmly remained until the last page. I’m going to go out on a limb and give credit where I think credit is due and say the magic of the unwasted page/paragraph/sentence in this short story is all owed to Joe Hill. I’m generally not a fan of even the novella, so an actual 50-some page short like this is really not my cuppa. That being said, just as King knows the art of painting the horror story with a nice broad brush, Joe Hill knows how to get right to the point and not spend a second on unnecessary details. Obviously I can’t tell you what lies beyond the “tall grass,” but I can tell you that it’s easily the most disturbing short I’ve ever (or probably will ever read) and it’s not for the timid . . . or the weak-stomached. It made Michael’s little “experience” with the worms and maggots in one of my faves look like child’s play . . . If you’re looking for something that will horrify you this Halloween week – In The Tall Grass is a winner.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Gregor Xane

    The product description for this book wasn't honest, and that kind of ticks me off. The way it's listed on Amazon, it looks like you're going to get a novella-length story written by Stephen King and his son Joe Hill. There is no mention of the fact that the last 25% of the eBook's length is taken up by teaser chapters from King and Hill's forthcoming novels (at the time), Doctor Sleep and NOS4A2, respectively. When the advertisements stuffed into the back amount for 25% of the page count, it ju The product description for this book wasn't honest, and that kind of ticks me off. The way it's listed on Amazon, it looks like you're going to get a novella-length story written by Stephen King and his son Joe Hill. There is no mention of the fact that the last 25% of the eBook's length is taken up by teaser chapters from King and Hill's forthcoming novels (at the time), Doctor Sleep and NOS4A2, respectively. When the advertisements stuffed into the back amount for 25% of the page count, it just seems to me like you're paying to be pitched to. Also, not knowing from the get-go that the last 25% of the book is ad space, you get a false sense of how long the story is going to be. It really kind of fucks with the story's rhythm and flow. Yes, you can open up the Look Inside sample and see the teasers listed in the TOC for this book, but who does that when purchasing something written by Stephen King? I'd say about 1% of the potential buyers. Also, when you've downloaded (side-loaded, or whatever) the book to your Kindle and open that puppy up, you are taken to the beginning of the book to start reading. It takes a special effort to look at the table of contents. And why exactly would you look at the table of contents before you start reading what you think is a novella? Oh, wait, what about the story, the (at most) novelette, In the Tall Grass? It was pretty good. It started out genuinely scary and got rather disturbing and disgusting as it went along. All very good for a horror story. BUT the ending was so goofy and filled with dopey, unrealistic characters, and, worst of all, it was redundant. We already knew what kind of story this was pretty early on. We didn't need a giant, tacky neon sign at the end to spell it all out for us. Get it from your local library's digital collection or wait for a price break.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sandeep

    Can a field of grass be scary? Sinister even? Cal and Becky DeMuth, a brother and sister are driving across the United States to arrange the adoption of Becky’s unborn child. On their way, they hear a child calling from the field of long grass nearby. The child sounds in trouble and the DeMuths believe they can help the child out. Events only get more sinister from that point on. This short story was written by the dynamic father-son duo of horror, Joe Hill and Stephen King. Seriously though, Can a field of grass be scary? Sinister even? Cal and Becky DeMuth, a brother and sister are driving across the United States to arrange the adoption of Becky’s unborn child. On their way, they hear a child calling from the field of long grass nearby. The child sounds in trouble and the DeMuths believe they can help the child out. Events only get more sinister from that point on. This short story was written by the dynamic father-son duo of horror, Joe Hill and Stephen King. Seriously though, this is a tale you can sink your teeth into. I couldn't put it down. Fast-paced, eerie, disturbing and gory, it had all the elements of an edge-of-the-seat thriller. Something else delightfully unexpected was the united voice by the co-writers. For a story only sixty-two pages long there were a ton of plot twists that didn't just grab my attention, it demanded it. The only thing I didn't like about In the Tall Grass was that it is a short story. It ended too quick and few parts felt rushed. I think this has the potential to at least be a novella and now I'm left wanting MORE.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne

    Enjoyable short read that only takes a couple hours. It’s disturbing and horrifying, especially since a majority of us would stop and try to find a little boy calling for help from tall grass. Now I can watch the movie adaption that recently came out on Netflix. ⭐️⭐️⭐️

  9. 5 out of 5

    Edward Lorn

    "In the Tall Grass" is one of the most disturbing tales I've ever read. This is the first Stephen King story, or Joe Hill story for that matter, that actually turned my stomach. The writing is vivid, filled with brutal simplicity that drives the horror home. I didn't feel all that attached to either Cal or Becky, but what Becky goes through in the later part of this short story would crush the heart of any parent. No, not just crush. Decimate. This is also the first collaboration of father and s "In the Tall Grass" is one of the most disturbing tales I've ever read. This is the first Stephen King story, or Joe Hill story for that matter, that actually turned my stomach. The writing is vivid, filled with brutal simplicity that drives the horror home. I didn't feel all that attached to either Cal or Becky, but what Becky goes through in the later part of this short story would crush the heart of any parent. No, not just crush. Decimate. This is also the first collaboration of father and son where I was able to pinpoint which author wrote what sections. I've come to know Hill's work well enough that I can catch certain sentence structures he commonly uses. I couldn't imagine writing such a piece with my son or daughter, but these two pulled it off. "In the Tall Grass" garnered five stars simply for affecting me as much as it did. I will never forget this story. E.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Tamoghna Biswas

    "Blood is really warm, it's like drinking hot chocolate but with more screaming." --Ryan Mecum,( Zombie Haiku: Good Poetry for Your...Brains) In the few that I've read of Stephen King, I have become his fan, though each of his stories have a few elements(at least)that I could have done without. Take for instance The Ritual of Chüd in It. Still, disturbing as it is, it can be neglected in terms of the brilliance (and also the length) of the rest of the tale. But I finished this one last night. A "Blood is really warm, it's like drinking hot chocolate but with more screaming." --Ryan Mecum,( Zombie Haiku: Good Poetry for Your...Brains) In the few that I've read of Stephen King, I have become his fan, though each of his stories have a few elements(at least)that I could have done without. Take for instance The Ritual of Chüd in It. Still, disturbing as it is, it can be neglected in terms of the brilliance (and also the length) of the rest of the tale. But I finished this one last night. And I'm still nauseated. Seriously. Let's get to the story. It's about Cal and his sister Becky who on a cross-country drive pause by the 6 feet tall grass of rural Kansas, only to find a kid crying from amidst the grass for help. They go in there, unsuspecting to discover pretty soon all is not what it seems to be, and they could've done better staying back. Meanwhile, I came to know of it from the Netflix adaptation, I thought it would be good to read the novella before the movie with such underwhelming response. The story-telling is just as good as any other horror tale, for, obviously it's King writing this. Undeniably unique, too; it was Vincenzo Natali who said: "Who would think that grass could be frightening? Trust Stephen King and Joe Hill to find a way. They have transformed an otherwise innocuous Kansas field into a stage for some of the most disturbing horror fiction I have ever read." However, you can't deny it's entirely flawless, not a justified character development, to speak of one. Also, to speak of the truth, it's really way too gory, at particularly one instance for my taste. I don't mind anything that's spine-chilling or demands to stay awake a few nights( good frightening tales make me sleep better actually) but this one is what can be called "redundant gore". In the Netflix adaptation however, these flaws are rectified to a certain extent. And the experimental non-chronological way of storytelling was, to say the truth way better than the novella, or even the cool audibook narrated be Stephen Lang. And besides the movie had the amazing performance of Patrick Wilson, and ended on a poignant-yet-optimistic note that suited me well. Less of the graphicness, but that's one of the reasons most enjoy horror-slasher. That, and the reason it's done masterfully is the reason for this rating, though I will tell you to watch the movie rather if you choose one. "Becky thought she had walked twenty steps into the grass. Maybe thirty at most. The road should’ve been close enough to hit with a Frisbee. It was, instead, as if she had walked the length of a football field and then some. A battered red Datsun, zipping along the highway, looked no bigger than a Matchbox car. A hundred and forty yards of grass—a softly flowing ocean of watered green silk—stood between her and that slender blacktop thread."

  11. 5 out of 5

    Amanda NEVER MANDY

    I found out this story existed because of a not yet released Netflix movie and was excited. I immediately decided I wanted to read it first. I found out this story existed in a electronic book format and was devastated. I hate that method and do everything I can to avoid it. I found out this story existed online where I could easily access it and was excited again. I read the story, loved the story mostly (the bit of weird flashback lost me) and was satisfied. I found out this story existed as a re I found out this story existed because of a not yet released Netflix movie and was excited. I immediately decided I wanted to read it first. I found out this story existed in a electronic book format and was devastated. I hate that method and do everything I can to avoid it. I found out this story existed online where I could easily access it and was excited again. I read the story, loved the story mostly (the bit of weird flashback lost me) and was satisfied. I found out this story existed as a released Netflix movie I could now watch and was back to excited again. It was last Saturday night and I watched it and absolutely loved it. There were differences between the two but nothing that took from the original. I found out this story existed in an upcoming book that I was having shipped to me and felt sheepish. Why didn’t I do my research better before going on a mad crazy search? Five stars to a short story that was worth all of the shenanigans.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Sagan

    I'm in a mood for shorter stories as I'm trying to read at least 52 books this year, since the number I set up at the beginning of 2019 is completely out of reach, and In the Tall Grass came into my life at the right time. I was also feeling a bit guilty for not liking The Institute, but In the Tall Grass cured me. I LOVED IT!!! I'm in a mood for shorter stories as I'm trying to read at least 52 books this year, since the number I set up at the beginning of 2019 is completely out of reach, and In the Tall Grass came into my life at the right time. I was also feeling a bit guilty for not liking The Institute, but In the Tall Grass cured me. I LOVED IT!!!

  13. 4 out of 5

    NILTON TEIXEIRA

    Well, I decided to read this novella before watching the Netflix adaptation. This is not a new short story. It was originally published in two parts in the June/July and August 2012 issues of Esquire magazine. I have never heard of it before Netflix. This short horror story is very, very vivid, intense and gory. And extremely well written (and this is not a surprise, after all this is uncle Stevie at his best and showing off his talented son). I was engaged from the beginning. I heard bad reviews of Well, I decided to read this novella before watching the Netflix adaptation. This is not a new short story. It was originally published in two parts in the June/July and August 2012 issues of Esquire magazine. I have never heard of it before Netflix. This short horror story is very, very vivid, intense and gory. And extremely well written (and this is not a surprise, after all this is uncle Stevie at his best and showing off his talented son). I was engaged from the beginning. I heard bad reviews of the adaptation, but after reading this I do have to watch it.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sumit RK

    Stephen King has a knack of writing horror stories set at the most unlikeliest of places and around the most unlikeliest of things/events. This one is easily one of his most disturbing short stories you will read. The story was tense and creepy but it has more about gore than horror. Not for everyone.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Pantelis Andreou

    Impeccable short story! Still waiting for a full length book from King and Hill! That would be phenomenal!

  16. 5 out of 5

    exploraDora

    ***4.5 gruesome stars***

  17. 5 out of 5

    Wayne Barrett

    4.5 Great collaboration between father and son. The King and his heir work well together. This was like The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon meets The Children of the Corn. I felt claustrophobic while reading this and if I ever hear a kid calling for help from a field like this one, they're screwed. 4.5 Great collaboration between father and son. The King and his heir work well together. This was like The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon meets The Children of the Corn. I felt claustrophobic while reading this and if I ever hear a kid calling for help from a field like this one, they're screwed.

  18. 4 out of 5

    mina

    It’s a short story so I shouldn’t be disappointed that it wasn’t well developed because it didn’t have time to do that. And I shouldn’t feel cheated that it wasn’t as good as the movie but I am, and the most disappointing thing is that it isn’t a mind-fuck like the movie.

  19. 5 out of 5

    jenny✨

    I was definitely unsettled by this one, but also somewhat underwhelmed by the absurd horror of the latter half—deranged limericks, hallucinatory dreams, (view spoiler)[cannibalized baby (hide spoiler)] and all. I was definitely unsettled by this one, but also somewhat underwhelmed by the absurd horror of the latter half—deranged limericks, hallucinatory dreams, (view spoiler)[cannibalized baby (hide spoiler)] and all.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Bradley

    Great short story. Ahhh, memories. The good old days of early King, a reminiscence, and a better rendition of what I thought Children of the Corn would be. :) Good ole Horror. "Help me!" Muahahahaha LOVED the limericks. Creepy, gory, and it pushes all the right buttons. Great short story. Ahhh, memories. The good old days of early King, a reminiscence, and a better rendition of what I thought Children of the Corn would be. :) Good ole Horror. "Help me!" Muahahahaha LOVED the limericks. Creepy, gory, and it pushes all the right buttons.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sean Smart

    A very impressive well written scary short story from father and son King

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    A brother and sister driving across Kansas with the windows rolled down hear a young boy calling for help in the middle of a field of Tall Grass. Stopping to investigate, they enter the Tall Grass, become separated, and get lost in the Tall Grass. They can’t get out of the Tall Grass because the Tall Grass is weird and you can never leave the Tall Grass once you enter the Tall Grass. Huh. Tall Grass, eh? The premise is interesting: a field of Tall Grass that is somehow an evil living thing where A brother and sister driving across Kansas with the windows rolled down hear a young boy calling for help in the middle of a field of Tall Grass. Stopping to investigate, they enter the Tall Grass, become separated, and get lost in the Tall Grass. They can’t get out of the Tall Grass because the Tall Grass is weird and you can never leave the Tall Grass once you enter the Tall Grass. Huh. Tall Grass, eh? The premise is interesting: a field of Tall Grass that is somehow an evil living thing where no matter how close you can hear the people caught within it, you will never find them and so the characters are eternally ensnared within this bizarre field of Tall Grass. But then the story continues and gets progressively more of a chore to read, which is pretty damning for a short story that’s only about 50-odd pages long. It seems Stephen King and his son Joe Hill wrote this because they wanted to write some cannibalistic scenes together and not much else. It seems horror these days means descriptions of people who’ve gone nuts and resorted to eating one another. Except it’s not scary or interesting to read, and by the end I was just wanting it all to be over and done with. How can a tense and exciting scenario have the vitality sucked from it? Too much description, repetitiveness, and stupid limericks. The excessive goriness in this story is the literary equivalent of the torture porn in those crappy Saw movies and feels like King is trying too hard to shock his readers. In the Tall Grass is a weak attempt at horror that serves to underline how fresh King’s stories were in Night Shift when it came out in the late 1970s and how tired his work reads these days in comparison.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Katie.dorny

    Shock value horror with no shock whatsoever. I thought with two greats of horror this would be an amazing novella - sadly it falls as flat as the ground the grass is growing on.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Melanie (mells_view)

    The moral of this story... do not help people you hear screaming from tall grass. Actually, just don’t help people, periodt. This one is quick, stressful, and ambiguous. K bye.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Eliza Rapsodia

    REVIEW IN ENGLISH Stephen King is one of my favorite writers and I still have a lot of novels to read, so I take my time between each of his works This time I'll talk about a short story he published in 2012 with his son Joe. For those who do not know, Joe uses a pen name because he did not want to rely on his father's fame. Still, eventually it became known that Joe is Joseph Hillstrom, King's eldest son. This has been quite an experience. Becky and Cal are twins. They have done everything tog REVIEW IN ENGLISH Stephen King is one of my favorite writers and I still have a lot of novels to read, so I take my time between each of his works This time I'll talk about a short story he published in 2012 with his son Joe. For those who do not know, Joe uses a pen name because he did not want to rely on his father's fame. Still, eventually it became known that Joe is Joseph Hillstrom, King's eldest son. This has been quite an experience. Becky and Cal are twins. They have done everything together and their parents think they will be connected for the rest of their lives. But one day, Becky reveals to her brother that she is pregnant but she does not tell who's the father. So the twins decide to move to live with their uncles until the child is born. When they are on the road they hear the voice of a child, who seems to be lost and is asking for help. The voice seems to come from the side of the road. The twins decide to get off the car and help the child, in the middle of the tall grass. What could I expect from father and son writing an horror story together? I have not read anything from Joe Hill, but I will do it soon. What I got is one of the most disturbing and asphyxiating short stories I've read in a long time. I mean, it's a story that catches you and maintains a constant tension. It is narrated in two voices and divided into small chapters. I have the impression that Cal's voice is Joe and Becky's is Stephen, but I am not entirely sure. I expected suspense and horrifying stuff and I got it. I could not ask for less. Becky and Cal got into the tall grass to help a lost child. What else is hidden in this desolate landscape? How a story begins in apparent normality to become strange and horrifying is one of the things I like most about King's works. It's capable of turning something normal into an horrible and hard to forget experience. And that's why it's worth reading. I loved to discover Joe Hill's work too. I totally recommend. ********************************* RESEÑA EN ESPAÑOL Hace bastante tiempo que no leía nada de Stephen King, y ya se sabe que es de mis escritores predilectos y aún me queda una larga cantidad de novelas suyas por leer. En esta ocasión hablaré de un relato corto que publicó en 2012 con su hijo Joe. Para quienes no lo sepan, en un inicio nadie sabía quien era Joe, ya que el prefería usar un seudónimo que no lo vinculara con la fama de su padre. Tiempo después y luego de tener novelas publicadas, se reveló públicamente que Joe Hill era nada más ni nada menos que Joseph Hillstrom King, el hijo mayor del escritor de Maine. Stephen King y Joe Hill. Padre e hijo. Crédito de la imagen De esta historia había escuchado opiniones buenas en blogs y canales de terror, pero ha sido una experiencia leerlo. Becky y Cal son hermanos gemelos, han hecho todo juntos y sus padres opinan que estarán conectados el resto de sus vidas. Pero un día Becky revela a su hermano que está embarazada pero no le dice de quién y eso hace que los gemelos decidan irse a vivir con sus tíos hasta que el niño nazca. Cuando viajan juntos por la carretera con las ventanillas abajo escuchan una voz de un niño que pide ayuda desesperadamente. La voz parece provenir de una zona despoblada a un costado del camino. Los gemelos deciden bajar del auto y ayudar al niño, en medio de la hierba alta. ¿Qué podíamos esperar de un tándem padre e hijo escribiendo juntos una historia de terror? En mi caso no he leído nada de Joe en solitario, pero espero hacerlo pronto. Lo que me encontrado es una de las historias cortas más perturbadoras y asfixiantes que he leído en mucho tiempo. Es decir, es un texto que te atrapa y mantiene una tensión constante. Está narrado a dos voces y dividido en pequeños capítulos. Tengo la impresión que la voz de Cal es Joe y la de Becky es Stephen, pero no podría afirmarlo con toda seguridad. Lo que he sentido ha sido un suspenso y un horror escalofriante. Y no podía pedir menos. Becky y Cal se meten en la hierba para ayudar a un niño extraviado. Pero, ¿qué otra cosa se esconde en este paraje desolado? Sin duda descubrir como una historia inicia en aparente normalidad para transformarse en un relato escalofriante es una de las cosas que más me gusta de King. Es capaz de convertir una situación cotidiana en una experiencia horrible y díficil de olvidar. Y por eso vale la pena leer esta historia corta y así también descubrir el trabajo de Joe Hill, que espero leer pronto. Recomendada.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Milica

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Great and original idea. However, I felt that after all that misery the story needed (deserved) a happy ending. Also, I didn't like that it turned out the grass originated from an extraterrestrial rock. That's why I gave it a 3. I recommend it, but not if you are easily shocked or disgusted. Great and original idea. However, I felt that after all that misery the story needed (deserved) a happy ending. Also, I didn't like that it turned out the grass originated from an extraterrestrial rock. That's why I gave it a 3. I recommend it, but not if you are easily shocked or disgusted.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    I am a BIG fan of Stephen King, but not so much Joe Hill (yet) having only read two of his novels. I am struggling with a rating on this short horror story perhaps bc I just finished reading POE'S shorts The Pit and the Pendulum:, The Masque of the Red Death, and the really short The Black Cat (which were all GREAT by the way) so this one just kind of fell short (no pun intended) for me.The book summary and the beginning did draw me in......the deserted rest stop, the abandoned cars, and the cal I am a BIG fan of Stephen King, but not so much Joe Hill (yet) having only read two of his novels. I am struggling with a rating on this short horror story perhaps bc I just finished reading POE'S shorts The Pit and the Pendulum:, The Masque of the Red Death, and the really short The Black Cat (which were all GREAT by the way) so this one just kind of fell short (no pun intended) for me.The book summary and the beginning did draw me in......the deserted rest stop, the abandoned cars, and the call for help from the tall grass and I did like the close relationship between the twins, but they soon lost their (IKE AND MIKE) connection (which was so built up) when they (view spoiler)[ entered into the tall grass which I did not expect....plus I really could have done without the brutality to the stomach of the pregnant Becky resulting in a miscarriage at six months and the eating of the entrails. (hide spoiler)] 2.5 Stars with a round up to 3 for the first half.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Hunter Shea

    That ending! Dear God.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Leon Enciso

    3,5 That was something.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Sheena

    Ugh. What an unsatisfying ending though..

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