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Chicks Unravel Time: Women Journey Through Every Season of Doctor Who

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The sister book to the 2011 Hugo Award-winning Chicks Dig Time Lords... In Chicks Unravel Time, editors Deborah Stanish (Whedonistas) and L.M. Myles bring together a host of award-winning female writers, media professionals and scientists to examine each season of new and classicDoctor Who from their unique perspectives. Diana Gabaldon discusses how Jamie McCrimmon inspired The sister book to the 2011 Hugo Award-winning Chicks Dig Time Lords... In Chicks Unravel Time, editors Deborah Stanish (Whedonistas) and L.M. Myles bring together a host of award-winning female writers, media professionals and scientists to examine each season of new and classicDoctor Who from their unique perspectives. Diana Gabaldon discusses how Jamie McCrimmon inspired her best-selling Outlander series, and Barbara Hambly (Benjamin January Mysteries) examines the delicate balance of rebooting a TV show. Seanan McGuire (Toby Daye series) reveals the power and pain of waiting in Series 5, and Una McCormack (The King's Dragon) argues that Sylvester McCoy's final year of Doctor Who is the show's best season ever. Other contributors include Juliet E. McKenna (Einarrin series), Tansy Rayner Roberts (Power and Majesty), Sarah Lotz (The Mall), Martha Wells (The Cloud Roads), Joan Frances Turner (Dust), Rachel Swirsky ("Fields of Gold") and Aliette de Bodard (Obsidian and Blood series).


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The sister book to the 2011 Hugo Award-winning Chicks Dig Time Lords... In Chicks Unravel Time, editors Deborah Stanish (Whedonistas) and L.M. Myles bring together a host of award-winning female writers, media professionals and scientists to examine each season of new and classicDoctor Who from their unique perspectives. Diana Gabaldon discusses how Jamie McCrimmon inspired The sister book to the 2011 Hugo Award-winning Chicks Dig Time Lords... In Chicks Unravel Time, editors Deborah Stanish (Whedonistas) and L.M. Myles bring together a host of award-winning female writers, media professionals and scientists to examine each season of new and classicDoctor Who from their unique perspectives. Diana Gabaldon discusses how Jamie McCrimmon inspired her best-selling Outlander series, and Barbara Hambly (Benjamin January Mysteries) examines the delicate balance of rebooting a TV show. Seanan McGuire (Toby Daye series) reveals the power and pain of waiting in Series 5, and Una McCormack (The King's Dragon) argues that Sylvester McCoy's final year of Doctor Who is the show's best season ever. Other contributors include Juliet E. McKenna (Einarrin series), Tansy Rayner Roberts (Power and Majesty), Sarah Lotz (The Mall), Martha Wells (The Cloud Roads), Joan Frances Turner (Dust), Rachel Swirsky ("Fields of Gold") and Aliette de Bodard (Obsidian and Blood series).

30 review for Chicks Unravel Time: Women Journey Through Every Season of Doctor Who

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kara Babcock

    I came to Doctor Who solely through the revived series. Christopher Eccleston was my first doctor, and it’s true that I’ll never forget him. I was gutted to learn that he was leaving after only the first season and convinced that this new fellow, “David Tennant” (if that’s even his real name) could never live up to the Ninth Doctor’s brusque charisma. The rest is history, of course—the Tenth Doctor stole my heart, along with the hearts of many other Whovians, and then he left and the world would I came to Doctor Who solely through the revived series. Christopher Eccleston was my first doctor, and it’s true that I’ll never forget him. I was gutted to learn that he was leaving after only the first season and convinced that this new fellow, “David Tennant” (if that’s even his real name) could never live up to the Ninth Doctor’s brusque charisma. The rest is history, of course—the Tenth Doctor stole my heart, along with the hearts of many other Whovians, and then he left and the world would never be the same. Again. The story of new Who fans mirrors the story of generations’ coming-of-age: we forget those who came before already had to go through this. We feel like we’re the first ones to experience these anguishes. But no, fans who had been watching since the black-and-white era had been through this seven times before. It’s special, but it’s not the end of the world. My experience with older episodes of Doctor Who has only picked up recently. My roommate showed me Tom Baker’s E-space Trilogy, introducing me (and bidding farewell to) Romana II, Adric, and K-9. Prior to that, I had only seen one or two episodes (I can’t even remember which Doctor, let alone the plot of the episodes) in bits and pieces. Reading Chicks Unravel Time has made me hungry to see more. The specificity with which each of these authors discuss the various seasons of Doctor Who made me yearn to be as familiar with the show as they are. I wanted to meet Barbara and Ian, Liz and Jo, Sarah Jane, Leela, Tegan, et al. Prior to this, I’d been aware of how much of the show’s rich history I’ve been missing out on—but this made it more tangible, less mysterious. Reading Wikipedia articles just isn’t the same, because they lack the deep emotional connections that these essays invoke. The book weaves through the history of Doctor Who in an appropriately non-chronological fashion. Each essay loosely examines a specific season, but each writer approaches the concept of a season-spanning essay slightly differently. Some examine the impact of certain Doctors or their companions on their experience as fans, such as in the exquisitely-titled essays “The Doctor’s Balls” and “David Tennant’s Bum”, by Diana Gabaldon and Laura Mead, respectively. Others look at how that Doctor’s contributions over their particular season affected the course of the show, as in the case of “The Ultimate Sixth”, by Tansy Rayner Roberts, or “How the Cold War Killed the Fifth Doctor”, by Erica McGillivray. I really enjoyed both of these approaches. They exposed me to different fans’ interpretations of seasons I had never seen, heightening that eagerness to discover these Doctors and companions for myself. Many of the other essays touched on the portrayal of race and gender in Doctor Who. Plenty of the essays extol the various companions, and in so doing offer different ways of looking at Doctor Who’s treatment of women and people of colour. Some compare Liz Shaw to Jo Grant and find the latter wanting, expressing disappointment over her seemingly-shallow characterization in contrast to Shaw’s doctorates and expertise. Others draw the opposite conclusion, finding Jo a realistic depiction of someone who is constantly underestimated because of her appearance but much more capable than she might appear. Having never seen these companions, I’ll have to wait until I can draw my own conclusions. Similarly, some of the essays examine the colonialist tones to the show—once again, trying to find that balance between dismissing the show as a product of its time and excoriating it for its missteps. Again, difficult for me to agree or disagree with the specific comments, but it’s fascinating to see all the different perspectives and analyses. Though I understand the attraction of the season-based premise, I almost wish the essays hadn’t been constricted in that way. I’d be really fascinated to read broader essays that analyze the show from the same perspectives across the years. (The authors do this to some extent, naturally. I’m talking about far more ambitious analysis that really doesn’t focus on a particular season.) And with Matt Smith leaving and the fiftieth anniversary special soon upon us, I smell a sequel brewing with some updated content (in my dreams!). So take it from me, fan of the new show but really uninitiated into the old, there’s still something here for any stripe of Doctor Who fan. Every one of these essays is good—which is what you would expect, considering the all-star cast that Stanish and Thomas have lined up. Every one offers a unique, insightful take on a particular season of Doctor Who, grappling with it on a much deeper level than simply listing the reasons they love it. To me, this is the ultimate act of love for a show: critiquing it. I can’t stand fans who get all touchy when you start poking holes in their favourite show. If you truly love something, you should still be able to love it in spite of its flaws. Discussing, examining, acknowledging, deconstructing those flaws are all important ways to be more involved. And, of course, there’s always the potential for change as a result of such discussions—who knows, maybe someone will listen. There’s no point in culture if we just sit by and consume it. We need to become participants. Chicks Unravel Time exemplifies this tradition of fan-led critique, and I highly recommend it.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jacqueline O.

    This essay collection is the sequel to the Hugo Award-winning Chicks Dig Time Lords. I really liked it. I enjoyed it more than the previous book. Each essay addresses a season of Doctor Who and the book covers the original Classic series (1963-1989), the TV Movie (1996) and the new series (2005-). The BBC Eighth Doctor books and Big Finish audios are also mentioned. The essays in this book cover a number of topics while also reviewing each season, and the essays are organized thematically, not ch This essay collection is the sequel to the Hugo Award-winning Chicks Dig Time Lords. I really liked it. I enjoyed it more than the previous book. Each essay addresses a season of Doctor Who and the book covers the original Classic series (1963-1989), the TV Movie (1996) and the new series (2005-). The BBC Eighth Doctor books and Big Finish audios are also mentioned. The essays in this book cover a number of topics while also reviewing each season, and the essays are organized thematically, not chronologically. I would have preferred chronological organization, but as the Introduction points out, I can always re-read the book's essays in chronological order. Also, the subtle theme-order makes sense. I did find it helpful to have an episode guide handy while reading. Below I'll mention one of my favorite essays, but I'm not going to go through all the essays, there are just too many. "A Dance with Drashigs" by Emma Nichols focuses on the Doctor & Companion relationship, specifically in Season 10. But more specifically it focuses on Jo Grant -- and in a positive manner. Jo is a companion who gets no respect in Who fandom, and she's often unfairly compared with the companion before her (Dr. Liz Shaw) and after (Sarah Jane Smith, often perceived as the Classic series fan's most favorite companion). Yet, I've always really liked Jo, though I tend to be quiet about it. And, as this essay points out, it's because I saw "later Jo" first -- the first episode I saw with her was "Frontier in Space" and Jo kicks, um, butt, in "Frontier in Space" -- she's rescuing the Doctor, getting herself out of cells, successfully resisting the Master's hypnotism, and figuring out just what the deal is with the Drashigs anyway (as well as the rest of the plot, which involves perception of an "enemy". When I saw Jo's first episode I understood why a lot of fans didn't like her -- but what I also like is she evolves and she takes it upon herself to learn and grow. This essay legitimizes my opinion of Jo and adds to it. I also enjoyed the fact that a new Who fan actually enjoyed classic Who (perceived "wisdom", especially in the Moffat Era, is that a New Who Fan can't possibly be interested in Classic Who. Yeah, right.) Or as Nichols put it: "...when Rose encountered an Auton in Hendrick's basement, I had never seen an episode of Doctor Who. By the time she was crying on a Norwegian Beach, I'd seen every episode of Doctor Who. And then there were the 70-ish eighth Doctor novels and dozens of Big Finish audios..." (p. 24). I simply love that. Course, it was the comments of one of the editors praising Jo Grant at a Chicago TARDIS convention panel that convinced me to go straight to the dealers' room to buy my own copy! But there are many, many brilliant essays in this book. I loved the one's about my favorite Doctors and companions: What Would Romana Do?, I'm from the TARDIS and I'm here to help you Barbara Wright and the Limits of Intervention, Build High for Happiness!, Ace Through the Looking Glass. But I also liked essays that brought up topics I had never thought of before: Reversing Polarities The Doctor, The Master, and False Binaries in Season 8; The Problem with Peri; Identity Crisis, The Still Point, The Doctor's Balls" (not what you think!). And, without a doubt, many of the essays had me wanting to sit down and re-watch Doctor Who -- in its entirety! I highly recommend this book, everyone from the casual fan to fans like the guy who kept sitting next to me at Chicago TARDIS who could name every episode in order from the entire run (so far) -- and did so, frequently, at length. (I look-up info like that, which is why Lofficier's Programme Guide still sits on my desk). Anyway, it's brilliant!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Tehani

    I'm a fairly recent Doctor Who convert. Early last year I became hooked thanks to wanting to watch the Neil Gaiman authored episode "The Doctor's Wife", so started with the Eleventh Doctor, and was so enamoured I went immediately back to the beginning of New Who and devoured the lot. Of course I have memories of watching Classic Who when I was a kid, with the Fourth Doctor, K9 and the Daleks being the only real things that I remember. And despite the best efforts of good friends trying to encour I'm a fairly recent Doctor Who convert. Early last year I became hooked thanks to wanting to watch the Neil Gaiman authored episode "The Doctor's Wife", so started with the Eleventh Doctor, and was so enamoured I went immediately back to the beginning of New Who and devoured the lot. Of course I have memories of watching Classic Who when I was a kid, with the Fourth Doctor, K9 and the Daleks being the only real things that I remember. And despite the best efforts of good friends trying to encourage me to embrace a bit of Classic Who now, I've struggled. Well, after reading Chicks Unravel Time, I just want to go back in time myself and be able to watch the whole of Doctor Who from the very beginning! The essays in this book are passionate, engaging and fascinating, encompassing, as the subtitle suggests, every season of Doctor Who. As we lead up to the 50th anniversary of the airing of the first episode, I can't think of a better way to garner an understanding of the show in its entirety! Some authors focussed on characters, some on story, some on companions, some on production, but all, even those finding fault with some show elements, betray the writer's love for Doctor Who, and this more than anything was a key factor in my own enjoyment. To be completely honest though, I do have a complaint - I simply wanted more! Some of the essays I really wanted to be longer, and I would have loved to see further exploration of the tie-in media (Big Finish audio plays and the novelisations etc) in relation to the characters being discussed. But really, when the one complaint is that the reader loves the books so much she wishes it was longer? That's a pretty good recommendation I reckon!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Although I loved the sister volume to this anthology of essays, Chicks Dig Time Lords: A Celebration of Doctor Who by the Women Who Love It, which was also arranged thematically rather than chronologically, I found the structure of 'Chicks Unravel Time' incoherent. The introduction does point to the fact that each essay is accompanied by the season number, allowing the book to be read 'in order' if you prefer, but I found this useless due to the fact that these numbers did not appear in the cont Although I loved the sister volume to this anthology of essays, Chicks Dig Time Lords: A Celebration of Doctor Who by the Women Who Love It, which was also arranged thematically rather than chronologically, I found the structure of 'Chicks Unravel Time' incoherent. The introduction does point to the fact that each essay is accompanied by the season number, allowing the book to be read 'in order' if you prefer, but I found this useless due to the fact that these numbers did not appear in the contents page. To use the season references at all you have to flick through the book! Maybe I am just simple, but instead of helping me to identify where the essays fit in, the numbers just brought it to my attention that the structure was weird. Like I said, I didn't have this problem with 'Chicks Dig Time Lords', which just felt like a collection of essays. I think the half-hearted structuring was a mistake. Thankfully most of the essays were really interesting, although 'The Doctor's Balls' by Diana Gabaldon put my back up quite early on. The subject of her essay is the masculinity of Doctor Who, and when she stated that "he's got balls" is the ultimate masculine compliment I knew we weren't going to get on. Her approach to female roles in the show were hypocritical: women should be equal, but men should protect them without question if something goes wrong. Ergh. I also did not appreciate her squeezing in a self-serving, smug footnote that took up half a page. However, it is the nature of anthologies to include a wide range of opinions, and, to Gabaldon's credit, she did get me thinking about the masculinity of the show. On to the positives! I recently borrowed another anthology of Doctor Who essays, Time, Unincorporated: Volume 2-Writings on the Classic Series, which made it clear to me why a women-only collection was necessary - a huge majority of the contributors are male. I am looking forward to reading it, but it made me appreciate the 'Chicks' series for giving the women in fandom more of a voice. These books have a really inclusive feel to them, which I suppose comes from the fact that the essays are discussing something I love. The essays that stood out for me were 'A Dance With Drashigs' by Emma Nichols, 'Donna Noble Saves the Universe' by Martha Wells, 'The Women We Don't See' by K. Tempest Bradford, 'The Problem With Peri' by Jennifer Pelland, 'The Sound's the Star' by Emily Kausalik, and 'Guten Tag, Hitler' by Rachel Swirsky. All of them contributed something interesting, however, even if I didn't agree! Overall this is an excellent book of essays that, for me, was let down by the structure.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas Whyte

    http://nwhyte.livejournal.com/2065071.html[return][return]A sister book to Chicks Dig Time Lords, this is a set of essays by women on each season/series of Doctor Who, old and new. One or two are sheer squee, but most are serious examinations of the show, usually (but not always) positive, often looking at gender issues, and one or two commentaries on race (also one chapter on "The Doctor's Balls" and another on "David Tennant's Bum"). I particularly enjoyed the chapters which were constructivel http://nwhyte.livejournal.com/2065071.html[return][return]A sister book to Chicks Dig Time Lords, this is a set of essays by women on each season/series of Doctor Who, old and new. One or two are sheer squee, but most are serious examinations of the show, usually (but not always) positive, often looking at gender issues, and one or two commentaries on race (also one chapter on "The Doctor's Balls" and another on "David Tennant's Bum"). I particularly enjoyed the chapters which were constructively critical - thinking of Caroline Symcox and Aliette de Bodard in particular - but almost all of them are good and thought-provoking. (But I discover that I have a finite tolerance for sheer squee.) Recommended for thoughtful Who fans.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kerry

    Fascinating collection of essays that I really, really enjoyed. ETA: I know that’s horribly short, but it was all I could manage on New Year’s Eve. I highly recommend this. It was perfect for me as end of year summer reading when I couldn’t manage a developing and focussed narrative. Instead, I could read an essay or two or even three, I could agree or disagree or learn something new and stop when I needed a break. Each essay was complete in itself and I wasn’t having to try to carry a story in my Fascinating collection of essays that I really, really enjoyed. ETA: I know that’s horribly short, but it was all I could manage on New Year’s Eve. I highly recommend this. It was perfect for me as end of year summer reading when I couldn’t manage a developing and focussed narrative. Instead, I could read an essay or two or even three, I could agree or disagree or learn something new and stop when I needed a break. Each essay was complete in itself and I wasn’t having to try to carry a story in my head. It’s lovely to get a feminine perspective on Doctor Who both new and old and this books offers lots of them. Doctor Who and 10/10 was a good way to finish the year!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Lynne

    I'm one of the contributors! I'm one of the contributors!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jamieson

    Chicks Unravel Time is a collection of essays, written by women, where each essay looks at a season of Doctor Who from a female perspective. Published in 2012, it covers the show up through Series 6. It's a enjoyable read with interesting ideas that's well worth it for fans of Doctor Who of course, but also sci-fi nerds in general and/or those interested in gender studies. Unlike my initial expectations, the book is not organized in a linear fashion (where we start with Season 1, go to Season 2, Chicks Unravel Time is a collection of essays, written by women, where each essay looks at a season of Doctor Who from a female perspective. Published in 2012, it covers the show up through Series 6. It's a enjoyable read with interesting ideas that's well worth it for fans of Doctor Who of course, but also sci-fi nerds in general and/or those interested in gender studies. Unlike my initial expectations, the book is not organized in a linear fashion (where we start with Season 1, go to Season 2, etc.). It instead jumps all over the place. The introduction explains that it can be read linearly, jumping all across Who history, or for those who want to read in series order, the season that corresponds with each essay is posted to the side at the start of each chapter. Thus, to read it in series order through the course of the show as I did, you can read the chapters in this order: 9, 20, 29, 5, 27, 2, 26, 34, 11, 3, 18, 10, 13, 16, 7, 12, 23, 25, 28, 6, 30, 19, 14, 22, 24, 4, 32, 1, 17, 15, 8, 21, 31, 33. I enjoyed the book and found it a quick, fun and thought-provoking read with bits of humor thrown in that mostly stemmed from memories of various referenced bits of Who.

  9. 4 out of 5

    KP Mathislife

    Some very interesting essays about doctor who with a focus on the female fans and the female companions. Some essays better than others of course but really gave me a lot of 'huh' or 'interesting' moments. Some very interesting essays about doctor who with a focus on the female fans and the female companions. Some essays better than others of course but really gave me a lot of 'huh' or 'interesting' moments.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Scott Haworth

    Very enjoyable!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Erika

    I had a lot of fun reading this book, it brought back a lot of memories of my old Doctor Who watching experiences, gave me new perspectives to look back on them with and in some cases exposed me to seasons I had not seen so it sort of felt like it was filling in the gaps a bit. I was impressed with how honest the essays were, these were not written by rabid, rose colored glass wearing fangirls but by thoughtful fans who clearly put a lot of thought into what made one of their favorite shows work I had a lot of fun reading this book, it brought back a lot of memories of my old Doctor Who watching experiences, gave me new perspectives to look back on them with and in some cases exposed me to seasons I had not seen so it sort of felt like it was filling in the gaps a bit. I was impressed with how honest the essays were, these were not written by rabid, rose colored glass wearing fangirls but by thoughtful fans who clearly put a lot of thought into what made one of their favorite shows work and sometimes not work. Where it got it right, where it got it wrong and why both were important for so many reasons. My one and only quibble with this book is that I wish they had organized the essays in order of the seasons they covered. I feel it would have been interesting to see the essays as a progression through the series but that is such a small thing and ultimately their order didn 19t really detract from my enjoyment of reading them so I don 19t really hold it against the book. If you are a fan of Doctor Who, especially if you are a fan of the classic Doctor Who series this is a fun book that makes you think and look a bit differently at a beloved series and it made me want to invest in a regionless DVD player so I can get as many of the surviving episodes as I can.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ralst

    The essays themselves were interesting and brought back many memories from a childhood spent watching a number of different Doctors and their companions. The book is let down, however, by the continuing misuse of the American term 'season' to refer to a British 'series'. A little thing, perhaps, but it was increasingly annoying and showed a lack of regard to the original source material that was unbecoming. The choice of 'season' to mean 'series' in the case of classic Who could have been forgive The essays themselves were interesting and brought back many memories from a childhood spent watching a number of different Doctors and their companions. The book is let down, however, by the continuing misuse of the American term 'season' to refer to a British 'series'. A little thing, perhaps, but it was increasingly annoying and showed a lack of regard to the original source material that was unbecoming. The choice of 'season' to mean 'series' in the case of classic Who could have been forgiven if the use had been explained. As a child, I don't recall anyone talking about this series or that series of Doctor Who, as it was more accurately a serial than series (unlike new Who), and even today the DVD releases fail to portion things into series or seasons. So to have writers continually talk about season seven or eighteen or five was extremely confusing, until you reached a point in the story that identified a Doctor and, more importantly, a companion. All that confusion could have been avoided with the inclusion of a list of Doctors, story titles and how they were going to be referred to in the book, but instead we were left to guess. It was sloppy.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Michel Siskoid Albert

    Chicks Unravel Time is the sequel to Chicks Dig Time Lords, again all essays written by female fans of Doctor Who, but where the first book had a lot of personal "how I got into it" stories that at some point felt a little redundant, this one features analytical pieces on each season. And I eat that kind of stuff like it was manna from the sky. Unravel presents 34 essays, one for each season of both the classic and new series (up to Series 6), including the TV Movie and the Tennant specials. The Chicks Unravel Time is the sequel to Chicks Dig Time Lords, again all essays written by female fans of Doctor Who, but where the first book had a lot of personal "how I got into it" stories that at some point felt a little redundant, this one features analytical pieces on each season. And I eat that kind of stuff like it was manna from the sky. Unravel presents 34 essays, one for each season of both the classic and new series (up to Series 6), including the TV Movie and the Tennant specials. They're not in order, though we're told we certainly could read the book "chronologically", though I wish there was an alternate table of contents or index to help someone do that (not that it's overly complicated to do so). Regardless, the authors do an excellent job of bringing out the themes of each season, often in the context of gender studies, but not always. Just because you're a female fan doesn't mean you view the show through that filter no more than male authors focus only on maleness. It's a collection of refreshing takes, many making me reevaluate aspects of the show, with a strong focus on the role of the companion, and yes, one article nominally about David Tennant's bum.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sunil

    Chicks Unravel Time: Women Journey Through Every Season of Doctor Who does just what it says on the cover: 33 women write about all 33 seasons of Doctor Who. On the surface, this seems like an interesting idea, but what it means is that it is nigh impossible for someone to truly appreciate the whole book unless they have seen all 33 seasons of Doctor Who. Having only seen New Who, I understood the pieces about those seasons the best, but the essays about the older seasons did pique my interest i Chicks Unravel Time: Women Journey Through Every Season of Doctor Who does just what it says on the cover: 33 women write about all 33 seasons of Doctor Who. On the surface, this seems like an interesting idea, but what it means is that it is nigh impossible for someone to truly appreciate the whole book unless they have seen all 33 seasons of Doctor Who. Having only seen New Who, I understood the pieces about those seasons the best, but the essays about the older seasons did pique my interest in certain stories, episodes, and Companions. The topics are fairly varied, with authors focusing on everything from David Tennant's bum to the musical score, but it felt like the vast majority of the pieces were an analysis of each episode in the season as it related to whatever theme she was extracting from it. Overall, the book is a mixed bag, but it did give me a strong appreciation for the strengths of every single season of the show. I'm far more interested in watching the older stuff now!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Catherine Thompson

    In this, the companion volume to Chicks Dig Time Lords, female fans of "Doctor Who" go through every season--more or less--and write about aspects of the show that changed their perspectives, or that they take issue with, or that they simply wish to praise. Every incarnation of the Doctor is discussed (including the Eighth Doctor, in case you were wondering!), sometimes more than once. And the overall result is... timey-wimey. These essays, written by science-fiction authors in the main, touch o In this, the companion volume to Chicks Dig Time Lords, female fans of "Doctor Who" go through every season--more or less--and write about aspects of the show that changed their perspectives, or that they take issue with, or that they simply wish to praise. Every incarnation of the Doctor is discussed (including the Eighth Doctor, in case you were wondering!), sometimes more than once. And the overall result is... timey-wimey. These essays, written by science-fiction authors in the main, touch on all kinds of subjects: the role of the companion, the changing face of the fandom, the use of music in Classic Who, the (questionable) science of "Doctor Who," even spirituality. They're thoughtful, well-written, and often amusing as well as thought-provoking. Once you've read this (and Chicks Dig Time Lords), you'll never look at "Doctor Who" in the same way again.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    An interesting, fun read. My criticism is that I would have liked it if the articles were marked with which Doctor they were about. The author of each article tended to reference which season they were writing about but not being super intimate with the entire history of Doctor Who it was a bit of a guess to know which Doctor the author was talking about it until they specifically mentioned it. To make matters worse, the post reboot articles referred to Seasons 1 through 5 but were talking about An interesting, fun read. My criticism is that I would have liked it if the articles were marked with which Doctor they were about. The author of each article tended to reference which season they were writing about but not being super intimate with the entire history of Doctor Who it was a bit of a guess to know which Doctor the author was talking about it until they specifically mentioned it. To make matters worse, the post reboot articles referred to Seasons 1 through 5 but were talking about Doctors Nine thru Eleven. Also, there were a couple of articles that could have been edited better. Still, there was a lot of interesting insights about the long history of Doctor Who and it whetted my appetite for seeing more classic episodes.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Katherine Sas

    This was a welcome and enjoyable read after several more academic studies. The editors assembled a wide range of diverse and interesting (and geeky) women, and the essays included (one per season of the show) were uniformly well-written, intelligent, and insightful. I liked the variety, too: Some focused on seasonal arcs and themes, some a particular episode, others an individual character. It's not all universal praise, either. There's a healthy amount of critique (feminist and otherwise) mixed This was a welcome and enjoyable read after several more academic studies. The editors assembled a wide range of diverse and interesting (and geeky) women, and the essays included (one per season of the show) were uniformly well-written, intelligent, and insightful. I liked the variety, too: Some focused on seasonal arcs and themes, some a particular episode, others an individual character. It's not all universal praise, either. There's a healthy amount of critique (feminist and otherwise) mixed in with the squee and feels. But neither does the collection shortchange those fangirly impulses. This is a book by fans, for fans. For some reason this was easier for me to get a hold of than its predecessor, Chicks Dig Time Lords, but I'll definitely be tracking that down.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Christina

    Half the fun of this book is thinking "hey, I've met that author!" for half of the chapters. The other half is learning about Who stories I haven't seen yet and looking forward to them, and to see different angles of Who stories I may or may not have liked before. It was a little weird to read because the stories don't go in chronological order, but reading a chapter a night was really helpful with that. And you can read them in order if you want to, they're marked with the season they're about. Half the fun of this book is thinking "hey, I've met that author!" for half of the chapters. The other half is learning about Who stories I haven't seen yet and looking forward to them, and to see different angles of Who stories I may or may not have liked before. It was a little weird to read because the stories don't go in chronological order, but reading a chapter a night was really helpful with that. And you can read them in order if you want to, they're marked with the season they're about.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Crowe

    A stronger, more substantive book than Chicks Dig Time Lords, with some piercing insights by the essayists. Compared with some of the heavy geekishness one sees in discussions about a fannish thing, these essays are quite refreshing -- erudite and thoughtful without being abstruse. With one essay for each season of Doctor Who, there will inevitably be essays that will be trickier to follow unless you've watched everything. I haven't, so I confess that my attention drifted from time to time. A stronger, more substantive book than Chicks Dig Time Lords, with some piercing insights by the essayists. Compared with some of the heavy geekishness one sees in discussions about a fannish thing, these essays are quite refreshing -- erudite and thoughtful without being abstruse. With one essay for each season of Doctor Who, there will inevitably be essays that will be trickier to follow unless you've watched everything. I haven't, so I confess that my attention drifted from time to time.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    I liked this book, not as much as the first one I read "Chicks Dig Time Lords," but it was interesting. The reviews of seasons that I had seen made me want to see them again, but it was also fun to read about those that I wasn't familiar with (it's frustrating that a lot of the earlier shows no longer exist). I had always wondered how/why Susan, Ian and Barbara had left the Doctor and the TARDIS, and my question was answered. I liked this book, not as much as the first one I read "Chicks Dig Time Lords," but it was interesting. The reviews of seasons that I had seen made me want to see them again, but it was also fun to read about those that I wasn't familiar with (it's frustrating that a lot of the earlier shows no longer exist). I had always wondered how/why Susan, Ian and Barbara had left the Doctor and the TARDIS, and my question was answered.

  21. 4 out of 5

    M.k. Yost

    I suppose my disappointment with this is that I have enjoyed so much serious scholarship about 'Doctor Who' with exciting insights into the show's production history and philosophy, that I just didn't find these little personal vignettes all that engaging. Some were well done and enjoyable, but I found myself skimming a lot of them, hoping my eyes would catch something interesting to slow me down. I suppose my disappointment with this is that I have enjoyed so much serious scholarship about 'Doctor Who' with exciting insights into the show's production history and philosophy, that I just didn't find these little personal vignettes all that engaging. Some were well done and enjoyable, but I found myself skimming a lot of them, hoping my eyes would catch something interesting to slow me down.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kay

    I was surprised by how much fun I found this book to read, because I've seen very few episodes of Old Who and often had no prior knowledge of the characters being discussed. But it was precisely the various authors' interest in the particular aspects that they chose to explore that kindled my interest. I may never get around to watching those particular episodes, but I kept on wanting to read the next essay in this collection. I was surprised by how much fun I found this book to read, because I've seen very few episodes of Old Who and often had no prior knowledge of the characters being discussed. But it was precisely the various authors' interest in the particular aspects that they chose to explore that kindled my interest. I may never get around to watching those particular episodes, but I kept on wanting to read the next essay in this collection.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Krista McCracken

    A great collection of analytical essays written by female fans on each season of new and classic Doctor Who. The range of authors, their relationships to Doctor Who, and their educational or personal interest backgrounds made for a very diverse anthology. I didn't love every essay but I think that's to be anticipated with any book of this nature. But I did find every essay interesting and enjoyed the book generally. A great collection of analytical essays written by female fans on each season of new and classic Doctor Who. The range of authors, their relationships to Doctor Who, and their educational or personal interest backgrounds made for a very diverse anthology. I didn't love every essay but I think that's to be anticipated with any book of this nature. But I did find every essay interesting and enjoyed the book generally.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Travis

    Like any anthology, this is an uneven read. Some essays are quite clever and the love of the show comes through, others feel a bit phoned in or reek of over-thinking things. As a steady listener to the Verity podcast, it was interesting to read their thoughts without the chatty element or them talking over each other. I'm always interested to learn which Doctor people think of as THEIR Doctor and why, so that part was interesting. Like any anthology, this is an uneven read. Some essays are quite clever and the love of the show comes through, others feel a bit phoned in or reek of over-thinking things. As a steady listener to the Verity podcast, it was interesting to read their thoughts without the chatty element or them talking over each other. I'm always interested to learn which Doctor people think of as THEIR Doctor and why, so that part was interesting.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Hudsonpubliclibrary

    Some stellar essays, some rambling essays, some rather boring essays; all mixed together in a compilation of short pieces by female authors making one (or sometimes more) point(s) about one season of Dr. Who each. So, you get a flavor for some of each of the Doctors and get a few thoughtful nuggets to carry away from the book.

  26. 5 out of 5

    April

    Some stellar essays, some rambling essays, some rather boring essays; all mixed together in a compilation of short pieces by female authors making one (or sometimes more) point(s) about one season of Dr. Who each. So, you get a flavor for some of each of the Doctors and get a few thoughtful nuggets to carry away from the book.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Theresa

    I loved this book. The essays were entertaining. And they weren't in chronologivcal order. Fans of the classic series and new Who fans will love this volume I loved this book. The essays were entertaining. And they weren't in chronologivcal order. Fans of the classic series and new Who fans will love this volume

  28. 5 out of 5

    Terri M.

    Probably a better read if you have seen more of episodes of Doctor Who prior to the recent reboot. Towards the end, I skipped many of the essays about the seasons prior to the reboot.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Elanor Matton-Johnson

    I adored this book. Some essays made me punch the air, some made me laugh, all made me think, and some made me rush to the DVD rental store because I really wanted to see more Jo Grant.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Leilani

    A highly enjoyable ramble through all of televised Doctor Who, with lots of essays that raised interesting ideas and only a couple of clunkers.

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