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Mary Poppins Opens the Door

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From the moment Mary Poppins arrives at Number Seventeen Cherry-Tree Lane, everyday life at the Banks house is forever changed. This classic series tells the story of the world's most beloved nanny, who brings enchantment and excitement with her everywhere she goes. Featuring the charming original cover art by Mary Shepard, these new editions are sure to delight readers of From the moment Mary Poppins arrives at Number Seventeen Cherry-Tree Lane, everyday life at the Banks house is forever changed. This classic series tells the story of the world's most beloved nanny, who brings enchantment and excitement with her everywhere she goes. Featuring the charming original cover art by Mary Shepard, these new editions are sure to delight readers of all ages. Mary Poppins reappears just in time! According to her tape measure, Jane and Michael have grown "Worse and Worse" since she went away. But the children won't have time to be naughty with all that Mary has planned for them. A visit to Mr. Twigley’s music box-filled attic, an encounter with the Marble Boy, and a ride on Miss Calico’s enchanted candy canes are all part of an average day out with everyone's favorite nanny.


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From the moment Mary Poppins arrives at Number Seventeen Cherry-Tree Lane, everyday life at the Banks house is forever changed. This classic series tells the story of the world's most beloved nanny, who brings enchantment and excitement with her everywhere she goes. Featuring the charming original cover art by Mary Shepard, these new editions are sure to delight readers of From the moment Mary Poppins arrives at Number Seventeen Cherry-Tree Lane, everyday life at the Banks house is forever changed. This classic series tells the story of the world's most beloved nanny, who brings enchantment and excitement with her everywhere she goes. Featuring the charming original cover art by Mary Shepard, these new editions are sure to delight readers of all ages. Mary Poppins reappears just in time! According to her tape measure, Jane and Michael have grown "Worse and Worse" since she went away. But the children won't have time to be naughty with all that Mary has planned for them. A visit to Mr. Twigley’s music box-filled attic, an encounter with the Marble Boy, and a ride on Miss Calico’s enchanted candy canes are all part of an average day out with everyone's favorite nanny.

30 review for Mary Poppins Opens the Door

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    Mary Poppins Opens the Door (Mary Poppins #3), P.L. Travers, Mary Shepard (Illustrator), Agnes Sims (Illustrator) Mary Poppins Opens the Door is a British children's fantasy novel by the Australian-British writer P.L. Travers, the third book and last novel in the Mary Poppins series that features the magical English nanny Mary Poppins. It was published in 1943 by Harcourt, Brace & World, Inc and illustrated by Mary Shepard and Agnes Sims. Mary Poppins arrives in the wake of the last fireworks disp Mary Poppins Opens the Door (Mary Poppins #3), P.L. Travers, Mary Shepard (Illustrator), Agnes Sims (Illustrator) Mary Poppins Opens the Door is a British children's fantasy novel by the Australian-British writer P.L. Travers, the third book and last novel in the Mary Poppins series that features the magical English nanny Mary Poppins. It was published in 1943 by Harcourt, Brace & World, Inc and illustrated by Mary Shepard and Agnes Sims. Mary Poppins arrives in the wake of the last fireworks display by the Banks family. The Banks children Michael, Jane, the twins, and Annabel plead with her to stay. Mrs. Banks has Mary and the children find a piano tuner, who happens to be Mary's cousin, Mr. Twigley. When Mary and the children visit, Mr. Twigley tries to unburden himself from seven wishes given to him when he was born. Besides pianos, Mr. Twigley also specializes in songbirds such as nightingales, one of which he releases when he's finished. He also provides music boxes for Mary and the Banks children to dance to. When they return home later, the drawing room piano is playing perfectly, and when the Banks children ask Mary what happened, she sharply rebukes them. Other adventures in the book include Mary telling the story of a king who was outsmarted by a cat (known as "The Cat That Looked at a King"), the park statue of Neleus that comes to life for a time during one of their outings, their visit to confectioner Miss Calico and her flying peppermint sticks, an undersea (High-Tide) party where Mary Poppins is the guest of honor, and a party between fairy tale rivals in the Crack between the Old Year and the New. When the children ask why Mary Poppins, a real person, is there, they are told that she is a fairy tale come true. Finally, the citizens of the town as well as many other characters from the previous two books turn out to say good-bye to Mary. The children realize they're not leaving, but Mary is, and they rush to the nursery window and see her entering a house just like theirs, opening the door, and walking in. Later that evening, Mr. Banks sees a shooting star, and they all wish upon it, the children faintly make out Mary Poppins. They wave and she waves back to them. "Mary Poppins herself had flown away, but the gifts she had brought would remain for always." تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز پانزدهم ماه می سال 2007میلادی عنوان: مری پاپینر در را باز میکند؛ نویسنده: پاملا لیندون تراورس؛ تاریخ بهنگام رسانی 17/07/1399هجری خورشیدی؛ ا. شربیانی

  2. 4 out of 5

    Hilary

    This is the third in the series and although Mary Poppins leaves for the last time in this book, the other books in the series contain stories that fit in the time scale of the first 3 books, so in a way this is comforting as Mary's departure needn't feel so final. We loved this mixture of everyday and magic, we love the family and we so wanted Mary Poppins just for once to admit the magic happened, only if just with a wink. The children's character's are wonderful, ever hopeful and kind. We love This is the third in the series and although Mary Poppins leaves for the last time in this book, the other books in the series contain stories that fit in the time scale of the first 3 books, so in a way this is comforting as Mary's departure needn't feel so final. We loved this mixture of everyday and magic, we love the family and we so wanted Mary Poppins just for once to admit the magic happened, only if just with a wink. The children's character's are wonderful, ever hopeful and kind. We loved the story of Neleus and his freedom for an hour or two and how the children would consider this statue's feelings and try to read within his sight in the park so he wasn't too bored, this is exactly the sort of thing my children would have wanted to do when they were younger.The cat can look at a king was a lovely story of philosophy, considering happiness and what intelligence really is. The chapter about the musical boxes is wonderful, the idea everyone has their own piece of music is great, what a nice idea, it has left us trying to work out what ours would be. A wonderful, magical story. Like Mary Poppins herself, this book gives you no answers, but lots to think about.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl

    The end of the trilogy. Especially poignant, as revealed in the introduction, which explains the historical significance of the 5th of November and alludes to the horrors of WWII which robbed many children of the innocence and happiness that all should experience. But the story itself is much akin to the first two, and that's a good thing. I really like the original fairy tales inserted into each. In this entry, it's The Cat Who Looked at a King, a parable on the difference between cleverness and The end of the trilogy. Especially poignant, as revealed in the introduction, which explains the historical significance of the 5th of November and alludes to the horrors of WWII which robbed many children of the innocence and happiness that all should experience. But the story itself is much akin to the first two, and that's a good thing. I really like the original fairy tales inserted into each. In this entry, it's The Cat Who Looked at a King, a parable on the difference between cleverness and wisdom. Lovely and valuable. Also lovely are the illustrations, now by Mary Shepard and Agnes Sims. I get the impression that Shepard drew MP, and that Sims drew the children, other characters, and settings 'in the style of' Shepard. The drawings are more refined, a finer line of brush or pencil (?) enables more detail. Note: these are dated, and there are a few problems. For example, I'm not at all comfortable with the depiction of Friday, from Robinson Crusoe. Otoh, the depictions of the servant class and of the poor are sympathetic, and men are gently mocked as much as are women (iow, not sexist). I recommend these to all adults who have access to their inner child, and to families who can discuss the wonder, the joy, and the small issues.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Trish

    In this 3rd installment, Mary Poppins comes back like a Shooting Star! This time, there are 5 Banks children, of course, as Annabel was born in the previous installment. So this was new territory and yet not quite because to my surprise and delight, I discovered that some elements had made it from this book into the second movie. Moreover, one of the great things about these stories is that some elements feel familiar because Mary Poppins herself does - like a favorite piece of clothing. My favouri In this 3rd installment, Mary Poppins comes back like a Shooting Star! This time, there are 5 Banks children, of course, as Annabel was born in the previous installment. So this was new territory and yet not quite because to my surprise and delight, I discovered that some elements had made it from this book into the second movie. Moreover, one of the great things about these stories is that some elements feel familiar because Mary Poppins herself does - like a favorite piece of clothing. My favourite bit in this installment wasn’t one of the adventures the children had but the story Mary Poppins told them of the cat that looked at the king. That was seriously marvellous. Though the encounter with all the fairytale characters was very nice also. The ending, then, came as a bit of a surprise considering that I have the boxed set that contains the first 4 books ((view spoiler)[ so I naturally didn't expect her to leave for the last time already (hide spoiler)] ). (view spoiler)[ Mary Poppins herself had flown away, but the gifts she had brought would remain for always. (hide spoiler)] The writing was as if P.L. Travers had written all three stories in one go and then simply divided them afterwards. The sheer amount of ideas this woman had flying around in her mind that she then bound onto the pages … stunning! And very nice life lessons for the children. I have the theory that (view spoiler)[Mary leaving is to test the family if they can live without her and to also prepare them, instead of letting them get used to her presence (hide spoiler)] . Not sure that works for me as well as how the movie handled it, ((view spoiler)[aka her staying precisely as long as she is needed and not a second longer (hide spoiler)] ) but still cool. This third volume might have been my favorite along with the first (there is a special kind of magic in beginnings). Nevertheless, I stand by my assessments in the previous review: 1) the movies are slightly better for me, 2) the books are just what young AND old need, especially nowadays.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ivonne Rovira

    I thoroughly enjoyed Mary Poppins Opens the Door — much more than I thought I would, as it is P.L. Travers’ third book in the Mary Poppins series and because the very first story about Mary Poppins’ beleaguered cousin, Mr. Twigley, was so reminiscent of tales in both the inaugural Mary Poppins (Uncle Albert Wiggs) and Mary Poppins Comes Back (cousin Arthur Turvy and his housekeeper Topsy). However, the ensuing tales proved delightful and inventive, although never up to the standard set in the fi I thoroughly enjoyed Mary Poppins Opens the Door — much more than I thought I would, as it is P.L. Travers’ third book in the Mary Poppins series and because the very first story about Mary Poppins’ beleaguered cousin, Mr. Twigley, was so reminiscent of tales in both the inaugural Mary Poppins (Uncle Albert Wiggs) and Mary Poppins Comes Back (cousin Arthur Turvy and his housekeeper Topsy). However, the ensuing tales proved delightful and inventive, although never up to the standard set in the first book. In Mary Poppins Opens the Door, Jane and Michael Banks (and, at times, their twin siblings Barbara and John) encounter very unusual horses, an enchanting — and enchanted — statue, a very clever cat, and other adventures. Some of the tales, particularly “The Cat That Looked At a King” and “The Marble Boy,” dispensed some subtle wisdom as to what things are truly important in life, morals that were missing in the two earlier books. These were quite touching. The Banks children also encounter beloved characters from the previous books, returned again for another visit. I had been planning to abandon the series after three books, quitting, so to speak, before the series invariably deteriorated. But the more I think about it, the more I think that I shall read the fourth and final storybook, Mary Poppins in the Park. As Jane and Michael could testify, Mary Poppins always leaves you begging for more. And, thus far, so it has proved.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Aranda

    This is probably my least favorite Mary Poppins book as the story format has fallen into a predictable pattern (Mary Poppins returns in an epic way, we meet family members, fairy tale and animal stories, and kids forget that Mary has to leave and try to get her to stay). Even though the stories followed a pattern they were still unique and kept me interested throughout the book. I’m not sure what it was about the second chapter that made it my least favorite chapter but it almost made me change This is probably my least favorite Mary Poppins book as the story format has fallen into a predictable pattern (Mary Poppins returns in an epic way, we meet family members, fairy tale and animal stories, and kids forget that Mary has to leave and try to get her to stay). Even though the stories followed a pattern they were still unique and kept me interested throughout the book. I’m not sure what it was about the second chapter that made it my least favorite chapter but it almost made me change my rating. The rest of the book made up for it though especially the last few chapters with all the dancing. In the last chapter, all of Mary Poppins family and friends returned and it was wonderful. I’m still upset that Bert and Mary didn’t dance together, but there was a tender moment between them that fits Mary’s characters. It became very clear how much Ms. Travers cared about Mr. Banks over Mrs. Banks. Reading you can tell how important his feelings were, and Mrs. Banks seemed like a nervous or upset person whenever she appeared. I’m not sure why this is so but it doesn’t seem like it will change in the last Mary Poppins book Ms. Travers wrote.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Guylou (Two Dogs and a Book)

    📚 Hello Book Friends! Just finished reading the third book in the whimsical Mary Poppins series entitled Mary Poppins Opens the Door by P.L. Travers. As in all the books, Mary Poppins returns to number 17 Cherry Tree Lane, London in a spectacular way and again the Banks children: Jane, Michael, fraternal twins John and Barbara, and Annabel will have fantastic adventures. This book was fun and enchanting. I was sad at the end as Mary Poppins leaves the children again. The feeling of abandonment f 📚 Hello Book Friends! Just finished reading the third book in the whimsical Mary Poppins series entitled Mary Poppins Opens the Door by P.L. Travers. As in all the books, Mary Poppins returns to number 17 Cherry Tree Lane, London in a spectacular way and again the Banks children: Jane, Michael, fraternal twins John and Barbara, and Annabel will have fantastic adventures. This book was fun and enchanting. I was sad at the end as Mary Poppins leaves the children again. The feeling of abandonment felt by the children was much stronger this time around. But do not despair, she will be back since there are more books in this series to read. #readwithrovergroup #bookstadog #poodles #poodlestagram #poodlesofinstagram #furbabies #dogsofinstagram #bookstagram #dogsandbooks #bookishlife #bookishlove #bookstagrammer #book #books #booklover #bookish #bookaholic #reading #readersofinstagram #instaread #ilovebooks #bookishcanadians #canadianbookstagram #bookreviewer #bookcommunity #bibliophile #bookphotography #marypoppinsopensthedoor #pltravers #bookreview

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lynne

    This is my favourite of the 6 books so far. Up till now they've been mainly magical, and I had mixed feelings about children being left in the care of a nanny who screwed with their minds and refused to answer their questions. However, in this one, the mystical element hinted at in the previous book becomes a bit more obvious and there are passages of incredible beauty amongst the more commonplace magic (if that's not an oxymoron). This is my favourite of the 6 books so far. Up till now they've been mainly magical, and I had mixed feelings about children being left in the care of a nanny who screwed with their minds and refused to answer their questions. However, in this one, the mystical element hinted at in the previous book becomes a bit more obvious and there are passages of incredible beauty amongst the more commonplace magic (if that's not an oxymoron).

  9. 5 out of 5

    Bookista

    These books are weird, and the adventures are random, but I love them anyways. Mary Poppins has currently brainwashed me into thinking that it's refreshing to read about a thoroughly empowered woman. Some might say she's a little too empowered, to the point where she thinks she's the cat's pajamas, but so be it. Favorite stories are when MP makes peppermint sticks turn into horses and when they travel under the sea to visit an ancient turtle. These books are weird, and the adventures are random, but I love them anyways. Mary Poppins has currently brainwashed me into thinking that it's refreshing to read about a thoroughly empowered woman. Some might say she's a little too empowered, to the point where she thinks she's the cat's pajamas, but so be it. Favorite stories are when MP makes peppermint sticks turn into horses and when they travel under the sea to visit an ancient turtle.

  10. 4 out of 5

    booklady

    Despite its claim as the third in the Mary Poppins series, Mary Poppins Opens the Door is the book containing the story of our heroine’s final departure and hence, should probably be read last. Once again she returns to a state of disarray. One and all are lost without her: children, parents, fellow servants, animals and even the surrounding neighborhood. Why did she leave? What has kept her so long? Never mind, Mary Poppins is back. You might as well ask why the gift horse is a dapple gray. Be Despite its claim as the third in the Mary Poppins series, Mary Poppins Opens the Door is the book containing the story of our heroine’s final departure and hence, should probably be read last. Once again she returns to a state of disarray. One and all are lost without her: children, parents, fellow servants, animals and even the surrounding neighborhood. Why did she leave? What has kept her so long? Never mind, Mary Poppins is back. You might as well ask why the gift horse is a dapple gray. Because it is—be grateful. Life at #17 Cherry Tree Lane can return to normal … well sort of. Anyway, it can be happy again. Normal is overrated anyway. One of P.L. Travers’ trademarks are the little telltale bits of evidence which confirm the most incredible things the children Jane and Michael have seen Mary Poppins do (such as reappearing in a rocket or cavorting under the sea) things which she also vehemently denies. And yet if she really didn’t want the children to know the truth, why not also be tidier about all the scraps of proof which belie the adventures? Rather, like the loving person we know her to be, Mary Poppins lets them have the joy of belief while outwardly scorning their suggestions of impropriety on her part. As readers we smile sympathetically along with Jane and Michael’s secret knowledge but inability to confirm it. In this third book we are introduced to more things found in the movie, including one of my favorite lines, ‘Close your mouth, Michael! You are not a Codfish!, except I think in the movie, Mary says, ‘we’ are not a codfish, but close enough. The closing episode and possibly my favorite in the series. *Interestingly this book ended with these Latin words written in all caps: GLORIA IN EXCELSIS DEO (or GLORY TO GOD IN THE HIGHEST)

  11. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    These are such fun books! I really enjoyed this particular collection of adventures, with the fairytales coming to life in the "crack" of the new year, the peppermint horses, the marble boy, the cat who looked at a king, and the undersea adventure. I have to say, as stingy as she can be, I am growing more and more fond of Mary Poppins... I can understand that to admit that the adventures she organizes for the children are real would be to get too "chummy" with them. There is a comfort in consist These are such fun books! I really enjoyed this particular collection of adventures, with the fairytales coming to life in the "crack" of the new year, the peppermint horses, the marble boy, the cat who looked at a king, and the undersea adventure. I have to say, as stingy as she can be, I am growing more and more fond of Mary Poppins... I can understand that to admit that the adventures she organizes for the children are real would be to get too "chummy" with them. There is a comfort in consistency, even when it's not all roses and sunshine. I even think the name "Mary Poppins" is indicative of her personality: Mary is sensible and no-nonsense, but "Poppins" promises something a little bit more on the wild side. I also love the narration in these books: I think the joy in simple pleasures and innocent adventures is wonderful; I love all the "cozy passages" as I think of them, about how Mary Poppins smells like toast, and how warm and lovely the fire is- I am also interested in random historical tidbits, like the fact that crumpets were apparently delivered by a "crumpet man" at one time.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ebookwormy1

    As is typical of her style, P.L. Travers seems to have intended "Mary Poppins Opens the Door" to be a final farewell to the nanny that we are supposed to adore but cannot discern why. The combination of Opening with Closing is the type of synchronization that I find so incredibly disconcerting about Travers' writing for children, as is the Guy Fawkes opening. It is clear that Mary Poppins is "the RIGHT sort of people" and it seems the authoress, through her, aspires to the same. The introduction As is typical of her style, P.L. Travers seems to have intended "Mary Poppins Opens the Door" to be a final farewell to the nanny that we are supposed to adore but cannot discern why. The combination of Opening with Closing is the type of synchronization that I find so incredibly disconcerting about Travers' writing for children, as is the Guy Fawkes opening. It is clear that Mary Poppins is "the RIGHT sort of people" and it seems the authoress, through her, aspires to the same. The introduction treats us to a reflective embellishment of England's Guy Fawkes celebration - a confusing and conflated event in itself - that is particularly strange when one is aware of Travers' history; Travers didn't grow up celebrating the holiday in England, because she grew up in Australia! Nonetheless, the introduction seeks to "educate" along the back drop of this false narrative, and then makes pains for the opening chapter to refer us back to the introduction just in case we missed it. Maybe it is just me, but my intuition is that there is some crazy psychology here between the stories of Mary Poppins and her creator. Perhaps the movie, "Saving Mr. Banks" got it right. As for the rest of this title, I found it to be rather stale. We've seen so many of these characters or types of characters before. The stories all center around the same concepts: 1) Mary Poppins is vain, impatient, cross and generally horrible to the children. Additionally, she often leaves the baby or the twins behind without explanation. 2) A relative of Mary Poppins is encountered. 3) The relative is strange, supernaturally gifted or plagued, but LOVES seeing Mary Poppins and seeks to comply with her demands while emphasizing Mary Poppins demigod qualities. 4) After they leave, Mary Poppins returns to her usually overpowering rude self and denies the event ever happened, claiming that "people of the right sort" don't do such crazy things. 5) The children knowingly exchange pleasantries about the adventure and comply with Mary's stern exhortations, while the narrator reminds us that Mary Poppins never explains anything. 6) The children observe something that confirms their adventure is real, often a momento of their time that remains hanging around to be added to various lists throughout the rest of the story. Sigh. I rather prefer a true English adventure to Ms. Travers attempts to prove how very English her persona truly is, though she is not. Roald Dahl, C.S. Lewis, Tolkien, A. A. Milne, Beatrix Potter, Robert Lewis Stevenson or even, though I do not like him as well, Lewis Carroll are, in my humble opinion, a far better use of reading time. I have one more in this series before I can sell out the books I unwisely purchased! "Mary Poppins Come Back" (too bad!) review will be forthcoming, but unless there is some huge change in Book 4, it will be the end of the line for me. There's more.... Mary Poppins in the Park (Mary Poppins #4), Travers, 1952 https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

  13. 5 out of 5

    Drew Graham

    This is more of the same. It's a series of random, unconnected adventures concerning the toxic, rude, abusive Mary Poppins and her charming, thankfully resilient young charges. I kind of thought (hoped?) that this book would be comprised of, basically, Mary Poppins literally opening a door, and that would be it, but there was a little more to it than that. This one starts with a random historical discussion on Guy Fawkes Day, leading to the return of Mary Poppins via firework in the Park. From th This is more of the same. It's a series of random, unconnected adventures concerning the toxic, rude, abusive Mary Poppins and her charming, thankfully resilient young charges. I kind of thought (hoped?) that this book would be comprised of, basically, Mary Poppins literally opening a door, and that would be it, but there was a little more to it than that. This one starts with a random historical discussion on Guy Fawkes Day, leading to the return of Mary Poppins via firework in the Park. From there you read about stories involving peppermint stick horses, an undersea party honoring Mary Poppins (of course) and a celebration of the New Year with a multitude of rival fairy tale characters joining forces in The Crack between the old year and the new. This book also includes the story that was adapted to an animated short and included in a recent DVD release of Disney's Mary Poppins, "The Cat That Looked At a King." So for some reason every creature in the world adores Mary Poppins (at least in the non-human world), and I still don't really get it. The parents are more oblivious than ever, the kids are still pretty fun, but Mary Poppins is more toxic than ever. She's always looking at the children with disgust and treating them like they're absolute morons for mentioning the adventures that she led them on! The strangest part is that these adventures sometimes include the entire cast or other visitors of the park, but she still is furious and mortally offended at any implication that she would do anything reproachful. How can someone claim to be "practically perfect" when she's so horribly cross all the time? The writing is still all right, and the illustrations are still charming, but it's so hard to get on board when the main character is such an unpleasant prig. Why does she keep leaving and coming anyway. Perhaps to inflict further psychological damage to poor Jane and Michael? I don't think the series needed to continue this long, but, well, it did. There's a little of the charming, and a lot of the maddening, but the balance is obviously off. I think Mary Poppins reaches her height of unpleasantness in this third book in the series.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

    This may be stunning, but I was just not thrilled with the story at all. The story seems so disjointed, no growth or development of characters. In fact, I am stunned by the abusive Mary Poppins! I cannot see the Disney Mary Poppins in this, at all, and that is actually quite sad. I think that it is the Mary Poppins found here that caused my actual biggest disappointment with the book. I think that there is some fun in the fantasy side for the children in the story, but it would take some tremend This may be stunning, but I was just not thrilled with the story at all. The story seems so disjointed, no growth or development of characters. In fact, I am stunned by the abusive Mary Poppins! I cannot see the Disney Mary Poppins in this, at all, and that is actually quite sad. I think that it is the Mary Poppins found here that caused my actual biggest disappointment with the book. I think that there is some fun in the fantasy side for the children in the story, but it would take some tremendously resilient children to survive the treatment they receive from Mary! I can see a lot of Ms. Travers in Mary Poppins!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Geraldine

    Loved this series as a child and re-reading during a period of illness - still find the books marvellous. I must admit as a child I didn't notice how badly Mr and Mrs Banks parent nor did I pick up on the mind games Mary Poppins seems to play with the children after their adventures. However, I think, although some readers have been negative about her, what comes through is the sense of order and routine MP creates and how the children feel secure with her and she always keeps them safe. Althoug Loved this series as a child and re-reading during a period of illness - still find the books marvellous. I must admit as a child I didn't notice how badly Mr and Mrs Banks parent nor did I pick up on the mind games Mary Poppins seems to play with the children after their adventures. However, I think, although some readers have been negative about her, what comes through is the sense of order and routine MP creates and how the children feel secure with her and she always keeps them safe. Although they enter amazing adventures together MP's personality is always predictable - very appealing to a young child.

  16. 5 out of 5

    ضحى الحداد

    Well, This one was a slight improvement over the last two books, I can see that this one was meant to be the last book but for some reason it will continue which will make the ending of this book kind of silly .. after all this drama she will return in the end LOL,my favourite story was happy ever after and I found it refreshing after the boring repeated stories I've read through out the three books, I still can't enjoy this series but let's see what the rest will bring Well, This one was a slight improvement over the last two books, I can see that this one was meant to be the last book but for some reason it will continue which will make the ending of this book kind of silly .. after all this drama she will return in the end LOL,my favourite story was happy ever after and I found it refreshing after the boring repeated stories I've read through out the three books, I still can't enjoy this series but let's see what the rest will bring

  17. 5 out of 5

    Dawn Michelle

    This was another good edition of this series - a little darker than the previous ones, but still very good. The only negative with this one was the narrator - the previous two were narrated by Sophie Thompson and it was absolutely delightful. Then the narrator changed [which is totally annoying] and this one was nowhere near as good and as delightful as Sophie Thompson. I wasn't even sure I would be able to listen to her, but as it went on, it was less grating and I was able to finish it. This was another good edition of this series - a little darker than the previous ones, but still very good. The only negative with this one was the narrator - the previous two were narrated by Sophie Thompson and it was absolutely delightful. Then the narrator changed [which is totally annoying] and this one was nowhere near as good and as delightful as Sophie Thompson. I wasn't even sure I would be able to listen to her, but as it went on, it was less grating and I was able to finish it.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    Charming, delightful, and funny as ever but not quite at the same level as the first two. Perhaps the formula is getting a little rote (strange uncle, someone selling something in the park, etc). I'm still amused how transcendental these books are. Who'd a thunk? Still worth every word. Charming, delightful, and funny as ever but not quite at the same level as the first two. Perhaps the formula is getting a little rote (strange uncle, someone selling something in the park, etc). I'm still amused how transcendental these books are. Who'd a thunk? Still worth every word.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Hissa

    I hated this one! the stories were very dull, and bleak. And somewhat repeated, I honestly hope the fourth book will be better.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Karin

    Mary Poppins pops back during a fireworks event and once again Jane and Michael Banks are in for some fantastic magical adventures. She does speak more sharply and primly than my favourite screen rendition of her (as played by Julie Andrews--my kids are too old for the remake), but I can see I'd have loved this if I'd had it as a child. I'm only sorry we didn't own this book series along with our other books when I was growing up. Also, I really wouldn't mind travelling on a candy cane, preferab Mary Poppins pops back during a fireworks event and once again Jane and Michael Banks are in for some fantastic magical adventures. She does speak more sharply and primly than my favourite screen rendition of her (as played by Julie Andrews--my kids are too old for the remake), but I can see I'd have loved this if I'd had it as a child. I'm only sorry we didn't own this book series along with our other books when I was growing up. Also, I really wouldn't mind travelling on a candy cane, preferably one that didn't get called back that night. It would be a great way to beat rush hour traffic.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Steph

    Book was published in 1943, a dark time in history. It warms my heart to think of the number of people this book helped escape to the magical world of Mary Poppins. I picked up this book on a bad day as well (though not comparable to a World War bad day) and it also provided me with a sheltering refuge. Read these books to your kids at bedtime and they will have magical dreams! Thank you Mary Poppins and Ms. Travers for being the perfect example on the power and boundlessness of books.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Alana

    Mary Poppins returns in gregarious style and sets all to rights again, tells a new, moral tale, sweeps the children off on fantastical adventures (which she always denies afterwards, of course), new friends are made and strange events happen, and then she whooshes off again when her work is done. All in a day's work in the life of the most famous nanny. 3/5 Mary Poppins returns in gregarious style and sets all to rights again, tells a new, moral tale, sweeps the children off on fantastical adventures (which she always denies afterwards, of course), new friends are made and strange events happen, and then she whooshes off again when her work is done. All in a day's work in the life of the most famous nanny. 3/5

  23. 4 out of 5

    Anna-Sofie

    Another trip back to Cherry Tree Lane and its inhabitants...and Mary Poppins, who'll remain my favorite nanny, delightfully mystical, stern and firm, but also allowing "her" children to enter a world of magic and adventure. Another trip back to Cherry Tree Lane and its inhabitants...and Mary Poppins, who'll remain my favorite nanny, delightfully mystical, stern and firm, but also allowing "her" children to enter a world of magic and adventure.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Wonderish

    I loved these books as a kid, and I love them still. Mary Poppins is a total asshole, but the adventures have are still so magical and impactful.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Wreade1872

    Well there's still some magic here but its pretty thin. This is a bit repetitive and shows too much about how special Mary is. Some sort of advancment or change with the house or children would be nice. It does have a good ending but it feels like an ending for the series at its height but doesn't feel quite earned based on this entry. Given that there are, i think, still 4 more books, it will be interesting to see how it continues. There was one thing i didn't notice before which is that the girl Well there's still some magic here but its pretty thin. This is a bit repetitive and shows too much about how special Mary is. Some sort of advancment or change with the house or children would be nice. It does have a good ending but it feels like an ending for the series at its height but doesn't feel quite earned based on this entry. Given that there are, i think, still 4 more books, it will be interesting to see how it continues. There was one thing i didn't notice before which is that the girl seems older and more mature than the boy it would be nice to see if that division gets any wider.

  26. 4 out of 5

    JoAnn Hallum

    I have read the book a million times but we listened to the audiobook today on a car trip and it was delightful. Read by Rosalyn Landor. The voices were especially fun.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Elizabeth

    The adventures are fun as always. This one is a little shorter than the others, and nothing in particular stands out, except the last two chapters. Jane and Michael have interactions with animals in each book, but I loved Happy Ever-After because it is fairy tales that come to life here. And for whatever reason, the ending of the second Mary Poppins I found to be especially bittersweet, and this one didn't seem quite so sad. Mary Poppins is vain and snippy the entire book, and then when she is s The adventures are fun as always. This one is a little shorter than the others, and nothing in particular stands out, except the last two chapters. Jane and Michael have interactions with animals in each book, but I loved Happy Ever-After because it is fairy tales that come to life here. And for whatever reason, the ending of the second Mary Poppins I found to be especially bittersweet, and this one didn't seem quite so sad. Mary Poppins is vain and snippy the entire book, and then when she is sweet and kind to the children, you know the end is near and it's very strange feeling. Fortunately, the series isn't over quite yet!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Theresa

    And so I finish reading the first 4 Mary Poppins books with the third one where she leaves the Banks home for the third and last time. While I will always see and hear Julie Andrews as MP, the books have managed to establish their own identity, especially with a narcissistic and very stern, almost humorless MP. There are marvelous scenes in the Park and under the sea. Continuity between the visits and stories is well done. And MP gets a spectacular send-off! Time to watch the movie again.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Judy Evenson

    How did I miss the Mary poppins books as a child? Then by the time the movie came along, I was in high school and who had time for a story about a nanny when you could be watching James Bond. What a treasure to explore as a senior reader. Now I’m asking why did I start with the third book? Why didn’t I read the first two!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Bethany

    This one wasn’t as memorable as the first two and it seems like she really tried to find some closure at the end with the reunion. I almost thought I had skipped one and accidentally was on the fourth. Most favorite Poppins adventures were the statue and the candy horses in this one.

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