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Roughneck Nine-One: The Extraordinary Story of a Special Forces A-Team at War

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On April 6, 2003, twenty-six Green Berets, including those of Sergeant 1st Class Frank Anentori's Special Forces A-Team (call sign Roughneck Nine One), led a violent battle against a vastly superior force at the remote crossroads near the village of Debecka, Iraq. In an already legendary conflict that will influence US Army doctrine for years to come, the Green Berets s On April 6, 2003, twenty-six Green Berets, including those of Sergeant 1st Class Frank Anentori's Special Forces A-Team (call sign Roughneck Nine One), led a violent battle against a vastly superior force at the remote crossroads near the village of Debecka, Iraq. In an already legendary conflict that will influence US Army doctrine for years to come, the Green Berets stopped an enemy unit that included battle tanks and more than 150 well-trained, well-equipped, and well-commanded soldiers. Any normal American light infantry unit finding itself outnumbered over five to one and outgunned on the ground by such a heavily armored force would have turned and run for cover. But Green Berets don't like to run and Nine One Don't Run was Antenori's team's motto from the very beginning. In a spectacular fight, they battled Iraqi tanks and personnel until only a handful of Iraqi survivors finally fled the battlefield. In the process, Nine One encountered hordes of news media, and at the peak of the fight, a US Navy F-14 dropped a 500-pound bomb in the middle of a group of supporting Kurdish Peshmerga fighters, killing and wounding dozens. This is the never-before-told, unsanitized, unedited story of the fight for the crossroads at Debecka, Iraq, and a unique inside look at a Special Forces A-Team as it recruits and organizes, trains for combat, and eventually fights a battle against a huge opposing force in Iraq. Roughneck Nine One is a powerful look inside a Special Forces A-Team and its dramatic and controversial battle against a huge opposing force, and a revealing story of the role of Special Forces in the ongoing war in Iraq.


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On April 6, 2003, twenty-six Green Berets, including those of Sergeant 1st Class Frank Anentori's Special Forces A-Team (call sign Roughneck Nine One), led a violent battle against a vastly superior force at the remote crossroads near the village of Debecka, Iraq. In an already legendary conflict that will influence US Army doctrine for years to come, the Green Berets s On April 6, 2003, twenty-six Green Berets, including those of Sergeant 1st Class Frank Anentori's Special Forces A-Team (call sign Roughneck Nine One), led a violent battle against a vastly superior force at the remote crossroads near the village of Debecka, Iraq. In an already legendary conflict that will influence US Army doctrine for years to come, the Green Berets stopped an enemy unit that included battle tanks and more than 150 well-trained, well-equipped, and well-commanded soldiers. Any normal American light infantry unit finding itself outnumbered over five to one and outgunned on the ground by such a heavily armored force would have turned and run for cover. But Green Berets don't like to run and Nine One Don't Run was Antenori's team's motto from the very beginning. In a spectacular fight, they battled Iraqi tanks and personnel until only a handful of Iraqi survivors finally fled the battlefield. In the process, Nine One encountered hordes of news media, and at the peak of the fight, a US Navy F-14 dropped a 500-pound bomb in the middle of a group of supporting Kurdish Peshmerga fighters, killing and wounding dozens. This is the never-before-told, unsanitized, unedited story of the fight for the crossroads at Debecka, Iraq, and a unique inside look at a Special Forces A-Team as it recruits and organizes, trains for combat, and eventually fights a battle against a huge opposing force in Iraq. Roughneck Nine One is a powerful look inside a Special Forces A-Team and its dramatic and controversial battle against a huge opposing force, and a revealing story of the role of Special Forces in the ongoing war in Iraq.

30 review for Roughneck Nine-One: The Extraordinary Story of a Special Forces A-Team at War

  1. 4 out of 5

    Mike (the Paladin)

    This is a good book. Upon reflection however I have decided to rate it 3 stars. The reason is that while the book is very interesting there is a great deal of it that if you aren't yourself military you won't find interesting. The book here tells the story it sets out to tell but it does it in a great deal of detail. Now while I found that of interest (units, and unit movements [only declassified of course] the pesonal that can be discussed are and their lives are sort of). The time line sets up This is a good book. Upon reflection however I have decided to rate it 3 stars. The reason is that while the book is very interesting there is a great deal of it that if you aren't yourself military you won't find interesting. The book here tells the story it sets out to tell but it does it in a great deal of detail. Now while I found that of interest (units, and unit movements [only declassified of course] the pesonal that can be discussed are and their lives are sort of). The time line sets up the situations and then leads us into what happened and how it happened. there are some very interesting insights into the action, the situations and the people involved. So a bit slower and more detailed than I expected and I think many "lay readers" (those with no military background) may find it a bit more detailed than expected...still an excellent read if it's what you are looking for.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Eric Liknes

    A good book that gives the reader an inside look at a Special Forces A team. It's a good read if you are interested in that sort of thing, but probably won't do much for you if you aren't. Frank Antenori is now retired and running for office. To me, it feels at times like he wrote this book to define himself for political purposes - his "PT 109" story, if you will. Antenori tells his story as if he were unerring, unphased, and unaltered by war. I felt that books like Jarhead and House to House w A good book that gives the reader an inside look at a Special Forces A team. It's a good read if you are interested in that sort of thing, but probably won't do much for you if you aren't. Frank Antenori is now retired and running for office. To me, it feels at times like he wrote this book to define himself for political purposes - his "PT 109" story, if you will. Antenori tells his story as if he were unerring, unphased, and unaltered by war. I felt that books like Jarhead and House to House were as technically interesting but contributed much more "human interest."

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ru

    This first-hand account of The Battle of Debecka Ridge in Iraq by Sgt. Antenori is equal parts tactical & action-packed, but also offers some valuable lessons along the way. This book is very much a meat-and-potatoes account of a military life, and it reads like no detail is spared from training to deployment on various missions, before hitting the crux. Sgt. Antenori is very analytical & does an excellent job of not only detailing specific events, but explaining why certain actions were chosen This first-hand account of The Battle of Debecka Ridge in Iraq by Sgt. Antenori is equal parts tactical & action-packed, but also offers some valuable lessons along the way. This book is very much a meat-and-potatoes account of a military life, and it reads like no detail is spared from training to deployment on various missions, before hitting the crux. Sgt. Antenori is very analytical & does an excellent job of not only detailing specific events, but explaining why certain actions were chosen and what their consequences might be. There is a point where one team must give up a member to offset the membership of another team, and rather than just pick the person who last joined, or least-popular, or what have you, it becomes quite a process to choose carefully. Because, the wrong choice could potentially weaken the team. And, yet, this is a choice that has to be made fairly quickly; it's uncomfortable but pretty compelling. In doing some analysis work for an upcoming mission, another story is told about trying to determine the best way to go about a mission, analyzing maps, data, reconnaissance information, environment, geography, etc. The team determines that no matter what they try, the mission will almost certainly end in failure and the mission objective will not be achieved. However, to explain this to a superior officer is to also admit defeat and to some extent, shame. Not every untenable situation has to reach the life-threatening stage to be problematic, and it feels very tense. Debecka itself is very fast-paced and at times, difficult to follow, but it is absolutely amazing how quickly events unfold and how Nine-One turns the tides, so to speak. Javelin missiles are the unsung "heroes" here, but as one of the lessons relayed explains, technology just doesn't outweigh the value of people. Furthering that point, Sgt. Antenori explains that training a soldier is a time-intensive task - so, when politicians claim they will increase numbers of soldiers, etc., they are risking producing an ill-equipped member of the military, because they rarely ever increase the training resources. The time it takes to instil the skill set and personal qualities like courage and efficiency into a soldier cannot be hurried. Solid read for fans of military history, especially of such a recent occurrence. Very inspirational, too.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jim Morris

    For a guy like me this book is both a marvel and a revelation. I was in Vietnam in Special Forces, and after that I was a writer and editor, mostly about the war and the guerrilla wars of the eighties. After writing seven books about that and editing somewhere around two hundred I have become highly selective about reading books on SF and irregular warfare. But I loved this one. It's a no-nonesense account of how a Special Forces team forms, how it trains, and how it fights. Turns out that all t For a guy like me this book is both a marvel and a revelation. I was in Vietnam in Special Forces, and after that I was a writer and editor, mostly about the war and the guerrilla wars of the eighties. After writing seven books about that and editing somewhere around two hundred I have become highly selective about reading books on SF and irregular warfare. But I loved this one. It's a no-nonesense account of how a Special Forces team forms, how it trains, and how it fights. Turns out that all the gear is different, but there's not much difference in the kinds of guys who go into this work, from one generation to the next. I noted in 1967 that SF guys walk a certain way, as though they expect to be opposed, but not stopped. I can tell from this book that they still do. Other than that the gear was the revelation. We started in Vietnam with old WWII stuff, including our radios, vehicles, and weapons. These guys have stuff beyond our wildest dreams. But if they don't have something they know who does, and how to talk them out of it. That hasn't changed. I'd like to go on and say something about team sergeants, how important they are, and the kinds of men they are, how rock solid they are. But this is too long already. If you like SF you will like this book

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    A mediocre book about great people involved in important events. Basically, a brief intro to life in US Army Special Forces, with some about 1990s life and then a focus on ODA 391 and a few of their early Iraq war missions. The main focus is on tactical aspects of combat and grinding an axe against "MAJ X" (unnamed in the book, but not hard to identify) who appears to be a fucking piece of shit, at least based on the evidence provided in the book. The story of the battle is a fast read but not r A mediocre book about great people involved in important events. Basically, a brief intro to life in US Army Special Forces, with some about 1990s life and then a focus on ODA 391 and a few of their early Iraq war missions. The main focus is on tactical aspects of combat and grinding an axe against "MAJ X" (unnamed in the book, but not hard to identify) who appears to be a fucking piece of shit, at least based on the evidence provided in the book. The story of the battle is a fast read but not really particularly insightful. There are only really 3 takeaways: 1) mountain/UW SF is less useful in a more conventional light infantry/raider mission than fully motorized SF 2) the Javelin is a good missile system, and the Dragon was so shitty that it poisoned the well for many 3) light units like SF are safer when on the attack/advance than when stuck in a static position.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    I am not usually one for military history or books about wars. I much prefer to read fiction that happens to have war as a backdrop and generally read to escape my own reality. Sometimes it is difficult to escape into someone else’s reality. My cousin Jake (ok he’s not really my cousin — my mom and his dad are cousins, so that makes him my second cousin once removed?) is a green beret and is part of the Special Forces team that miraculously came out of Iraq unscathed in April 2003. I remember goi I am not usually one for military history or books about wars. I much prefer to read fiction that happens to have war as a backdrop and generally read to escape my own reality. Sometimes it is difficult to escape into someone else’s reality. My cousin Jake (ok he’s not really my cousin — my mom and his dad are cousins, so that makes him my second cousin once removed?) is a green beret and is part of the Special Forces team that miraculously came out of Iraq unscathed in April 2003. I remember going out to his house in Southern Ohio when he was in his teens and my brother and I were elementary age. We were fascinated by his dirt bikes, dart board, and all things cool and dangerous and teenager-like. Jake and his sister grew up in the middle of nowhere and my brother and I grew up in postage stamp lawn suburbia — it was quite a treat for us to visit and we have hours of ridiculous home movies to prove it. I found out a book was written about one of his tours (he’s been on at least 3 that I know of) so I had to read it. Antenori offers a glimpse inside the special forces that is rarely seen because of security issues, and only because of the unique nature of the conflict and outcome was this story able to be published. He wrote it after her retired and current servicemen, most of whom still work in Special Forces, were not able to be interviewed. Still, he is able to describe the events and tell a captivating story. Previous to reading, I didn’t fully understand the preparations and team building that go into preparing for war, nor did I know about the differences between the Special Forces and other companies. The story itself is extraordinary, and while Antenori is not a writer in the typical sense, his feeling and emotion come across with minimal what I’d call army starkness and formality. Perhaps the most poignant part for me were the last few pages, which many people may gloss over. I listened to this book on audio, and the narrator read the final entry that details the killed-in-action Special Forces since 2001. The book was over, but I couldn’t turn it off, and even paused to finish before getting out of my car in the grocery store parking lot. Whether or not I agree with the reasoning behind why our troops are abroad, I could stand to support them a little more.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jerome

    This is not your typical Special Forces story. The story is not a covert operation of any kind. The SF groups engage the enemy on an open battlefield. Sgt. Frank Antenori states this in the beginning of the book. He shares this story because it is a great accomplishment by a greatly outnumbered unit. The intro into the book explains the great need our country has for Special Forces. I enjoyed this because he gives reasons why the U.S should have more elite soldiers to carry out missions. The first This is not your typical Special Forces story. The story is not a covert operation of any kind. The SF groups engage the enemy on an open battlefield. Sgt. Frank Antenori states this in the beginning of the book. He shares this story because it is a great accomplishment by a greatly outnumbered unit. The intro into the book explains the great need our country has for Special Forces. I enjoyed this because he gives reasons why the U.S should have more elite soldiers to carry out missions. The first part of the book explains the make-up of his team. He gives the details of each member as if they were family. This makes the team come to life in my opinion. He explains how each member came to be on his team and how they will help the make-up of the team. The next part of the book goes extensively into the details of the their training. Sgt. Anteroni explains the preparations a SF team makes before they launch a mission. This is an excellent overview of the time that the unit puts in before they are ever deployed. They will train for months before they ever get a mission, and this is what the Roughnecks did. It is funny because Sgt. Anetroni and his team are gung-ho and ready to do some killing, yet they have to ait for a long time before they get a mission. The last part explains the battle that has made Roughneck Nine-One a legend in the Special Forces comunity. I will not ruin the details of the story because it is so unbelievable they were able to accomplish their objective. I will say that they were outnumbered Five to One including tanks against them. The battle is definately worth the wait because it feels as if the reader is trained well enough to be there. The author makes the reader feel as if they were there fighting the battle with them. There are also some funny dialogues that go on during the mission. This is an excellent book that goes right along with all the courage and bravery that one has heard about the U.S SPecial Forces. The author's tone is never egotistical as one would expect. Their is a certain arrogance that the author displays, but who would not be arrogant if you were one of the most elite soldiers in our country. To say the least I believe it comes with the territory. This book is a fast read, and the reader will be glad that they spent the time to read it. Kind of choppy and incoherent though...

  8. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Emil

    Roughneck Nine-One is not your story where misfits band together, get themselves stuck in a sticky situation and return with overwhelming results. This isn't G.I. Joe. This a true story of men in the War on Terror who, through thick and thin, managed overcome an enemy that 'outnumbered them five to one'. They were considered as the black sheep in their unit, 3rd Special Forces Group and maintained that reputation when their finest hour came. Frank Antenori and Hans Halberstadt gave an unprecedent Roughneck Nine-One is not your story where misfits band together, get themselves stuck in a sticky situation and return with overwhelming results. This isn't G.I. Joe. This a true story of men in the War on Terror who, through thick and thin, managed overcome an enemy that 'outnumbered them five to one'. They were considered as the black sheep in their unit, 3rd Special Forces Group and maintained that reputation when their finest hour came. Frank Antenori and Hans Halberstadt gave an unprecedented access on ODA-391's operation near Debecka, Iraq. How they got to know each other, train together, joke together was written there in detail. There were some comical reliefs (pardon my dark humor), adventures and tragedies that made Roughneck Nine-One strong. One thing that bothered me was Frank's placing new characters out of nowhere but I was able to connect the dots. Maybe they can improve this in later works. Roughneck Nine-One don't run. They pile the enemy.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    I never served in the military so I have no idea what war is like. I found this an interesting and well-paced look inside a military unit. If you have never read a book like this, you should give it a try. It gives you a view into an experience that you would not otherwise get. It is not as gritty as House to House. Which is good if you (like me) are faint of heart. I never served in the military so I have no idea what war is like. I found this an interesting and well-paced look inside a military unit. If you have never read a book like this, you should give it a try. It gives you a view into an experience that you would not otherwise get. It is not as gritty as House to House. Which is good if you (like me) are faint of heart.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Robert Garcia

    Wow, what a ride. Great story and much respect for those men who become members of the small community of Special Forces and don the Green Beret. Excellent details of the battles and training that took place. It felt like I was in the middle of the events that unfolded in the story A must read to understand what it took to win the war in Iraq.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Dave Rapozo

    Decent read. Like all of the services, the author uses too many abbreviations and it gets annoying to read and except in a few Aces the technicalities do not enhance the story. None the less a great story of some brave men and the battle they fought on our behalf, thank you.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    This was an interesting behind-the-scenes look into an Army Special Forces small unit action. I have no first-hand knowledge of these operations or team actions but was shocked to hear the tone and vernacular that Mr Anenori a Sgt. Used with superior officers. Maybe that's how it is in Special Forces or maybe that's just how he remembered it and chose to present it. It sounds like his ire may have been somewhat justified if the circumstances and events were accurately depicted, but it didn't see This was an interesting behind-the-scenes look into an Army Special Forces small unit action. I have no first-hand knowledge of these operations or team actions but was shocked to hear the tone and vernacular that Mr Anenori a Sgt. Used with superior officers. Maybe that's how it is in Special Forces or maybe that's just how he remembered it and chose to present it. It sounds like his ire may have been somewhat justified if the circumstances and events were accurately depicted, but it didn't seem proper to a person with little military exposure. I was also a little bit surprised to discover the recounting of the fairly casual usage of pretty high dollar equipment in situations that seemed much more for "sport" than for military strategy. Regardless, it was an interesting book that was pretty fast-paced. He never really showed himself in a bad light so I wonder how very realistic it was or at least questioned how inter perspective the author is.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ra Fe

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Overall, it was strongly told story and a good book. Definitely worth the read if you are into non-fiction current military history types of books. The author is a decent story teller, but I felt slightly let down when I finished because the premise set on the back cover is the main battle that the author encountered when entering Iraq and deploying as the war was starting. However that was a small portion and really that last third or quarter of the book. Antenori spent so much time in the begin Overall, it was strongly told story and a good book. Definitely worth the read if you are into non-fiction current military history types of books. The author is a decent story teller, but I felt slightly let down when I finished because the premise set on the back cover is the main battle that the author encountered when entering Iraq and deploying as the war was starting. However that was a small portion and really that last third or quarter of the book. Antenori spent so much time in the beginning setting the stage and scene that very little space was devoted to the main battle. With that said, I enjoyed the read. It was quick and gave the author's insight and perspectives into Special Forces A teams.

  14. 5 out of 5

    David

    I thought the story was difficult to follow. While the author tells the story, the co-writer should be able to punch it up a bit to make it more readable. I'm not talking about changing the narrative, but rather the narration. It also made me wonder how the heck the US military gets anything accomplished with officers not understanding the capabilities of their units, units being moved about without regard to how they will integrate, and seemingly no one had an understanding of the "big picture" I thought the story was difficult to follow. While the author tells the story, the co-writer should be able to punch it up a bit to make it more readable. I'm not talking about changing the narrative, but rather the narration. It also made me wonder how the heck the US military gets anything accomplished with officers not understanding the capabilities of their units, units being moved about without regard to how they will integrate, and seemingly no one had an understanding of the "big picture" which affects decisions as they roll downhill.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Pat Appel

    The Sample sucked me in Terrible is the best way to describe this book. When I read the sample, I thought it was going to be good. Not so! Fifty percent way through the book and they are still getting their gear together to deploy to Iraq. The book never gets started. Horrible writing. Have you ever met someone that tells you a story but never gets to the point? That's this book. I gave up on it at the half way point. The Sample sucked me in Terrible is the best way to describe this book. When I read the sample, I thought it was going to be good. Not so! Fifty percent way through the book and they are still getting their gear together to deploy to Iraq. The book never gets started. Horrible writing. Have you ever met someone that tells you a story but never gets to the point? That's this book. I gave up on it at the half way point.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Forrest

    This is the story of the Battle of Debecka that took place soon after the 2003 invasion of Iraq began. A relatively small group of U.S. Special Forces soldiers were out-manned and out-gunned by the Iraqi equivalent of an entire division equipped with 2 tanks, 8 armored trucks, and over 100 soldiers. Kind of a slow read at first. The meat of the story is about two thirds in where the book really takes off. The author, Frank Antenori is currently serving as an Arizona State Senator.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Joel B Champagne

    Special Ops Primer Started off very slow because the author was sharing the basic structure and doctrine of the Special Forces ie: the Green Barets. The action begins when this team, Ops-901 is deployed to Iraq. The action is heavy and furious, with a good explanation of the whys and hows of the unit's response. Excellent read, recommended. Special Ops Primer Started off very slow because the author was sharing the basic structure and doctrine of the Special Forces ie: the Green Barets. The action begins when this team, Ops-901 is deployed to Iraq. The action is heavy and furious, with a good explanation of the whys and hows of the unit's response. Excellent read, recommended.

  18. 4 out of 5

    x x x

    Good introduction and characterization Frank really puts the human in Special Forces and the roller coaster that all our Warriors in combat and out experience as they attempt to protect us from ourselves and our enemies good read.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Barnard Madsen

    War is a serious business. Skill and the will to win guided these men.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Josh

    Completely enjoyed this account and the narrative of the mission.

  21. 4 out of 5

    John Bishop

    Great read This is a fast paced story of Special Force soldiers doing a fantastic job. They do their job, often being outnumbered and out gunned, yet they perform admirably.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Rick B.H. Ghost

    Great read on Nine-One (Green Berets) Special Forces

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jim Heivilin

    An A-Team in action Good info on green berets in Iraq. And SFC Antenori is a good story teller. Highly recommended. Give it a read.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Larry Roszell

    Great read Accurate report by an American hero! Hope to read more of this fine writing. Felt like I had returned to Iraq.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

    I guess "you had to be there." The book discusses Operational detachment Alpha team 91 (nicknamed Roughneck Nine One), or A-Team 91, during a particular battle in Iraq. There were some cool things about the battle... however I think the biggest factor in the battle was the relatively new Javelin missile system. Essentially they hung back and shot boatloads of trucks, APC's and other vehicles with these anti-tank missiles. It wasn't the down and dirty kind of fighting that was described with such I guess "you had to be there." The book discusses Operational detachment Alpha team 91 (nicknamed Roughneck Nine One), or A-Team 91, during a particular battle in Iraq. There were some cool things about the battle... however I think the biggest factor in the battle was the relatively new Javelin missile system. Essentially they hung back and shot boatloads of trucks, APC's and other vehicles with these anti-tank missiles. It wasn't the down and dirty kind of fighting that was described with such great detail as in "Blackhawk down". I guess when I read a military book, I am comparing it to my two favorites, "Blackhawk Down" and "Recondo." So, in my opinion, this book was good, but fell short of these two for a gripping, can't put the book down type of story. Finally, I listened to this as a book on CD. The narrator... oh, heavens... I had a hard time with his voice and his performace while reading the book. But, overall it was good.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    The writing style and narrative form for this book was a LOT better than many books of this type that I have read int he past. I really enjoyed the flow and the information provided. Now, the big issues is judging how accurate the view is that the author is presenting when you read a story like this. There are far to many books about combat and especially the Special Forces, that have been embellished to the point that they defy reality. This one seemed authentic without the superman issues I ha The writing style and narrative form for this book was a LOT better than many books of this type that I have read int he past. I really enjoyed the flow and the information provided. Now, the big issues is judging how accurate the view is that the author is presenting when you read a story like this. There are far to many books about combat and especially the Special Forces, that have been embellished to the point that they defy reality. This one seemed authentic without the superman issues I have seen elsewhere and even shows flaws in the system and problems with that some others gloss over or ignore. I never got the feeling I was reading someones imaginary movie script, so I'm going to take it that this one is legit, even if the author's perspective is a little cocky. Heck, he's a Green Beret, so I guess he is entitled to being a little cocky.

  27. 5 out of 5

    John

    I absolutely loved this book. This is a first hand account of Special Forces A-Teams in Iraq. It tells somewhat of their initial training, but focuses mostly on gearing up for war. It describes their training in the states, how these A-teams (Operational Detachment Alphas) are organized and how such small teams destroyed the Iraqi army in the North. My interest was kept from the beginning until the end. If you enjoy books about War, Soldiers, History or Special Operations then I highly recommend I absolutely loved this book. This is a first hand account of Special Forces A-Teams in Iraq. It tells somewhat of their initial training, but focuses mostly on gearing up for war. It describes their training in the states, how these A-teams (Operational Detachment Alphas) are organized and how such small teams destroyed the Iraqi army in the North. My interest was kept from the beginning until the end. If you enjoy books about War, Soldiers, History or Special Operations then I highly recommend this book!!!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Tom Schulte

    A good tale of building a special ops A-Team getting them to Iraq and engaging a tank group with javelin missiles despite political inefficiencies of the American infantry establishment and unseasoned leadership ("Major X"). I found the scientific methodology of modern American warfard the most interesting and the pig headedness that made that intelligent design often so inaccessible the most disheartening. A good tale of building a special ops A-Team getting them to Iraq and engaging a tank group with javelin missiles despite political inefficiencies of the American infantry establishment and unseasoned leadership ("Major X"). I found the scientific methodology of modern American warfard the most interesting and the pig headedness that made that intelligent design often so inaccessible the most disheartening.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Tom Rodriguez

    As the title states, this is a book about an Army special forces team that is inserted into Iraq at the beginning of the 2003 Iraq invasion. Antenori details the operations, planning, training, and support that allowed the team to succeed, and also documents some of the problems that he encountered in working with the various factions of Iraq's population. As the title states, this is a book about an Army special forces team that is inserted into Iraq at the beginning of the 2003 Iraq invasion. Antenori details the operations, planning, training, and support that allowed the team to succeed, and also documents some of the problems that he encountered in working with the various factions of Iraq's population.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Thomas

    When most war coverage consists of political rants, "expert" commentary, or I'm-not-a-hero memoirs, it is refreshing to read a fine warrior's boast. This book may not feature the alliterative poetry of Beowulf, but it still revels in feats of strength and courage, as well as the ensuing carnage. The narration, while not beautiful, gets the job done. When most war coverage consists of political rants, "expert" commentary, or I'm-not-a-hero memoirs, it is refreshing to read a fine warrior's boast. This book may not feature the alliterative poetry of Beowulf, but it still revels in feats of strength and courage, as well as the ensuing carnage. The narration, while not beautiful, gets the job done.

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