website statistics Faust, Part Two - PDF Books Online
Hot Best Seller

Faust, Part Two

Availability: Ready to download

This is a new translation of Faust, Part Two by David Luke, whose translation of Faust, Part I was the winner of the European Poetry Translation Prize. Here, Luke expertly imitates the varied verse-forms of the original, and provides a highly readable and actable translation which includes an introduction, full notes, and an index of classical mythology.


Compare

This is a new translation of Faust, Part Two by David Luke, whose translation of Faust, Part I was the winner of the European Poetry Translation Prize. Here, Luke expertly imitates the varied verse-forms of the original, and provides a highly readable and actable translation which includes an introduction, full notes, and an index of classical mythology.

30 review for Faust, Part Two

  1. 5 out of 5

    E. G.

    Preface & Notes Chronology Introduction Translator's Note The Writing of 'Faust, Part II' 'Faust, Part II' Act by Act: Composition and Synopsis Further Reading --Faust, Part II Notes Preface & Notes Chronology Introduction Translator's Note The Writing of 'Faust, Part II' 'Faust, Part II' Act by Act: Composition and Synopsis Further Reading --Faust, Part II Notes

  2. 5 out of 5

    Annie

    Er so according to Wikipedia, "Appreciation of the work often requires an extensive knowledge of Greek mythology, and it is arguably one of the most difficult works of world literature." Eh. No. Cmon. Is that a joke? This is 1000% more accessible than anything by James Joyce, John Milton, and dozens of other writers. Even a rudimentary knowledge of classical myth & lit will make this readable. Didn't enjoy it as much as Part 1, though. This is defs more sophisticated, to be sure... but it lacks th Er so according to Wikipedia, "Appreciation of the work often requires an extensive knowledge of Greek mythology, and it is arguably one of the most difficult works of world literature." Eh. No. Cmon. Is that a joke? This is 1000% more accessible than anything by James Joyce, John Milton, and dozens of other writers. Even a rudimentary knowledge of classical myth & lit will make this readable. Didn't enjoy it as much as Part 1, though. This is defs more sophisticated, to be sure... but it lacks the vibrancy, the energy, the eager honesty of P1, which felt resonant and personal and human. P2 reads more like an intellectual exercise of someone who's spent scores of years studying the classics, someone who wants to establish himself as descendant of those great writers. Which makes it feel more pretentious than groundbreaking. It's very Odyssean, except that Faust's katabasis is not a literal descent into the underworld but a figurative one, via his deal with Mephisto. There were parts I loved, though. The Euphorion bit- the part about the son Faust has with Helen of Troy- was pretty heavy-handed in its parallels with the myth of Icarus, but nevertheless a memorable section. And the ending was stunning, too.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Roxana Chirilă

    I think that the title is a bit misleading - it makes one expect "Faust, Part Two" to be the sequel to "Faust, Part One". Instead, this reads more like "The New Faust: Containing an Emperor of Much Import and Lavish Greek Settings". The play opens with Faust getting his memory wiped by a fairy - so he no longer remembers the tragic end met by his lover, or pretty much anything that he previously did, except that he had the devil by his side. For reasons unknown to me, he goes to the Emperor's cour I think that the title is a bit misleading - it makes one expect "Faust, Part Two" to be the sequel to "Faust, Part One". Instead, this reads more like "The New Faust: Containing an Emperor of Much Import and Lavish Greek Settings". The play opens with Faust getting his memory wiped by a fairy - so he no longer remembers the tragic end met by his lover, or pretty much anything that he previously did, except that he had the devil by his side. For reasons unknown to me, he goes to the Emperor's court, where he is convinced to bring Helen (of Troy) and Paris in front of the nobles, for their amusement. His devilishly handsome devil, Mephistopheles, is pretty much useless when it comes to anything non-Christian, so he sends Faust on a quest to the Mothers, some sort of horrid deities, in what we can only presume is a dangerous, exciting, profound quest. We don't get to see that quest. But that's okay, we get to see a masquerade where Mephistopheles pretty much invents paper money for the Emperor and saves him from his money issues. Deep. Anyway, Faust manages to bring Helen and Paris in front of the audience and falls in love or lust or something with Helen and decides he *must* have her. As stated above, Mephistopheles is about as useful as an oxygen mask on a fish, so they go back to Faust's old university to talk to some characters we used to know and pick up a homunculus (tiny being in a bottle). Then they head off to the Classical Walpurgis Night, which happens in Ancient Greece. Lots of fun things ensue - for example, Faust buggers off in search of Helen into the Underworld, another journey filled with danger, excitement, depth and awe which we DON'T see. Mephistopheles runs around with ancient Greek creatures and also vanishes out of the picture. That's okay, we stick with the homunculus and Proteus for this part of the play - remember Proteus? Of course not, he was just introduced three seconds ago. Anyway, I lost track of what the hell was going on because a new character was introduced every page or two and I was getting bored, but I think the homunculus finally had sex with Proteus or someone else. I don't care. Neither did Goethe, we never see any of these characters ever again. Soon, we see Helen and her women return to Greece after the end of the Trojan war. She's told she'll be killed in a sacrifice by her husband - unless she goes to Faust, who'll save her. She does go to him indeed, followed by her women, and what follows is the amazing relationship between her and Faust, which lasts for many, many years. But we don't get to see it, because we stick with the chorus of bored waiting women who sleep through the entire thing. That's okay, though, because we get to see Helen and Faust come out with their amazing boy, who's really something special. Unfortunately, soon after being introduced, he jumps too high up in the sky and falls down to his death, which gets Helen to vanish in a puff of mist representing her suicide or something. Anyway, Faust returns to his own time, meets with the Emperor, wins him a battle and receives a strip of land near the sea in thanks. He proceeds to Netherlands he hell out of it, making the sea back away, but unfortunately he utters the wrong words and his pact with Mephistopheles comes to an end and he dies. (Finally!!!!) He doesn't go to Hell, though, because the angels rescue him from the grips of the devil by striking him with lust (as angels do, I guess) and distracting him. Thus, Faust ends up in heaven and we get cameos from other characters we used to know. Hardly a page or two can go by without a new character appearing out of nowhere. I didn't have the inspiration to count from the start, but I swear there were hundreds of characters, none of whom I gave much of a damn about. The story felt even less coherent than Part I, I guess the social commentary is worthwhile, if you're into that sort of thing, but I kept feeling that I'd rather read something more Faust-centered, something even vaguely more coherent, something that didn't hint at good bits happening off-stage, something which also stood as a *story*, not just as *ideas*.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Inkspill

    This is one wacky read made up of inter-locking sketches told in narrative verse. The story in Part 1 sits in the shadows, in this part there are many new story threads along with numerous characters. Mephistopheles has most of the limelight and the best lines; his sardonic tones turn this into a light and frothy read. This is a fun play, that is as long as you don’t spend too much time trying to make sense of the many interlocking sketches with its sprawling, jumbled ideas that are not always c This is one wacky read made up of inter-locking sketches told in narrative verse. The story in Part 1 sits in the shadows, in this part there are many new story threads along with numerous characters. Mephistopheles has most of the limelight and the best lines; his sardonic tones turn this into a light and frothy read. This is a fun play, that is as long as you don’t spend too much time trying to make sense of the many interlocking sketches with its sprawling, jumbled ideas that are not always clear where it’s all going. It’s very different in structure from part one, and aside from Act 3, Faust is a minor character with an important part. Act 3 can stand on its own as playlet. It’s set after the Trojan war. Faust besotted with Helen of Troy, saves her from the sacrifice Menelaus had planned for her. In love with her, he marries her, finds happiness and they have a child, so years pass. The child grown into a young man who is fearless but in his bravado, he falls off a mountain edge and dies, Helen in grief disappears to Hades to be with her son, leaving Faust clutching to bodiless clothes. Faust is grieving in Act 4, but not for long as Mephistopheles finds off-setting a chain of events that are as random and coherent as a painting fused with Picasso and Dali’s style. The play ends tying it to the main theme of Part 1. This is my second 📕 of the year, my goal is 20 where I'm just reading, not making notes or looking things up. It was close, I had to stop myself from looking at the notes / reading essay. I am curious to know why this part differs so much from Part 1, so I can see myself reading this again. With 1 chill down I have 19 to go :)

  5. 4 out of 5

    Iohannes

    the perfect sequel doesn't exi... ok, after rereading I&II back to back this week, I kinda feel like sharing some thoughts: this is so masterfully done; even tho on the surface level both parts couldnt be more different from one another, the structure perfectly mirrors the first part, almost like a distorted mirror-image, or a musical composition with themes and variations; not only regarding the big story elements but also rly subtle small parts (just one of many examples; where Gretchen asks the the perfect sequel doesn't exi... ok, after rereading I&II back to back this week, I kinda feel like sharing some thoughts: this is so masterfully done; even tho on the surface level both parts couldnt be more different from one another, the structure perfectly mirrors the first part, almost like a distorted mirror-image, or a musical composition with themes and variations; not only regarding the big story elements but also rly subtle small parts (just one of many examples; where Gretchen asks the 'Mater Dolorosa' in Faust 1: Ach neige / Du Schmerzensreiche / Dein Antlitz gnädig meiner Not! -- in Faust 2 she greets the 'Mater Gloriosa' with: Neige neige / Du Ohnegleiche / Du Strahlenreiche / Dein Antlitz gnädig meinem Glück! etc.) While in Faust I most of the more metaphysical and philosophical themes are delivered through dialogue, Faust II makes intensive use of allegories; ideas are acted out rather than stated. The ideas beeing so rich, that I'm almost tempted to call Goethes biography and his complete oeuvre merely a footnote to Faust (I+II). So in the first part Faust wants to know what binds the world together (was die Welt / im innersten zusammenhält), tragedy ensues but after a short slumber Faust awakes again and continues his quest to strive for the highest beeing (Zum höchsten Dasein immerfort zu streben) throwing himself into a series of weird allegorical adventures with Mephisto, only to learn at the end that neither money, pleasure, power, success nor fame can give lasting happiness and that even tho beauty and art/poetry can (in this case even quite literally) transport us to 'Arcady', they are fragile and fleeting, and will only be able to glow for a short time before crashing to the ground and dying/vanishing (as we learn in the rather hilarious Helena/Euphorion passage), -- What binds the world is das Ewig-Weibliche (the embodiment of eternal, all-pervading Love) Wie Felsenabgrund mir zu Füßen Auf tiefem Abgrund lastend ruht, Wie tausend Bäche strahlend fließen Zum grausen Sturz des Schaums der Fluth, Wie strack, mit eignem kräftigen Triebe, Der Stamm sich in die Lüfte trägt: So ist es die allmächtige Liebe Die alles bildet, alles hegt. Besides all the big themes etc. for me its also esp. the more subtle, tongue-in-cheek bits (for example; fear and hope chained to the elphant--the Plutus/Poetry bit--the king/bishop bit--Guilt/Lack&Need beeing denied entrance--Mephisto bringing the 3 companions of war to Fausts proto-industrial operation etc.pp.) that makes this such a pleasure to read and reread

  6. 5 out of 5

    E.A. Bucchianeri

    Goethe's "Faust" is arguably the most important milestone in Romantic literature. Taking the famous medieval legend of Dr. Faustus and his pact with the devil, Goethe adapted the tale of old, and transformed it into a great love story, and a probing poetical tract on the nature of good and evil, salvation and damnation, failing and striving, the innate search for truth and lasting fulfilment. After his tragic love affair with Margareta in Part One, Faust is mystically restored by a band of elvin Goethe's "Faust" is arguably the most important milestone in Romantic literature. Taking the famous medieval legend of Dr. Faustus and his pact with the devil, Goethe adapted the tale of old, and transformed it into a great love story, and a probing poetical tract on the nature of good and evil, salvation and damnation, failing and striving, the innate search for truth and lasting fulfilment. After his tragic love affair with Margareta in Part One, Faust is mystically restored by a band of elvin sprites during a glorious sunrise in the alps in Part Two, and he continues his quest to find that one moment of bliss that his soul cries out for, that one moment that will convince him to cease his constant striving and yearning for activity, which ironically, will seal his fate among the damned according to the agreement he made with Mephistopheles. With his diabolical companion, Faust sets out on new adventures and travels the world, often leaving destuction and confusion in his wake. He enters the employment of the Holy Roman Emperor, providing him with grand magical entertainments and helping him to defend the empire from its enemies. He also travels allegorically through poetic space and time to visit ancient Greece, the land of the legendary Helen of Troy and falls in love again. When this does not last, he attempts to build his own kingdom, and he envisions a future moment when he can see the glory of this kingdom established, a moment he wished would last forever. Does this wish damn Faust for all eternity? Who will win the battle for Faust's soul, the demons or the angels? In contrast to the clear-cut plot of Part One, Faust Part Two is a confusion of strange allegories and cryptic scenes that can often prove tedious to read, and therefore it is no surprise Goethe's admirers found it difficult to comprehend and appreciate. In fact, not many readers continue on past Part One, and few universities include Part Two for their courses in German drama and literature, which is a pity. This work should not be overlooked. To begin with, it is useful to note that Goethe admitted he intended to incorporate 3000 years of history in this drama, and to one acquaintance he declared that the Faust text was filled with contrasts that would seem like an intriguing story with beautiful imaginative pictures to the general readers, while those who could understand the symbols behind Mozart's Masonic opera, "The Magic Flute", would be able to comprehend the deeper meanings hidden in his allegorical jumbles. Hence, appreciating this work and its dramatic riches requires a daunting amount of presupposed knowledge, not only of this mystic symbolism, theology and philosophy, but also ancient and more modern mythology, literature, drama, science, not to mention world history. As one Goethean scholar once declared, to study Goethe is an education in itself. David Luke's translation is the most accessible to date, and he provides an informative introduction to get readers started with basic accounts of the historical events that inspired Goethe. There is also a glossary of the classical Greek and mythological figures of history to help the reader find their feet. A map of ancient Greece is included to allow you plot Faust's travels in addition to a chronological timeline displaying when he drafted the various scenes, numerous explanatory footnotes, and sketches of Goethe's early drafts of Part Two. This publication is a great starting point for an introduction, however, the information provided by Luke only scratches the surface of Goethe's text, for instance, the glossary provides information on the Greek legends and myths used in the plot, and it is up to the readers to figure out why Goethe changes many elements, but in all, it is well worth the effort. A great book if you love mulling over poetical conundrums. E.A. Bucchianeri - author of "Faust: My Soul be Damned for the World"

  7. 5 out of 5

    Crito

    Part II is as strange and anomalous as everyone makes it out to be, yet it inexplicably provides a logical continuation of the major themes of the first part with emphasis on the macro rather than the micro. In the Walpurgis Night of Part I Faust is distracted by a Medusa creature who resembles his beloved Gretchen, and Mephistopheles pulls him away, remarking “Each thinks her his sweetheart.” And then in Part II he develops obsession for Helen of Troy (as the personification of beauty itself), Part II is as strange and anomalous as everyone makes it out to be, yet it inexplicably provides a logical continuation of the major themes of the first part with emphasis on the macro rather than the micro. In the Walpurgis Night of Part I Faust is distracted by a Medusa creature who resembles his beloved Gretchen, and Mephistopheles pulls him away, remarking “Each thinks her his sweetheart.” And then in Part II he develops obsession for Helen of Troy (as the personification of beauty itself), which is perfectly alluded to by the line above in the other work. In Part I the running motif of debts is one on one (e.g. Faust’s debt to Mephistopheles), and in Part II it shows up as debts of kingdoms and economies. The style itself is also subject to this shift to the macro, and in part embodies the massive departure from Part I. The writing in Part I is very interior and psychological, whereas in Part II all this is externalized in metaphor and symbolism, to where things like terrain become important. That accounts for how strange and dense people find Part II, and also just how lush and gorgeous the poetry is. Throughout the work Goethe uses different types of verse to reflect what’s happening or give subtle thematic hints. Change, transformation, healing, and redemption are the major themes that the work focuses on as opposed to the degeneration depicted in Part I, so you can be sure it’s not just an elaboration on Part I but a response as well. My favorite bit of running imagery embodying this is the sun which rises at the start and sets at the end. Also of note is how much it embodies Goethe’s ambitions of world literature. It’s a melting pot where you get bits of Byron, Shakespeare, Dante, Sterne, German poetry, Chinese poetry, The Bible, stories from the Arabian Nights retold using Greek Myth, and all this only amplifies Goethe’s already established strength of making something so original out of existing stories and ideas. What happens here, no matter how outlandish, still structurally and thematically fits in with the traditional Faust story. It’s all the richer for it, this is potent literature as fertile and thick as Nile silt. It becomes less of a necessity of understanding to slow down while reading, and instead turns into the desire to really savor it. I can see it being difficult for some since the subtext is what drives it rather than outward plot, but there’s still interesting ways the two parts feed on, and elucidate, each other. Though plot takes a backseat, there are still arcs that get finished and fleshed out, like the fantastic scene where the Student who Mephistopheles fucks with in Part I returns as the Graduate only to get roasted some more. The spirit and irony that made the first part so enjoyable, and the themes and ideas that made it so engaging and universal are still all here in the second part. It's just far more potent this time around. Strong Recommendation.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Merle

    what the fuck just happened

  9. 4 out of 5

    Barnaby Thieme

    The second part of Goethe's masterpiece is a titanic work of endless complexity and depth, providing ample basis for sustained meditation on a host of core concerns of human experience. It is as inexhaustible as the sea, great and sublime, but also cheerful and hilarious. It celebrates spiritual exaltation with directness and glory, while scorning bourgeois piety and the church with a hostility rarely seen this side of Friedrich Nietzsche. It's one of the greatest works of literature I've read. The second part of Goethe's masterpiece is a titanic work of endless complexity and depth, providing ample basis for sustained meditation on a host of core concerns of human experience. It is as inexhaustible as the sea, great and sublime, but also cheerful and hilarious. It celebrates spiritual exaltation with directness and glory, while scorning bourgeois piety and the church with a hostility rarely seen this side of Friedrich Nietzsche. It's one of the greatest works of literature I've read. What can one say in a short review about this work? To begin with, it is long, complex, often taxing, and sometimes difficult, and has been poorly translated into English several times, notably in partial translation by the distinguished scholar Walter Kaufmann, whose insight into Goethe is vast, but whose rendition leaves much to be desired - a fact of which I was never more clear than when I saw his rendering of the very famous final lines, which I think quite botches the meaning. It is not clear to me that Faust is currently worth undertaking by readers who lack some knowledge of German, but one does what one can. Essentially, this work sublimates the field of action of the first part onto the domain of world mythology and depth psychology. It bounds through the collective unconscious and cultural history at a breathless pace, and Goethe often gives little guidance to orient the readers through the shifting scenery. There is some heavy lifting to be done, but ample supplementary material exists - the scholar Jochen Schmidt counted no less than ten thousand published books on Faust. I can't bring myself to engage with it seriously in a review at this time - Thomas Mann's fifty-page essay on it barely scratches the surface. But I may write more on it later.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ivana Books Are Magic

    I have already reviewed the first part and pretty much said what I set out to say about this book, so I'll keep my second review shorter. The myth of Faust has great potential and Goethe's version is certainly an impressive one. However, I do not think that Goethe succeeded in realizing its full potential. It may be that my expectations for his Faust were raised too high. I have not enjoyed it as much as I expected to. Nevertheless, I cannot say that I did not like it. I definitely enjoyed readi I have already reviewed the first part and pretty much said what I set out to say about this book, so I'll keep my second review shorter. The myth of Faust has great potential and Goethe's version is certainly an impressive one. However, I do not think that Goethe succeeded in realizing its full potential. It may be that my expectations for his Faust were raised too high. I have not enjoyed it as much as I expected to. Nevertheless, I cannot say that I did not like it. I definitely enjoyed reading it, just not as much as I thought I would. Maybe it is the influence of all the other versions of this legend that I have read that stopped me from seeing it clearly. Like the Marlowe's versions or Roger Zelazny's parody on Goethe's version. Maybe it was all the other versions that made me see this epic work differently. On the other hand, it might not have been blown away by it even if I have not known anything about the legend of Faust. I just couldn't connect to this book as much as I wanted to. In part two, Faust isn't the most likable character- The ending didn't feel realistic to me.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sookie

    It is no accident that there are many literary figures that are built on this classic. Be it Don Quixote or Don Juan, they all share the same over achieving characters that Faust desperately tries to. He goes as far as committing suicide in search of a moment of true bliss. He takes on an adventure with the Devil after making a wager. What follows is romance, tragedy, heartbreak and adventure. The interesting twist is the Devil himself has made a bet with the angels so he moves with an agenda of It is no accident that there are many literary figures that are built on this classic. Be it Don Quixote or Don Juan, they all share the same over achieving characters that Faust desperately tries to. He goes as far as committing suicide in search of a moment of true bliss. He takes on an adventure with the Devil after making a wager. What follows is romance, tragedy, heartbreak and adventure. The interesting twist is the Devil himself has made a bet with the angels so he moves with an agenda of his own. A highly captivating story about humanity, happiness, tragedy, greed, passion, romance, love and being a visionary. I enjoyed part one more than second as there was a definitive story progressing when compared to part two where there are many characters that come ago. Having said that, its still brilliant and worth several more reads.

  12. 5 out of 5

    abi

    anyway, read my faust/mephisto fanfic

  13. 5 out of 5

    Simon

    Almost incomprehensible without secondary literature. In the first dozen pages or so, there are probably over 50 characters, many only deliver a single line. And i had almost no idea who they were or what anyone was talking about throughout most of the play. Faust Part One was entirely different, easily understood, and one of my favourites. The plot seems very disconnected, and not a point of focus. The language though is always finely constructed and there are beautiful verses, but without much Almost incomprehensible without secondary literature. In the first dozen pages or so, there are probably over 50 characters, many only deliver a single line. And i had almost no idea who they were or what anyone was talking about throughout most of the play. Faust Part One was entirely different, easily understood, and one of my favourites. The plot seems very disconnected, and not a point of focus. The language though is always finely constructed and there are beautiful verses, but without much apparent meaning, I can't take very much away from it. Disclaimer: I read this in the original German, my mother tongue.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Burcu

    It's a great transformation from part I, almost feels like it lacks the conviction of its prequel. However, its difference also shows a transforming intellectual mind. The best discussion on the Fausts I read so far is still Berman's chapter in "All that is Solid" (All That Is Solid Melts Into Air: The Experience of Modernity) and he is right, not much happens until much later. It's a great transformation from part I, almost feels like it lacks the conviction of its prequel. However, its difference also shows a transforming intellectual mind. The best discussion on the Fausts I read so far is still Berman's chapter in "All that is Solid" (All That Is Solid Melts Into Air: The Experience of Modernity) and he is right, not much happens until much later.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Tom

    This really paled in comparison to part one. In all honesty Goethe would have done no damage to his legacy if he would’ve just kept it to one part. This was still ok though. It had a few good sections, and if it was released by any other author then it’d definitely be regarded as their best work, which is a shame really as he definitely outdid himself prior to this book.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kate Langley

    You know when you’ve been writing a really long essay for a really long time and you basically start to lose your mind and start to go off on random tangents? And it’s a real bummer cos your introduction and first half was so well written and now you’ve just descended into schizophrenic rambling? That’s Faust part 2.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Leah

    I read this a long, long time ago and to be honest I didn't understand it all. Probably because the book deals with subjects that are unknown to me like Greek mythology. I really look forward to reading it again and maybe even understand it this time! I read this a long, long time ago and to be honest I didn't understand it all. Probably because the book deals with subjects that are unknown to me like Greek mythology. I really look forward to reading it again and maybe even understand it this time!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    Not as good as Faust 1.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ramybe

    I see this as a decent rap song.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Robert Sheppard

    GOETHE'S FAUST----THE IMMORTAL CLASSIC OF HUMAN ASPIRATION-----FROM THE WORLD LITERATURE FORUM RECOMMENDED CLASSICS AND MASTERPIECES SERIES VIA GOODREADS—-ROBERT SHEPPARD, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Johann Wolfgang von Goethe is universally revered as one of the great immortal geniuses of World Literature, and his great classic "Faust," the epic drama of the scholar's pact with the devil that has come to embody the spirit of the West and its fated love affair with limitless knowledge and technology, is ofte GOETHE'S FAUST----THE IMMORTAL CLASSIC OF HUMAN ASPIRATION-----FROM THE WORLD LITERATURE FORUM RECOMMENDED CLASSICS AND MASTERPIECES SERIES VIA GOODREADS—-ROBERT SHEPPARD, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Johann Wolfgang von Goethe is universally revered as one of the great immortal geniuses of World Literature, and his great classic "Faust," the epic drama of the scholar's pact with the devil that has come to embody the spirit of the West and its fated love affair with limitless knowledge and technology, is often held to be his greatest masterpiece. "Faust," which he finished with Part II in 1831, shortly before his death, can indeed be seen as the crowning achievement of his long and polymath career, but was by no means his only major contribution to World Literature. He wrote the most popular world novel of the 18th Century, "The Sorrows of Young Werther," a masterpiece of European Romanticism which catapulted him to European fame at the age of twenty-six, followed by one of the most influential novels of the 19th Century, the Bildungsroman "Wilhelm Meister's Apprenticeship," then topped off those acheivements with a profoundly modern novel of sexuality and adultery, "Elective Affinities," which has been widely influential in the 20th Century. GOETHE AND WORLD LITERATURE In addition, Goethe is credited with the creation of the concept and institution of World Literature, or "Weltliteratur," as he termed it in his "Conversations with Eckermann," and thus continues as a living and seminal presence in Western and World Culture and Civilization two centuries after his death. He was a pioneer of Comparative Literature and vigorously advocated the study and appreciation of works from outside the Western tradition, reading Chinese novels and Persian poets such as Hafiz, and publishing his "East-West Divan" as a bridge between Western and non-Western cultures and literary traditions. Speaking of World Literature to his young disciple Eckermann in January 1827, the seventy-seven-year-old Goethe first used his newly minted term "Weltliteratur," which upon publication of the Conversations passed into common international currency: "I am more and more convinced," Goethe remarked,"that poetry is the universal possession of mankind, revealing itself everywhere and at all times in hundreds and hundreds of men . . . I therefore like to look about me in foreign nations, and advise everyone to do the same. National literature is now a rather unmeaning term; the epoch of World Literature is at hand, and everyone must strive to hasten its approach." In his internationalist view of literature and culture Goethe was joined by other of the great founding fathers of World Literature such as Matthew Arnold of the English-speaking world, who in his "The Function of Criticism at the Present Time" urged national literatures and literary criticism to internationally incorporate "the best that has been known and thought in the world:" "One may say, indeed, of current English literature, that they may at all events endeavour, in dealing with this, to try it, so far as they can, by the standard of the best that is known and thought in the world; one may say, that to get anywhere near this standard, every critic should try and possess one great literature, at least, besides his own; and the more unlike his own, the better. But, after all, the criticism I am really concerned with,--the criticism which alone can much help us for the future, the criticism which, throughout Europe, is at the present day meant, when so much stress is laid on the importance of criticism and the critical spirit,--is a criticism which regards Europe as being, for intellectual and spiritual purposes, one great confederation. That modern nation will in the intellectual and spiritual sphere make most progress, which most thoroughly carries out this programme. And what is that but saying that we too, all of us, as individuals, the more thoroughly we carry it out, shall make the more progress?" Such figures as Marx and Engels also saw the globalization, internationalization and social transformation of literature and culture to be a necessary consequence of the globalization and transformation of the world economy and of the relationships between social classes in the modern age. In addition to his literary creations and leadership, Goethe as a true "Renaissance Man" or "Universal Mind" made lasting contributions to many fields, including one of the most important works on theoretical optics, chemistry and meteorology, as well as studies in geology, comparative anatomy and botany that anticipated and laid a foundation for Darwin's theory of evolution. He was also a government official responsible for establishing and developing museums, libraries and universities. As the example of "Faust" reminds us, he was also deeply involved in the theater as a playwright, actor, director and manager of theatrical companies and institutions. He was a close friend of the great poet and dramatist Friedrich Schiller and the center of a global network of writers, artists, scholars and statesmen. Though enobled as amember of the aristocracy and often regarded as of "Olympian" stature, he married a woman from a lower-class background and insisted on the principle of equality, while living through the great transmormation of Europe through the French Revolution and its aftermath in which the "ancien regime" of feudal heirarchy was eventually swept away in the birth of the bourgeious age of mass democracy. GOETHE'S FAUST, PARTS I & II The Faust legend was not invented by Goethe, but was a folk saga based on the life of a historical person, Georg Faust (1480-1540) who was a wandering charlatan, magician and showman, and whose life was subsequently embellished by gossip, folk tales, puppet shows and subsequent literary adaptations, most notably through the legend of his pact with the devil to gain occult knowledge and power in exchange for his soul, until it bacame the source material for Goethe's several works from the 1770's until his death in 1832. In England, Christopher Marlowe had used the folk legend as a basis of his play, "Dr. Faustus" in 1590, though Goethe probably did not know of it until around 1818, or ten years after he had published Part I of Faust. He probably first was exposed to the Faust material in local puppet plays at fairs and similar venues, including his early participation in the Romantic movement to record "folk songs" and "folklore" of the common people, led by such intellectuals as Herder and the Grimm Brothers. Later authors such as Gounod in opera and Thomas Mann in "Doktor Faustus" would rework the legend in ways additional to Goethe's treatment. Goethe's Faust consists of two parts, Part I & Part II, the first of which was, after an extended period of reworking, finally published in 1808, though not performed until 1829, Part II was the major work of Goethe's final years, and he put the final touches to it only shortly before his death in 1832. Thus the composition of the whole of the Faust epic occupied Goethe off and on for over fifty years. Goethe's Faust constitutes a complete reworking and reshaping of the Faust material under the influence of the Enlightenment and the Romantic Age's love affair with infinite striving of the free individual and communion with Nature. Thus Marlowe's play and the popular folk versions of Faust cast the legend as an admonitory morality play in which Faust's hubris and impiety seduce him into a sinful quest for occult knowledge and magic powers by sale of his soul to the devil, with his eternal damnation as a result of his errors. Goethe' Faust is completely different. Goethe as a "Renaissance Man" and "Romantic" is fully in sympathy with Faust's endless striving after infinite knowledge, and the secrets of nature and the spirit as the proper cultivation of the "Spark of the Divine Soul" which dwells in man and seeks to join with and commune in the powers of God as one's human birthright. Seeing Man as umbilically linked in spirit with God and Nature, Faust's thirst for ever greater knowledge and experience is seen not as a sinful presumption and defiance of God's order as in Marlowe, but rather as evidence of the living spiritual bond between God and Man that draws him ever closer to union with God and Heaven. Accordingly, Goethe's Faust never "sells his soul" to the devil, or Mephistopholes, but rather makes a friendly wager with him, echoing a wager God himself has made, betting his soul that no mere gratification or power the devil could confer on him would quench his thirst for even greater and infinite life and experience, a yearning for the infinite which is in itself a yearning for the embrace of the infinite goodness of God. Romanticism, in essence, is the apotheosis of the Individual. And the Romantic Movement in all its ramifications, with all its cornucopia of creation, with its vast range of artistic expression, constitutes identifiable movement precisely because it rests on and returns to a single unifying theme: The Individual Mind, the freedom and supremacy of that Mind, in particular its powers of Imagination and Creation, and the conflicts between the passions and aspirations of that Mind and the reality in which it must live. Romanticism as a way of being in the world, and as an ethos for communiion with nature and creative art, changed the balance of thought, and the focus of perception of its culture. It ultimately completed a cultural revolution, from a world centred on society and the divine, to a world centred on humanity and the individual. Where the Classical world of Greek and Roman antiquity saw human beings in society, where the Medieval world conceived of them in their respective positions on the ladder of God, and as parts of the Divine plan, Romanticism, fuelled by the Enlightenment, starts from the Individual, who shares in the creative powers of both Nature and God, and goes on from there to question the meaning of being. It’s premise is therefore Existentialist, and its outcome is Modernity. That is not to say, however, that Goethe in Faust and elsewhere is merely the stock figure of "a Romantic." While he was one of the earliest embodiments of "Romanticism," his Werther predating Wordsworth, Shelley, Keats and Byron, we could say that for Goethe, his Romanticism was one stage on an evolutionary path of further development, which, while preserving the essence of Romanticism, sought to bring it into a greater maturity,harmony and synthesis with Classicism, the Enlightenment, Rationalism, and a reformulated spirituality. This is often described as his "Classicism" or a grand humanist harmonzation of those complementary and at times contradictory cultural movements. Part I was completed between 1797 and 1806 and published in Goethe's late fifties, in 1808. Part II was created in his seventies and published after Goethe’s death in 1832. Part I can thus be understood as a mature man’s revision of his youthful Romantic ideas. Part II is an older man’s development of and resolution of that work and its contradictions. Goethe put into Faust not only his early Romantic emotion, in all its depth, but also his later more mature understanding of that state, and his attempt to resolve the problems for the Individual that it represented, through creative activity, intense subjective emotion informed and restrained by reason, and the acceptance of some fundamental limitations in the human condition. Faust, the dramatic character, was ready-made for Goethe as a vehicle through which to express the new situation of the Individual attempting to penetrate single-handedly master the hidden fabric of the Universe. Part I presents the essential personal tragedy of Faust, in Microcosm as he wields the enhanced powers of his own genius aided by Mephistopholes' arts. Like the archetypal Romantic hero he is restless and dissatisfied with the limits of his own life and human life. Despite his genius he feels the emptiness of common goals in life---pleasure, wealth, women, wine, power, social status, even academic knowledge. He contemplates suicide as he is approached by Mephistopholes, who is following up on a wager in Heaven with God that he can corrupt God's darling Faust into sin and damnation. Faust first regains lost youth from a potion from the Witch's Kitchen. After that the plot focuses on his love for Gretchen, a common innocent girl who sees him in his new youth and falls in love with him. Faust himself, seized with more lust than love, asks Mephistopholes aid in getting Gretchen for him, which he does through various arts such as bribing her and her mother with jewels and wealth, providing a sleeping potion to help the girl evade her mother to make a tryst with Faust and decoying her chaperone. But this overwhelming passion follows a tragic trajectory as the sleeping potion inadventantly kills the mother, and the sexual affair causes Gretchen's brother to challenge Faust to a duel of honor in which the brother is killed. Faust is cast in a conflicted character. His heart is well meaning, and even God in the Prologue has admired his idealism and aspirational ardour, but his selfishness and lack of foresight and wisdom leads to unintended evil consequences. This reflects his impulsive Romantic character, perhaps the consequence of an immaturity arising from his regained youth. Moreover, Gretchen, though pure and innocent of heart, becomes pregnant. She asks Faust if he is religious and they should be married, but he, in the romantic spirit is hostile to the church and marriage and prefers "free love" which Gretchen out of love acceeds to. Meanwhile Mephistopholes takes Faust on additiobal adventures including a visit to the Earth Spirit and a visit to the "Walpurgisnacht" or witches' fair. When they return Faust learns that Gretchen has unintentionally distracted by her despair caused the death of her baby and is being prosecuted for murder. Faust chastizes himself for having caused such harm and vows to save her through Mephisto's magic. But when they attempt to break her out of jail she refuses to leave, in the purity of her heart prefering judgment and repentence to flight. As Part I ends, Mephistopholes claims Gretchen for damnation for her sin, but merciful Heaven takes her upwards to God as the purity of her heart and her repentence saves her. In Part II, which is much longer and more complex than Part I, we switch from the Microcosm of Faust and Gretchen's small fate to the Macrocosm through which Faust's enhanced powers lead him. That is to say his forays with Mephisto lead him to adventures within several wider dimensiobs of human experience: the world of power represented by the Imperial Court, the realm of art and beauty represented by his pursuit of Helen of Troy, the epitome of beauty, and the ideal worlds of "The Mothers" and of the "Classical Walpurgisnacht," back to the Emperor in time of war, and finally to new land where he attempts to create a Utopia by reclaiming land from the sea and leading society. GOETHE'S FAUST & SPIRITUS MUNDI, NOVEL BY ROBERT SHEPPARD Goethe's Faust heavily influenced the composition of my own contemporary and futurist epic novel, Spiritus Mundi. First of all, Goethe himself plays a significant role appearing as a key character in Spiritus Mundi in Book II as the mentor and guide for Sartorius, the protagonist, on the Quest to save humanity from World War III, visiting Middle Earth, the Great Central Sea at the center of the globe and transiting the Cosmic Wormhole to plead with the Council of the Immortals at the Black Hole at the center of our Milky Way Galaxy. In this regard Goethe takes on the role of Dante's Vergil as the guide of the Divine Comedy. Goethe is the mentoring sage of Modernity, as Vergil was the sage bridging the Classical and Christian worlds in Dante's epic. Goethe appears mysteriously in the underground caves of Qom, Iran where Sartorius and the questers are escaping from the captiviity as 'human shields" of the Supreme Leader, accompanied by both the "Homunculus" the half-born, spiritual Frankenstein created by Wagner in Faust, who is on a parallel quest to seek completion in a natural and spiritual rebirth in Part II, and by the "Trickster" figue of the Monkey-King, Sun Wu Kong from the Chinese Journey to the West. Similarly, in Spiritus Mundi, there is a double quest, not only to save humanity from extinction in WWIII but also to acheive spiritual rebirth of the modern world. In terms of structure, Spiritus Mundi is also divided into two parts, as is Goethe's Faust, with the first part focused on the Microcosm, or the level of realistic individual life, and the second part, Spiritus Mundi Book II: The Romance, dialating its action to the Macrocosm, the symbolic, mythic and spiritual realm. Both Goethe's Part II and Spiritus Mundi's Book II thus offer symbolic, archetypal and mythic journeys and explorations. Part II of Faust involves a trip to "The Mothers" which is a sort of idealized witches cauldron of protean Platonic forms arising and falling into and out of existence. Sartorius in Spiritus Mundi, like Faust, also pays a visit to "The Mothers" on the Island of Omphalos at the center of the Central Sea at the hollow center of the globe, where he is to transit a cosmic wormhole to visit the Council of the Immortals at the Black Hole at the Center of the Milky Way Galaxy. In Spiritus Mundi "The Mothers" are conflated with the Three Fates, the ugly hags of Necessity. Just as Faust visits the Court of the Emperor in Part II, in Book II of Spiritus Mundi Sartorius and the band of social idealists on their Campaign to create a United Nations Parliamentary Assembly visit the "court" of the Supreme Leader of Iran. Additional archetypes from Faust are echoed in Spiritus Mundi, such as the role of Eva Strong, who is Sartorius's anima and soulmate, who inspires him and leads him onwards in development as an embodiment of the "Ewige Weibliche" or the "Eternal Feminine" anima-spirit which guides man to greater spirituality. Just as Faust's line of development is from egocentric and isolated genius in Part I to relationship and belonging in both his love of Gretchen and of Helen of Troy, as well as his joining and leading a Utopian project reclaiming land from the sea, so similarly Sartorius goes from a divorced and loveless existence contemplating suicide only mitigated by his social and intellectual idealism, to a marriage with Eva, an organic and spiritual union, in which he fathers a child, as does Faust with Helen, which Sartorius also names Euphorion, and their both working organically related within society----a creative individual within a free and creative people---- to bring about their Utopian project, the United Nations Parliamentary Assembly. In conclusion, I invite you to read both the immortal Clasic of human aspirationm, Faust, and Spiritus Mundi, which derives spiritual inspiration from it. For a fuller discussion of the concept of World Literature you are invited to look into the extended discussion in the new book Spiritus Mundi, by Robert Sheppard, one of the principal themes of which is the emergence and evolution of World Literature: For Discussions on World Literature and Literary Criticism in Spiritus Mundi: http://worldliteratureandliterarycrit... Robert Sheppard Editor-in-Chief World Literature Forum Author, Spiritus Mundi Novel Author’s Blog: http://robertalexandersheppard.wordpr... Spiritus Mundi on Goodreads:http://www.goodreads.com/bo... Spiritus Mundi on Amazon, Book I: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00CIGJFGO Spiritus Mundi, Book II: The Romance http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00CGM8BZG Copyright Robert Sheppard 2013 All Rights Reserved

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kyle van Oosterum

    I definitely enjoyed the first part more than I did the second. Something about this one makes it seem like Goethe is just looking to brag about his encyclopedic knowledge of mythology, Ancient Greece and Rome and other obscure literary references. Maybe I’ll return to it when I’m a bit more educated...🙄

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    This is a very funny book. From a chattering brilliant mind. ...funny and brilliant as Melville. I am reading this right now. It is hilarious, insane, wonderful. well not insane at all, just the mix/ meeting of the classical gods, pre-classical gods and our paltry contemporary icons coming together. Deep quest of life meeting myths of life jambalaya. Sphinxes and ants and the devil all talk to each other. Everyone is invited to dinner. Just think of all your smartest craziest friends getting toge This is a very funny book. From a chattering brilliant mind. ...funny and brilliant as Melville. I am reading this right now. It is hilarious, insane, wonderful. well not insane at all, just the mix/ meeting of the classical gods, pre-classical gods and our paltry contemporary icons coming together. Deep quest of life meeting myths of life jambalaya. Sphinxes and ants and the devil all talk to each other. Everyone is invited to dinner. Just think of all your smartest craziest friends getting together at one table. Beautiful chaos towards a higher song. Lots of beauty and funny bristling. The larger meanings will never be found. Too much going on in life. There is this little 'Homunculus' in Faust 2, that I am in love with the idea of. Pre-microscope, sperm was thought to contain little fully formed men, little Homunculi. Pythagoras would not eat beans, as a vegetarian, because he thought the 'germ' inside the bean-the small nutrient seed that looks like a little curled up man, was indeed a man. I like the changing ideas of origin and myth all mixed together. Goethe's 1790's Homunculus is a flame in a jar, an unformed man looking to be formed. The Homunculus guides Faust when the devil runs out of ideas. Its very funny. He is a beautiful metaphor for searching for creative being, for hope, for life. This book is inspiring me to make art work. I love the idea of the symbol of the Homunculus, and what he represents-being the seed of creativity, the seed of growth, and that thing that drives us outward into the world. Now since Goethe is the Shakespeare of Germany I am screwed out of the five star book experience, as I do not read German. Faust is written in a rhyming balanced poem play. So the flowing balance and play on words I do not get to expereince through translation. (Maybe one wish from a Genie would go to this...an instant understanding of german I could read Faust) So the 'fifth star' of the book cannon is not in my universe to see. Its just a beautiful theory which I can only imagine exists. There is a good translation by Walter Kaufmann of Faust pt 1. I am really bummed he only translated parts of part 2. His translation has german and english on facing pages. I went through 5-6 translations looking for the best. I looked hard for a good translation for Part 2. I looked through a lot of them. I have maybe 3 Faust II translations. I am reading the Oxford translation by David Luke. When there are unclear passages I look for the meanings by comparing with the Yale translation by Martin Greenberg. It was funny to pick up an old translation and to read something written in the style of the King James Bible, or some really horrible sonorous prose that has practically no content in common with Goethe's words. This reminds me of American pop songs that are sung in Italian with the same orchestration and completely different lyrics. Its kind of preposterous. It has made me think a lot about how rare it must be to find a sensitive ingenious translator. they have to be smart, sensitive, a poet in their own right and heart. someone like the New Yorker art writer Peter Schjeldahl.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Perry Whitford

    The second and concluding part of Goethe's Faust, written years after the first part, is a very different play altogether. Faustus is now an eminent figure, a person of influence in the Emperor's court. But he is still unfulfilled, and the condition of the state is similarly parlous. Mistrusted and feared by all but invaluable for the services their magic can bring, Faustus and Mephistopheles rescue the state from bankruptcy by promising to deliver gold from beneath the earth, but instead introd The second and concluding part of Goethe's Faust, written years after the first part, is a very different play altogether. Faustus is now an eminent figure, a person of influence in the Emperor's court. But he is still unfulfilled, and the condition of the state is similarly parlous. Mistrusted and feared by all but invaluable for the services their magic can bring, Faustus and Mephistopheles rescue the state from bankruptcy by promising to deliver gold from beneath the earth, but instead introducing paper money. After a short respite that will, however, eventually lead to further strife and all out war with a rival, the Emperor calls for beauty and entertainment, wherein Faustus falls in love with the spirit of Helen of Troy in a dream world where they defeat Menelaus and live together in a castle. Tragedy strikes, the dream ends and Faustus returns to the real world, aiding the Emperor in his war and exacting a reward. Years pass and Faustus ages in his domain, master of nearly all he surveys yet still unhappy, as Lynceus The Warder (one of the legendary Argonauts, blessed with the ability to see over vast distances) looks over the land that war has left and reflects: "What the eye so loved is vanished With the years of long ago". Will Faustus repent and be saved, or will Mephistopheles have his soul as their bargain proscribed and as all other versions of the story conclude? It's almost impossible to visualize this play produced on the stage, so symbolic and metaphysical are its concerns. The (mostly) recognisable human action of the first part is almost completely absent, replaced with pageants and phantasmagorias of Classical and Germanic characters from myths and legends, with Sirens, Sphinxes and Titans alternating scenes with Elves, Dwarves and Witches. The scope for interpretation is vast, but how could a a director tackle stage directions such as [Helena's clothes dissolve into clouds, surround Faustus, raise him into the air, and bear him away]! As a reading experience though it's a veritable cornucopia of lofty, ennobling verse - again in a variety of schemes and meters, though mostly AABB or ABAB - adorned with so much mythic history, enriched with so much religious and scientific thought behind each phrase that in truth I was overwhelmed. I need to read it again to come close to understanding it, next time from a version with accompanying notes and commentary if possible. Extraordinary.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Yair Ben-Zvi

    A sublime and wonderful work. Stuart Atkin's translation commendably shows the power and grandeur of Goethe's masterwork in a complex but somehow still (mostly) accessible English rendition. Reading about the history of the work and of Goethe himself, it's not that it's a wonder that the work is what it is now, but rather that it was ever conceived and finished at all. The first part is wonderful, even in its linearity, but the second part transcends not only the form of the closet drama but of A sublime and wonderful work. Stuart Atkin's translation commendably shows the power and grandeur of Goethe's masterwork in a complex but somehow still (mostly) accessible English rendition. Reading about the history of the work and of Goethe himself, it's not that it's a wonder that the work is what it is now, but rather that it was ever conceived and finished at all. The first part is wonderful, even in its linearity, but the second part transcends not only the form of the closet drama but of the idea of story in a (then) modern vein juxtaposed with the classical sources from which it sprung forth and attempts to simultaneously break free and do homage to. Not enough good can be said about this work, it must be read, and it must be acknowledged as one of the crowning achievements of Western and world literature.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Albert

    This play is tough. the toughest thing I ever read that I still plan on reading it again in order to actually understand it. You need concentration, you need skill and you need tricks up your brain in order to fully understand and know how to read this play. However I loved it. Again this book is filled with laughs, tragedy, eroticism, magic and even a bit of science fiction. unbelievably interwoven one more time with the adventures of Faust and Mephisto. This time going beyond what is a genre. This play is tough. the toughest thing I ever read that I still plan on reading it again in order to actually understand it. You need concentration, you need skill and you need tricks up your brain in order to fully understand and know how to read this play. However I loved it. Again this book is filled with laughs, tragedy, eroticism, magic and even a bit of science fiction. unbelievably interwoven one more time with the adventures of Faust and Mephisto. This time going beyond what is a genre. They go through Greek lands and a ton of Greek mythology and history is needed to get this. But alas it's beautiful! A story with just the right amount of action, dialogue, philosophical insights and everything else. Very Confusing, but it gets better the more you read it.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Josh

    I had the pleasure of rereading this while at a conference with a Goethe scholar. Having had some conversations with him, I feel like I'm more able to put my finger on the seeming change of gears between this and the first part of Faust. There is definitely a change in tone and pacing, as well as theme. The first part always strikes me as more Romanticist, while the second part (explicitly in parts) moves away from romanticism and to classicism. Having reread both parts recently, I still like th I had the pleasure of rereading this while at a conference with a Goethe scholar. Having had some conversations with him, I feel like I'm more able to put my finger on the seeming change of gears between this and the first part of Faust. There is definitely a change in tone and pacing, as well as theme. The first part always strikes me as more Romanticist, while the second part (explicitly in parts) moves away from romanticism and to classicism. Having reread both parts recently, I still like this one, but prefer the first for tone, pace and plot.

  27. 4 out of 5

    A.D. Crystal

    READ - ONLY IF HUMAN! Is KNOWLEDGE the answer to happy and fulfilled life? Don't we all strive to become more and more knowledgeable faster and faster? Well, no! Goethe claims. His tragic honored scholar Faust was devoured by a consuming eagerness for more of ... some UNNAMED URGE all humans are doomed with. Selling his soul to the Devil to fill in his swallowing need, would only make his ending dreaded by generations of people to come and his name cursed in every language. READ - ONLY IF HUMAN! Is KNOWLEDGE the answer to happy and fulfilled life? Don't we all strive to become more and more knowledgeable faster and faster? Well, no! Goethe claims. His tragic honored scholar Faust was devoured by a consuming eagerness for more of ... some UNNAMED URGE all humans are doomed with. Selling his soul to the Devil to fill in his swallowing need, would only make his ending dreaded by generations of people to come and his name cursed in every language.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Glen Schroeder

    Shall I call — Sweet folk, god-fearing — Ho, I greet you, call you blest. If you still, with ways endearing, Give good comfort to a guest.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    quite jumbled and rushed, compared to book one, though not in a bad way. that could also just be due to my own minds weariness—if only we could be eternal like the soul of Faust! Great ending to the story, heavier in mythology and folk lore than the first with great themes and symbolism centered around the humanity and doom we all face as being thus, and what it is we truly desire, just what it is that we will find in eternity.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Matheus Resende

    What an absolute magnificent oeuvre. The moments where you're in awe reading this make 70% of the whole tragedy. Seriously, it's OBLIGATORY for everyone to read this. I'll not go any longer on this, just stress that you should read it as soon as possible. Shout out to Jenny Klabin Segall and Marcus Vinícius Mazzari and the whole Editora 34 for providing this stupendous edition What an absolute magnificent oeuvre. The moments where you're in awe reading this make 70% of the whole tragedy. Seriously, it's OBLIGATORY for everyone to read this. I'll not go any longer on this, just stress that you should read it as soon as possible. Shout out to Jenny Klabin Segall and Marcus Vinícius Mazzari and the whole Editora 34 for providing this stupendous edition

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...