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Henry Wadsworth Longfellow was an American poet born in 1807. He is one of the five Fireside Poets. Longfellow is best known for his poems Paul RevereZs Ride and Evangeline. His first major poetry collections were Voices of the Night (1839) and Ballads and Other Poems (1841). Poems in this collection include The Skeleton in Armour, The wreck of the Hesperus, The Luck of Ed Henry Wadsworth Longfellow was an American poet born in 1807. He is one of the five Fireside Poets. Longfellow is best known for his poems Paul RevereZs Ride and Evangeline. His first major poetry collections were Voices of the Night (1839) and Ballads and Other Poems (1841). Poems in this collection include The Skeleton in Armour, The wreck of the Hesperus, The Luck of Edenhall, The Elected Knight, The Children of the LordZs Supper, The Village Blacksmith, Endymion, The two Locks of Hair, It is not Always May, and The rainy day.


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Henry Wadsworth Longfellow was an American poet born in 1807. He is one of the five Fireside Poets. Longfellow is best known for his poems Paul RevereZs Ride and Evangeline. His first major poetry collections were Voices of the Night (1839) and Ballads and Other Poems (1841). Poems in this collection include The Skeleton in Armour, The wreck of the Hesperus, The Luck of Ed Henry Wadsworth Longfellow was an American poet born in 1807. He is one of the five Fireside Poets. Longfellow is best known for his poems Paul RevereZs Ride and Evangeline. His first major poetry collections were Voices of the Night (1839) and Ballads and Other Poems (1841). Poems in this collection include The Skeleton in Armour, The wreck of the Hesperus, The Luck of Edenhall, The Elected Knight, The Children of the LordZs Supper, The Village Blacksmith, Endymion, The two Locks of Hair, It is not Always May, and The rainy day.

33 review for Ballads and Other Poems

  1. 4 out of 5

    Tom

    Preface - 4 Stars Longfellow prefixed the ballad The Children of the Lord's Supper with background information of Swedish traditions. Edgar Allan Poe in his review had this to say about needing to explain background information for a poem. " . . . every work of art should contain within itself all that is requisite for its own comprehension. And this remark is especially true of the ballad. In poems of magnitude the mind of the reader is not, at all times, enabled to include, in one comprehensiv Preface - 4 Stars Longfellow prefixed the ballad The Children of the Lord's Supper with background information of Swedish traditions. Edgar Allan Poe in his review had this to say about needing to explain background information for a poem. " . . . every work of art should contain within itself all that is requisite for its own comprehension. And this remark is especially true of the ballad. In poems of magnitude the mind of the reader is not, at all times, enabled to include, in one comprehensive survey, the proportions and proper adjustment of the whole. He is pleased, if at all, with particular passages; and the sum of his pleasure is compounded of the sums of the pleasurable sentiments inspired by these individual passages in the progress of perusal. But, in pieces of less extent, the pleasure is unique, in the proper acceptation of this term — the understanding is employed, without difficulty, in the contemplation of the picture as a whole; and thus its effect will depend, in great measure, upon the perfection of its finish, upon the nice adaptation of its constituent parts, and especially, upon what is rightly termed by Schlegel [a German poet, literary critic, philosopher, philologist, and Indologist] the unity or totality of interest. But the practice of prefixing explanatory passages is utterly at variance with such unity. By the prefix, we are either put in possession of the subject of the poem; or some hint, historic fact, or suggestion, is thereby afforded, not included in the body of the piece, which, without the hint, is incomprehensible. In the latter case, while perusing the poem, the reader must revert, in mind at least, to the prefix, for the necessary explanation. In the former, the poem being a mere paraphrase of the prefix, the interest is divided between the prefix and the paraphrase. In either instance the totality of effect is destroyed." https://www.eapoe.org/works/criticsm/... In essence Poe was saying if you needed to pre-explain the background of the poem, the poem wasn't constructed properly. Despite Poe's criticism albeit his point well taken, I thoroughly enjoyed learning more background about the Swedish traditions in this ballad, as well as the small introductions preceding the other poems. Longfellow being a professor, as well as a poet couldn't help himself being a bit of a didactic instructor. The Skeleton in Armour- 4.5 Stars TIDBIT Edgar Allan Poe's review stated: "[The Skeleton in Armour] Is one of the best poems of Longfellow; if not indeed his very best. it has the merits of directness and simplicity, it is sprinkled with vigorous thought tersely expressed. Its versification would be monotonous, if it did not at points, become so radically defective as to change into prose. . . . [an example is then given] . . . as to make decent prose, nothing more." Poe, Edgar Allan. (1984). Essays and Reviews., (G.R. Thompson, Ed.). New York: Literary Classics of the U.S. Inc. (772) The Wreck of the Hesperus- 4.5 Stars TIDBIT Edgar Allan Poe's review stated: "The Wreck of the Hesperus has some remarkably spirited passages, but what can justify any man to-day, in the use of daughter, and sailor?" Poe, Edgar Allan. (1984). Essays and Reviews., (G.R. Thompson, Ed.). New York: Literary Classics of the U.S. Inc. (772-73) Boy! Poe could be picayune when he wanted to be. The Luck of Edenhall by Johann Ludwig Uhland translated by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow - 3.5 Stars TIDBIT Edgar Allan Poe's review stated: "The Luck of Edenhall is a capital translation of one of Uhland's best romances." Poe, Edgar Allan. (1984). Essays and Reviews., (G.R. Thompson, Ed.). New York: Literary Classics of the U.S. Inc. (773) The Elected Knight - 2.5 Stars TIDBIT Edgar Allan Poe's review stated: "The Elected Knight from the Danish, is meant to prove, we presume, the Professor's acquaintance with the literature of Hardiknute." Poe, Edgar Allan. (1984). Essays and Reviews., (G.R. Thompson, Ed.). New York: Literary Classics of the U.S. Inc. (773) The Children of the Lord's Supper by Esaias Tegner translated by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow - 1 Star TIDBIT Edgar Allan Poe in his review of Longfellow's book had this to say about his translation: “The Children of the Lord’s Supper is, beyond doubt, a true and most beautiful poem in great part, while, in some particulars, it is too metaphysical to have any pretension to the name. In our last number [edition], we [Poe] objected, briefly, to its metre — the ordinary Latin or Greek Hexameter — dactyls and spondees at random, with a spondee in conclusion. We [Poe] maintain[s] that the Hexameter can never be introduced into our [the English] language, from the nature of that language itself. This rhythm demands, for English ears, a preponderance of natural spondees. Our tongue has few. Not only does the Latin and Greek, with the Swedish, and some others, abound in them; but the Greek and Roman ear had become reconciled (why or how is unknown) to the reception of artificial spondees that is to say, spondaic words formed partly of one word and partly of another, or from an excised part of one word. In short the ancients were content to read as they scanned, or nearly so. It may be safely prophesied that we shall never do this; and thus we shall never admit English Hexameters. The attempt to introduce them, after the repeated failures of Sir Philip Sidney, and others, is, perhaps, somewhat discreditable to the scholarship of Professor Longfellow. The Democratic Review, in saying that he has triumphed over difficulties in this rhythm, has been deceived, it is evident, by the facility with which some of these verses may be read. In glancing over the poem, we do not observe a single verse which can be read, to English ears, as a Greek Hexameter." https://www.eapoe.org/WORKS/criticsm/... In essence Poe was saying in putting these Greek Hexameters into an English translation, Longfellow diminished the original poem's beautiful meaning. All I can say on the matter was that I found the poem flat and boring. The Village Blacksmith - 2 Stars Endymion - 1.5 Stars The Two Locks of Hair - 1 Star It is not always May - 2 Stars The Rainy Day - 3 Stars God's Acre - 1.5 Stars To the River Charles - 2 Stars Blind Bartimeus - 1 Star the Goblet of Life - 3 Stars Maidenhood - 2 Stars Excelsior - 2.5 Stars

  2. 5 out of 5

    Illiterate

    Tragedy, sorrow, and melancholy, lightly worn.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    Longfellow is at his best when telling stories - all five ballads were great. The other poems (all on slavery) also were interesting - "The Quadroon Girl" was my favorite, another example of Longfellow as a superb storyteller. Longfellow is at his best when telling stories - all five ballads were great. The other poems (all on slavery) also were interesting - "The Quadroon Girl" was my favorite, another example of Longfellow as a superb storyteller.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

    In my previous review, I expressed that I had some doubts on Longfellow. Mainly, to the tone of his poems and their subject. I can say now that, at least in part, some of that doubt has waned by reading this, his following collection from 1841. Well, if we exclude the collection Juvenile and Earlier Poems, which had ones from around this period and before; but that wasn't published until much later. This was very much up to my interests, with most of the stories being of a mythological nature. I' In my previous review, I expressed that I had some doubts on Longfellow. Mainly, to the tone of his poems and their subject. I can say now that, at least in part, some of that doubt has waned by reading this, his following collection from 1841. Well, if we exclude the collection Juvenile and Earlier Poems, which had ones from around this period and before; but that wasn't published until much later. This was very much up to my interests, with most of the stories being of a mythological nature. I'm not sure though, as to which is my favourite. Three stood out in this collection, all of them being noted classics of American poetry. We have The Skeleton in Armour, The Wreck of the Hesperus, and Excelsior! Yet, as to which is better...I can't say. The Skeleton in Armour was an interesting pseudo-ghost story. Based upon a skeleton that was dug up around a decade prior to the writing of the poem. The Wreck of the Hesperus was a ship-sinking tale, which I usually don't like; but I found this one decent and even a bit touching. Although, it'll probably help in noting me of it's various cultural references throughout the last hundred years or so to it. Excelsior though, is more of a poem of moving on. Saying that we ought to get marching on, as it's title suggests. Now, each of these were good, and the others were as well. But the three mentioned above are the real standouts. I think though, just like before, another reading is needed. I have to admit though, I like Longfellow much more now.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Miles Smith

    An early collection of translated poems and other miscellany from Longfellow. It’s uneven. His introductions excellent, however, and the early translated Scandinavian poems are really splendid. Includes the long verse poem “The Wreck of the Hesperus.*” *Reviewed separately

  6. 5 out of 5

    Bruce

    Reading Longfellow is like drinking sun tea His language is so easy to read and follow; no road bumps.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    To be honest I was just interested in the Rainy Day, and some of the translated ballads were tedious to read, but some of the other poems were good.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Isaberu

    The Skeleton in Armor * The Wreck of the Hesperus * The Village Blacksmith Endymion It is not always May The Rainy Day * God’s-Acre To the River Charles Blind Bartimeus The Goblet of Life Maidenhood Excelsior

  9. 4 out of 5

    Angel Parrish

    Amazon freebie

  10. 5 out of 5

    Tim

  11. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Howard

  12. 4 out of 5

    Alex

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jared

  14. 5 out of 5

    Marie-Sarah

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jane Reye

  16. 4 out of 5

    Amber Dalpoas

  17. 4 out of 5

    Paul K

  18. 4 out of 5

    Leopold Publishing

  19. 5 out of 5

    John

  20. 4 out of 5

    Don Davis

  21. 5 out of 5

    Laura

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ngoc Tran

  23. 4 out of 5

    Christina Browne

  24. 5 out of 5

    Diana Nguyen

  25. 5 out of 5

    Larunda Libera

  26. 5 out of 5

    Deb Powers

  27. 5 out of 5

    Roxana Austin

  28. 4 out of 5

    Just Jazalyn

  29. 4 out of 5

    Robert Glover

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mark Gaulton

  31. 5 out of 5

    Grant

  32. 5 out of 5

    Natalie

  33. 5 out of 5

    DZMM

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