website statistics Historical Literacy: The Case for History in American Education - PDF Books Online
Hot Best Seller

Historical Literacy: The Case for History in American Education

Availability: Ready to download

A complete 38-page report from the Bradley Commission on History in Schools that makes recommendations on the curricular role of history and suggestions for all those concerned on how to improve the core of social studies in schools.


Compare

A complete 38-page report from the Bradley Commission on History in Schools that makes recommendations on the curricular role of history and suggestions for all those concerned on how to improve the core of social studies in schools.

25 review for Historical Literacy: The Case for History in American Education

  1. 4 out of 5

    May Ling

    An interesting topic that consolidates a lot of the thinking surrounding the Bradley Commission on History in Public Schools. It was published in 1989. We are still dealing with these issues and losing the battle. About half way through I came to the same conclusion that is in a later article. How do we get learners to appreciate why? How do you latch onto this impossible body of knowledge? I mean the subject is the entire global existence of earth. It’s not until far later chapters that they ta An interesting topic that consolidates a lot of the thinking surrounding the Bradley Commission on History in Public Schools. It was published in 1989. We are still dealing with these issues and losing the battle. About half way through I came to the same conclusion that is in a later article. How do we get learners to appreciate why? How do you latch onto this impossible body of knowledge? I mean the subject is the entire global existence of earth. It’s not until far later chapters that they talk about the silliness of trying to cover it all and the fact that at best all we do in history learning is enumerate and regurgitate. I would have liked to see the commission go more into applied history. Likely the problem is they had too many history teachers and not enough people who indirectly use history. For example, there’s a big difference in finance between those who know the history and those who don’t. When you travel, you enjoy what you’re seeing so much more if you know history. That’s implied in parts of the book, but it seems like the author of these smaller articles collections might not have personal empathy to really articulate the issues clearly. Still, I doubt I’ll find another book that attempts to address the subject, so 4 stars. Here are some quotes and takeaways. P. 6 “The weakening of history in the schools was exacerbated by the situation in national colleges, where the new social history, emphasizing quantification, theory and narrowly defined topics, turned much scholarly writing away from topics of broad general interest.” Yeah. The need to specialize is destroying critical thinking, which is the point of why you might care about history. Agreed. p. 13 “Stressing only the present, however, leads to a narrow focus, superficiality, and distortion.” In this case we’re talking about the Civil Rights movement. I think this is still the case. All of chapter 4 should be read. The teaching of history in public schools is off the heels of WWI and later WWII. They were trying to do something rather specific, a la not repeating certain types of history. P. 192 – Here is where they spell out the problem that the amount of history is just so vast, how to you get your arms around it and then how do you allocate it across grades. Fair point. P. 260 This talks to the fact the material are dull. This is a very bad compromise made to try to get the breadth in. P. 304 They talk about historical empathy as being understanding of what was possible for a particular time in history. I think this cannot be said enough and is a very interesting topic as we think about the aging population that is living these different forms of history.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Carl

  3. 5 out of 5

    Michael Reitemeyer

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Samuelson

  5. 5 out of 5

    Dale Anderson

  6. 5 out of 5

    Margaret

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy Huffer

  8. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jim Walsh

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mike

  11. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

  12. 5 out of 5

    David

  13. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Joseph Pegoda

  14. 4 out of 5

    Mike Hamm

  15. 5 out of 5

    BookDB

  16. 4 out of 5

    Andres

  17. 5 out of 5

    Paul

  18. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

  19. 5 out of 5

    Courtney McIndoe

  20. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie N

  21. 5 out of 5

    Shailesh Kumar

  22. 5 out of 5

    PKN3 GoodReads

  23. 5 out of 5

    Laura

  24. 4 out of 5

    Douglas Herron

  25. 4 out of 5

    Mario M.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.