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The Fire and the Staff: Lutheran Theology in Practice

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- Continues the tradition establshed by J. H. C. Fritz and C. F. W. Walther of fine works on practical ministry - Shows pastors how to carry out ministry on the basis of confessionally Lutheran theological principles - Stories and personal experience lend immediacy to the discussion - Unique in its presentation and content


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- Continues the tradition establshed by J. H. C. Fritz and C. F. W. Walther of fine works on practical ministry - Shows pastors how to carry out ministry on the basis of confessionally Lutheran theological principles - Stories and personal experience lend immediacy to the discussion - Unique in its presentation and content

30 review for The Fire and the Staff: Lutheran Theology in Practice

  1. 4 out of 5

    Luke

    Strong rebuke of American evangelicalism, revivalism and the Church Growth Movement. Doctrine follows practice, he strongly asserts, and it has a negative affect on the assurance of our faith. I agreed with a lot of what he said, and other parts I'll have to think about. Strong rebuke of American evangelicalism, revivalism and the Church Growth Movement. Doctrine follows practice, he strongly asserts, and it has a negative affect on the assurance of our faith. I agreed with a lot of what he said, and other parts I'll have to think about.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jake Moore

    A excellent book on the relationship between Lutheran doctrine and worship.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jared Abbott

    Very informative and solid.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jim B

    I wanted to really love this book. The author writes in a fresh way and uses contemporary and personal illustrations. I have no doubt that there are Lutheran pastors and young people who love this book, which is about how what a church does (its "practice") has an affect on what you teach (its "doctrine") For me, it got to be work to pick up this book. It's hard for me to put my finger on it. Matthew Harrison writes in a similar way, yet I never get tired of his joyful voice. This book seemed to I wanted to really love this book. The author writes in a fresh way and uses contemporary and personal illustrations. I have no doubt that there are Lutheran pastors and young people who love this book, which is about how what a church does (its "practice") has an affect on what you teach (its "doctrine") For me, it got to be work to pick up this book. It's hard for me to put my finger on it. Matthew Harrison writes in a similar way, yet I never get tired of his joyful voice. This book seemed to be a fresh polemic for Lutheranism, and while I'm a Lutheran and agree with his viewpoint, I'm not into reading a polemic for my own viewpoint. I've kept the book for its vivid illustrations.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mark Matzke

    If you are Lutheran, please read this and let's discuss. If you are Lutheran, please read this and let's discuss.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    This book focuses on doctrine and practical theology in the Lutheran church. Why should Lutheran churches stick to traditional liturgy? Why be cautious using praise songs for worship? What problems can arise when churches adopt the principles of the church growth movement? Preus begins with a look at biblical doctrines and how those influenced (and still do) influence the practices of the church. Doctrine and worship are always intertwined, and when one is changed, the other will change too. This This book focuses on doctrine and practical theology in the Lutheran church. Why should Lutheran churches stick to traditional liturgy? Why be cautious using praise songs for worship? What problems can arise when churches adopt the principles of the church growth movement? Preus begins with a look at biblical doctrines and how those influenced (and still do) influence the practices of the church. Doctrine and worship are always intertwined, and when one is changed, the other will change too. This is a long book, but worth the read if you are looking at an in-depth look of doctrine and practice in the Lutheran church.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Albert Meier

    Theology and Practice are related. What you believe informs how you worship and live. How you worship and live forms what you believe. Preus makes the case for an unapologetic use of historical Lutheran practice as a style that flows from the gospel and a style that proclaims and confesses the gospel. He avoids legalism or setting down rules, but is winsome as he demonstrates how such practices serve God's people and proclaim the saving truth to unbelievers in a superior way to methods and style Theology and Practice are related. What you believe informs how you worship and live. How you worship and live forms what you believe. Preus makes the case for an unapologetic use of historical Lutheran practice as a style that flows from the gospel and a style that proclaims and confesses the gospel. He avoids legalism or setting down rules, but is winsome as he demonstrates how such practices serve God's people and proclaim the saving truth to unbelievers in a superior way to methods and styles adopted from American Evangelicalism.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Laurie Sand

    My issue with this book is Preus's insistence that the truths of the Bible are self-evident. I simply cannot take his fixation on "pure doctrine" seriously when his basic argument is "The Bible is true because it says it's true, and anybody who talks about the Bible is automatically telling the truth." This is, to put it mildly, idiotic. Has this guy honestly never heard the term "circular argument"?? My issue with this book is Preus's insistence that the truths of the Bible are self-evident. I simply cannot take his fixation on "pure doctrine" seriously when his basic argument is "The Bible is true because it says it's true, and anybody who talks about the Bible is automatically telling the truth." This is, to put it mildly, idiotic. Has this guy honestly never heard the term "circular argument"??

  9. 4 out of 5

    Paul Willweber

    Good defense of historic Lutheranism in the face opposing theologies.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Burchart

    Great explanation of the treasures of Lutheran liturgy and doctrine and how they point to Christ.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    an excellent book on why we are Lutheran and should hold fast to what our forefathers taught. because it keeps us focused ever on Jesus

  12. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    Klemet Preus��� book, ���The Fire and the Staff,��� is about the basic idea that doctrine and practice have a reciprocal relationship. Obviously doctrine drives the church���s practice, but Preus argues that a change in practice can actually bleed back into doctrine and influence one���s theology. More specifically Preus seems to narrow in towards the practices of Modern Evangelicalism that are displayed most visibly by many mega-churches in America. He discusses the historical background of the Klemet Preus��� book, ���The Fire and the Staff,��� is about the basic idea that doctrine and practice have a reciprocal relationship. Obviously doctrine drives the church���s practice, but Preus argues that a change in practice can actually bleed back into doctrine and influence one���s theology. More specifically Preus seems to narrow in towards the practices of Modern Evangelicalism that are displayed most visibly by many mega-churches in America. He discusses the historical background of these practices in order to show that many of these practices are not rooted in the divine scriptures, but rooted in methodologies that have sprung forth from certain time periods and contexts. Thus he makes the appeal that when a conservative confessional Lutheran church body incorporates a Modern Evangelicalism���s practice it is essentially and inadvertently introducing new theology into the parish and its statement of faith. In simplistic terms, Modern Evangelicalism has practices that are not derived from scripture, some that are essentially anti-sacramental and anti-monergistic. Therefore, when a confessional Lutheran church embraces one of these practices, not for theological reasons but for pragmatic reasons, it is then allowing the practice to bleed false truths back into the church���s theology. Preus argues rightly that practice and methodologies are not neutral. Practice contains theological presuppositions. If practices are changed, the doctrine will be changed. If doctrine is changed, practice will be changed. The main thesis of Preus��� book is certainly true. Doctrine not only provides knowledge to one���s epistemological framework, but practice is also a source of knowledge for one���s epistemological framework as well. They are connected and it is vital for the church to understand this. Simply saying that form is neutral, while embracing different methodologies for pragmatic reasons, will certainly jeopardize the Lutheran church���s theology. This may also create an environment for an epistemological crisis or cognitive dissonance to occur for parishioners. Thus Preus��� book is one that every pastor should soberly consider.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Richard

    Klemet Preus’ book, “The Fire and the Staff,” is about the basic idea that doctrine and practice have a reciprocal relationship. Obviously doctrine drives the church’s practice, but Preus argues that a change in practice can actually bleed back into doctrine and influence one’s theology. More specifically Preus seems to narrow in towards the practices of Modern Evangelicalism that are displayed most visibly by many mega-churches in America. He discusses the historical background of these practic Klemet Preus’ book, “The Fire and the Staff,” is about the basic idea that doctrine and practice have a reciprocal relationship. Obviously doctrine drives the church’s practice, but Preus argues that a change in practice can actually bleed back into doctrine and influence one’s theology. More specifically Preus seems to narrow in towards the practices of Modern Evangelicalism that are displayed most visibly by many mega-churches in America. He discusses the historical background of these practices in order to show that many of these practices are not rooted in the divine scriptures, but rooted in methodologies that have sprung forth from certain time periods and contexts. Thus he makes the appeal that when a conservative confessional Lutheran church body incorporates a Modern Evangelicalism’s practice it is essentially and inadvertently introducing new theology into the parish and its statement of faith. In simplistic terms, Modern Evangelicalism has practices that are not derived from scripture, some that are essentially anti-sacramental and anti-monergistic. Therefore, when a confessional Lutheran church embraces one of these practices, not for theological reasons but for pragmatic reasons, it is then allowing the practice to bleed false truths back into the church’s theology. Preus argues rightly that practice and methodologies are not neutral. Practice contains theological presuppositions. If practices are changed, the doctrine will be changed. If doctrine is changed, practice will be changed. The main thesis of Preus’ book is certainly true. Doctrine not only provides knowledge to one’s epistemological framework, but practice is also a source of knowledge for one’s epistemological framework as well. They are connected and it is vital for the church to understand this. Simply saying that form is neutral, while embracing different methodologies for pragmatic reasons, will certainly jeopardize the Lutheran church’s theology. This may also create an environment for an epistemological crisis or cognitive dissonance to occur for parishioners. Thus Preus’ book is one that every pastor should soberly consider.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ben Weis

    Second read-through and much needed. What a fantastic reminder of why Lutherans believe what we believe and do what we do. In an age of blurring distinctions and subjectivity, we need to stand on our distinctive and historic beliefs and practices. The objective nature of the Gospel and the means by which God “bespeaks us righteous” tie directly into the historic liturgy and practices of the church.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    Very good book explaining the importance of the relationship between Doctrine and practice. Klemet Preus provides an interesting read showing how the American Evangelical and Church Growth movements are leaking into the Lutheran Church and breaking the bond between Doctrine and practice.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Edward Durand

    I found The Fire and the Staff, to be an enjoyable read. It ignited a desire in me to continue to study the Confession of the Church and it's doctrine. It has helped me understand where the Church Growth Movement came from and it has strengthen my stand on the practice of Church and it liturgy. I found The Fire and the Staff, to be an enjoyable read. It ignited a desire in me to continue to study the Confession of the Church and it's doctrine. It has helped me understand where the Church Growth Movement came from and it has strengthen my stand on the practice of Church and it liturgy.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Brian Yamabe

    Lex orandi, lex credendi.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    Lots of theology/alphabet soup

  19. 4 out of 5

    Philski

    Excellent book on Lutheran theology and the errors of the Church Growth Movement from a Lutheran perspective.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Tanya

    Great great readon on Lutheran theology. Easy to understand and fun to read. I love his stories. He gets the point across without being boring.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lori Allen

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Wielert

  23. 4 out of 5

    Stefan

  24. 4 out of 5

    Tracy

  25. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

  26. 5 out of 5

    Damion

  27. 5 out of 5

    Hanna

  28. 5 out of 5

    Larry

  29. 4 out of 5

    Scott

  30. 4 out of 5

    Michael Kober

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