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The first narrative biography of the Bee Gees, the phenomenally popular vocal group that has sold more than 200 million records worldwide -- sales in the company of the Beatles and Michael Jackson. The Bee Gees is the epic family saga of brothers Barry, Robin, and Maurice Gibb, and it's riddled with astonishing highs—especially as they became the definitive band of the dis The first narrative biography of the Bee Gees, the phenomenally popular vocal group that has sold more than 200 million records worldwide -- sales in the company of the Beatles and Michael Jackson. The Bee Gees is the epic family saga of brothers Barry, Robin, and Maurice Gibb, and it's riddled with astonishing highs—especially as they became the definitive band of the disco era, fueled by Saturday Night Fever and crashing lows, including the tragic drug-fueled downfall of youngest brother, Andy. In recent years, a whole new generation of fans has rediscovered the undeniable grooves and harmonies that made the Bee Gees and songs like Stayin' Alive, How Deep is Your Love, To Love Somebody, and I Started a Joke timeless.


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The first narrative biography of the Bee Gees, the phenomenally popular vocal group that has sold more than 200 million records worldwide -- sales in the company of the Beatles and Michael Jackson. The Bee Gees is the epic family saga of brothers Barry, Robin, and Maurice Gibb, and it's riddled with astonishing highs—especially as they became the definitive band of the dis The first narrative biography of the Bee Gees, the phenomenally popular vocal group that has sold more than 200 million records worldwide -- sales in the company of the Beatles and Michael Jackson. The Bee Gees is the epic family saga of brothers Barry, Robin, and Maurice Gibb, and it's riddled with astonishing highs—especially as they became the definitive band of the disco era, fueled by Saturday Night Fever and crashing lows, including the tragic drug-fueled downfall of youngest brother, Andy. In recent years, a whole new generation of fans has rediscovered the undeniable grooves and harmonies that made the Bee Gees and songs like Stayin' Alive, How Deep is Your Love, To Love Somebody, and I Started a Joke timeless.

30 review for The Bee Gees: The Biography

  1. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Edwards

    Verified Purchase I should have known better. I had been warned. I was told my friends online. I read the Amazon.com reviews. I was told by Barry Gibb himself on Twitter that this book was trash. But I have to admit, my curiosity got the best of me, I had to have Bee Gees the biography by David Meyer. As stated by other reviewers, this book is riddled with not only spelling errors of the worst kind (ie Barry Gordy for Berry Gordy), but also factual errors that even the casual reader could spot. I h Verified Purchase I should have known better. I had been warned. I was told my friends online. I read the Amazon.com reviews. I was told by Barry Gibb himself on Twitter that this book was trash. But I have to admit, my curiosity got the best of me, I had to have Bee Gees the biography by David Meyer. As stated by other reviewers, this book is riddled with not only spelling errors of the worst kind (ie Barry Gordy for Berry Gordy), but also factual errors that even the casual reader could spot. I have to admit, when I got the book, I skipped to page 225, the chapter "Andy Gibb", the love of my teenage years. I was prepared for whatever crap Meyer had to fling. I didn't have to read far. On the second page of this chapter, not only does the author mis-identify the color of Andy's eyes as "piercing, sparkling blue eyes", he goes on for the rest of the page talking about how those "piercing, sparkling blue eyes" entranced many a television interviewer. Andy had BROWN eyes like all of his brothers. I know this because those brown eyes looked down on me every night for many years. His brown eyes were the last thing I saw when I went to sleep at night and the first thing I saw in the morning. And, yes they were brown, not "piercing, sparkling blue." Other errors within the same chapter include the author identifying Andy's full name as "Andy Roy Gibb". It was ANDREW not Andy. Also, one of the weirdest errors was the identification of the song "Man on Fire" as being included on the After Dark album. WRONG. This song was released after Andy's death on a greatest hits album. This are but a few of the factual errors to be found. I just chose one chapter in particular. I could go on and on about the mistakes in this book. Da Capa Press, the publishers of this book should be ashamed of themselves to allow such a travesty to be put to print. Mr. Meyer has enraged Gibb fans all over the world. It is like he took The National Enquirer and just reworded every article ever printed on the Bee Gees and Andy Gibb. There is no new information or great revelations in this book that are reliable. I just found exaggerations of rumors and whispers. Not only is this the WORST biography on the Gibb family, it is the worst biography I have ever read. It needs to be re-titled BeeGees, A Fictitious Account. If you really want to learn about The Bee Gees, read The Bee Gees Tales From The Brothers Gibb by Hector Cook, Melinda Bilyeu, and Andrew Mon Hughes. The sad thing is, non-Bee Gee fans will not recognize the factual errors and will take them as true fact. They will never know that they are just reading what amounts to lies to sell a very poorly written book of miscellaneous articles and interviews taken out of context and thrown together. It's like the author went on an internet cut and paste spree. Really needs a zero or negative star rating.

  2. 4 out of 5

    ஐ Briansgirl (Book Queen)ஐ

    I found this biography terrible. It's not the subject matter, the Bee Gees. It's the author. It's obvious that the author never meet any of the Gibb Brothers, and he comes across as not even liking them. The book reads like a term paper. It has 27 pages of Notes, 14 pages of selected Bibliography, 3 pages of Acknowledgements, 2 pages of Source Acknowledgements, and a 19 page Index. I want to give an example of why I don't like the book. I have watched two taped interviews with the Bee Gees where I found this biography terrible. It's not the subject matter, the Bee Gees. It's the author. It's obvious that the author never meet any of the Gibb Brothers, and he comes across as not even liking them. The book reads like a term paper. It has 27 pages of Notes, 14 pages of selected Bibliography, 3 pages of Acknowledgements, 2 pages of Source Acknowledgements, and a 19 page Index. I want to give an example of why I don't like the book. I have watched two taped interviews with the Bee Gees where the youngest brother, Maurice, admits to having been the one to carry and hold the record, and the one then to drop it, when they were off to their first gig to Mime along as the Rattlesnakes when they were kids. ( Bee Gees: This is your life [Go to 7:25] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UwO7s... ). Yet, not only does the author say the oldest brother Barry was carrying it, he accuses him of dropping it on purpose to manipulate his brothers. Page 15.... "As every great origin myth must, this tale features the perfect Jungian symbolic moment. Barry, the eldest, the Alpha, the most ambitious, the one with the guitar, bears the precious object - the record. But that precious object also contains falsity - under the spell of that falsity, the boys will deny their gifts and only pretend to sing. When Barry enters the temple - The Gaumont Theater - in a moment of apostasy, he drops the sacred object; he smashes it to the floor. With that "accident," Barry frees himself and his brothers from imitation, from false performance, from false ceremony, from living a lie in front of the congregation. Barry, consciously or not, had no interest in going onstage and faking anything. By smashing the record, he allowed the brothers' true natures to be revealed. Smashing the record meant that the Gibbs expressed themselves in their own voices. Smashing the record gave their voices primacy. Smashing the record meant they were ready to own their abilities and own the ritual of performance." Knowing that he has the wrong brother listed, his assumptions of why Barry would break the record on purpose are obviously wrong. The entire book is like this. I gave up halfway through, so upset with the author ruining the subject matter, that I couldn't finish it. I had to just let it go. The only interesting thing in this book, can be found elsewhere as well, is the fact that all three Gibb brothers (as well as all four Beatles), cannot read or write sheet music. They can write songs and record #1 hits, just not on paper.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Terri

    Very rarely do I get so upset after reading a book that I am angry but this book did this for me. First, I learned nothing that I didn't already know about the brothers Gibb. Second, there was no point all to include a draining and venom filled chapter on Andy Gibb in this book. What you don't learn is how very very important the BeeGees were in bridging musical genres together. That Barry Gibb is one of the best pop songwriters in the last fifty years- he is on a par with Paul Simon, Cat Steven Very rarely do I get so upset after reading a book that I am angry but this book did this for me. First, I learned nothing that I didn't already know about the brothers Gibb. Second, there was no point all to include a draining and venom filled chapter on Andy Gibb in this book. What you don't learn is how very very important the BeeGees were in bridging musical genres together. That Barry Gibb is one of the best pop songwriters in the last fifty years- he is on a par with Paul Simon, Cat Stevens and yes even Sir Paul. This author did want you to learn that Maurice was a drunk, Robin couldn't keep it in his pants and died a billionaire and that Barry was just moving through it all. And why Mr Meyer was it necessary to make insults at other musical acts? You may not think much of the 5thDemencion or Dan Fogelberg but to say what you did- seems a bit too much. Especially when some members of the group and Mr. Fogelberg aren't here to respond but of course neither are Maurice, Robin and Andy. The Brothers Gibb have had a history of being great artist and combative brothers. But look at the history of rock music be it the Davies Brothers (kinks), The Robinson Brothers (Black Crowes) or The Gallagher Brothers (oasis) and you see many of the same issues. You learn nothing new here and that is what is sad. They have a sister and a mother who buried three sons but little beyond preliminary filler do we get about them. What a let down. I am still waiting for the book about the Gibb Brothers. Waiting and seething having to have experienced this one first.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Irene

    Reading this book was an interesting experience. I gave it 4 stars because it made me laugh out loud with its brutal humour! For example Barry is described as a " megalomaniac with piano-key teeth" and Andy as "a male Farrah Fawcett - Majors" This was a warts-and- all biography with interesting (to me, anyway)background on their music writing process.I would have liked more time spent on their time in Brisbane, but then I am biased! I feel both enlightened and disillusioned! Reading this book was an interesting experience. I gave it 4 stars because it made me laugh out loud with its brutal humour! For example Barry is described as a " megalomaniac with piano-key teeth" and Andy as "a male Farrah Fawcett - Majors" This was a warts-and- all biography with interesting (to me, anyway)background on their music writing process.I would have liked more time spent on their time in Brisbane, but then I am biased! I feel both enlightened and disillusioned!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Karen Sheldon

    Must read for Bee Gee's fans I'm still not sure if the author respected the Brothers Gibb because of some of the negatives he mentioned about each of them...some things I'm sure I never wanted to know myself ... but ... this was a very informative collection of information on my favorite musical group. I'm proud to say I bought each and every one of their albums....including the velvet-jacketed one...as well as the collectors edition cd set & duplicate cd's of the vinyls I already owned. I fell i Must read for Bee Gee's fans I'm still not sure if the author respected the Brothers Gibb because of some of the negatives he mentioned about each of them...some things I'm sure I never wanted to know myself ... but ... this was a very informative collection of information on my favorite musical group. I'm proud to say I bought each and every one of their albums....including the velvet-jacketed one...as well as the collectors edition cd set & duplicate cd's of the vinyls I already owned. I fell in love with them the first time I heard them and have mourned the individual losses as they occurred. I will always love you my favorite brothers!!!!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Marymatt

    As a Bee Gees fan, familiar with a lot that has been written about them, I didn't learn much that was knew. I read the book quickly because I was so interested in the subject and because of the writer's skills. I thought it could have been longer. I enjoyed the analysis of some of their songs and songwriting and I would have liked to see more of that. However, I felt the writer depicted Barry as almost a bully at times and Maurice as someone who did not pull his weight in the group. Instead of b As a Bee Gees fan, familiar with a lot that has been written about them, I didn't learn much that was knew. I read the book quickly because I was so interested in the subject and because of the writer's skills. I thought it could have been longer. I enjoyed the analysis of some of their songs and songwriting and I would have liked to see more of that. However, I felt the writer depicted Barry as almost a bully at times and Maurice as someone who did not pull his weight in the group. Instead of being nasty, I think the author could have delved more into the complexities of the brothers' personalities and interactions. Even though the book is very readable and I did particularly enjoy the song analysis, I have lowered my rating because of factual errors and misspellings throughout the book. The Bee Gees deserve better.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    Detailed look at the brothers Gibb. It does seem like the author's treatment of Barry Gibb is a bit judgmental and harsh. The fact the Maurice, Robin and Andy had substance abuse problems cannot be blamed on big brother. To me Barry seemed over generous in trying to take care of everyone. An excellent review though of Barry's songwriting skill. His work ethic and talent is usually written off as fluff. I respect him more after reading this; even with Mr. Meyer's overtone of hate. Detailed look at the brothers Gibb. It does seem like the author's treatment of Barry Gibb is a bit judgmental and harsh. The fact the Maurice, Robin and Andy had substance abuse problems cannot be blamed on big brother. To me Barry seemed over generous in trying to take care of everyone. An excellent review though of Barry's songwriting skill. His work ethic and talent is usually written off as fluff. I respect him more after reading this; even with Mr. Meyer's overtone of hate.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Melinda

    It seems this book was written in an outdated, discredited, "disco sucks" time warp, that window in pop culture history when it was deemed that EVERYTHING the Bee Gees did, said, wrote, recorded, and even wore, was a manifestation of their corrupt commercial ambition. Meyer's tired parade of putdowns is the most scathing expose' of 1981. It seems this book was written in an outdated, discredited, "disco sucks" time warp, that window in pop culture history when it was deemed that EVERYTHING the Bee Gees did, said, wrote, recorded, and even wore, was a manifestation of their corrupt commercial ambition. Meyer's tired parade of putdowns is the most scathing expose' of 1981.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Rochelle

    This is the only pop biography I have ever read, and that is only because I have a new found appreciation for Bee Gees' music. This is a decent depiction of the brothers' rise to fame and much of the book is focused on the 70s and early 80s era. However, there are also three chapters that are solely dedicated to Andy, Maurice and Robin. Unfortunately the chapters on Maurice and Robin are not as in-depth as the one on Andy, but I presume that is because both Maurice and Robin gain quite a bit of This is the only pop biography I have ever read, and that is only because I have a new found appreciation for Bee Gees' music. This is a decent depiction of the brothers' rise to fame and much of the book is focused on the 70s and early 80s era. However, there are also three chapters that are solely dedicated to Andy, Maurice and Robin. Unfortunately the chapters on Maurice and Robin are not as in-depth as the one on Andy, but I presume that is because both Maurice and Robin gain quite a bit of coverage in the rest of the book. The line about Barry being a 'megalomanic with piano key teeth' and Andy being a male 'Farah Fawcett' made me laugh. The reason I didn't give this book a five star rating is because I felt that while the music was analysed to a great extent, coverage on the personal lives of the three brothers, especially Barry was sparse. This may not be the author's fault, but rather be a result of Barry being very protective of his privacy. Having said that, I would like to read a biography that covers more about their time in Brisbane, the internal family dynamics between Hugh, Barbara and their kids and also how the different wives got on with each other and each of the brothers. If you are a huge fan of the Bee Gees, this is a book that you should read, and you will no doubt love the sequential listing of all their hits.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rose

    A pretty good, entertaining biography of a chart-topping musical group whose music many of us have enjoyed for much of our lives. At times snarky, at times idolizing, this book provides a look into the lives and music of the talented brothers Gibb. The author used footnotes, but also seemed to just make things up without substantiation, like the reasons why certain songs were written or why one of the Gibb brothers may have acted or felt a certain way. Nevertheless, I found it a useful guide for A pretty good, entertaining biography of a chart-topping musical group whose music many of us have enjoyed for much of our lives. At times snarky, at times idolizing, this book provides a look into the lives and music of the talented brothers Gibb. The author used footnotes, but also seemed to just make things up without substantiation, like the reasons why certain songs were written or why one of the Gibb brothers may have acted or felt a certain way. Nevertheless, I found it a useful guide for discovering excellent songs that I had missed, and I now have greater empathy for the roots of some messy family sorrows and dysfunctions. The chapter on Andy Gibb was a particular eye-opener to me. Despite endless in-fighting, trainwreck (literal), arson (also literal), drug and alcohol abuse and all sorts of other things, the immense talent overcame it all - the body of work these men created, from a very early age, with no ability to read music -- is astounding. They learned harmony naturally, by listening to the radio, and they worked at their craft. Amazing results.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Brigitte

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Interesting read since it's the first book on the Bee Gees I've ever read, however, I didn't really like the tone of the author's voice. I felt that there was a bit of a lack of respect by him towards the brothers. The fact is, no matter whether you were a fan or not (and yes, I'm a fan), these brothers were hugely talented. They wrote many hits and had unique voices, and were loved by millions. I also found the author went into EXCESSIVE detail about many of their songs to the point where he to Interesting read since it's the first book on the Bee Gees I've ever read, however, I didn't really like the tone of the author's voice. I felt that there was a bit of a lack of respect by him towards the brothers. The fact is, no matter whether you were a fan or not (and yes, I'm a fan), these brothers were hugely talented. They wrote many hits and had unique voices, and were loved by millions. I also found the author went into EXCESSIVE detail about many of their songs to the point where he totally lost me. These pages were completely boring and I found myself skipping these parts, which were heavily bogged down in much, too much unimportant melody detail. Nonetheless, I learnt many things about the brothers and am keen now to read other books on the Bee Gees.

  12. 5 out of 5

    David Gagen

    Interesting and well written biography of the brothers Gibb. Revealing chapter on Andy Gibb perhaps the most fascinating aspect.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jane T

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This biography rarely mentions the year behind discussed eg when records were recorded or released and this makes it hard to keep the groups ages in mind.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Heather Lidgard

    Wow, what rubbish. So disrespectful.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mieszko Pelc

    7

  16. 5 out of 5

    Helynne

    This biography has been criticized by other reviewers for various inaccuracies. People like me, who are rather latent Bee Gees fans, really would not recognize any errors or care much if they are there. Personally, I had a ton of fun reading through the personal and musical facts about an amazingly gifted set of brothers. Anyone who has listened to these performers’ beautiful three-part harmony in their hundreds of original songs over the decades knows their talent is the focus that matters. I h This biography has been criticized by other reviewers for various inaccuracies. People like me, who are rather latent Bee Gees fans, really would not recognize any errors or care much if they are there. Personally, I had a ton of fun reading through the personal and musical facts about an amazingly gifted set of brothers. Anyone who has listened to these performers’ beautiful three-part harmony in their hundreds of original songs over the decades knows their talent is the focus that matters. I had a vinyl Bees Gees album once way back in the mid-1970s, and rather liked “How Can You Mend a Broken Heart” and “Run to Me,” but stopped short of thinking the guys were very cool. Author David N. Meyer says much the same thing, “Always trying too hard, The Bee Gees never got near hipness or cool.” Meyer also does not hesitate to throw out descriptions such as “buck-toothed,” “twerpy,” and “biggest dork in the universe” to describe the boys in certain early singing moments as children in Manchester, England, teens in Australia, and contemporaries of the Beatles in 1960s London. And then there were their clothes, especially during the disco era of 1979, which included “the crotch-grabbing glimmering trousers” (seen in the photo on the book’s cover). Meyer notes that everyone looked awful during the disco era, (but) “give the Bees Gees a fashion period and they always chose the worst possible options.” Maybe if Robin and Maurice looked more like “Alpha brother” Barry? It’s not that the fraternal twins were not attractive—they were, each in his own way. But their coolness factor pales next to their elder, taller brother with his luscious hair and movie star looks. Then there was the fact that Barry was bossy and a bit of a glory hog, grabbing most of the good solos for himself, an irksome habit that led Robin to leave the group for 15 months in 1969-70, and cut a solo album. The author does not sugar coat the problems of the Brothers Gibb such as the ups and downs of their record sales, see-sawing critical responses, and their frequent in-house squabbling, as well as the tragedies of drugs, alcohol, and untimely deaths. But again, the narrative focuses mainly on the bottomless talent with which all of the Bee Gees were endowed as well as the basic sweetness and closeness of the Gibb family—four brothers, one older sister (who stayed behind in Australia to raise her family), a loving mum and dad (who lived most of their lives with or near one son or another), three long-lasting (second) marriages to lovely, supportive wives, and plenty of posterity (which now includes a growing number of Bee Gee grandchildren). Ultimately, the proof of their talent is in the sales. Only the Beatles, Paul McCartney, Madonna, Michael Jackson and Garth Brooks, have sold more recordings worldwide. One chapter follows the meteoric, but short, solo career of youngest brother Andy, a smaller clone of Barry—gorgeous, golden, talented, but doomed. The whole family adored Andy, and by the time he was 19 years old, so did a bevy of giddy fans. But Andy's elder brothers, who had carefully overseen his career development, grew exasperated with his tendency to tank every good thing that came his way. Lacking the grit and confidence that the Bee Gees gained as they clawed their way up performing as boys on the street corners of Manchester and the night clubs of Brisbane, Andy suffered from melancholy, and fell victim to the party and drug culture that too often follows sudden fame. His long-term use of alcohol and cocaine caused a fatal heart infection days after his thirtieth birthday in 1988. Similar tales of devastation plagued the family as they lost dad Hugh in 1992, Maurice, a recovered alcoholic, who died suddenly from complications of twisted intestine in 2003, and Robin, who stoically endured a bout with cancer before his death in 2012. Patriarch Barry, now the last Bee Gee standing, has made efforts in recent years to continue concerts and tributes to help assure that the group’s music endures, which, of course, it does. Meyer meticulously chronicles the genesis and trajectory of the Bee Gees’ best-loved tunes. If a reader comes across unfamiliar song title or wishes to see the boys in a certain concert (or their first appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show), one need only close the Kindle book for a moment, go to YouTube, and voilà. What a blessing to have such technology at our fingertips, and what a musical legacy with which to enjoy it.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Dave Schwensen

    On The Outside Looking In I didn't know what to title this review, but guess the one above sums up this bio of The Bee Gees. One of the biggest selling pop music acts of all time, the Gibb brothers never seemed to fit into the upper echelon of superstars such as Elvis, The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, Michael Jackson or even Madonna. It's hard to understand why because their talent was immense as songwriters and vocalists, but they always seemed to be a bit on the "outside." Along with telling t On The Outside Looking In I didn't know what to title this review, but guess the one above sums up this bio of The Bee Gees. One of the biggest selling pop music acts of all time, the Gibb brothers never seemed to fit into the upper echelon of superstars such as Elvis, The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, Michael Jackson or even Madonna. It's hard to understand why because their talent was immense as songwriters and vocalists, but they always seemed to be a bit on the "outside." Along with telling their life stories, this book attempts to explain why. As child performers in Australia, they weren't groomed to be pop stars. Managed by their father and his big band era influences, their stage outfits were from the Sears Rat Pack Jr. Collection and they were taught to always smile while singing pop standards that might have been hits in the 1940's. In comparison, the Beatles were in leather jackets and covering Little Richard and The Stones were earning a Master Degree in Muddy Waters. But once the Gibb brothers discovered their talent for crafting hit singles they became famous, broke-up, reunited, went out of style, returned as the biggest group in the world with "Saturday Night Fever," and then suffered the backlash of disco, family feuds and various addictions. The author takes us on that journey and as a fan of The Bee Gees since their earliest U.S. hits like "New York Mining Disaster 1941," "To Love Somebody" and "Massachusetts" (to mention only a few) I found much of it quite interesting. The relationships between the brothers is especially compelling with oldest brother Barry being the dominate personality, Robin the most rebellious, Maurice the most distracted, and youngest brother Andy the most tragic. The only negative is that this book seems to get bogged down at times trying to cover too much ground. If you're a Bee Gees "historian" you'll want to know all the minor details and supporting players - and this book gives you all that. But if you're simply a fan like me and interested more in the family saga of these talented brothers you might be tempted to speed read over a few sections. I know much more about The Bee Gees than I did before reading this book. That's why I read it - and that's why I enjoyed it.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lynda

    I'm going to start by skipping ahead to the Andy Gibb chapter. It wasn't perfect but Meyer did a fairly good job of describing the short life of Andy, the youngest brother of the Gibb family. Yes, he got the "sparkling blue eyes" wrong. Andy had brown eyes. And I've read other mistakes but Meyer seems to grasp the underlying themes of Andy's troubles. Of course more insights could be provided by Victoria Principal, Maria Osmond and of course Andy's brother, Barry, but that is yet to be or maybe I'm going to start by skipping ahead to the Andy Gibb chapter. It wasn't perfect but Meyer did a fairly good job of describing the short life of Andy, the youngest brother of the Gibb family. Yes, he got the "sparkling blue eyes" wrong. Andy had brown eyes. And I've read other mistakes but Meyer seems to grasp the underlying themes of Andy's troubles. Of course more insights could be provided by Victoria Principal, Maria Osmond and of course Andy's brother, Barry, but that is yet to be or maybe will never happen. Back to the Bee Gees, Meyer showed overall respect for the group yet delved into the darker side of fame. This is a thin line to walk but Meyer manages to show many facets of personalities along with temptations and frustrations that occur within a "family business". The obvious parental control issues rings similar to other famous groups like The Carpenters and Beach Boys. Overall, this was a great read. I don't thing the Bee Gees got enough credit due to the "Disco Sucks" image that followed the 70's era. Most hit songs can be recollected with great ease by anyone over 40. What does that tell ya?

  19. 5 out of 5

    W. Whalin

    I love to read biographies and I hoped I was going to learn some interesting insights to the Begees reading this book. The first two thirds of this book are not written well and mostly a recounting of the facts you can find almost anywhere about the Begees. I was disappointed. In the final chapters of the book, the author's storytelling improved and it made for worthwhile reading. If you are looking for a biography on the Begees, I'd skip this one. It was barely worth the experience. I love to read biographies and I hoped I was going to learn some interesting insights to the Begees reading this book. The first two thirds of this book are not written well and mostly a recounting of the facts you can find almost anywhere about the Begees. I was disappointed. In the final chapters of the book, the author's storytelling improved and it made for worthwhile reading. If you are looking for a biography on the Begees, I'd skip this one. It was barely worth the experience.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kathy

    I have had this for a long time and read it some years ago but in hindsight of the deaths of Mo and Robin, with Barry not getting any younger, this is a personal journey into the Bee Gees from their youth through to the Disco years. There are some bittersweet moments with Andy in this book which in view of what happened to Andy are sweet but sad, I found myself asking what if! This is well worth a re-read or a read if you haven't already. I have had this for a long time and read it some years ago but in hindsight of the deaths of Mo and Robin, with Barry not getting any younger, this is a personal journey into the Bee Gees from their youth through to the Disco years. There are some bittersweet moments with Andy in this book which in view of what happened to Andy are sweet but sad, I found myself asking what if! This is well worth a re-read or a read if you haven't already.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Nina

    I bought this book because I enjoyed Meyer's book on Gram Parsons, and because I love the early Bee Gees. I don't care much for their disco-era music, and Meyer tried too hard to convince me that I should. The phrase "narrative biography" is rather telling. The behind the scenes stories are fascinating. I bought this book because I enjoyed Meyer's book on Gram Parsons, and because I love the early Bee Gees. I don't care much for their disco-era music, and Meyer tried too hard to convince me that I should. The phrase "narrative biography" is rather telling. The behind the scenes stories are fascinating.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Alayne

    I enjoyed reading this book, as I have loved the Bee Gees for years. The biographer, David Meyer, seemed to have a dislike towards Barry, but notwithstanding he has written a bio that is comprehensive and illuminating. It takes the reader (fan) up to 2013 after Robin's death and with Barry beginning to perform solo. If you are a Bee Gees fan, I recommend it. I enjoyed reading this book, as I have loved the Bee Gees for years. The biographer, David Meyer, seemed to have a dislike towards Barry, but notwithstanding he has written a bio that is comprehensive and illuminating. It takes the reader (fan) up to 2013 after Robin's death and with Barry beginning to perform solo. If you are a Bee Gees fan, I recommend it.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Liza

    This book was sad and gave a behind the scenes look at the musical family. There is a chapter that talks about Andy Gibb. Barry does have his regrets when it comes to Robin and Maurice but now has to deal with that. Mentions the movie "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band" which is awful. This book was sad and gave a behind the scenes look at the musical family. There is a chapter that talks about Andy Gibb. Barry does have his regrets when it comes to Robin and Maurice but now has to deal with that. Mentions the movie "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band" which is awful.

  24. 5 out of 5

    John Haydon

    An excellent read for Gee Gees fans.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kenneth Fairfield

    So...Barry was the pot-head, Robin the speed freak, Maurice the alcoholic, and Andy the coke-head. Got it.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Keith Nellist

    I enjoyed the story because of the interesting story of the Bee Gees. I didn't think it was especially well written, although I don't usually read pop biographies. I enjoyed the story because of the interesting story of the Bee Gees. I didn't think it was especially well written, although I don't usually read pop biographies.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Crystal

    Very well researched. I learned things I never knew about them.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Donna Luu

    Too much technical analysis of the songs and too many confusing quotes from multiple parties in the same paragraph. Almost makes me want to read their authorized bio.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Elise Watts

    This was a really interesting read, I didn't know much about the history of this band but it brought me a new appreciation of their songs I already loved. This was a really interesting read, I didn't know much about the history of this band but it brought me a new appreciation of their songs I already loved.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lorraine Heathcote

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