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Jangles: Big Fish Story: A Big Fish Story

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Bestselling storyteller David Shannon instantly hooks readers with this stunning, highly entertaining tour-de-force--his best book ever! Breathtaking oil paintings bursting with energy pull readers along into Big Lake, the home of Jangles, the biggest fish anyone has seen. Fishing alone at dusk, a boy feels a tug on his line and comes face-to-face with the gigantic trout--whose Bestselling storyteller David Shannon instantly hooks readers with this stunning, highly entertaining tour-de-force--his best book ever! Breathtaking oil paintings bursting with energy pull readers along into Big Lake, the home of Jangles, the biggest fish anyone has seen. Fishing alone at dusk, a boy feels a tug on his line and comes face-to-face with the gigantic trout--whose enormous jaw is covered with so many lures and fish hooks that he jingles and jangles when he swims. Terrified by the sight, the boy is shocked when Jangles befriends him and takes him on an adventure to the bottom of the lake. A surprise ending will leave readers laughing and shaking their heads. Here is Shannon at his very best-in a wild and witty story that begs repeated reading.


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Bestselling storyteller David Shannon instantly hooks readers with this stunning, highly entertaining tour-de-force--his best book ever! Breathtaking oil paintings bursting with energy pull readers along into Big Lake, the home of Jangles, the biggest fish anyone has seen. Fishing alone at dusk, a boy feels a tug on his line and comes face-to-face with the gigantic trout--whose Bestselling storyteller David Shannon instantly hooks readers with this stunning, highly entertaining tour-de-force--his best book ever! Breathtaking oil paintings bursting with energy pull readers along into Big Lake, the home of Jangles, the biggest fish anyone has seen. Fishing alone at dusk, a boy feels a tug on his line and comes face-to-face with the gigantic trout--whose enormous jaw is covered with so many lures and fish hooks that he jingles and jangles when he swims. Terrified by the sight, the boy is shocked when Jangles befriends him and takes him on an adventure to the bottom of the lake. A surprise ending will leave readers laughing and shaking their heads. Here is Shannon at his very best-in a wild and witty story that begs repeated reading.

30 review for Jangles: Big Fish Story: A Big Fish Story

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kylie

    This book reminded me of the movie Big Fish right from page one. It tells a cute story of a boy who learns a life lesson from a giant uncatchable fish. Jangles has beautiful pictures that really bring the story to life, and frankly, the story would probably fall flat without them. Overall, this is a cute book I would recommend to a young male reader.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Alyson (Kid Lit Frenzy)

    Jangles is definitely a "big fish" story or a tall tale. Shannon scores with both text and illustrations. Jangles is definitely a "big fish" story or a tall tale. Shannon scores with both text and illustrations.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Erin Reilly-Sanders

    The three stars for this one is mainly on behalf of the illustrations. Or rather it would have gotten four stars had I actually liked the text. Yes, I love the pictures. I loved hearing David Shannon talk about creating the book, particularly the pictures. I love the partially abstract unfinished face in the crowd and the balance provided by the random blob of red in the corner and the mustard and oh-so-dark-and-deep blues with red highlights (the color palette is really one of the best pasts of The three stars for this one is mainly on behalf of the illustrations. Or rather it would have gotten four stars had I actually liked the text. Yes, I love the pictures. I loved hearing David Shannon talk about creating the book, particularly the pictures. I love the partially abstract unfinished face in the crowd and the balance provided by the random blob of red in the corner and the mustard and oh-so-dark-and-deep blues with red highlights (the color palette is really one of the best pasts of the book). The plot itself is a pretty decent idea and the inspiration and generational stories behind it fascinating. The telling of it, however, lacks pizzaz on the page. I think it really needed to be tightened up. For example, there is little joy to reading aloud "After a while I started to get sleepy, and he said, 'Time to go.'" It's just not necessary, as is a lot of the text. The extra words take away from the drama, suspense, and excitement of the story, especially when you can imagine the skill with which this story might be told by an old storyteller. I also would have helped to have the frame story in a different font or italics. But back to raving about the pictures for a good ending here. The cover is one of the best I've seen in a while- bold, untraditional, and still somehow silky smooth with the brush strokes of Shannon's first picturebook in oil paints. The framing of each page is usually quite excellent with a sense of unbalance and using the occasional bright reds and yellows to direct attention- really a great use of value. So buy this one for the photos and make up your own story for it- it will be worth it, even if you just want to cut the pages out to hang on the wall.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    The origins of the metal lures and fishhooks in the tackle box carried by the narrator's father are revealed in this tall tale about Jangles, a trout that everyone tries to catch. I love the description of him as "so big, he ate eagles from the trees that hung out over the lake and full-grown beavers that strayed too far from home" (unpaged). When Jangles allows himself to get caught, he takes the boy whose lure he swallowed deep beneath the waters to his cave where he tells secrets about the Ea The origins of the metal lures and fishhooks in the tackle box carried by the narrator's father are revealed in this tall tale about Jangles, a trout that everyone tries to catch. I love the description of him as "so big, he ate eagles from the trees that hung out over the lake and full-grown beavers that strayed too far from home" (unpaged). When Jangles allows himself to get caught, he takes the boy whose lure he swallowed deep beneath the waters to his cave where he tells secrets about the Earth's origin. When the boy tricks him once they return to the boat, Jangles asks for mercy, and rewards his doing the right thing. The oil paintings allow readers to notice the ripples of the water and the enormity of Jangles. I loved the two-page spread of that big fish that kept getting away, displaying all the hooks and lures that failed to catch him. Young readers will too! This is one title that you won't want to let get away.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kristine

    Read this 2013-14 Texas Bluebonnet book with my 4th grader. He's a fisherman and couldn't wait to have me read the big fish tale aloud to him. The story was great, a good fish story with a little fantasy stuck in for fun. Coincidentally, we just caught a fish in the Gulf this past summer that already had a lure in the side of its mouth, so my son was able to make connections with the story. Not until the end did I realize that this book is by David Shannon, author of the "David" books which have Read this 2013-14 Texas Bluebonnet book with my 4th grader. He's a fisherman and couldn't wait to have me read the big fish tale aloud to him. The story was great, a good fish story with a little fantasy stuck in for fun. Coincidentally, we just caught a fish in the Gulf this past summer that already had a lure in the side of its mouth, so my son was able to make connections with the story. Not until the end did I realize that this book is by David Shannon, author of the "David" books which have never been a favorite in our house. We loved the story and the illustrations in this book though!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Shannon tells the classic "giant-fish-that-got-away" story with his wonderfully unique twist, and the ending (which I won't spoil), made me smile. The illustrations are interesting and bold, as is to be expected. I highly recommend this book for promoting creative writing and lessons in integrity. Shannon tells the classic "giant-fish-that-got-away" story with his wonderfully unique twist, and the ending (which I won't spoil), made me smile. The illustrations are interesting and bold, as is to be expected. I highly recommend this book for promoting creative writing and lessons in integrity.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Monica

    I loved this story because my grandpa loved to take me fishing and he too had a big, beat up green tackle box full of lures. It now belongs to my son. My grandpa was full of fish stories too.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Michaela George

    Jangles is a book about a dad telling his son a tall tale. He tells his son about an old fishing tale, where there was an enormous fish in a lake nearby. Everyone had heard stories about how this fish could not be caught, and was bigger than any fish they had ever seen. There was even a story that this fish saved a baby that had fallen into the lake. According to the dad one day he was fishing as a little boy and caught something. It was an old fishing rod, which he began to reel in as well. On Jangles is a book about a dad telling his son a tall tale. He tells his son about an old fishing tale, where there was an enormous fish in a lake nearby. Everyone had heard stories about how this fish could not be caught, and was bigger than any fish they had ever seen. There was even a story that this fish saved a baby that had fallen into the lake. According to the dad one day he was fishing as a little boy and caught something. It was an old fishing rod, which he began to reel in as well. On the end of the hook was Jangles, the ginormous fish! He pulled the boy under water and showed him where he lived. He could also talk and told the young boy all of the fish secrets. When the boy returned to the surface with the fish he tricked him and wanted to catch him. The fish was hurt that the boy would betray him and asked if it was more important to have this story or do the right thing. Luckily the boy did the right thing and let Jangles go and in return Jangles gave the boy all of his old fishing hooks, which the dad then passed down to his son when he told him the story. In reality we know that Jangles wasn’t real and this didn’t actually happen. These fishing hooks were probably accumulated through many years of fishing, and I’m sure there is a story for every single one of them. But a father son relationship is a very special one. As the father was passing down these hooks he wanted his son to have the same experiences and memories fishing as he did. Critiques: I think this was a good tale. The pictures were really detailed and showed a lot of talent. In class activity: I think a good teaching strategy or lesson for this book would be to have the students read the book or read it aloud to them, then have them go home and tell their parents about the story. Have the students ask their parents if they have any stories like this one from their childhood that they can tell their child. The parents will understand what is expected and will (hopefully) tell a story with a lot of imagination. The students will then draw a picture based on what they imagined in their head about the story. This will help get parents involved and show the kids how big their imagination is. This story also gives the life lesson that it is more important to do the right thing, instead of doing what is best for yourself.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Megan Cureton

    Jangles: A Big Fish Story is a book about a story that a father once told a son when he was a kid. Jangles was the biggest fish anyone had ever seen, but no one had ever caught him. One time when his father was fishing, he heard something on the end of the line and he knew it was Jangles. Jangles took him back to his home and showed him around told him stories and then took him back to his boat. When they got back the boat, his father had tricked Jangles and got him in his boat too. Jangles told Jangles: A Big Fish Story is a book about a story that a father once told a son when he was a kid. Jangles was the biggest fish anyone had ever seen, but no one had ever caught him. One time when his father was fishing, he heard something on the end of the line and he knew it was Jangles. Jangles took him back to his home and showed him around told him stories and then took him back to his boat. When they got back the boat, his father had tricked Jangles and got him in his boat too. Jangles told him that he tricked him and made him feel bad, so his father decided to set Jangles free again. But just to make sure people believed he had caught him, he collected all the fishhooks that were connected to Jangles. I really enjoyed reading this story about Jangles. I found myself wanting to read on to find out if anyone was ever going to catch Jangles, or if Jangles was really even real. My favorite part of the story was when the father set Jangles free. I liked that Jangles said to him that he tricked him and he told him to do what is right. I think that this part in the story is really good for young readers to hear, because it shows them to always do what is right, even if it isn't what you want to do. I would have this book in my future classroom library for my first through fourth graders. I think that students who are interested in fish and fishing would really enjoy reading this story about Jangles. I also think that the illustrations were awesome in this book. They are big and bold and really jump off the page. After reading this book, you could talk about it with the readers and have a discussion on what they would have done if they caught Jangles, and discuss why what the father in the story did, releasing him, was the right thing to do.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Written in first person format, this book writes about the father telling stories to his son, the writer. One of his favorite stories was the one about Jangles. His father always brought out his green tackle box and shook it to make it jangle like the fishes name for this one. Jangles whole mouth was covered with fishing lures and hooks. They say he even ate eagles from the trees. It's said that Jangles even saved a baby by bringing it safely to shore. The people of the town held tournaments to Written in first person format, this book writes about the father telling stories to his son, the writer. One of his favorite stories was the one about Jangles. His father always brought out his green tackle box and shook it to make it jangle like the fishes name for this one. Jangles whole mouth was covered with fishing lures and hooks. They say he even ate eagles from the trees. It's said that Jangles even saved a baby by bringing it safely to shore. The people of the town held tournaments to try and catch Jangles but he snapped lines or couldn't be found. One time my father was o9ut fishing and didn't realize his anchor wasn't on the ground any more so he was drifting. When he realized this he also felt a gentle tug on his line but it didn't feel like a fish. It turned out to be a fishing rod. But as he pulled in the rod, e began to hear the tinkling of metal on metal A gigantic shadow appeared and swallowed up the lure on that old rod. He even got pulled into the lake holding on to that rod. Jangles took him to a cave where all the stories he told were from almost the beginning of time. Then Jangles took him back to the boat. He tricked Jangles and had him upside-down so he couldn't get away. Jangles talked to him and let him know that he needed to do what is right. His father knew he had to let Jangles go but he had to apologize to Jangles first. And then his father gave his son the tackle box with all the lures and hooks inside as proof as he got them all off of Jangles before he set Jangles free.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Araceli Aispuro

    There is something special about Jangles, he's not just a fish, he's a talking fish. He was the biggest fish anybody had ever seen. Tournaments were hold in trying to capture Jangles. At many failed attempts, Jangles had many old fishing lines stuck to his jaw which is why they call him "Jangles". A boy went out into the big lake one day and drifted off further and further out into the middle of the lake. He continued fishing when suddenly he felt a jerk on his line. He got pulled down deep into There is something special about Jangles, he's not just a fish, he's a talking fish. He was the biggest fish anybody had ever seen. Tournaments were hold in trying to capture Jangles. At many failed attempts, Jangles had many old fishing lines stuck to his jaw which is why they call him "Jangles". A boy went out into the big lake one day and drifted off further and further out into the middle of the lake. He continued fishing when suddenly he felt a jerk on his line. He got pulled down deep into the lake. Jangles told him stories and took him back up. The boy betrayed him by trying to capture him but set him free again. Jangles was an interesting book. The story has a lot of text but because the pictures could not tell the story alone the large amount of text is required. I personally believe that this book is appropriate for grades second through fifth. Although some of the worlds in the story are complex and the paragraphs are quite long I believe the students will still be able to read the book with minimal struggle. As I read this book I started to feel sympathy towards Jingles. I felt that the pacing of the story needs improvement. The events that occurred in the middle of the story seemed to move to fast and the end of the story came too quickly. Although felt that I cared for one of the characters in the story I feel that if the story had been a little longer or discussed the fish more I would of had more emotion towards the story. Yet, the ending of the story was satisfying and brought a smile to my face.

  12. 5 out of 5

    ACS Book-finder

    Review: Jangles a BIG fish story by Davis Shannon is a delightful tale of the fish that got away. The story is smooth to read and would make a great read-a-loud story for children to anticipate what will happen at the end. I enjoyed the illustrations that make you feel like you are part of the story. Every town has a story that has been passed down for generations and this book is a wonderful depiction of a father passing down a tale to his children. (rev. C.Delorge) The illustrations in Jangles Review: Jangles a BIG fish story by Davis Shannon is a delightful tale of the fish that got away. The story is smooth to read and would make a great read-a-loud story for children to anticipate what will happen at the end. I enjoyed the illustrations that make you feel like you are part of the story. Every town has a story that has been passed down for generations and this book is a wonderful depiction of a father passing down a tale to his children. (rev. C.Delorge) The illustrations in Jangles a BIG fish story seem to literally jump off the page at you. You are amazingly brought into the story by the bold, active, strong art. About the author/illustrator: David Shannon has been telling tales all his life. When he was a little boy, he created a book that later inspired his international bestseller No, David!, a 1998 Caldecott Honor Book, as well as David Gets in Trouble; David Goes to School.; and It's Christmas, David! Shannon is the author and illustrator of numerous popular picture books, including Too Many Toys; Good Boy, Fergus; Alice the Fairy; and A Bad Case of Stripes. This year, the Blue Sky Press reissued How Georgie Radbourn Saved Baseball, a New York Times Best Illustrated Book of 1994 and the first book Shannon wrote himself. A native of spokane, Washington, Shannon has been an avid fisherman since childhood. DISCLOSURE: A complimentary review copy was provided by Scholastic to facilitate this honest review.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Brianna Clark

    Jangles is this mythical fish that no one has really seen but say they have and yet have no proof that they have encountered him. Thus, as stories get told and the image of this big old fish covered in fishing lures is told there is a urge to catch him. People go all out using any means necessary to catch this fish to say they were the one to catch the elusive Jangles. Then the father telling this all to his child he tells about the day he met Jangles and how Jangles took the father to his home Jangles is this mythical fish that no one has really seen but say they have and yet have no proof that they have encountered him. Thus, as stories get told and the image of this big old fish covered in fishing lures is told there is a urge to catch him. People go all out using any means necessary to catch this fish to say they were the one to catch the elusive Jangles. Then the father telling this all to his child he tells about the day he met Jangles and how Jangles took the father to his home and told him a bunch of amazing stories. Then there is a moral dilemma that comes about when the father as a young boy caught Jangles but then changes his mind because Jangles reminds him that he is a story teller and asks if catching him is truly important. No one ever found out about the father catching Jangles except when he tells his child and shows him proof of all the lures he took out of Jangles mouth in a full tackle box. This story is adorable and the pictures are amazingly drawn. The story depicts a moral of what is really important in life and that sometimes experiencing something even though there is not a lot of proof to prove it is just as important as proving what happened to all around.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lara

    David Shannon's best book ever? I beg to disagree. What I've enjoyed about Shannon's past books is the humor--they're generally really funny, and whimsical, and work just as well for adults as they do for kids. But I felt like this one just didn't have that. At all. The art is fairly nice (I especially like the cover), but the story...just really didn't work for me. It starts out well and good, and then sort of turns into something completely different, and then...ends. I guess I was just expect David Shannon's best book ever? I beg to disagree. What I've enjoyed about Shannon's past books is the humor--they're generally really funny, and whimsical, and work just as well for adults as they do for kids. But I felt like this one just didn't have that. At all. The art is fairly nice (I especially like the cover), but the story...just really didn't work for me. It starts out well and good, and then sort of turns into something completely different, and then...ends. I guess I was just expecting more from this; as it is, it just comes across to me as a clumsy message to "do the right thing." I really like the idea of it--the quintessential "the one that got away" fish story, how the end links back around to the beginning, the magic--but just feel like the execution was somewhat lacking. Sorry, David Shannon, but...meh. --Update-- Okay, well, on second read I actually liked this better than I did the first time through. It's still far from being one of my favorites of Shannon's, but the story does hang together better than I first thought it did. I'll up my rating to a 3.

  15. 4 out of 5

    David

    Jangles: A Big Fish Story by David Shannon is an original story about a boy who catches the biggest, most elusive fish anyone has ever seen, and who learns about doing the right thing. Shannon's luminous oil paintings use color, composition, varied perspectives, and detail to lure readers into this fishing adventure. Some pages are very glossy and many feature double page spreads. My favorite images are Jangles, baby, dynamite, pulled under, cave, stories, gotcha, and final picture. Shannon's ent Jangles: A Big Fish Story by David Shannon is an original story about a boy who catches the biggest, most elusive fish anyone has ever seen, and who learns about doing the right thing. Shannon's luminous oil paintings use color, composition, varied perspectives, and detail to lure readers into this fishing adventure. Some pages are very glossy and many feature double page spreads. My favorite images are Jangles, baby, dynamite, pulled under, cave, stories, gotcha, and final picture. Shannon's entertaining fish tale will reel readers into Jangles' world. Jangles' fish story held appeal for me because my father was a dedicated fisherman. It seems a bit wordy in the middle. Some may find the "do the right thing" theme too didactic for them. Yet the surprise ending to this tall tale should please readers and listeners. For ages 4.5 to 8, fish, fishing, tall tales, family, friendship, sport, animals, story-telling, family, promises, and fans of David Shannon.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Heather Langendorff

    Jangles is a book about a dad telling his son a tall tale. He tells his son about an old fishing tale, where there was an enormous fish in a lake nearby. According to the dad one day he was fishing as a little boy and caught something. It was an old fishing rod, which he began to reel in as well. On the end of the hook was Jangles, the ginormous fish! He pulled the boy under water and showed him where he lived. He could also talk and told the young boy all of the fish secrets. In reality we know Jangles is a book about a dad telling his son a tall tale. He tells his son about an old fishing tale, where there was an enormous fish in a lake nearby. According to the dad one day he was fishing as a little boy and caught something. It was an old fishing rod, which he began to reel in as well. On the end of the hook was Jangles, the ginormous fish! He pulled the boy under water and showed him where he lived. He could also talk and told the young boy all of the fish secrets. In reality we know that Jangles wasn’t real and this didn’t actually happen. These fishing hooks were probably accumulated through many years of fishing, and I’m sure there is a story for every single one of them. But a father son relationship is a very special one. As the father was passing down these hooks he wanted his son to have the same experiences and memories fishing as he did. I really liked this book and I would share it to my class and ask them to share stories that they have with their mother or father. The story is a smooth and easy ready and will be enjoyable for students.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    David Shannon is WILDLY POPULAR in elementary school libraries. The kids love the “David” books and the David Shannon books are among the favorites at check-out time. This book about “the one that got away” will certainly have its place in that faves list. Jangles is a sassy fish so famous that he has been talked about for generations. Kids will immediately identify it as a David Shannon book not only because of the boy’s round head, but the expressions on Jangle’s face. The illustrations were m David Shannon is WILDLY POPULAR in elementary school libraries. The kids love the “David” books and the David Shannon books are among the favorites at check-out time. This book about “the one that got away” will certainly have its place in that faves list. Jangles is a sassy fish so famous that he has been talked about for generations. Kids will immediately identify it as a David Shannon book not only because of the boy’s round head, but the expressions on Jangle’s face. The illustrations were marvelous! I especially got a hoot out of the one with Jangles and all the lures stuck in his lips--making him the superstar “one that got away.” Kids who are fishermen will relate to that. Jangles begs the question: "What is more important--the event or the stories will tell about it forever?" A great place to animate would be the part where dad brings out his green tackle box and shakes it to make it “jangle” like the fish’s name--another aspect that will be relatable to fishermen in the class. It was a quick, easy read and VERY David Shannon.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Alexis Kydon

    Jangles is a very cute story. It's how a young boy learns something from a fish. As unrealistic as it sounds, it is pretty interesting. The thing about Shannon's books that are apart from the David series, is that you can relate to a lot of them. For example, one can probably relate to someone telling them a story when they were little. The only thing that I liked more than the story itself was the illustrations. The underwater life and illustrations of the fish are so beautiful. They're so deta Jangles is a very cute story. It's how a young boy learns something from a fish. As unrealistic as it sounds, it is pretty interesting. The thing about Shannon's books that are apart from the David series, is that you can relate to a lot of them. For example, one can probably relate to someone telling them a story when they were little. The only thing that I liked more than the story itself was the illustrations. The underwater life and illustrations of the fish are so beautiful. They're so detailed and when reading it, the reader definitely should pay attention to the pictures more than other books. A boy feels a tug on his line and comes face-to-face with the gigantic trout. Once this happens, the reader is brought into Jangle's underwater world. It's fun to examine and experience with the boy himself. The boy becomes friends with Jangles and he is surprised that the fish can speak and befriends him. I think it forces kids to think because of how unrealistic it is. It broadens the imagination just by looking at the illustrations.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Alora

    Jangles a BIG fish story David Shannon I caught myself flying through the pages of this story! I loved the story line because I remember going fishing with my father all the time as a kid. Any young child that has ever gone fishing will be able to relate to this story in some way. I enjoyed the way in which the story was written. If there were no illustrations I could have used my imagination to picture what Shannon was depicting in his text. The way in which Shannon writes is so captivating and Jangles a BIG fish story David Shannon I caught myself flying through the pages of this story! I loved the story line because I remember going fishing with my father all the time as a kid. Any young child that has ever gone fishing will be able to relate to this story in some way. I enjoyed the way in which the story was written. If there were no illustrations I could have used my imagination to picture what Shannon was depicting in his text. The way in which Shannon writes is so captivating and descriptive. There is no other author that writes the way in which he does. The illustrations in this book were nice. They were not my favorite illustrations that I have seen done by Shannon. I enjoyed them. The colors were perfect for the setting in which they were being used. However, I thought some of the images came across as a little scary or disturbing for young children. Overall, I gave this book a 4 out 5 stars! I loved the story and found it very relatable. However, I was not a huge fan of the illustrations.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    Kelly Wiegand April 7, 2015 EDL54500 Library Materials for Children and Youth Title: Jangles: A Big Fish Story Author: David Shannon Plot: A boy's father tells him the legend of Jangles, the biggest fish in the lake, and how their paths crossed one night while he was fishing. Setting: The Lake; Jangles' Cave Characters: The boy; Jangles Point-of-View: First-Person (Father telling son legend of Jangles) Themes: Honesty; Friendship; Right and Wrong Style: There is no specific style to the wording or phras Kelly Wiegand April 7, 2015 EDL54500 Library Materials for Children and Youth Title: Jangles: A Big Fish Story Author: David Shannon Plot: A boy's father tells him the legend of Jangles, the biggest fish in the lake, and how their paths crossed one night while he was fishing. Setting: The Lake; Jangles' Cave Characters: The boy; Jangles Point-of-View: First-Person (Father telling son legend of Jangles) Themes: Honesty; Friendship; Right and Wrong Style: There is no specific style to the wording or phrases in this picture book. Copyright: 2012 Reflection: This was such a neat story! I love how the author did not explicitly write out the ending, but makes the reader infer what Jangles asked the boy to do. This could be a book to show variations in story endings if a class is working on fiction writing. Also, to talk about transformations of characters throughout a book.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    I was excited to read this book. David Shannon is huge in elementary libraries. The kids love the David books, and I know I can always get a reluctant new reader to check them out. Now, I must preface this by saying this book is on the 2013-2014 Bluebonnet List, which is a list for Texas students in grades 3-6, where they read the books and vote across the state for a winner. So, I was reading this book while keeping my students in those grades in mind. I like the idea of a mystery fish that no I was excited to read this book. David Shannon is huge in elementary libraries. The kids love the David books, and I know I can always get a reluctant new reader to check them out. Now, I must preface this by saying this book is on the 2013-2014 Bluebonnet List, which is a list for Texas students in grades 3-6, where they read the books and vote across the state for a winner. So, I was reading this book while keeping my students in those grades in mind. I like the idea of a mystery fish that no one can catch and the secret of the one person who did. However, I just didn't enjoy the book. I thought the story was a little corny and the pictures too dark. I'm eager to see how the students like it, but I don't think it will be a favorite. I'll probably stick to the David books for a Shannon read-aloud.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Fry

    In "Jangles," David Shannon puts a fun fantasy twist on a story about fishing. This book tells the story of a boy who befriends a legendary fish named Jangles and then tries to catch him. He then realizes that Jangles is an important part of the history of the lake and that catching him is not worth taking that away from everyone else. The young boy in this story has to make the very important choice of choosing between what he wants to do, and what he knows he should do. This story is relatable In "Jangles," David Shannon puts a fun fantasy twist on a story about fishing. This book tells the story of a boy who befriends a legendary fish named Jangles and then tries to catch him. He then realizes that Jangles is an important part of the history of the lake and that catching him is not worth taking that away from everyone else. The young boy in this story has to make the very important choice of choosing between what he wants to do, and what he knows he should do. This story is relatable to a large variety of readers, but I think that it would really appeal to anyone who loves to fish or grew up fishing.This story could be used in a lesson plan about morals and doing what is right and wrong. Sometimes you have to choose to do what is right rather than what is easy or what you want, and this story could be used to teach students that lesson.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea Keopraseurt

    Jangles is about a young boy that befriends a legendary fish named Jangles--the biggest fish anyone has ever seen. When the boy is fishing, he meets Jangles, who shakes and jangles on the line. The boy notices that Jangles' jaw is covered in holes from where other fishermen had hooked and failed to catch him. Jangles ends up taking the boy on an adventure to the bottom of the lake, and the boy learns the importance of Jangles' history to the lake. I really enjoyed the storyline, as well as the o Jangles is about a young boy that befriends a legendary fish named Jangles--the biggest fish anyone has ever seen. When the boy is fishing, he meets Jangles, who shakes and jangles on the line. The boy notices that Jangles' jaw is covered in holes from where other fishermen had hooked and failed to catch him. Jangles ends up taking the boy on an adventure to the bottom of the lake, and the boy learns the importance of Jangles' history to the lake. I really enjoyed the storyline, as well as the oil painting illustrations. The settings were so elaborate, the reader was instantly drawn into the dark mysterious lake that Shannon depicted in his dark hues, and the full page drawings of the gigantic fish, that kept getting out of the boy's reach--keeps the reader hooked on the book, and turning the page.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Cara

    3.5 stars, but I liked it enough to round up It's the story about a man telling his son about an elusive, mystery fish that no one ever caught but everyone heard of. A young boy is out fishing and hooks the massive fish and is pulled off the boat into the water. Turns out this fish can talk and takes the boat down to his home where the boy can breathe. Jangles the fish tells him lots of stories before taking the boy back to his boat where the kid tricks him and catches him. After some convincing, 3.5 stars, but I liked it enough to round up It's the story about a man telling his son about an elusive, mystery fish that no one ever caught but everyone heard of. A young boy is out fishing and hooks the massive fish and is pulled off the boat into the water. Turns out this fish can talk and takes the boat down to his home where the boy can breathe. Jangles the fish tells him lots of stories before taking the boy back to his boat where the kid tricks him and catches him. After some convincing, Jangles is released because it's the right thing to do. In apology, the boy removes all of the many hooks and lures which is how the fish got the name Jangles in the first place. At the end, the narrator reveals it was his father that caught the fish and that he never told another person before telling his son and the narrator never told anyone else other than the reader.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Gretchen

    At first I wasn't too sure about this book. It was recommended as a mentor text in The Writing Thief so I checked it out. Now I'm not one that likes fishing, eats fish, or even likes to hear too many fish stories so I went into it without a lot of positives. The story starts out calmly and then you first see Jangles - UGLY! Strike one. The story being told about him was hugely mythical for example he was large enough for a baby to ride on after the baby fell out of the boat and Jangles returned At first I wasn't too sure about this book. It was recommended as a mentor text in The Writing Thief so I checked it out. Now I'm not one that likes fishing, eats fish, or even likes to hear too many fish stories so I went into it without a lot of positives. The story starts out calmly and then you first see Jangles - UGLY! Strike one. The story being told about him was hugely mythical for example he was large enough for a baby to ride on after the baby fell out of the boat and Jangles returned him. Strike two. Not doing well through the whole book, then you get to the last page and it sold me on the book. Now, for those students who like fishing, tall tales (which is another area this book could be used in), and mean, ugly looking fish, they'll be won over immediately. But overall, this is a book I will use with my students.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kenneth Bwanika

    I remember the last time I went fishing but I enjoyed reading this book. Author David Shannon in this book tells a story about the amazing journey of a boy trying to catch the biggest fish, they’d heard of named Jangles. Jangles got the name because he was covered in rusty old fish hooks from people trying to catch him over the many years. As I was reading this book I starting thinking back about the many fish tales my grandpa used to tell me growing up. This book can be a great bedtime story th I remember the last time I went fishing but I enjoyed reading this book. Author David Shannon in this book tells a story about the amazing journey of a boy trying to catch the biggest fish, they’d heard of named Jangles. Jangles got the name because he was covered in rusty old fish hooks from people trying to catch him over the many years. As I was reading this book I starting thinking back about the many fish tales my grandpa used to tell me growing up. This book can be a great bedtime story that parents can tell their young children. Many people think fishing is a disgusting and muddy experience but David Shannon does a great job putting humor into fishing. The illustrations used in the book are great and the choice of colors is amazing which makes this fish tale really interesting and fun to read. I also liked how the story reminded of my past memories with my grandpa.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Eryn Earsley

    This book takes place in a big lake. Jangles is the biggest fish in the lake. One night a boy going fishing at dusk, he feels Jangles tug on his line. Jangles was an enormous trout with so many fish hooks caught in his jaw. As Jangles swims around, the books jingles. Jangles pulls the boy in and takes him to the bottom of the lake on an adventure. Jangles tells the story of how Earth became what it is today in an underwater cave. The medium used to make these vivid illustrations was oil paint. T This book takes place in a big lake. Jangles is the biggest fish in the lake. One night a boy going fishing at dusk, he feels Jangles tug on his line. Jangles was an enormous trout with so many fish hooks caught in his jaw. As Jangles swims around, the books jingles. Jangles pulls the boy in and takes him to the bottom of the lake on an adventure. Jangles tells the story of how Earth became what it is today in an underwater cave. The medium used to make these vivid illustrations was oil paint. This book is simple in text, yet complex with the vivid illustrations. This is a great book for young readers because it has the right amount of simple text to allow a young reader to read on their own. Teachers would benefit from having this in their classroom as a the books illustrations are so surreal and detailed.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Cindy

    Jangles is a fish tale that goes beyond just a legend. This old trout is so famous that he is talked about for generations. He is always the target and goal for every fisherman in town. Men have gone to great lengths to catch this legendary fish. The surprise of the story is when the main character gets caught instead of Jangles. He finds that the story of Jangles is more amazing than he ever could have imagined. He also learns a very valuable lesson- sometimes the story is the most important th Jangles is a fish tale that goes beyond just a legend. This old trout is so famous that he is talked about for generations. He is always the target and goal for every fisherman in town. Men have gone to great lengths to catch this legendary fish. The surprise of the story is when the main character gets caught instead of Jangles. He finds that the story of Jangles is more amazing than he ever could have imagined. He also learns a very valuable lesson- sometimes the story is the most important thing. This is a very differnt book for Shannon. I really loved the illustrations and think that most boys will enjoy this story.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Dolly

    We really enjoy reading David Shannon's books, so when I saw this fishing-themed tale at our local library, I just had to borrow it. The story is entertaining and the illustrations are terrific, although I must admit that toward the end the story takes a strange and surreal turn. I almost thought we'd strayed into a David Wiesner story... Overall, this is an entertaining tale with a fun ending. Even though we are not big fans of fishing, we enjoyed reading this book together. We really enjoy reading David Shannon's books, so when I saw this fishing-themed tale at our local library, I just had to borrow it. The story is entertaining and the illustrations are terrific, although I must admit that toward the end the story takes a strange and surreal turn. I almost thought we'd strayed into a David Wiesner story... Overall, this is an entertaining tale with a fun ending. Even though we are not big fans of fishing, we enjoyed reading this book together.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Matthew West

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Jangles is a talking fish and described as the biggest fish anyone has ever seen. He is constantly being hunted but all the attempts fail until a little boy finds him. The little boy gets dragged down into the water but Jangles tells him stories. Once they are done with the stories Jangles brings the boy back up to the surface and the boy tried to capture him. However, the boy’s betrayal might be too much for him. This book gives children the experience of conquering greed and substituting it fo Jangles is a talking fish and described as the biggest fish anyone has ever seen. He is constantly being hunted but all the attempts fail until a little boy finds him. The little boy gets dragged down into the water but Jangles tells him stories. Once they are done with the stories Jangles brings the boy back up to the surface and the boy tried to capture him. However, the boy’s betrayal might be too much for him. This book gives children the experience of conquering greed and substituting it for loyalty. A really great read with wonderful illustrations, which seems to be the norm for David Shannon. Shannon, D. (2012). Jangles: A Big Fish Story. New York, NY: Scholastic Inc.

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