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The Sandman: The Story of Sanderson Mansnoozie

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The Man in the Moon has a problem. Most nights, he beams down at the children of Earth, providing them with an inextinguishable nightlight that keeps nightmares at bay. But what happens when it's foggy or cloudy? When the moon is less than full and bright? Who will keep the children safe at night? He needs a helper! And he's spied just the fellow: a sleepy little guy named The Man in the Moon has a problem. Most nights, he beams down at the children of Earth, providing them with an inextinguishable nightlight that keeps nightmares at bay. But what happens when it's foggy or cloudy? When the moon is less than full and bright? Who will keep the children safe at night? He needs a helper! And he's spied just the fellow: a sleepy little guy named Sanderson Mansnoozie (Sandy, for short), who might be perfect...if only the Man in the Moon can get him to wake up.


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The Man in the Moon has a problem. Most nights, he beams down at the children of Earth, providing them with an inextinguishable nightlight that keeps nightmares at bay. But what happens when it's foggy or cloudy? When the moon is less than full and bright? Who will keep the children safe at night? He needs a helper! And he's spied just the fellow: a sleepy little guy named The Man in the Moon has a problem. Most nights, he beams down at the children of Earth, providing them with an inextinguishable nightlight that keeps nightmares at bay. But what happens when it's foggy or cloudy? When the moon is less than full and bright? Who will keep the children safe at night? He needs a helper! And he's spied just the fellow: a sleepy little guy named Sanderson Mansnoozie (Sandy, for short), who might be perfect...if only the Man in the Moon can get him to wake up.

30 review for The Sandman: The Story of Sanderson Mansnoozie

  1. 5 out of 5

    Trish

    Ever since I first saw the movie The Guardians I was enthralled by the story and ideas behind it. A popular children's book in Germany, Peterchen's Mondfahrt is quite similar with ideas about dreams and guiding children through the dark. Naturally, that allures to all of us. This book is the (shortened) story of Sanderson Mansnoozie who will become The Sandman. The three books of this that are out, are more picture books and therefore focus on the art rather than the full story. However, that mak Ever since I first saw the movie The Guardians I was enthralled by the story and ideas behind it. A popular children's book in Germany, Peterchen's Mondfahrt is quite similar with ideas about dreams and guiding children through the dark. Naturally, that allures to all of us. This book is the (shortened) story of Sanderson Mansnoozie who will become The Sandman. The three books of this that are out, are more picture books and therefore focus on the art rather than the full story. However, that makes this book all the more suited for younger children. Also, William Joyce illustrates these books himself and man, he's got talent! A wonderful tale of The Man In The Moon and how he asked Sandy for help in order to protect the children of the Earth from Pitch, the Nightmare King; full of fantastic illustrations of dreamy creatures that tickle the imagination of young and old.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Calista

    This is a magical story. It is a myth about the Sandman. I love this artwork, I love this story. This book made me feel something. The man in the moon works with the Sandman keeping children's dreams safe and happy. The Sandman fights the bad dreams for us. This is one of my new favorite books at the moment. The kids loved this book too. We are going to have to re-read this before it goes back to the library. This is a magical story. It is a myth about the Sandman. I love this artwork, I love this story. This book made me feel something. The man in the moon works with the Sandman keeping children's dreams safe and happy. The Sandman fights the bad dreams for us. This is one of my new favorite books at the moment. The kids loved this book too. We are going to have to re-read this before it goes back to the library.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nikki in Niagara

    Reason for Reading: Next in the series. Well, I feel a bit guilty not giving this book a 5* rating but I must be honest, we were somewhat disappointed. For those not sure how this series works. It is made up of picture books and chapter books which in the long run are related to each other, same characters, but supposedly could be read apart from one another. The picture books are called "The Guardians of Childhood" while the chapter books are called "The Guardians". We are reading all the books Reason for Reading: Next in the series. Well, I feel a bit guilty not giving this book a 5* rating but I must be honest, we were somewhat disappointed. For those not sure how this series works. It is made up of picture books and chapter books which in the long run are related to each other, same characters, but supposedly could be read apart from one another. The picture books are called "The Guardians of Childhood" while the chapter books are called "The Guardians". We are reading all the books in order as they are published and *highly* enjoying this series: the writing, the world-building, the plot and the illustrations. We came to this book, looking forward very much to the picture book format again, expecting to be taken back to the world of "The Man in the Moon" and perhaps a small insight into the continuing storyline as we know the next chapterbook is titled after the Sandman as well. First, our disappointment came in that this story is very much a stand-alone. Yes, the man in the moon (MiM) is briefly present but this is "Sandy's" story of how he came to be in the "Golden Age", a time far in the past before the events taking place in the chapter books. None of the chapter book characters are mentioned except of course the villain Pitch, neither is any of that plot, nor is the story advanced in anyway. In truth, while the Sandman is an interesting character, his story is rather boring and feels out of place within the context of the overall series. Some sort of continuity for readers of the entire series (picture & chapter) would have been appreciated. On the other hand, William Joyce is an illustrator extraordinaire. He should be remembered as one of the greats of our time to follow in the footsteps of the likes of N.C. Wyeth and the Hildebrandts. This book is exquisite. Each page is simply beautiful and the story, as it is, is fully realized with the fantastical, otherworldly illustrations which use a dark palette of blues, purples and browns contrasted with the bright glimmering yellow/gold light of the sandman, his sand, his star and the moon. Beautiful, beautiful! Recommended age is 5+ for reading aloud but quite a bit older for individual reading, perhaps 9/10+. Not what we had expected storywise, but nonetheless a gorgeous book.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Courtney Apperson

    William Joyce's, The Sandman: The Story of Sanderson Mansnoozie is absolutely amazing. The illustrations in the book are eye catching and will draw any child into the story of the ever popular Sandman. This book is one that creates a whimsical world for the children to get swept up in. The theme is that of dreaming and wishing. Which is something that every child should believe in. The characters in the story include the evil King of the Nightmares as well as the man in the moon who is trying to William Joyce's, The Sandman: The Story of Sanderson Mansnoozie is absolutely amazing. The illustrations in the book are eye catching and will draw any child into the story of the ever popular Sandman. This book is one that creates a whimsical world for the children to get swept up in. The theme is that of dreaming and wishing. Which is something that every child should believe in. The characters in the story include the evil King of the Nightmares as well as the man in the moon who is trying to look over the children of the world. There is a fight between good and evil throughout the book that will keep children predicting throughout the entire book. Overall, the book tells the story of the Sandman and how he came to be in a way that children of all ages would appreciate.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    I really enjoyed these illustrations, especially the mermaids.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Abigail

    William Joyce returns to his ongoing saga of The Guardians of Childhood in this second gorgeous picture-book, which continues the story begun in The Man in the Moon . Unable to protect the children of Earth from nightmares when the moon is dark, MiM (the Man in the Moon) searches for an earthly partner in his work, finding him in the form of Sanderson Mansnoozie - Sandy for short - a fellow celestial traveler from the Golden Age, who was stranded when his comet was attacked during the great b William Joyce returns to his ongoing saga of The Guardians of Childhood in this second gorgeous picture-book, which continues the story begun in The Man in the Moon . Unable to protect the children of Earth from nightmares when the moon is dark, MiM (the Man in the Moon) searches for an earthly partner in his work, finding him in the form of Sanderson Mansnoozie - Sandy for short - a fellow celestial traveler from the Golden Age, who was stranded when his comet was attacked during the great battle with the evil Pitch, King of Nightmares. Awakening this sandman, MiM makes a wish for his assistance, and Sandy - soon dubbed "His Nocturnal Magnificence, Sanderson Mansnoozie, Sandman the First, Lord High Protector of Sleep and Dreams" - rises to the occasion. This picture-book series, and the related children's fantasy novels featuring the same characters, were recommended to me by members of the children's books group that I moderate on another site, during a discussion of the film Rise of the Guardians. I'm glad that it was, as I have really enjoyed what I have read so far! As with its predecessor, the artwork here is simply breathtaking. Joyce's palette is visually striking, with its deep shades of blue, and rich gold, and his fantastic subjects are beautifully realized. My favorite scene was the one in which the mermaids gather to sing little Sandy to sleep. Even the endpapers, which depict the Island of Sleepy Sands, are beautiful! The story itself is engaging, building on the developments of The Man in the Moon , and leaving me wondering what would happen next, and which Guardian would feature in the third picture-book in the series.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Khadijah

    "Dreams, sweet dreams, be in the sand you hold. They banish all the darkling fears and fill the night with gold." It's so cute~ And the art is so beautiful- it's everything I love; gold, dark blues, stars, the moon, magic sand, and of course "His Nocturnal Magnificence, Sanderson Mansnoozie, Sandman the First, Lord High Protector of Sleep and Dreams" aka Sandy❤️ I'm excited to real all the books! "Dreams, sweet dreams, be in the sand you hold. They banish all the darkling fears and fill the night with gold." It's so cute~ And the art is so beautiful- it's everything I love; gold, dark blues, stars, the moon, magic sand, and of course "His Nocturnal Magnificence, Sanderson Mansnoozie, Sandman the First, Lord High Protector of Sleep and Dreams" aka Sandy❤️ I'm excited to real all the books!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    I love the art in these books more than the story... :/ But hopefully I'll enjoy the story more when I read the chapter books. I love the art in these books more than the story... :/ But hopefully I'll enjoy the story more when I read the chapter books.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kathy Davie

    Second in the Guardians of Childhood fantasy series. The focus in The Sandman is all about dreams and where they come from. My Take This would be a good story for children with nightmares — or who need a fascinating idea for a Halloween costume! Joyce has one heck of an imagination, and I do have to wonder if I should have read Man in the Moon to give this story greater depth. The kids will enjoy the idea of shooting stars being spaceships, and I did get a kick out of the shell soldiers. They we Second in the Guardians of Childhood fantasy series. The focus in The Sandman is all about dreams and where they come from. My Take This would be a good story for children with nightmares — or who need a fascinating idea for a Halloween costume! Joyce has one heck of an imagination, and I do have to wonder if I should have read Man in the Moon to give this story greater depth. The kids will enjoy the idea of shooting stars being spaceships, and I did get a kick out of the shell soldiers. They were so intent on Sandy that it was cute. The front endpapers are an illustrated glossary of the creation of the island and some of the characters while the back endpapers explore how the island works these days — be sure to explore the locations of the different sleepy sands, *grin*. The graphics have gorgeously intense colors with the constellations of stars lined out. The Story The Man in the Moon has a problem. Most nights, he beams down at the children of Earth, providing them with an inextinguishable nightlight that keeps nightmares at bay. But what happens when it's foggy or cloudy? When the moon is less than full and bright? Who will keep the children safe at night? He needs a helper! And he's spied just the fellow: a sleepy little guy named Sanderson Mansnoozie (Sandy, for short), who might be perfect…if only the Man in the Moon can get him to wake up. The Characters Sanderson "Sandy" Mansnoozie was the pilot of a shooting star and he's also known as the Sandman and then His Nocturnal Magnificence, Sanderson Mansnoozie, Sandman the First, Lord High Protector of Sleep and Dreams, who once received a wish from a very young Man in the Moon. Mermaids and turtles and seashells come out to help, although how they do this, I haven't a clue. The Man in the Moon was the very first guardian and watches over the children of Earth. Pitch is the King of Nightmares sailing in his Nightmare Galleon with his Dream Pirates. The Golden Age was long ago. The Cover and Title The cover is great fun with its tubby little man all wrapped up in some kind of blanket tailored to his chubby form, standing on a dune of sand on the Island of the Sleepy Sands. His hair is divided into three upright swirls, the ones on either side like a bull's horns and the center tuft curling up into a backwards question mark. His arms are spread, palms flat while the Dreamsand streams out into the sky. On either side of the cover are sculpted swirls and twirls of hoodoos, all these soft browns standing out against the deeply royal blue sky with its scattered stars and cloud mountains beneath which is the gleaming green sea. Tucked in unobtrusively around the bottom are the shellmen, wielding their shell-topped spears. The swirling title and author's name, curved to fit the full moon, are of embossed metallic copper filling the moon along with what looks like an vignette of shape. At the very top is the name of the series in a pretty and soft purple. The title is all about the new helper for the Man in the Moon, The Sandman.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Dolly

    This is a fantastic tale of nighttime wonder and dreams. The gorgeous illustrations are so detailed and the story is magical. Our girls were convinced that David Catrow illustrated this book, based on the appearance of little Sandy, but apparently William Joyce's style is just similar. The story alternates from being very dramatic to very soothing and while this is a terrific bedtime story, I would recommend it for older children. Overall, we thought this was a wonderful tale and we really enjoy This is a fantastic tale of nighttime wonder and dreams. The gorgeous illustrations are so detailed and the story is magical. Our girls were convinced that David Catrow illustrated this book, based on the appearance of little Sandy, but apparently William Joyce's style is just similar. The story alternates from being very dramatic to very soothing and while this is a terrific bedtime story, I would recommend it for older children. Overall, we thought this was a wonderful tale and we really enjoyed reading it together. I see that there are two picture books in The Guardians of Childhood series. We haven't read the first book yet,The Man in the Moon, so we'll have to look for it at our local library. In addition, there's a series of chapter books, called The Guardians by the same author. I expect we'll likely check out some of these chapter books, too. And now that I know that there's a movie featuring these characters called Rise of the Guardians, our girls are excited to see it. Thanks to Kathryn for telling me about it. August 2013 update: We finally got around to seeing the movie. It was good and we loved the interaction between the characters. The Sandman was a silent, but integral part of the tale.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jenni Arndt

    I have to admit here that this was my first William Joyce book, yes, I read the first two books in The Guardians of Childhood series backwards. My kids found this one at the grocery store and were so excited because they had seen the Sandman in the movie trailer for The Guardians so I was told we had to get the book. I read it to them that night and finished with a tear in my eye. This is a beautiful story about protecting our children from the darkness & all the things they are afraid of. My fav I have to admit here that this was my first William Joyce book, yes, I read the first two books in The Guardians of Childhood series backwards. My kids found this one at the grocery store and were so excited because they had seen the Sandman in the movie trailer for The Guardians so I was told we had to get the book. I read it to them that night and finished with a tear in my eye. This is a beautiful story about protecting our children from the darkness & all the things they are afraid of. My favorite thing about this series is the rich illustrations, they are absolutely gorgeous and I could flip through the book just to look at them and it still be a worthwhile book. They have a vintage looking quality to them and remind me of the epic fairy tales of my childhood. Reading it to my children they were constantly pointing out little details in the drawings that they loved and my daughter sat flipping through the book long after we finished reading it. Not only is this chalk full of stunning imagery, it also has a beautiful tale to go along with the pictures. I love the idea behind these books and the way that they put a fresh spin on the origin of beloved childhood figures. This one was very special and led to a conversation between my children and I about where the morning sleep crusts in your eyes come from. I couldn't believe that I had never gone into the childhood lore about that with them and it was definitely fun to go into it now. I hope there will be more Guardian tales to come, my children are definitely pining for more! You can read all of my reviews at Alluring Reads.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    A Wish Always Begins with a Dream After reading The Sandman, I had wished that I had started with the first book in the Guardians of Childhood series – The Man in the Moon. This book is for advancing readers, not suggested for 3 and 4 year olds like so many of the children’s books currently on the market. Combining myth, fantasy and folklore, William Joyce tells a tale of how the Man in the Moon needs help on the evenings where his visibility is low. He needs a guardian to help keep children safe A Wish Always Begins with a Dream After reading The Sandman, I had wished that I had started with the first book in the Guardians of Childhood series – The Man in the Moon. This book is for advancing readers, not suggested for 3 and 4 year olds like so many of the children’s books currently on the market. Combining myth, fantasy and folklore, William Joyce tells a tale of how the Man in the Moon needs help on the evenings where his visibility is low. He needs a guardian to help keep children safe from bad dreams. Spying a gentle dreamer, a man that guided shooting stars during the Golden Age, the Man in the Moon enlists a sweet little man named Sanderson Mansnoozie in fighting off Pitch, the Nightmare King. Not your typical children’s book. This tale is a bit deeper and darker and will appeal to your curious seven or eight year olds, who think that they are too big for baby books, but will be transported to Sandy’s island of Dreamsand and will watch the battle between good and evil unfold. I cannot tell you if I enjoyed the illustrations or the narrative more. I am sure that I would be offending Mr. Joyce by saying that I was reminded of Harry Potter when I read this book, but I do have to admit that Sanderson looks a bit like a mandrake and Pitch sure has something in common with Voldemort’s gang. I might be digressing. Do not like let my strange association distract you from this book. It is a true gift to be cherished, one that your “I’m too old for baby books”, readers will enjoy.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Scott Rhee

    Ever wonder where dreams and nightmares come from? William Joyce's wonderful picture book, "The Sandman: The Story of Sanderson Mansnoozie" answers the question. Apparently "The Sandman" is the second book in a series called the Guardians of Childhood. Sandy made a cameo in the first book, which described how the Man in the Moon came to be. In this book, the Man in the Moon needs help guarding children of Earth, so he sends a message into deep space to ask Sandy---flying around Orion's Belt in hi Ever wonder where dreams and nightmares come from? William Joyce's wonderful picture book, "The Sandman: The Story of Sanderson Mansnoozie" answers the question. Apparently "The Sandman" is the second book in a series called the Guardians of Childhood. Sandy made a cameo in the first book, which described how the Man in the Moon came to be. In this book, the Man in the Moon needs help guarding children of Earth, so he sends a message into deep space to ask Sandy---flying around Orion's Belt in his shooting star spaceship---for help. The evil Pitch and his army of nightmares, however, want to destroy Sandy, who has the ability to create wonderful and happy dreams whenever he sleeps, which he does a lot. (Hence his name.) Pitch shoots Sandy's ship down over Earth, and the ship crash-lands in the ocean. The ship solidifies into a vast island, where Sandy sleeps for thousands of years, creating dreams that help defeat nightmares. Lavishly illustrated and with a fairy tale story that is just begging to be made into a feature-length animated movie from Disney/Pixar, 'The Sandman" is great fun.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kerr

    That wasn't what I was expecting. Not that I know what I was expecting to be honest. I don't know if this is the first origins for Sandman but I was thinking something different. That wasn't what I was expecting. Not that I know what I was expecting to be honest. I don't know if this is the first origins for Sandman but I was thinking something different.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    "Mr. Sandman, bring me a dream...." LOVE, LOVE, LOVE THIS BOOK. I absolutely adored the first book in this series by Joyce. I was excited to find this second book for my son and I to enjoy together. The narrative flows seamlessly from page to page spread between beautiful, full-spread illustrations. The images were breath-taking and the story is captivating for adults and children alike. I was fully engaged in the story and so was my six year old. I also love that the story provoked my son to ask "Mr. Sandman, bring me a dream...." LOVE, LOVE, LOVE THIS BOOK. I absolutely adored the first book in this series by Joyce. I was excited to find this second book for my son and I to enjoy together. The narrative flows seamlessly from page to page spread between beautiful, full-spread illustrations. The images were breath-taking and the story is captivating for adults and children alike. I was fully engaged in the story and so was my six year old. I also love that the story provoked my son to ask questions and make connections to his own life and ponder how much of the story he wanted to believe. I personally loved the way Joyce took a well-know figure of lore, who has inspired movies and songs (see above) and made him available to children in a fun and exciting way. I just wish there was more!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Rain Misoa

    A brilliant continuation to this lovely children's picture book series. To read my full review, click here. A brilliant continuation to this lovely children's picture book series. To read my full review, click here.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lindsey

    The Sandman is my favorite! He’s adorable.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Rick

    Another absolutely charming and delightful tale of a post-modern take on a nursery rhyme myth. Beautiful illustrations and a fascinating origin story for another “guardian” of children all the world over.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    Have you ever wondered who protects the children of the world as they sleep from the nightmares that can bring them fear, pain and sorrow? It’s the Sandman, of course! In the second book of “The Guardians of the Childhood Series,” the Man in the Moon finds Sanderson Mansnoozie, better known as the “Sandman.” Sandman helps him protect the children of the world since his moonlight cannot be bright all nights. The story flows from the beginning of Sanderson as he is a pilot of a shooting star to fi Have you ever wondered who protects the children of the world as they sleep from the nightmares that can bring them fear, pain and sorrow? It’s the Sandman, of course! In the second book of “The Guardians of the Childhood Series,” the Man in the Moon finds Sanderson Mansnoozie, better known as the “Sandman.” Sandman helps him protect the children of the world since his moonlight cannot be bright all nights. The story flows from the beginning of Sanderson as he is a pilot of a shooting star to fighting Pitch, The King of Nightmares. This story will leave readers captivated by remembering their dreams that Sanderson brings to them each night. The pictures in this book are vibrant and will captivate the reader’s wildest imagination. The illustrations play between dark and bright showing the contrast between nightmares and dreams. Sanderson and his shooting star dust are magically sprinkled across almost every page giving the reader the feeling of the magic of the sparkles of dreams that are dropped in the children’s eyes every night. This book would be best with intermediate elementary grades 3-5th grade. It would be an excellent text to use with children to explore how the actions of the characters drive the plot. There are several key actions taken by the Man on the Moon, Sanderson and Pitch that drive the plot. What are those actions and how do they change the course of the story?

  20. 5 out of 5

    Marsha

    Gorgeously illustrated and freshly told, this story of the Sandman and his origins is like puff pastry: light, delicate and a thing of beauty. Billed as a guardian of children’s dreams, Sanderson Mansnoozie has few lines but considerable heft once he faces his fears in the form of black nightmares that haunt the sleep of children all over the world. The illustrations are sumptuous, with sand swirling like golden clouds, luminous and airy. Golden color sweeps across the page in the form of moonli Gorgeously illustrated and freshly told, this story of the Sandman and his origins is like puff pastry: light, delicate and a thing of beauty. Billed as a guardian of children’s dreams, Sanderson Mansnoozie has few lines but considerable heft once he faces his fears in the form of black nightmares that haunt the sleep of children all over the world. The illustrations are sumptuous, with sand swirling like golden clouds, luminous and airy. Golden color sweeps across the page in the form of moonlight, sand storms and the inner light of the Sandman himself. The island of the Sandman is perfectly rendered in swirling peninsulas and richly purple oceans. The other denizens don’t go begging either as the illustrator gives us a chubby, waxing and waning Man in the Moon, marching seashells and tattooed mermaids, slender and sweet, as they croon to a sleeping Sanderson. This is a wonderful book that will delight children and is a perfect bedtime treat as well.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    Seeking help to make sure the children of Earth feel safe on nights when fog or clouds obscure the moon's comforting light, the Man in the Moon finds the perfect candidate, Sanderson Mansnoozie (Sandy), a sleepy human who eventually rises to the occasion. The multimedia illustrations are rendered in sumptuous colors, making this book appealing to the eye. The illustration near the back of the book showing snoozing children is especially lovely. This would be a good read aloud but early readers w Seeking help to make sure the children of Earth feel safe on nights when fog or clouds obscure the moon's comforting light, the Man in the Moon finds the perfect candidate, Sanderson Mansnoozie (Sandy), a sleepy human who eventually rises to the occasion. The multimedia illustrations are rendered in sumptuous colors, making this book appealing to the eye. The illustration near the back of the book showing snoozing children is especially lovely. This would be a good read aloud but early readers will struggle with reading it for themselves. Part of the Guardians of Childhood series, this title is best enjoyed alongside its predecessor, giving readers context for the story. I look forward to seeing all the books together.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    This second book in the Guardians of Childhood series (following The Man in the Moon) has equally drool-worthy pictures, with intricate details and a glowing light: sort of Arthur Rackham meets Maxfield Parrish. I don't love the name "Sanderson Mansnoozie," but I suppose it keeps the book from taking itself too seriously. "The Rise of the Guardians" movie comes out Nov. 20. This second book in the Guardians of Childhood series (following The Man in the Moon) has equally drool-worthy pictures, with intricate details and a glowing light: sort of Arthur Rackham meets Maxfield Parrish. I don't love the name "Sanderson Mansnoozie," but I suppose it keeps the book from taking itself too seriously. "The Rise of the Guardians" movie comes out Nov. 20.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Elevetha

    Cute, cute, cute. A lovely bedtime story for childlings. Joyce's world he's created is imaginative and fun to read about, child or not. He creates some wonderful characters that feel alive with the use of beautiful illustrations and some deft writing. Sandy is one of my favorites. He's sweet and quite adorable in the illustrations. He needs to sleep, and sleep a lot, in order to use his power. If there was a female Sandy, I'd like to think that'd be me. Cute, cute, cute. A lovely bedtime story for childlings. Joyce's world he's created is imaginative and fun to read about, child or not. He creates some wonderful characters that feel alive with the use of beautiful illustrations and some deft writing. Sandy is one of my favorites. He's sweet and quite adorable in the illustrations. He needs to sleep, and sleep a lot, in order to use his power. If there was a female Sandy, I'd like to think that'd be me.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Linda Lipko

    This is a wonderful tale of evil and good as they battle each other in the war of children's nightmares. When the sandman discovers that if the moon is dark, all children have terrible nightmares, he solicits help from Sanderson Mansnoozie who battles the evil forces. The illustrations are lush and very detailed. This is a wonderful tale of evil and good as they battle each other in the war of children's nightmares. When the sandman discovers that if the moon is dark, all children have terrible nightmares, he solicits help from Sanderson Mansnoozie who battles the evil forces. The illustrations are lush and very detailed.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Defenestraethe

    Joyce gives us another back story to one of the figures of childhood mythology: the Sandman. The story is adequate, the villains are creepy, but the art: the art earns this book all its stars. Gorgeous. Library copy.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sherry

    Wonderful book which I enjoyed more the second time around. May I never be too old for beautiful books with wonderful heartwarming stories.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jaimie

    I really want to love William Joyce's stories of the Guardians of Childhood, but the narratives always seem to be missing that crucial something which would make the stories magic. Joyce's premise is an excellent start, and the Sandman's story is extremely promising, but his conflict with the King of Nightmares just doesn't jive. The potential coflict between these two characters is one that has been explored successfully by many other authors, so Joyce's riff essentially falls short of the mark I really want to love William Joyce's stories of the Guardians of Childhood, but the narratives always seem to be missing that crucial something which would make the stories magic. Joyce's premise is an excellent start, and the Sandman's story is extremely promising, but his conflict with the King of Nightmares just doesn't jive. The potential coflict between these two characters is one that has been explored successfully by many other authors, so Joyce's riff essentially falls short of the mark instead of adding to the dream mythos. The only real saving grace in this book are Joyce's wonderful illustrations. Even without the story they are whimsical, imaginative, and have a perfect colour palette for a story of dreams. It's almost too bad that Joyce didn't just leave the story wordless, and given us a purely graphic novel, since a few more carefully chosen illustrations and we would have had a perfectly adequate book.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Shaina Cade

    This review applies to the other two in Joyce's series about the mythical guardians of the best parts of childhood: dreams, adventure, hope, sharing, love. Everything is so new and whimsical and epic and powerful as a child. Joyce perfectly captures that in his detailed colorful illustrations. My personal fave is His Nocturnal Magnificence, Sanderson Mansnoozie, Sandman the First, Lord High Protector of Sleep and Dreams. You deserve all your titles, my sweet dude. I want your island, and your fa This review applies to the other two in Joyce's series about the mythical guardians of the best parts of childhood: dreams, adventure, hope, sharing, love. Everything is so new and whimsical and epic and powerful as a child. Joyce perfectly captures that in his detailed colorful illustrations. My personal fave is His Nocturnal Magnificence, Sanderson Mansnoozie, Sandman the First, Lord High Protector of Sleep and Dreams. You deserve all your titles, my sweet dude. I want your island, and your falling star ship, and some of that dreamsand for some lovely dreams. I also think some of the best points of these picture books, and the movie, is how transformative life is. Everything changes and every little thing and person is worthy of a closer look. Take a few short minutes to appreciate how bloody fantastic the world is around you. Lovely faerie tale twists on familiar concepts.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kira Dickson

    Copyright:2012 Number of Pages: Unknown Book Format: Hardcover Reading Level: Grades 3-5 Genre: Fantasy Picture Book Lit. Requirement: Picture #3 Summary: Who looks after children in the night giving away good dreams? The Sandman does, in this book the origin of the Sandman is told. Who he was before he was a guardian and what he does and why. Response: I love this book. William Joyce is a fantastic author and his books get better and better. I love the pictures of this book and the writing is fantastic Copyright:2012 Number of Pages: Unknown Book Format: Hardcover Reading Level: Grades 3-5 Genre: Fantasy Picture Book Lit. Requirement: Picture #3 Summary: Who looks after children in the night giving away good dreams? The Sandman does, in this book the origin of the Sandman is told. Who he was before he was a guardian and what he does and why. Response: I love this book. William Joyce is a fantastic author and his books get better and better. I love the pictures of this book and the writing is fantastic. I love his origin story and what happen to get him stuck on earth. I have read this to one of the classes I was interning at and they of course loved it. I would recommend this book.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Luisa Knight

    2.5 stars. A bedtime fantasy for your children that enjoy made-up lands. It's a little odd for me but I could see some people really liking it. Ages: 6 - 9 Cleanliness: bad dreams are depicted as scary, black wisps with eyes - younger children might be a little disturbed, so maybe take a look before reading it to see if your child can handle it. **Like my reviews? I also have hundreds of detailed reports that I offer too. These reports give a complete break-down of everything in the book, so you'll 2.5 stars. A bedtime fantasy for your children that enjoy made-up lands. It's a little odd for me but I could see some people really liking it. Ages: 6 - 9 Cleanliness: bad dreams are depicted as scary, black wisps with eyes - younger children might be a little disturbed, so maybe take a look before reading it to see if your child can handle it. **Like my reviews? I also have hundreds of detailed reports that I offer too. These reports give a complete break-down of everything in the book, so you'll know just how clean it is or isn't. I also have Clean Guides (downloadable PDFs) which enable you to clean up your book before reading it! Visit my website: The Book Radar.

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