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THEY ARE ALREADY HERE. THEY HIDE AMONG US. THEY HUNT US. THEY FEED ON US. THEY ARE US. When melting Artic ice releases a virus it triggers dormant genes from junk DNA. The genes that once created vampires. Now, all over the world, people are beginning to transform. To develop unnatural and unstoppable hungers. Are they still human? Or is there now a brand new link in the food c THEY ARE ALREADY HERE. THEY HIDE AMONG US. THEY HUNT US. THEY FEED ON US. THEY ARE US. When melting Artic ice releases a virus it triggers dormant genes from junk DNA. The genes that once created vampires. Now, all over the world, people are beginning to transform. To develop unnatural and unstoppable hungers. Are they still human? Or is there now a brand new link in the food chain? The world is filled with vampire legend. Each culture with its own unique brand of blood-thirsty killer, but the stories aren't mere myth. Strange, savage, immensely powerful, and driven by a need to feed on human blood - vampires are returning. V-Wars is the chronicle of the first vampire war. From the savage murders committed by the patient zero of the plague to full-out battles with vampire terrorist cells, these are the stories of the most terrifying war mankind has ever faced. The vampire wars have begun. The world will scream. . .


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THEY ARE ALREADY HERE. THEY HIDE AMONG US. THEY HUNT US. THEY FEED ON US. THEY ARE US. When melting Artic ice releases a virus it triggers dormant genes from junk DNA. The genes that once created vampires. Now, all over the world, people are beginning to transform. To develop unnatural and unstoppable hungers. Are they still human? Or is there now a brand new link in the food c THEY ARE ALREADY HERE. THEY HIDE AMONG US. THEY HUNT US. THEY FEED ON US. THEY ARE US. When melting Artic ice releases a virus it triggers dormant genes from junk DNA. The genes that once created vampires. Now, all over the world, people are beginning to transform. To develop unnatural and unstoppable hungers. Are they still human? Or is there now a brand new link in the food chain? The world is filled with vampire legend. Each culture with its own unique brand of blood-thirsty killer, but the stories aren't mere myth. Strange, savage, immensely powerful, and driven by a need to feed on human blood - vampires are returning. V-Wars is the chronicle of the first vampire war. From the savage murders committed by the patient zero of the plague to full-out battles with vampire terrorist cells, these are the stories of the most terrifying war mankind has ever faced. The vampire wars have begun. The world will scream. . .

30 review for V-Wars

  1. 4 out of 5

    AziaMinor

    Overall Rating: A- I've always loved Jonathan Maberry's books and this one is no exception. Dark, gritty, and an all too real look at what would happen in a fantasy setting. *Side note - as your aware of every book to t.v. show, do not compare them to each other. Both are equally good on their own* Technically there are 11 stories - some split up into parts - and each one provides a new, unique view of the deadly "V-Virus" spreading around the world. Here's a rundown of each one: JUNK/ESCALATION/SP Overall Rating: A- I've always loved Jonathan Maberry's books and this one is no exception. Dark, gritty, and an all too real look at what would happen in a fantasy setting. *Side note - as your aware of every book to t.v. show, do not compare them to each other. Both are equally good on their own* Technically there are 11 stories - some split up into parts - and each one provides a new, unique view of the deadly "V-Virus" spreading around the world. Here's a rundown of each one: JUNK/ESCALATION/SPECIES GENOCIDE/EMBEDDED/LAST BITES Rating A+: An amazing beginning, middle, and end? of the V-Virus. Loved Luther Swann, loved the panic and chaos as he tries to come up with a peaceful solution you know won't happen. Everything flowed beautifully and left you wondering who exactly the monsters are. ROADKILL Rating B: A hard look at a world going crazy. A D.E.A undercover for too long, a militia run by a raging lunatic and a suprising twist that leads to.....something? Nothing? No one knows. LOVE LESS Rating A+: Who knew talk show hosts are heartless and power hungry? Everyone lol. Starts off dark and gets darker, with an ending that'll leave you depressed as hell - but in a good way. EPIPHANY Rating B+: A girl the world hurt all over finally gets the chance to fight back. Solid story but could've been more. THE BALLAD OF BIG CHARLIE Rating A: What would we do for our family? Whatever we can. This story shows how one man tried - and sort of succeeded - to show the world how to be a decent being. No matter what you've become. A sadder ending than what I was hoping for but a great contribution to the overall theme. HEARTSICK Rating B-: A short story about an old dick that gets what's coming to him. Not needed and no point in this story. VULPES Rating A+: Something other than vampires come out in the night. But for good, or evil? STALKING ANNA LEI Rating C+: I was barely able to read this. The tone was so different than the rest it put me off big time. First person POV about a cat??? vampire trying to find his sister. Tries being funny but goes to far for this sort of book. All of these together serve to bring about a whole world filled with dread and terror, each one telling a tale of despair and, surprisingly, hope. Definitely give this a read if your in a vampire mood!!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    2.5 stars. This looked like it might resemble World War Z with multiple authors and vampires. It was more like World War Zzzzzzzzzz. The "war" was a cold one and the overarching story seemed to deal more with social consciousness than with staking bloodsuckers. Oh wait. Just saying that makes me racist against vampires. Should I not use the "V" word? I'd hate to be banned from a cable tv network 30 years from now because they found out I said "vampire". That said, I did enjoy some of the stories 2.5 stars. This looked like it might resemble World War Z with multiple authors and vampires. It was more like World War Zzzzzzzzzz. The "war" was a cold one and the overarching story seemed to deal more with social consciousness than with staking bloodsuckers. Oh wait. Just saying that makes me racist against vampires. Should I not use the "V" word? I'd hate to be banned from a cable tv network 30 years from now because they found out I said "vampire". That said, I did enjoy some of the stories. Mostly I was intrigued with the Maberry sections and those by Nancy Holder. The rest pretty much reminded me that I hate vampires. Well, at least none of them sparkled. It wasn't a horrible read, and the audio format really worked well for this work. Still, I would have liked to have seen more bullets fly and less political agenda.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Burton

    V-Wars, edited by Jonathan Maberry, is a collection of stories set in the same world but written by a bevy of talented authors. In the world Maberry creates in V-Wars, a prehistoric virus has been released from polar ice, awakening recessive genes in the human genome. The virus triggers changes in some humans, awakening physical changes that are varied and dramatic. Before long, vampires walk among us. Some are benign; many are not. Maberry's collection of tales does well and more credibly what V-Wars, edited by Jonathan Maberry, is a collection of stories set in the same world but written by a bevy of talented authors. In the world Maberry creates in V-Wars, a prehistoric virus has been released from polar ice, awakening recessive genes in the human genome. The virus triggers changes in some humans, awakening physical changes that are varied and dramatic. Before long, vampires walk among us. Some are benign; many are not. Maberry's collection of tales does well and more credibly what X-Men (at least the movies--I'm not familiar with the comics) tries to do: it portrays a genetic mutation that changes a portion of humanity, causing ostracization, fear, violence, and, of course, government action. I've always been dubious about what the reaction to the X-Men. After all, the powers they have seem to be magical and useful. On the other hand, the mutations in V Wars result in a change that seems to drive its mutants to, well, suck blood. That seems a bit more against the public interest than the power to start fires, freeze objects, levitate, or any of the other number of changes that Stan Lee's X-Men undergo. Maberry does an excellent job tying the stories together with a common story that intersperses the tales. While the majority of the stories seem to take place in and around the American northeast, especially New York City, V-Wars treats readers to a semi-global perspective, with stories from the American southern border with Mexico, in the shadows of the Appalachian Mountains, and one that crisscrosses the globe, starting in Antarctica, jetting off to Romania, and stopping through France, too. Some times we read from the vampire's perspective; other times, from the humans. Maberry breaks up the stories, too, giving the collection something of novel-like feeling. As interesting as the collection is, the stories are not all created equal, and it's part of the reason I had a hard time settling on just three stars. I wanted badly to give the book four stars--but several of the stories disappointed, even bored me. They were few, however, and generally the stories were creative and enjoyable, if occasionally not for the faint of heart. Here are a few of my favorites: "Stalking Anna Lei" by James A. Moore brings together legends of vampires from East Asia, as John Lei searches for his sister while navigating the dangerous world of Asian gangs amid reports of a monstrous creature that seems to be haunting his every step. Told from John's perspective, Moore has a great voice that makes his story one of the most enjoyable, and his plotting makes the final twist satisfying and unexpected. "Vulpes" by Gregory Frost begins in Antarctica and trails Ruksana back to her home in Romania. Beware, though: when the change comes to her, the results are anything but vampiric. Yvonne Navarro's "Epiphany" asks what happens when society's most weak go through the vampiric change, trading vulnerabilities for superhuman power. Red Moon is the orphaned daughter of Native Americans, raped, pregnant, and infected by the virus. Beset by changes she cannot explain, she finds herself on the edge of motherhood in a world that threatens to destroy her for the changes that have come over her. V-Wars deserves a second installment. It is, in many ways, only the opening chapter in the new world that emerges as vampire and human eye each other and wonder if they will live together or in conflict.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Eldritch Reading Reindeer 2021 In Cobwebs

    “V-Wars” is a collection of “shared-world” stories, by Jonathan Maberry, Nancy Holder, John Everson, Yvonne Navarro, James A. Moore, Gregory Frost, Keith DeCandido, and Scott Nicholson. The premise for this collection is the worldwide epidemic of infection caused by a millennial-old virus, buried deep in an Antarctic glacier. Once the virus begins to be transmitted, it affects different individuals differently, depending on DNA. The various authors interweave tales relating to the main premise, e “V-Wars” is a collection of “shared-world” stories, by Jonathan Maberry, Nancy Holder, John Everson, Yvonne Navarro, James A. Moore, Gregory Frost, Keith DeCandido, and Scott Nicholson. The premise for this collection is the worldwide epidemic of infection caused by a millennial-old virus, buried deep in an Antarctic glacier. Once the virus begins to be transmitted, it affects different individuals differently, depending on DNA. The various authors interweave tales relating to the main premise, each in their own fashion, so that in the shared world in which vampires and werewolves are now real, being mutated humans transformed by the ancient virus-all parts work together to make one fascinating progression. Author Maberry, who is also the editor of this collection, pens one tale which forms the framework of the spider web of fear and horror that is this most excellent set. Jonathan Maberry has a singularly gritty approach that is well-chosen for the types of horror sub-genres in which he chooses to perform, including vampire and zombie. His first story in this powerful collection, “Junk,” examines a fallen actor, whose only good film came nearly a decade ago, now reduced to Starbucks baristo trying to pick up chicks. Eventually his life is reduced to living nightmare, all due to that one good film he acted in eight years earlier. “Junk” continues as the frame piece for the collection, appearing intermittently and continuing the story of misguided Michael Frayne, failed actor, newly mutant. If Maberry’s storyline is gritty and profane, starring an egotistical “ex-actor,” Nancy Holder’s tale is downright violent. A motorcycle militia patrolling the border between the Southwestern United States and Mexico, hunting not just for illegal immigration, but to hunt and execute supposed vampires. John Everson plays with the transmission vectors of the vampire virus, and does a startlingly, emotionally painful, job of it. Yvonne Navarro’s story presents a young Native girl whose life is difficult and dangerous-now with becoming vampire, maybe things will start to look up. This gives you just a few dips into the brew of “V Wars,” and my advice to readers is, do not miss this. You might think you know and love vampires-or maybe you despise the genre; but “V Wars” is one unforgettable set, and you need to read it. This story collection is absolutely riveting. I found it difficult to pull away to take care of real life, and when I did have to stop briefly, the stories continued to play in my head. Readers who enjoyed Mr. Maberry’s Joe Ledger series will find this collection very approachable; but I can recommend it to anyone who likes his or her horror well-written, timely, and graphic.

  5. 5 out of 5

    LaTonya Reed

    I loved that this was a different take on Vampires with a fresh and new perspective. There are like five to six different story lines within the book so you definitely have to pay attention, and in my opinion the didn't connect well. But they would be awesome stand alone books. The end was underwhelming, but overall the book was good and I'm looking forward to listening to the next one in the series. I loved that this was a different take on Vampires with a fresh and new perspective. There are like five to six different story lines within the book so you definitely have to pay attention, and in my opinion the didn't connect well. But they would be awesome stand alone books. The end was underwhelming, but overall the book was good and I'm looking forward to listening to the next one in the series.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    I thought this was going to be a bit of a comic book, but it was better than that for the most part. Written in a series of intertwining stories written by different authors, each read by a different reader, they varied a lot in setting, point, & perspective, but were mostly of excellent quality. There was surprisingly little gore, though. Sure, killings, but it wasn't a blood fest, concentrating more on the political, social, & personal aspects. ...Mankind is silently infected by a millennia-old I thought this was going to be a bit of a comic book, but it was better than that for the most part. Written in a series of intertwining stories written by different authors, each read by a different reader, they varied a lot in setting, point, & perspective, but were mostly of excellent quality. There was surprisingly little gore, though. Sure, killings, but it wasn't a blood fest, concentrating more on the political, social, & personal aspects. ...Mankind is silently infected by a millennia-old bacteria unknowingly exhumed by a scientific expedition...a person's so-called "junk DNA" becomes activated, and depending on their racial and ethnic heritage they begin to manifest one of the many diverse forms of the "others" that are the true basis for the legends of supernatural creatures. As you can see from the description, this left the door open for the 8 contributing authors to create interesting creatures. A few were like Dracula, but others varied wildly since the old legends did, too. Each looked at different aspects of how the authorities, populace, & individuals (both infected & unchanged) reacted to the changes. The macro view (authorities & populace) were pretty typical, although our evolved social conscience battling with mob fear made for good conflicts. Sections of each story would be read & then a switch was made to another in a roughly chronological order. It was the reactions of the individuals that were the most interesting. The physical changes varied. In some, the change was much like the craving for a drug, while it was pure instinctive survival for others. The degree of control varied a lot depending on the type of change & the individual's personality. (In high school, my psych teacher told us humans don't have instincts. By definition, instinctual behavior can't be consciously overridden which we do on a regular basis, with varying degrees of difficulty based on the situation.) For the most part, this was pure SF, no fantasy. There were a few times when physical changes were too fast, but the only bad one was (view spoiler)[ when the Chinese enforcer's sister, Anna, went back to being human. She had been a 500 lb ogre & became a small woman again. (hide spoiler)] The first infection source (arctic) was done really well. I didn't like the second one in the antarctic. The story itself was excellent, just not that part of it. The readers, with one exception, were excellent. They didn't do individual voices, but read entire stories & all the characters in them which helped glue the stories together. Wil Wheaton's part was one of the best & fit the character to a tee. The only reader I didn't care for was the one that read the 'Big Charley' parts. Even she wasn't awful, but a big change from the rest - discordant & slow. It sounded like her tongue was swollen or a bee stung her lip & she had to enunciate around it. Overall, I was quite pleased with it. There were monsters a plenty, but not all were 'vampires'. Very logical & well done.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    V Wars is a compilation of stories from different authors and such it can be a bit jarring. The chapters with Jonathan Maberry's writings are my favorites as I think he is a really very, VERY good writer. I like his style, if you will. I've read all his books and intend to keep doing so for(I hope)a long time! Not every author has the same style however so you will get a nice sampling of different perspectives and different styles and different takes on the plague that has enveloped the world. I V Wars is a compilation of stories from different authors and such it can be a bit jarring. The chapters with Jonathan Maberry's writings are my favorites as I think he is a really very, VERY good writer. I like his style, if you will. I've read all his books and intend to keep doing so for(I hope)a long time! Not every author has the same style however so you will get a nice sampling of different perspectives and different styles and different takes on the plague that has enveloped the world. I enjoyed the book overall and I even found some new authors whose writing I liked and I will search out books from them in the future too. If you like vampires, plagues and end-times genre, definitely give this book a read. It's very enjoyable and superbly easy to pick up and come back to any time you have a moment.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    It's hard to call this an anthology. It's more of a series of novelas that have been split all over the place. I don't see the purpose of that. This is not "Pulp Fiction", where that was fun and new. This seemed cheap. I was hoping on like a war between vampires and humans, and it wasn't that at all! It was more about how people are changing into vampires, and how they deal with it. I was a little dissipointed. It's hard to call this an anthology. It's more of a series of novelas that have been split all over the place. I don't see the purpose of that. This is not "Pulp Fiction", where that was fun and new. This seemed cheap. I was hoping on like a war between vampires and humans, and it wasn't that at all! It was more about how people are changing into vampires, and how they deal with it. I was a little dissipointed.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    V WARS is actually more of an anthology centered around a single spine of a plot. Maberry is in the middle of it all, weaving the basis of the world with JUNK, ESCALATION, SPECIES, GENOCIDE, EMBEDDED and LAST BITES. JUNK takes up the biggest chunk of the story, centering on Michael Fayne, aka Patient Zero (not Joe Ledger). The guy that started it all. I only know Jonathan for his zombies but let me tell you he can do vampires too. I just LOVED the science behind it, how it was basically a virus V WARS is actually more of an anthology centered around a single spine of a plot. Maberry is in the middle of it all, weaving the basis of the world with JUNK, ESCALATION, SPECIES, GENOCIDE, EMBEDDED and LAST BITES. JUNK takes up the biggest chunk of the story, centering on Michael Fayne, aka Patient Zero (not Joe Ledger). The guy that started it all. I only know Jonathan for his zombies but let me tell you he can do vampires too. I just LOVED the science behind it, how it was basically a virus that activated dormant, or junk, DNA in our genetic code giving humans vampire tendencies. Unlike zombies most of these guys blended into society so you would have no idea if the person standing next to you on the subway is leering at you because you're hot or because they're hungry. To pun terribly, it's a more evolved pandemic than something like a zombie virus, as that's what people with the mutations come to think of themselves as. Evolved. They've moved on to the next phase of humanity. Each subsequent story of Maberry's moves on to how the reaction to this virus would escalate in the world, the breakdown of the species (which I loved because all of these authors delved into some seriously off the beaten path vampires, the variety was awesome), deeming the mutants enemies of the state by the government and thus sanctioning their slaughter, the vampires teaming up to fight back and then vampires hiding in plain sight. These stories were sprinkled along the book, mixed in with other authors and they created an excellent complement to everything else going around. Everyone really wrote so well within Maberry's imagined world that while the voices differed the stories seemed authentic. Seriously loved it. Nancy Holder authored ROADKILL about bikers defending the border and then ultimately losing their grip on reality and who is really the enemy. I liked this one for the ambiance. The story didn't hold me so much as its setting. I could feel the grit and the grime of the desert and it ground out the unreality of the situations into something tangible. Probably because I've been to Arizona and could actually picture it. Made it all the more real. John Everson wrote LOVE LESS about a talk show host that's pretty much a closet sociopath. I liked this character for her ingenuity but that's where it pretty much ended. She wasn't sympathetic although she presented a really interesting variety in the vampire species going around. Yvonne Navarro wrote EPIPHANY which was quite possibly my second favorite story in this compendium. Also set in Arizona, it focuses on a seventeen-year-old Native American girl still living on the reservation and ostracized from her society in part because her parents were nonconformists to their world but also because she was raped. She begins to morph into a kind of snake-like vampire that was just super crazy from the beginning. She even adopted slightly snake-like features (if you're thinking Voldemort you've gone too far) and made a pretty good job for herself because of her, um, talents. Between the setting and the fantastic character in Mooney, I didn't want this particular narrative to end. Scott Nicholson wrote HEARTSICK, a short I wasn't all that impressed with. Loved the lore of the Raven Mockers that would eat people's hearts but the characters were a bit too stereotypical heehaws for my liking. James A. Moore added STALKING ANNA LEI which had a not-so-appealing vampire (something kind of cat-like) but a great plot. A brother is on a mission to find his sister who he thinks was kidnapped by an ogre-looking vampire. Except this nasty vampire is leaving a blood trail that points right back to the MC. Definitely suspenseful and an author that's rather unforgiving with his characters. I liked it. Keith RA Decandido wrote THE BALLAD OF BIG CHARLIE which deviated from the truer vampire line just a bit to add in shapeshifters. Charlie is a Bronx DA who also happens to be a werewolf. This is the story that, for me, really zeros in on something more political in terms of equality. Is Charlie even human anymore? Should he be allowed out of the house? Is he safe? Obvious parallels to society's current issues with gay people and their rights, or minorities, or any people in adversity really. It takes place an extended amount of time after the zero event so society has had a chance to thoroughly react to the issue and polarize itself. I normally don't like moralizing but I was okay with it here. It didn't seem contrived and fit really well with the story as a whole. This one probably came in a solid number three from the top for me. And last but not least Gregory Frost wrote VULPES about a Romanian scientist getting exposed to the virus in Antarctica but it doesn't go where you think it might go considering her home (as people's mutations depend on their heritage). She is actually the antithesis to the vampires, a protector of mankind. A great way to end the book, really. Her line of mutation is the medicine for the vampire virus. It's not pretty but with the "bad" mutations come the "good" ones that'll help protect society. With the ridiculous mix of vampire lore going on in V WARS, there is definitely something for every vampire lover in here. From the scientific aspect (which I found believable) to the emergence of little known vampire species (and the authors' willingness to deviate from the beaten and cliched path) and the various effects it has on the world, V WARS kept me entertained from beginning to end. This is a serious Christmas gift for at least a couple of my die hard vampire-loving friends. And I'm not talking about Twihards either. They can stuff it. These vamps would devour Edward whole, pound his granite glitter skin into eyeshadow and hand it out at strip clubs.

  10. 5 out of 5

    El_Commutador

    3.5 *, actually.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. **** SPOILER ALERT **** Some story details will be mentioned below. If you rather read the book without any previews, please back out of this review. First, if you look at the title and think of Max Brooks' World War Z, please go easy finding parallels connections between the two books. There are some. The main similarity between the two books is that they both deal with regular humanity finding out that a part of it has changed enough to present a threat. In World War Z, it is zombies who in no w **** SPOILER ALERT **** Some story details will be mentioned below. If you rather read the book without any previews, please back out of this review. First, if you look at the title and think of Max Brooks' World War Z, please go easy finding parallels connections between the two books. There are some. The main similarity between the two books is that they both deal with regular humanity finding out that a part of it has changed enough to present a threat. In World War Z, it is zombies who in no way can function or blend into human society. In V Wars, it is "vampires" and shapeshifters of many variations, many of which can co-exist with humans. Another is the use of different narrators presenting the crisis from a different vantage point. Both book do that. World War Z does it extensively. V Wars uses fewer narrators. But the vantage points of World War Z are done by one author. In V Wars, several authors provide individual narrative streams. This multiple authors approaches work well for the most part. We get variety in the description of the "vampires", often with cultural/ethnic distinctiveness. Russian "wurdalaks", loup garous, Chinese hopping vampire, Hispanic variations, etc. show up. Nice. Most of the time the interleaving is consistent. But once in a while, there is glitch. For example, several times, it is mentioned that shapeshifters will retain the same mass in all their forms. But in one case, there is shapeshifter who can become larger and presumablely more massive in one of the forms. By the way, I particular like Jonathan Maberry's hand in this book. He has a great way way with descriptions and setting the mood. A significant difference between World War Z and V Wars is the scope covered of their respective "wars". Brooks cover his "war" from star to its aftermath. V Wars is open-ended, covering the beginning of a conflict and stops with plenty of openings for sequels. (Please, continue the series.) I loved this book. One linguistic quibble that doesn't detract from the storytelling: "wurdalak" is slightly inaccurate rendition of the Russian «вурдалак» vurdalak. (Russian doesn't really have "w" sound. But American pop culture tends to render Russian v's as w's. Star Trek Ensign Checkov being one example. Maybe Americans associate v's with Germans. E.g., the cliché "Ve have vays of making you talk...") But this my quibble as a Russian language student.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Pam

    I received this book from NetGalley and IDW Publishing for a honest review. This book is a collection of stories by different authors that have to do with the V wars. Each author adds their own spin on these vampires that are taking over the world. A virus escapes the ice and soon begins to turn people into vampires, but each person is different. It all depends on what kind of heritage you have as to what kind of vampire you will be. The end of human kind may be upon us in this fascinating book, I received this book from NetGalley and IDW Publishing for a honest review. This book is a collection of stories by different authors that have to do with the V wars. Each author adds their own spin on these vampires that are taking over the world. A virus escapes the ice and soon begins to turn people into vampires, but each person is different. It all depends on what kind of heritage you have as to what kind of vampire you will be. The end of human kind may be upon us in this fascinating book, but can the werewolves save us. I really enjoyed each authors story. They all tie in so well with each other you have to believe they all sat down together to write this. It is a new way for vampires to emerge from books and one that is truly amazing. I never thought that vampires may not be just bloodsuckers or picky eaters. I love how each author gave their version of vampires but still kept it all flowing so neatly. If you love vampires pick this one up. It won't let you down.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Drucilla

    Actual rating: 1.5 stars. I had hoped this would be more like World War Z. You know, in a documentary format after the war had happened, but this was an anthology of people's stories as it was happening. I know I'm describing it weird, but it felt like all of these stories were building up to the war promised in the title and it just cuts off. It also didn't help that I didn't really care for any of the people in the stories. I will say I thought it was cool how what type of vampire you turned i Actual rating: 1.5 stars. I had hoped this would be more like World War Z. You know, in a documentary format after the war had happened, but this was an anthology of people's stories as it was happening. I know I'm describing it weird, but it felt like all of these stories were building up to the war promised in the title and it just cuts off. It also didn't help that I didn't really care for any of the people in the stories. I will say I thought it was cool how what type of vampire you turned into was based on your ethnic origins. It made me look up the vampires of my cultural background.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Alondra Miller

    3.5 Stars 4.5 Stars for Jonathan Maberry - Junk, and Keith RA Candido for The Ballad of Big Charlie. V-Wars is basically a compilation of inter-connecting 'accounts' of how the Vampire-virus started. Some accounts are better than others. If not for the two authors listed above, this book would have received a 2.5 at best. The other stories were enjoyable to a point, just not all that interesting. Jonathan Maberry knows how to write, so I really loved Junk; besides, I am a fan because i know I get 3.5 Stars 4.5 Stars for Jonathan Maberry - Junk, and Keith RA Candido for The Ballad of Big Charlie. V-Wars is basically a compilation of inter-connecting 'accounts' of how the Vampire-virus started. Some accounts are better than others. If not for the two authors listed above, this book would have received a 2.5 at best. The other stories were enjoyable to a point, just not all that interesting. Jonathan Maberry knows how to write, so I really loved Junk; besides, I am a fan because i know I get good story from him. Read, but read without blinders.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Marc-Antoine

    For those expecting war world z, look elsewhere, but if your looking for an original take on the vampire legends, and a mish mash of great fun to read stories, this is for you.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Christina

    I am just going to begin any review of a book by Jonathan Maberry with the disclosure that I am a bit biased. I absolutely loved the Benny Imura series (Rot & Ruin) and even though the Joe Ledger series is not my genre, I did give Patient Zero a high score because Maberry's writing is phenomenal and if it was one of my preferred genres, it would have rated high. If V-Wars had been written by just Jonathan Maberry, I would have given it 5 stars. The description states- For readers who enjoyed World I am just going to begin any review of a book by Jonathan Maberry with the disclosure that I am a bit biased. I absolutely loved the Benny Imura series (Rot & Ruin) and even though the Joe Ledger series is not my genre, I did give Patient Zero a high score because Maberry's writing is phenomenal and if it was one of my preferred genres, it would have rated high. If V-Wars had been written by just Jonathan Maberry, I would have given it 5 stars. The description states- For readers who enjoyed World War Z and Robopocalypse, along with two other books I have not yet read. I enjoyed both WWZ and Robopocalypse immensely, in fact the former made my top ten list. However, I know a lot of people had a difficult time with WWZ and Robopocalypse got mixed reviews from those I know who read it. In addition, there are a couple of major differences between those and V-Wars. WWZ comes across as a documentary. It is a series of interviews. V-Wars is not. It is straight up fiction. Robopocalypse is sequential. V-Wars is not. It jumps back and forth in time. Probably the major similarity is that V-Wars is also told from different points of view, but each point of view is written by a different author. This is the first time I have attempted such a book and aside from one or two issues, I really enjoyed it. In fact, I will eventually look up works by the other authors. Now to the story. V-Wars tells the events of vampires emerging, or re-emerging, into society. I know what you are thinking... The vampire thing has been so overdone, how could any vampire story be different? Trust me, this one is. Okay, I am guessing. I haven't read all vampire novels ever written, but I think this really is a new take. First, the premise is everyone carries the vampire gene; it's just inactive. Second, there are different types of vampires. Numerous in fact, based on ethnicity, even region. That was a stroke of genius, in my opinion. How many different legends have you heard about vampires? Maybe there is a reason for that and it doesn't have anything to do with inconsistency. If there are all kinds of different people with varying physical attributes, personalities and abilities, why wouldn't logic dictate that vampires would be the same? I'm not going to get too much into the story. I think those two details are enough to tempt you. If you enjoy vampire novels, I am confident you will enjoy V-Wars. And by the way, I really like the Twilight jab and the Eliot Spitzer reference. Or should I say Carlos Danger? I will never be able to hear Spitzer's name again without thinking of John Oliver's Carlos Danger bit. I actually downloaded a ringtone. Now to a few of my issues... Keith R.A. DeCandido and Big Charlie I loved the story about Big Charlie. My biggest issue is in chapter 6 when DeCandido portrays a fanatically fundamental religious group. I'll give you one guess what 'ethnic' group they belong to- that's right, they are from Iowa- backwoods, inbred hicks because ALL religious fanatics are white country folk who work farms, were fed Mountain Dew in their baby bottles and play banjoes. And just to be true to the stereotype, DeCandido attempts to reproduce their unique vernacular. For example, he uses y'see about a dozen times in the few pages of the pastor's speech and he ends -ing words with -in'. This reminded me of a high school classmate who said all you have to do to speak Spanish is add an o to the end of every word. Unfortunately, DeCandido is inconsistent. I started marking the -ing words that were not altered. Someone who really speaks that way, does not mix it up. Big Charlie's scene takes place in the Bronx. Where is the attempt to reproduce that accent? If he had written other sections, would he have attempted to reproduce other accents? I doubt it. But country bumpkins are fair game, right? Because there are no other types of religious fanatics to be found in the United States. And all religious fanatics speak that way. Everybody knows that. Like I said, I really enjoyed the story, but this type of inconsistency and yes, hypocrisy, drives me nuts. It perpetuates the stereotype that all country people are uneducated, illiterate and racist. Just as he did not include the numerous 'uh's that seem to be prevalent in a lot of speech today, there was no need to do the whole hick vernacular thing; DeCandido still would have made his point by writing normally. Scott Nicholson and Heartsick Again with the stupid hicks. What the hell? Now in all fairness, Nicholson doesn't make the mistake of attempting a stereotypical accent, but he makes the lead male character a dyslexic, racist, misogynistic, wife-beating, high school dropout: In a way, women were like Injuns, always wanting a little more than they were due, or else expecting equal treatment when they surely didn't deserve it. p191 Artus thought she talked pretty good for a Jap... p186 Really? Again, because only white country bumpkins are wife-beating, misogynistic, high school dropouts. You never find any of those in the inner cities. I loved this particular short story even though it is not an ongoing storyline, and the twist at the end was wonderful. But can we please give the poor country folk bashing a rest? It really becomes quite tedious after a while. Editing Who edited this? There are a lot of editing, or maybe more accurately, proofreading issues. Some sections seem to be worse than others. I didn't notice quite as many in Maberry's sections as I did in others. So did each author use his or her own editor? I couldn't find that info in the ebook but I did order a hardcover copy, so I'll check to see if it is only the ebook, although based on the errors, I am guessing it is not. I don't usually mention editing unless it is distracting. It was. There were periods missing after sentences. There were spaces missing, combining two words. Sometimes there was an extra word, i.e. 'She was just was standing there.' That is just an example by the way, not an actual quote. However, unless that is one of your things, it probably will not make a difference in whether or not you like the book. The story really is that good. Bottom line, I highly recommend V-Wars.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Reading is my Escape

    In this universe, people become supernatural creatures as a result of activated "junk DNA." The form an individual takes is based on their heritage. People become werewolves, creatures like snakes, vampires, etc. Each chapter in the book follows a different group of people on different fronts of the Vampire Wars. I enjoyed listening to this book and the different narrators all were excellent. Despite being written by different authors, the stories create a cohesive universe. Very well done. I did In this universe, people become supernatural creatures as a result of activated "junk DNA." The form an individual takes is based on their heritage. People become werewolves, creatures like snakes, vampires, etc. Each chapter in the book follows a different group of people on different fronts of the Vampire Wars. I enjoyed listening to this book and the different narrators all were excellent. Despite being written by different authors, the stories create a cohesive universe. Very well done. I didn't realize this was the first in a series before I started this. I think I will listen to the next one, but I'm not sure when yet.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Myriam

    Meh. I was hoping for something like World War Z but with Vampires. What I got was loosely connected stories that were way to impressed with their main characters and didn't get into the worlbuilding enough to keep me interested. Too bad. Meh. I was hoping for something like World War Z but with Vampires. What I got was loosely connected stories that were way to impressed with their main characters and didn't get into the worlbuilding enough to keep me interested. Too bad.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Zenda

    I enjoyed this collection. As with any anthology, there were some stories I liked more than others, some characters were more fun to read than others. I think Maberry did a good job tying them all together.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Nona

    Here's the thing: I like horror fiction, and the bulk of horror fiction being published these days is about zombies, so even though I'm not a huge fan of zombies, I'm going to end up reading about them. But given a choice between a zombie apocalypse and a vampire apocalypse, I'm going to pick the fangs every time. So I was pretty excited when I first heard about this book. While Jonathan Maberry is probably most strongly associated with the kind of zombie fiction that's more like action-adventur Here's the thing: I like horror fiction, and the bulk of horror fiction being published these days is about zombies, so even though I'm not a huge fan of zombies, I'm going to end up reading about them. But given a choice between a zombie apocalypse and a vampire apocalypse, I'm going to pick the fangs every time. So I was pretty excited when I first heard about this book. While Jonathan Maberry is probably most strongly associated with the kind of zombie fiction that's more like action-adventure than horror, he also wrote a story called "Family Business" (anthologized in The New Dead: A Zombie Anthology) that really impressed me. There are some things I really liked about this book. The book itself is quite nice, with heavy (though a tad bright) stock and the dust jacket graphics reproduced on the binding. In an era where books seem to be more cheaply made every year I have to give kudos to IDW. As they are mostly a comics publisher I would imagine they are used to working with higher quality materials, but I still appreciate it. While several authors contributed to this volume it is in a shared world, with a plot device that makes for a very multicultural approach, which a few of the writers did take advantage of. It's just a shame that the roster of writers here doesn't reflect any of that cultural diversity. Overall though, there's nothing in the storytelling itself that particularly stands out. Most of it is from the point of view of the newly changed, with a range of predictable emotional responses. The quality of the writing is decent enough, but it just didn't touch me. Overall, I'm glad I bought a used copy. It's possible that I'm an old fuddy-duddy who will think everything falls short of what is for me the vampire apocalypse gold standard, the HWA anthology Under the Fang. Those writers were not restricted by a shared world, and while not every story hit it out the park, several did. Outside of that anthology F. Paul Wilson also wrote a great vampire apocalypse story, "Midnight Mass", but then he expanded it to novel-length, and the best parts of the story were relegated to the sidelines. And he did NOT make up for that with DRACULAS. But I like to remain hopeful.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Audrey

    I've stated before that I love me some vampires. Especially scary vampires. Jonathan Maberry is also one of my favorite horror authors currently writing, so when I saw this book by Maberry, with contributions by other writers I enjoy, like Nancy Holder and John Everson, I knew it was a must-read. I'm glad to report that my instincts were dead-on. This book is great, and so much fun. The structure of the anthology is one of the best I've seen in a multi-author book. Each writer is allowed to have I've stated before that I love me some vampires. Especially scary vampires. Jonathan Maberry is also one of my favorite horror authors currently writing, so when I saw this book by Maberry, with contributions by other writers I enjoy, like Nancy Holder and John Everson, I knew it was a must-read. I'm glad to report that my instincts were dead-on. This book is great, and so much fun. The structure of the anthology is one of the best I've seen in a multi-author book. Each writer is allowed to have his or her own style and story, but all of the stories relate back to the larger work by Maberry and weave in elements and characters of his tale. Maberry writes in his signature style: the events leading up to a supernatural crisis, with medical and military storylines playing a large role in his plot. He breaks the events into chunks, giving us the countdown to, and time elapsed after, the V event. The other stories are sandwiched between Maberry's overarching narrative, so we know that we'll always come back to that central plot. None of the stories here are weak. Each author has a strength and unique voice, and those add up to a rich experience. Readers see the Vampire Wars as they play out across the country, and even around the world: on the talk show circuit, along the Mexican-American border, on an Indian reservation, in the Bronx, in Chinese gangs, in the backwoods, and in Europe. I think what I appreciated best about the world building is the way that a multiplicity of vampire archetypes are at play here. This is really a vampire aficionado's dream. Vampires run the gamut of classic western vamps, to flesh-eaters, to psychic vampires, and everything in between. They're called by their cultural names, and are even sometimes pitted against one another. Anyone who enjoys vampire horror from Carmilla through Anne Rice (maybe not Twilight fans so much) is sure to have a great time with this book.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Delaine Youngblood

    A group of related short stories chronicling the beginning of the V Wars, this collection chooses to tell the tale through the points of view of several characters. The melting of the polar ice caps has released a virus that can activate "junk DNA" to change the carriers into a variety of vampires, werewolves, and other previously believed to be mythological creatures. While the idea of these changes hardening back to long ago folklore is intriguing, the format of the book is needlessly complex. A group of related short stories chronicling the beginning of the V Wars, this collection chooses to tell the tale through the points of view of several characters. The melting of the polar ice caps has released a virus that can activate "junk DNA" to change the carriers into a variety of vampires, werewolves, and other previously believed to be mythological creatures. While the idea of these changes hardening back to long ago folklore is intriguing, the format of the book is needlessly complex. The short stories are broken into pieces that interweave. These breaks, however, add nothing to the story itself. The storyline written by the author is incredibly inventive. I found that I simply wanted to read that story in its entirety. I am a fan of unusual formatting and even framing concepts in novels, but I feel interweaving stories must serve a purpose. I listened to the shorts stories which were read by various readers, some much more melodious than others. Two of the readers were so good that I found that I was always upset when their stories were interrupted by other short stories.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Inglee-Richards

    I have to say I grew up with shared universe books and so I was happy to see one that included so many of my favorite authors. I was not disappointed in the least. I’m looking forward to a follow up.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Spencer

    V-Wars is a collection of stories by a handful of authors, they are all of a shared universe and tell parts of a larger story. An ancient virus is unleashed turning many into vampires, although what kind of vampire depends on your ancestry. The idea is pretty cool and works quite well… unfortunately the stories vary massively in quality. Some were engaging and a lot of fun while others were as interesting as watching a presentation on the history of cement whilst hungover. Because of this I’ll o V-Wars is a collection of stories by a handful of authors, they are all of a shared universe and tell parts of a larger story. An ancient virus is unleashed turning many into vampires, although what kind of vampire depends on your ancestry. The idea is pretty cool and works quite well… unfortunately the stories vary massively in quality. Some were engaging and a lot of fun while others were as interesting as watching a presentation on the history of cement whilst hungover. Because of this I’ll only give the book 3 stars but I would like to check out more in this series to see where they go from here.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sharon Bidwell

    Jonathan Maberry while best know for his Young Adult zombies book also writes for adults and proves he’s capable of handling the vampire genre. I started this because the series in production. The thing to stand out instantly for me was I’ve never seen a multi-authored book arranged in this manner with the stories broken up into parts and a sliding timeline. I can easily see why and how this has been adapted for television.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Marielle

    I’ve given this book a mild 4 star rating, because admittedly, it was VERY hard for me to get through. At times I simply wanted to skip to Jonathan Maberry’s own chapters as the others often felt slow. I do very much like everyone’s approach to vampirism and the different types they included within the book. Definitely curious to see what they’ll make of this in the Netflix series.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Antonio Villegas

    The thing about any type of anthology series written by various authors is... they are all really hit or miss and you may love a story and writing style of one author but be bored out of your mind by another. That’s how it was for me with V wars. About 50/50. Some stories/perspectives were engaging to me while others bored me to the point of deciding to not venture further into the sequels at this time. Maybe one day. But not today. In its entirety It was just OK.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Terry

    The sex scenes are a bit more graphic than I prefer in my books but it isn't super prevalent. Love the different nationalities having their own form of vampire and weres. The sex scenes are a bit more graphic than I prefer in my books but it isn't super prevalent. Love the different nationalities having their own form of vampire and weres.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Tarl

    This was an odd reading experience for me. I had picked this anthology up as part of a sale on a whim. I really had no interest in it from the bland cover to the lackluster blurb on the back. But, due to the excellent price as well as the fact that I wanted something with vampires to read, I decided give it a go. Starting off, I wasn't impressed. Looking back, I believe it was because I had expected a certain something from the book that wasn't there. The stories seemed lacking, the characters un This was an odd reading experience for me. I had picked this anthology up as part of a sale on a whim. I really had no interest in it from the bland cover to the lackluster blurb on the back. But, due to the excellent price as well as the fact that I wanted something with vampires to read, I decided give it a go. Starting off, I wasn't impressed. Looking back, I believe it was because I had expected a certain something from the book that wasn't there. The stories seemed lacking, the characters uninteresting. But I kept reading because I don't like giving up on books, and the formatting of this anthology intrigued me. And that's one of the interesting things about V-WarsYou have multiple stories by different authors that are broken up into parts which are then scattered around in the novel. So while you may start off with say, Junk pt 1, you will then move onto another story and eventually come back to parts 2, 3, etc of Junk later on. It makes for an interesting mix of stories and keeps the subject matter fresh in the reader's mind. About a third of the way through the anthology, I realized this wasn't the anthology I had thought I had purchased. Instead, it was something different, and more so, something amazingly creative. Not only are the writers really good at their craft, but unlike pretty much every vampire novel out there, this one dealt with a large variety of vampires. No two stories are alike in the vampire they represent, and with each breed comes a different story about the person who turned. And best of all, there is an over-arching plot of mankind reacting (poorly) to the sudden appearance of the vampires/werewolves. When I finally closed this book, I was excited, fulfilled, and wishing there was more. I want to go back and reread the book with my newfound understanding of the anthology and to actually enjoy the book as it should have been when I first opened it. Maberry has brought together something amazing here. It's unique, in both subject and formatting. The writing is excellent and enjoyable. At no point do any of the stories actually fall flat. Instead they build to the final climactic story where the full horror of the situation is revealed. It made me wonder what it would be like to be part of that world, and where my own morality would lay with the virus and its victims. I definitely recommend picking this book up. Don't go into it expecting World War Z, because it's not, and nowhere does it come across as being the same kind of book. Rather, it's a different take all together on an outbreak situation, and one that is distinct in a genre full of generic vampires. It's worth every penny, and I feel bad that I actually paid a sale price for it rather than full. Well worth every penny. So if you are looking for werewolf/vampire fiction that is fresh, this is it!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Cassandra

    --Full, non-spoiler review courtesy at Book & Movie Dimension a Blog-- Vampire stories are widespread but really the question is whether or not to read them. There has to be no question on their originality take and involving characters. V Wars is a vampire novel. Albeit honestly a humongously original one at that. Michael Fayne labeled patient zero in our modern world in V Wars happens to be the first individual to contract what many politicians and doctors as well as psychiatrists call the I1VI --Full, non-spoiler review courtesy at Book & Movie Dimension a Blog-- Vampire stories are widespread but really the question is whether or not to read them. There has to be no question on their originality take and involving characters. V Wars is a vampire novel. Albeit honestly a humongously original one at that. Michael Fayne labeled patient zero in our modern world in V Wars happens to be the first individual to contract what many politicians and doctors as well as psychiatrists call the I1VI virus-Vampire virus- and now he's known as the first vampire. We are thrown into Michael's world of while at first apparent normalcy becomes quickly discord. In blackouts, he happens to slaughter women in moments of close encounters. Letting it go on longer without knowing what is going on he also infects others from a far. That is how V Wars is built up. The changing of stories and narration of other people that have contracted the virus as well are featured too. Get this though there are many types of vampires. Some of which we are repugnant fur balls and other cadaver-looking people. Vampires are based on how a person may perceive vampires and also by the genetic origins (culture) that people come from. So we have a difference in vampire species with many much like ethnicity. The V Wars premise overall is that they the vampires are hunting us. The vampires aren't the only ones waging war in hunting.Werewolves emerge too and thankfully they are not hunting us. In the end, the extermination of the human race relies perhaps on whether we can actually consent to some truce between humans and vampires considering they are much stronger than us. V Wars had quite an intense angle because it actually had the entirety of the novel built on input from various authors who will, of course, bring a fresh take on things on vampire and werewolf characteristics. Its a mix of distinctive styles of writing which comes together seamlessly. Many readers will surely find stories or a story that they at least favor. Not only that but in general V Wars had quite an amusing tenor in its conclusion that a reader will no doubt find to their liking. V Wars has some nods to 30 Days of Night and the prestige of being all of its own a collaboration of authors who managed to create something utterly fantastic. Overall: Amazing read! Genre: Vampires, Werewolves, Horror

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