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Writers of the Future Volume 28

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Your passage to unforgettable worlds of imagination and escape. Discover the new visionaries of imagination in the Writers of the Future. Established in 1983 by L. Ron Hubbard expressly for the aspiring writer, Writers of the Future has become the most respected and significant forum for new talent in all aspects of speculative fiction. Never before published first-rate sc Your passage to unforgettable worlds of imagination and escape. Discover the new visionaries of imagination in the Writers of the Future. Established in 1983 by L. Ron Hubbard expressly for the aspiring writer, Writers of the Future has become the most respected and significant forum for new talent in all aspects of speculative fiction. Never before published first-rate science fiction and fantasy stories selected by top names in the field. "The offerings are thought provoking and varied, with a general trend towards excellence...The future is in good hands." −Publishers Weekly


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Your passage to unforgettable worlds of imagination and escape. Discover the new visionaries of imagination in the Writers of the Future. Established in 1983 by L. Ron Hubbard expressly for the aspiring writer, Writers of the Future has become the most respected and significant forum for new talent in all aspects of speculative fiction. Never before published first-rate sc Your passage to unforgettable worlds of imagination and escape. Discover the new visionaries of imagination in the Writers of the Future. Established in 1983 by L. Ron Hubbard expressly for the aspiring writer, Writers of the Future has become the most respected and significant forum for new talent in all aspects of speculative fiction. Never before published first-rate science fiction and fantasy stories selected by top names in the field. "The offerings are thought provoking and varied, with a general trend towards excellence...The future is in good hands." −Publishers Weekly

30 review for Writers of the Future Volume 28

  1. 4 out of 5

    Cissa

    This is the first time I've read one of these anthologies- I can see I've been missing out! No bad stories here, though some were more polished than others. To mention a few: "The Siren" by M.O. Muriel was truly weird and surreal; nicely paced, though, as our understanding of what was going on tracked the events quite tightly. "Contact Authority" by William Mitchell was a good first-contact story with a twist. Nicely done in the first-contact aspects, and the galactic ramifications were interesting This is the first time I've read one of these anthologies- I can see I've been missing out! No bad stories here, though some were more polished than others. To mention a few: "The Siren" by M.O. Muriel was truly weird and surreal; nicely paced, though, as our understanding of what was going on tracked the events quite tightly. "Contact Authority" by William Mitchell was a good first-contact story with a twist. Nicely done in the first-contact aspects, and the galactic ramifications were interesting and well-thought-out. I'm not sure what to think about "My Name is Angela" (Harry Lang), except that it will stay with me for quite a while. it was an intense and compelling read. These stories were the high points for me, though I did enjoy several of the others. A few of them, though, were pretty predictable- "The Command for Love" by Nick T. Chan, for example, and the first 2 stories. And "While Ireland Holds These graves" by Tom Doyle just never really came together; I think there was too much world background needed, and not enough was included. Unfortunately, we only get to see small grayscale versions of the winning illustrator's work, and that's really not enough to make any informed opinions on it- color would make such a difference! This MMPB is also ungainly- it is too big to even open comfortably without cracking the spine, and a number of the pages had printing so close to the binding that it was difficult to read. If one really must make such a huge MMPB, being careful to have sufficient margins toward the spine is vital to keep it readable. I appreciate all the effort that went into writing and collecting these stories and illustrations, and for the most part I enjoyed this collection more than most anthologies i read.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Janet

    The latest collection by L. Ron Hubbard, Writers of the Future 28 was a book I had been anticipating reading and it did not disappoint. I am a huge fan of the short story and novella, and this anthology ran the gamut from what I consider to be hardcore sci-fi to fantasy. My Favorites: Of Woven Wood, by Marie Croke A beautifully written story about a "wooden man". Sort of a twist on a Pinocchio theme, this story shows us that things are not always what they seem. Fast Draw, by Roy Hardin I really lik The latest collection by L. Ron Hubbard, Writers of the Future 28 was a book I had been anticipating reading and it did not disappoint. I am a huge fan of the short story and novella, and this anthology ran the gamut from what I consider to be hardcore sci-fi to fantasy. My Favorites: Of Woven Wood, by Marie Croke A beautifully written story about a "wooden man". Sort of a twist on a Pinocchio theme, this story shows us that things are not always what they seem. Fast Draw, by Roy Hardin I really liked the time differences and the way the scene played out. My Name is Angela, by Harry Lang. A story about clones who dare to believe that they might become human. The Poly Islands, by Gerald Warfield The poly islands are formed by all the pollution and trash we have thrown in the ocean over the years. Would that this were real, it would solve a lot of problems. Insect Sculptor, by Scott T. Barnes My favorite story in the collection, this story is based on insect technology - what would happen if we could control the insect mind. Rather than make war, this story makes art. All the stories come with illustrations from up-and-coming artists, and there are two "how-to" stories added for good measure. If you are a sci-fi or fantasy fan, I highly recommend this book. *I received the book for free through Goodreads First Reads.

  3. 4 out of 5

    James Mourgos

    First Impression: The Writers of the Future enters its 28th and perhaps its largest volume to date, boasting 586 pages! I’ve been collecting these paperbacks since 1986 and it never ceased to amaze me the opportunity for new writers to get published, often for the first time. These volumes also have famous names as judges – a partial list: Mike Resnick, Robert J. Sawyer, Fredrick Pohl, and Robert Silverberg – all giants in the science fiction/fantasy field. And there’s an illustrator’s contest as First Impression: The Writers of the Future enters its 28th and perhaps its largest volume to date, boasting 586 pages! I’ve been collecting these paperbacks since 1986 and it never ceased to amaze me the opportunity for new writers to get published, often for the first time. These volumes also have famous names as judges – a partial list: Mike Resnick, Robert J. Sawyer, Fredrick Pohl, and Robert Silverberg – all giants in the science fiction/fantasy field. And there’s an illustrator’s contest as well, such judges as Robert Castillo and Diane Dillion checking out the illustrations. As with any anthology, some of the writers fall on their face and that’s really too bad. I can see the potential and hope that they will continue to write. Others do well and will probably move on to bigger and better things. Do we have another Kevin J. Anderson or Kristine Kathryn Rusch here? Stories: It would be tedious to review every single story in this big volume. I will say that many of the tales were of androids/robots/artificial intelligences. Some made of woven wood, some even made of intelligent insects! Mary Croke’s “Of Woven Wood” was a fun read. Lan, an artificial intelligence, keeping track of the laboratory experiments of Haigh, his creator. Except that Haigh is dead! The mystery of his death is secondary to the true nature of Lan, the mysterious past of his creator and the Queen, who has some involvement as she demands what she perceives was “stolen” from her by Haigh. Interesting fantasy. I really liked William Ledbetter’s “Rings of Mars.” A man discovers intelligent constructs on Mars, except he wants to keep it to himself, afraid that the corporation who hired him will turn it into a Martian Disneyland rather than a valuable treasure of knowledge for Man. It is a story of Malcolm and Jack and how their friendship is strained as they both struggle with what they feel is just, yet their friendship is important too. Great hard science fiction here. And Harry Lang’s “My Name is Angela,” in a society where clones have been created to take care of the menial tasks so that humans can rise to greater heights. A modern-day slavery tale, actually. And a criticism on our educational system. Angela is supposed to just watch the malcontented fourth graders but she discovers through the “Soul Man” that she has a soul (he reprograms her) and she teaches the kids French and regrets beating her husband with a hot iron! She grows a conscience but the draconian society fears this and handles it. Quite a morality tale! Bottom Line: Some stories did not do it for me – slow starts, coming into the middle and not building characterization or using unnecessary ten dollar words to describe things. Quite a mess, but that’s to be expected in amateur writing. Nevertheless, great little collection – also articles from L. Ron Hubbard and Kristin Katherine Rusch on the art of the short story and the importance of researching a story to make it fly, and Roy Hardin’s advice to new artists in “Fast Draw.”

  4. 4 out of 5

    Donald

    This is the first Goodreads Giveaway title I received for 2013. It came in a red foil wrapper so fetching to the eye that I left it unopened for a while, displayed like a forgotten Christmas gift on my desk. It's thick, nearly 600 pages thick. This should be fun. It was a great read. There are thirteen stories here of varying length and ability, an introduction, and several essays on writing and illustration, as well as an illustration accompanying each story. The illustrations helped bring the st This is the first Goodreads Giveaway title I received for 2013. It came in a red foil wrapper so fetching to the eye that I left it unopened for a while, displayed like a forgotten Christmas gift on my desk. It's thick, nearly 600 pages thick. This should be fun. It was a great read. There are thirteen stories here of varying length and ability, an introduction, and several essays on writing and illustration, as well as an illustration accompanying each story. The illustrations helped bring the story they depicted to life. Who doesn't like a picture with their story now and then? Of the stories presented, several stood out. My Name Is Angela shows a measure of humanity where none—by design—should be present. Yet this clone gradually awakens to the idea of having a soul which is considered the very essence of being human. She rises to her understanding of self, bring her charges with her much to the chagrin of her superiors. She was really meant to be a babysitter, not a teacher. So she is retired. Of Woven Wood is a story of trust. An alchemist manufactures a helper. The helper outlives his maker. The helper is compartmentalized, holding many things in drawers and such. One of those things might have been a small boy's soul. That soul may have become the helper's as well. Insect Sculptor is probably the most bizarre story of the bunch. Yet it is made less improbable in the hands of Scott T. Barnes. It is a tale of the successful passing of the torch. In this, the illusion is maintained for another generation. The rest of the stories were great reads as well. I didn't skip over a single one. Thanks to all for some great entertainment.

  5. 5 out of 5

    J

    The cover calls this "The Best New Science Fiction and Fantasy of the Year". They all say that. But this one fits the bill. If you are looking for new sci-fi or a favorite new author, this might be just what you need to read. My personal favorite was "The Siren" by M P Muriel. What's yours? My only complaint is that the print was small, making it hard on my eyes. I need to see if these books come in Large Print versions ... The cover calls this "The Best New Science Fiction and Fantasy of the Year". They all say that. But this one fits the bill. If you are looking for new sci-fi or a favorite new author, this might be just what you need to read. My personal favorite was "The Siren" by M P Muriel. What's yours? My only complaint is that the print was small, making it hard on my eyes. I need to see if these books come in Large Print versions ...

  6. 5 out of 5

    D.A. D’Amico

    Fantastic

  7. 5 out of 5

    Andy

    Really liked a lot of stories in here

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kasey Jane

    My only regret is that I didn't learn about this excellent collection of short stories and illustrations earlier. The Writers of the Future anthologies are compilations of each year's rising stars in science fiction and fantasy as chosen by established greats (many of whom were previous Writers of the Future winners). This volume contains several unique and engrossing stories covering topics like alchemy, space exploration, and artificial intelligence. Some of my favorites are detailed below. Awe My only regret is that I didn't learn about this excellent collection of short stories and illustrations earlier. The Writers of the Future anthologies are compilations of each year's rising stars in science fiction and fantasy as chosen by established greats (many of whom were previous Writers of the Future winners). This volume contains several unique and engrossing stories covering topics like alchemy, space exploration, and artificial intelligence. Some of my favorites are detailed below. Awesome Alien Worlds The Siren by M.O. Muriel As a lifelong comic book fan, this story was immensely appealing. Muriel puts a new spin on the old trope of a ragtag group of vigilantes protecting humanity against a nigh-invulnerable foe. Without giving away too much, Muriel's take makes for a story much more interesting in its implications than the straightforward good v. evil of comics. Shutdown by Corry L. Lee Of the three stories in my "Awesome Alien Worlds" category, this is the only one that actually takes place on an alien world. The planet Helinski Five and the life of a for-profit soldier are equal parts surreal and gritty: think modern military versus Lovecraftian horror. The protagonist, Adanna Amaechi, is the most interesting character in the entire volume. Unfortunately, it seems like Lee intended to write a larger story and then changed her mind -- the middle and end seem rushed compared to the story's setup. The Poly Islands by Gerald Warfield This reminded me so much of Antarctica by Kim Stanley Robinson, and that's a good thing! Warfield evokes the haunting beauty and weirdness of life on the planet Earth so well that it seems like an alien landscape. His story is well paced and its politics interesting. The Darker Side My Name is Angela by Harry Lang Like many readers, this story really stood out to me. Angela, the protagonist, is a clone who wishes for humanity in a world where she is viewed as significantly less than human. I don't really know what to say about it, other than it is haunting. Lost Pine by Jacob A. Boyd I'm a fan of dystopian books, but I can't stand a lot of the dystopian YA that's been written in the last ten years or so. Thankfully, Boyd writes a dystopian story with a teenaged protagonist that is nuanced and truly chilling. The protagonist's mental degradation and general chaos of a rudderless civilization kept me from guessing the story's major plot twist. Divorce Mode Insect Sculptor by Scott T. Barnes So my partner is deeply entomophobic. I convinced him to leave our relatively bug-free apartment and spend a week backpacking in the bug-infested wilderness where all the bugs live. He was doing really well -- minimal mental breakdowns -- until I loaned him this book to read. He has talked about this story every other day since he read it, and I'm convinced that now skeptically eyes everyday objects to see if he can discern the waggle of an antenna or sheen of chitin. I don't blame him though: it's a really interesting, if mildly queasy-making, premise that Barnes executed well. I received this volume free as a Goodreads First Reads book.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Teressa Morris

    I remember when I was eleven or twelve, my parents went away for the weekend and left us with some friends, the Worthingtons. One afternoon, Mr. Worthington, knowing how much I loved to read, sent me up to the rafters in their big old barn to retrieve three big bags of paperback books. There was some parody, which I was much too young to understand, but the bulk of the titles were science fiction. Hard, pulpy science fiction. And I ate it up. I took the books home with me and read them over and I remember when I was eleven or twelve, my parents went away for the weekend and left us with some friends, the Worthingtons. One afternoon, Mr. Worthington, knowing how much I loved to read, sent me up to the rafters in their big old barn to retrieve three big bags of paperback books. There was some parody, which I was much too young to understand, but the bulk of the titles were science fiction. Hard, pulpy science fiction. And I ate it up. I took the books home with me and read them over and over again. But most science fiction was still way over the head of a twelve year old, so I put it aside. Then, when I was in college, I picked up my dad's old copy of Dune and I was hooked again. I read through every Frank Herbert, Robert Heinlein, Larry Niven. I dabbled in Anne McCaffrey and Lois McMaster Bujold. Even read a little fantasy, just to round out the diet a little. It was hard to afford such a voracious diet, epecially pre-Kindle. The local library only held a very small section of true science fiction. I was tooling around a local bbs about 22 years ago (for you youngsters, bbs stands for bulletin board system. This was pre-Internet and you would dial in to the bbs network to connect to other users. Well, one user had posted a classified ad saying that he wanted to give away his complete set (about 10 years worth) of Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine (there were some Amazings and even a few Astoundings in there as well). I thought I had died and gone to heaven. Little old pregnant me had all the reading material she could want!! Flash forward to the present and here I am with a copy of Writers of the Future Volume 28 (L. Ron Hubbard Presents Writers of the Future). It's 568 pages of science fiction bliss!! I love it like I love a buffet - so many different types of food to choose from. I can't say I enjoyed every story in the anthology, but there were a few that really stuck out. Of Woven Wood is a sweet story about a young man made entirely of wicker baskets. The Command for Love reminded me of the heartbreaking Hans Christian Andersen fairytale The Steadfast Tin Soldier. The Siren, My Name is Angela, and Insect Sculptor are all stories about the power of the human mind. Writers of the Future is a yearly contest for up and coming science fiction writers. The winners receive a cash prize as well as publication in the yearly anthology. Each story is illustrated by one of the winners of the Illustrators of the Future contest. The book also includes a few short prose pieces with helpful tips for beginning writers and illustrators. Such famous writers as Stephen Baxter and Karen Joy Fowler are past winners, and prominent judges have included Anne McCaffrey, Jerry Pournelle and Orson Scott Card.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Angie Lisle

    I avoided this series for a long time because L Ron Hubbard's religious cult scares me. Then, I received two volumes (29 and 30) in exchange for reviews. I adore short stories and this series definitely delivers high-quality stories presented by the winners of the annual Writers and Illustrators of the Future contest. Like many anthologies, there's the occasional tale that I can't get into - not because the writing is poor but because of my inability to relate to the characters or the topic. The I avoided this series for a long time because L Ron Hubbard's religious cult scares me. Then, I received two volumes (29 and 30) in exchange for reviews. I adore short stories and this series definitely delivers high-quality stories presented by the winners of the annual Writers and Illustrators of the Future contest. Like many anthologies, there's the occasional tale that I can't get into - not because the writing is poor but because of my inability to relate to the characters or the topic. There are also essays on writing and publishing - some are helpful, reminding me of handy tips and hints, and some are skimmable shameless self-promotions. But, at the end of the day, there are a lot of great writers featured here and no Scientology so I have commenced with reading the series backwards.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Zena Shapter

    I was disappointed in this volume. Probably the source of the stories set my expectations high. But the majority of the stories were difficult to get into, few caught my interest within the first pages, and that made the reading of them hard work. Only three of the thirteen stories ticked all the right boxes. These were: "Of Woven Wood" by Marie Croke "The Command For Love" by Nick T Chan "Shutdown" by Corry L Lee Each of these stories had a well-drawn character, in a detailed setting, doing somethi I was disappointed in this volume. Probably the source of the stories set my expectations high. But the majority of the stories were difficult to get into, few caught my interest within the first pages, and that made the reading of them hard work. Only three of the thirteen stories ticked all the right boxes. These were: "Of Woven Wood" by Marie Croke "The Command For Love" by Nick T Chan "Shutdown" by Corry L Lee Each of these stories had a well-drawn character, in a detailed setting, doing something interesting. Thank you Marie, Nick and Corry. Your worlds were so fascinating I could have spent more time in them, and I'd happily visit them again.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ruth

    c2012: This is the first time that I have had the pleasure of reading a L Ron Hubbard Anthology. As with any grouping of stories, there are some that evince more pleasure than others. For me, the stand out ones were The Paradise Aperture by David Carani (I have met this author!!), Shutdown by Corey L Lee and Lost Pine by Jacob A Boyd. In all three cases, the worlds and characters would probably have the required sustainability for a longer, novel-length tale. Highly recommended for the normal cr c2012: This is the first time that I have had the pleasure of reading a L Ron Hubbard Anthology. As with any grouping of stories, there are some that evince more pleasure than others. For me, the stand out ones were The Paradise Aperture by David Carani (I have met this author!!), Shutdown by Corey L Lee and Lost Pine by Jacob A Boyd. In all three cases, the worlds and characters would probably have the required sustainability for a longer, novel-length tale. Highly recommended for the normal crew.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Brittany

    Finally its on here, I've had this for months XD I really enjoyed all of these though some were way to odd for me but good none the less! The illustrations were pretty nice too! Some were gorgeous and other really cool looking! I loved meeting Roy Hardin -he is such a nice guy- at Books-A-Million while he was doing signings back in June! His short "Fast Draw" was the best to me to and I had seriously wished it had been a full novel, I hope he writes more because he is amazing!!!! Finally its on here, I've had this for months XD I really enjoyed all of these though some were way to odd for me but good none the less! The illustrations were pretty nice too! Some were gorgeous and other really cool looking! I loved meeting Roy Hardin -he is such a nice guy- at Books-A-Million while he was doing signings back in June! His short "Fast Draw" was the best to me to and I had seriously wished it had been a full novel, I hope he writes more because he is amazing!!!!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Dale

    I usually enjoy collections like this, but this time around it seemed kind of "meh". Individual stories seemed to hit a reasonable point of development, then suddenly wrap everything up like the last two minutes of an old network TV mystery series. Or maybe I was just having a bad day.... I usually enjoy collections like this, but this time around it seemed kind of "meh". Individual stories seemed to hit a reasonable point of development, then suddenly wrap everything up like the last two minutes of an old network TV mystery series. Or maybe I was just having a bad day....

  15. 5 out of 5

    JoJo Laforte

    I'm not a huge fan of anthologies but this was quite decent. I'm not a huge fan of anthologies but this was quite decent.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Amy (DemonKittie)

    *This book was won from a First Reads giveaway on goodreads.com*

  17. 4 out of 5

    AndPeggy

  18. 4 out of 5

    Susanb

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jessy May

  20. 5 out of 5

    Cody

  21. 5 out of 5

    Dharma Steed

  22. 4 out of 5

    Scott Cleveland

  23. 5 out of 5

    Bert Goodrich

  24. 4 out of 5

    David Michael Poore

  25. 4 out of 5

    Michael Fierce

  26. 5 out of 5

    Andromeda Edison

  27. 5 out of 5

    Andy Graetz

  28. 5 out of 5

    RENE T A LYSLOFF

  29. 5 out of 5

    Robert

  30. 5 out of 5

    James

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