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The Day of the Djinn Warriors

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From the NEW YORK TIMES bestselling author P. B. Kerr, comes the fourth volume in this exceptional, imaginative adventure series about a brother and sister who discover they are djinns. Djinn twins John and Philippa are off on another whirlwind adventure that takes them around the globe and into unknown worlds. And it's a race against time as they attempt to rescue their mo From the NEW YORK TIMES bestselling author P. B. Kerr, comes the fourth volume in this exceptional, imaginative adventure series about a brother and sister who discover they are djinns. Djinn twins John and Philippa are off on another whirlwind adventure that takes them around the globe and into unknown worlds. And it's a race against time as they attempt to rescue their mother from her fate as the Blue Djinn of Babylon. An aging curse has been placed on their father and if the twins are gone too long, he'll rapidly become an old man. Meanwhile, museums all over the world are reporting robberies of valuable jade from their collections, as well as bizarre hauntings.


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From the NEW YORK TIMES bestselling author P. B. Kerr, comes the fourth volume in this exceptional, imaginative adventure series about a brother and sister who discover they are djinns. Djinn twins John and Philippa are off on another whirlwind adventure that takes them around the globe and into unknown worlds. And it's a race against time as they attempt to rescue their mo From the NEW YORK TIMES bestselling author P. B. Kerr, comes the fourth volume in this exceptional, imaginative adventure series about a brother and sister who discover they are djinns. Djinn twins John and Philippa are off on another whirlwind adventure that takes them around the globe and into unknown worlds. And it's a race against time as they attempt to rescue their mother from her fate as the Blue Djinn of Babylon. An aging curse has been placed on their father and if the twins are gone too long, he'll rapidly become an old man. Meanwhile, museums all over the world are reporting robberies of valuable jade from their collections, as well as bizarre hauntings.

30 review for The Day of the Djinn Warriors

  1. 5 out of 5

    Darth J

    Blah blah blah. Another mildly interesting installment in this once promising series. Other than the convenient deus ex machina devices and back stories, the only thing that seems to connect these books is the sheer amount of really thoughtless comments made by Groanin about other cultures. I get that he's made to sound ignorant so that the children (and by extension, the audience) can learn and become cultured, but it often makes me cringe with the kind of generalizations that are made by this c Blah blah blah. Another mildly interesting installment in this once promising series. Other than the convenient deus ex machina devices and back stories, the only thing that seems to connect these books is the sheer amount of really thoughtless comments made by Groanin about other cultures. I get that he's made to sound ignorant so that the children (and by extension, the audience) can learn and become cultured, but it often makes me cringe with the kind of generalizations that are made by this character. The names of most of the side characters suffer from either being terrible puns or are completely unpronounceable. There are also about 50 of these characters throughout the series and the audience has to remember who is who and why they might need to remember them. I also have to say that throwing the word "djinn" in front of nearly everything djinn-related is just annoying at this point. "Djinnternational mail". "Djinnversonnacular tournament". "Djinn-soaked" would be a good way to describe the argot at times in this series. And yet, I continue to read these books. Why? Because I have a habit of reading the first book in a series then just ordering the rest to have so I can kinda binge read them. I probably shouldn't have with these because the character arcs are stretched and you can tell the author is running out of material. At this point, I have no clue why this needs to be a 7 book series other than to compete with the far more entertaining Harry Potter books.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Alise Anna

    I remember this series being one of my childhood favourites, but coming back to it now... it's an entirely different story. This was incredibly frustrating to read. I hated almost every character and every plot development felt like it was being forced down my throat. I really tried to finish it! But at some point, I just had to give up. Turns out that point was page 43… I. just. couldn’t. do. it. anymore. This left a bitter taste in my mouth. I had really high hopes for this series, sadly I was maj I remember this series being one of my childhood favourites, but coming back to it now... it's an entirely different story. This was incredibly frustrating to read. I hated almost every character and every plot development felt like it was being forced down my throat. I really tried to finish it! But at some point, I just had to give up. Turns out that point was page 43… I. just. couldn’t. do. it. anymore. This left a bitter taste in my mouth. I had really high hopes for this series, sadly I was majorly let down. ☹

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mateo

    Elements and style: This is the fourth book in this series. This book keeps you guessing and you keep wanting to turn the page through out the book until you finish it. It is set in New York, Babylon and Las Vegas and also in China. The protagonists are John and Phillipa Guant, their parents Mrs. and Mr. Gaunt. Nimrod, their uncle and his butler, Groanin. The antagonists are,Ifrit the head of the worst djinn tribe, his son and the warrior devils. Plot: First, Mrs. Gaunt (John and Phillipa's mo Elements and style: This is the fourth book in this series. This book keeps you guessing and you keep wanting to turn the page through out the book until you finish it. It is set in New York, Babylon and Las Vegas and also in China. The protagonists are John and Phillipa Guant, their parents Mrs. and Mr. Gaunt. Nimrod, their uncle and his butler, Groanin. The antagonists are,Ifrit the head of the worst djinn tribe, his son and the warrior devils. Plot: First, Mrs. Gaunt (John and Phillipa's mom) is going to become the blue djinn of Babylon. John and Philippa are djinn or genies and they don't want their mom to become the blue djinn because it hardens your heart so she wouldn't recognize them. To solve this problem someone has to replace her, so they decide to trade her with Fautima one of their friend's sister. But Fautima is dead, so they need to find her in the spirit world and locate her body and unite them. At the same time Fautima's brother, Dybbuck goes to a magic show and by showing off his "magic" starts a new T.V. show. But this is all apart of a plan. Eventually John, Phillipa and their uncle find the body of Fatima and by going into the spirit world, they also find Fatimas spirit and unite them. The now alive Fatima goes and takes the place of Mrs. Gaunt, who flies back to her house. John, Phillipa and Nimrod decide to go to Italy to find the tablet of command; a piece of gold that can control the terra-cotta warriors. At the same time Dybbuck creates a new episode in his magic show that somehow makes all the children watch it disappear and go into this underground pyramid. Back in Italy, Nimrod and John decide to go to the underground pyramid, which is China, and hope Phillipa gets back in time. Once John and Nimrod get to the underground pyramid they get trapped by Ifrit and his son but Phillipa comes with the tablet of command and saves them and the world. Characterization: John sometimes doesn't get along with his sister but they work well as a team. John works hard but isn't the one with the plan usually. He finds someone he likes in the story too.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Helen

    Like the other reviews said, this wasn't nearly as interesting as the other books from the series that kept me hooked throughout the entire story. I would have dropped it, had I not been stuck in an environment where I wasn't allowed to do anything but read, sleep, or die of boredom, for 6 hours. The main reason I'm giving this a low rating though, is because the Chinese was completely messed up. I know there are several ways to romanize Chinese--like "Gong Hay Fat Choy" instead of "Gong Xi Fa Ca Like the other reviews said, this wasn't nearly as interesting as the other books from the series that kept me hooked throughout the entire story. I would have dropped it, had I not been stuck in an environment where I wasn't allowed to do anything but read, sleep, or die of boredom, for 6 hours. The main reason I'm giving this a low rating though, is because the Chinese was completely messed up. I know there are several ways to romanize Chinese--like "Gong Hay Fat Choy" instead of "Gong Xi Fa Cai" (Cantonese vs. Mandarin spelling), for example, basically meaning "Happy New Year"--but the author switches back and forth throughout the whole book, which was kind of disorienting, and some of the spellings he used I don't even think are actual ways to romanize things. Many of the phrases he used made no sense either--it's clear he used something like Google Translate for his translation, and not an actual Chinese speaker. For example, using "zi" for "stop". First of all, it's "zhi", not "zi", and while it does mean "stop", no one uses it alone--it's usually used like "ting zhi". However, to tell someone to stop, people usually just use "ting". If you say "zhi" to anyone in China, I can guarantee you're going to get some weird looks. And at the "Dong Xi" part, I really wanted to slam my face on the desk as hard as I could, but alas, as I was required to stay quiet, I could not. "Dong Xi" literally means "thing". Kerr did address that "Dong Xi" means thing, but all the other translations he threw in, like "less than human"--they're true, but no one uses it that way. If you say "the Dong Xi are sucking up the souls" to someone, I am 100000% sure they're going to interpret it as "the things are sucking up the souls". Which, again, makes no sense and sounds kind of lame. And there actually is a word for zombie in Chinese. “僵尸", or "jiang shi". You can tell the author didn't spend much time on that aspect of the story. He's a pretty well-known author, does he not know a single person who speaks Chinese?

  5. 4 out of 5

    Shane

    The story its self was pretty good. A step up from book three, for sure. I can't say it was a bad book, but it had a few tragic flaws. First among these was the fact that he used a lot of mathematical formulaic type jazz(that's as well as I can describe it). In order to do that, the story had to stop for a few pages while he explained how the math worked...and then how the character figured it out. Second was the fact that he used a lot of Chinese, which had to be translated. Third was the fact t The story its self was pretty good. A step up from book three, for sure. I can't say it was a bad book, but it had a few tragic flaws. First among these was the fact that he used a lot of mathematical formulaic type jazz(that's as well as I can describe it). In order to do that, the story had to stop for a few pages while he explained how the math worked...and then how the character figured it out. Second was the fact that he used a lot of Chinese, which had to be translated. Third was the fact that he used a lot of ancient Chinese tradition and folklore, which many Westerners aren't familiar with in a story that was already heavy with Middle-Eastern folklore that Westerners aren't really familiar with. Essentially, there were a lot of places where the story stopped so that key plot elements could be explained. I hate ham-handed exposition. The story around all this gunk was pretty good, or I'd never have finished it in three days. There are better series out there. If you've made it this far, I can guarantee that you'll want to read book five. Why? Because they left some stuff WAY open ended in the last chapter. If nothing else, you just have to find out who is in which body and where.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Devlin

    Some things to consider in this book are the plot holes. If I wasn’t reading straight through from book to book, I may not have noticed how, for example, Gronnins arms that are supper strong are now down to one arm. Perhaps the author had intended only one arm to be strong but I’d think he would just go with how he played grinning in the last book. Also odd how the kids were running to a few McMuffins that suddenly helped them when they were in a bind. Just because the kids are djinn and their po Some things to consider in this book are the plot holes. If I wasn’t reading straight through from book to book, I may not have noticed how, for example, Gronnins arms that are supper strong are now down to one arm. Perhaps the author had intended only one arm to be strong but I’d think he would just go with how he played grinning in the last book. Also odd how the kids were running to a few McMuffins that suddenly helped them when they were in a bind. Just because the kids are djinn and their power affects luck shouldn’t mean they can’t just get out of a scenario by chance (which Nimrod himself said isn’t real). This includes random friends from other books just showing up. But the story was interesting to see a kind of djinn doomsday device that a Bond villain.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Hunter_cme

    A fiction story about genies and wishes.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Faith Catherine

    So far my least favorite of the series. There is so much that happens, and it's all connected by a very thin thread requiring quite a bit of suspension of disbelief. So far my least favorite of the series. There is so much that happens, and it's all connected by a very thin thread requiring quite a bit of suspension of disbelief.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Bai

    This book series is sooo funny, there have been many moments where I cannot stop laughing like when Groanin got stung by that bee. I really love how there are several funny moments in these books.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Arbaz Ahmed

    Not as good as its predecessors, but still a good fantasy story.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Pat Raab

    Love a good dose of fantasy every now and then!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Daisy

    To be honest, I wasn't all that impressed with this one. I'm starting to agree with some of the other reviews I've read: I really don't know how this series is going to drag on for another three books. The storyline didn't grip me because they seemed just to be solving some kind of vague old mystery for no reason. One of the characters did say something like: "Why are we trying to solve this mystery anyway? I just want to go home and see mom. . ." then Nimrod replied: "Because, John, old mysteri To be honest, I wasn't all that impressed with this one. I'm starting to agree with some of the other reviews I've read: I really don't know how this series is going to drag on for another three books. The storyline didn't grip me because they seemed just to be solving some kind of vague old mystery for no reason. One of the characters did say something like: "Why are we trying to solve this mystery anyway? I just want to go home and see mom. . ." then Nimrod replied: "Because, John, old mysteries like this are not to be left alone. They carry ancient and powerful magic." And I was like: "OK, so I'm reading this book because of that? They need a better reason." I think the reason I actually did persevere is because of the weird thing that was happening to Dybbuk/Jonathan Tarot. That storyline was moderately entertaining, but ended, sorry - stopped suddenly and not very well at all. (and, just one little thing - what is it with all the John/Jons in this book! I think P.B. Kerr must like that name and doesn't realize that he gives it to almost every male minor character. There was; John (main character), Jonathan (moderately main character's new name), Jon (minor character who was somebody's hairdresser), John (some author one of the characters mentions). . . I could go on! There was too many Johns!) When the book started off, after last book's epic final line and dilemma that I was looking forward to being solved, I wondered if the series was losing it's charm. My favourite characters went sort of strange and everything was going wrong for the characters. It was basically just a bit of a downer at that point. Then it started to pick up as the twins went adventuring off around the globe as usual. Soon all the djinn were leaving their bodies and becoming spirits all over the place. I couldn't stop thinking: This is so weird. At one point three people were sharing a body, and it was beyond strange. Also, the author is seriously rubbish at writing normal people's reactions to extraordinary things. At one point a man who'd been dead for who knows how long came back to life just because his bones were laid out on the floor in a magical way or something like that. A woman who was not a djinn or anything came in and didn't seem in the slightest weirded out that a man from thousands of years ago had come back to life! I didn't think John and Faustina's relationship added anything to the tale, and didn't John have a crush on some girl in the last book?! Of course, that went nowhere and it doesn't look like this one will be either. I just hope this isn't becoming a habit for John; it's sort of weird. I also found the trail from Phillipa granting that policeman guy's wish to a volcano erupting, totally ridiculous and childish (I know that's random but I wanted to mention it). So then in the next part of the story, we got onto the main mystery. I found it really sloppily planned and not very well written. The whole ancient-mystery-of-hauntings-and-stolen-stuff-from-museums-thing didn't grab me. The author also kept writing in new random people from all different times in history with complicated names that I couldn't remember. It was so confusing so that when this guy came near the end, the main characters were all like: "It's you!" "Where did you come from?" "We thought you were dead!" etc, and I didn't have the faintest idea who the man was. All of the storylines were wrapped up, in general, poorly. They just seemed to either fix themselves in an instant, stop randomly with no closure, or just be too easy after all the build-up. (view spoiler)[The defeat of Iblis was WAY too easy and in some ways I want him to come back, because if this was the end, I'm wondering why he was ever included in the first place, but then in some ways I don't want him to come back, because it's getting kind of old and boring. (hide spoiler)] The end of the book itself was also a bit of a let down. The last chapter was really sloppy as if the author just threw it together with no planning. After the really cool end line in the previous book, this one just felt like a random phrase. Not a good one to end a book with. OK, I've been being a bit negative in this review. I did rate it 3 stars and there were some bits I did enjoy, like the whole spirit thing, which was infinitely weird, but kinda cool at the same time. It was interesting and enjoyable in it's own way, just not in all parts. I am going to continue with the series though and just pray that the next ones make up for this one :) (oh, and one more thing, the title for this book was in no way appropriate, they should have called it The Minute of The Clay Warriors because the warriors weren't djinn and it wasn't a day, it was more like a minute!)

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sparkle32

    This review is actually 4.9 stars. I like the book. It gets you interested, and has great plots. The only thing - I wish they didn't kill off that character. He wasn't one of the most important main characters (John and Philippa) but he was to some degree a main character. Otherwise, it is great. This review is actually 4.9 stars. I like the book. It gets you interested, and has great plots. The only thing - I wish they didn't kill off that character. He wasn't one of the most important main characters (John and Philippa) but he was to some degree a main character. Otherwise, it is great.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sophie

    AWESOME!! Definitely my favourite Children of the Lamp (COTL) book so far. There seemed to be a few storylines grabbing for your attention but they all linked in the end somehow. I was never bored reading this awesome book. Things I did not like. Sometimes P.B.Kerr seems to forget that he's writing for children and insults you by saying that anyone would know some random fact that I don't think most adults would know! On the other hand sometimes he thinks he can get away with writing random things AWESOME!! Definitely my favourite Children of the Lamp (COTL) book so far. There seemed to be a few storylines grabbing for your attention but they all linked in the end somehow. I was never bored reading this awesome book. Things I did not like. Sometimes P.B.Kerr seems to forget that he's writing for children and insults you by saying that anyone would know some random fact that I don't think most adults would know! On the other hand sometimes he thinks he can get away with writing random things in and all kids won't think twice because as Iblis (I think) said 'All kids are gullible and will believe anything you tell them'. At one point Kerr completely messed up a normal person's reaction to a weird thing. Without spoiling I will try and explain. Basically this guy comes back from the dead and this woman (who I think is mundane) walks in and Nimrod literally says "Hello, this is Marco Polo who just came back from the dead. Marco, this is some nun who works here." And she stares at Marco for a moment and then OFFERS HIM A BISCUIT! :0 Yes I'm sure when you come back from the dead you would quite like a biscuit but still... :0 Also, its not that bad but I did notice that these two quotes are used A LOT. A wish is a dish that's a lot like a fish once its been eaten its harder to throw back and a wish is like a fire, it is reasonable to assume the smoke might make someone cough Things I liked The introduction of Faustina's character. I hope (but doubt) that we will hear from her again but you never know! The changes of scene. They globe-trotted a bit didn't they! I didn't lose track though and I don't think it was overdone. The sprit moving. We learnt a bit about the sprit world and it was well written and comical at times. Jonathan Tarot's magic show - great idea!! Oh and while we're on the subject John/Jonathan, bit similar aren't they? There were plenty of other enjoyable scenes but I will leave you to discover them on your on. This book was great. I would recommend it to children who enjoy magic and adventure books.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ronah

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. John and Philippa Gaunt have to outwit the wicked Iblis and they attempt to rescue their mother from her fate as the Blue Djinn of Babylon (a djinn that is beyond good and evil, who has powers over all.) There is only one way to ensure that their mother doesn't succumb to this fate, and that is to find the true successor to the last Blue Djinn of Babylon, the sister of their friend, Dybbuk Sachertorte, Faustina. They discover that an aging curse has been placed on their father and if the twins a John and Philippa Gaunt have to outwit the wicked Iblis and they attempt to rescue their mother from her fate as the Blue Djinn of Babylon (a djinn that is beyond good and evil, who has powers over all.) There is only one way to ensure that their mother doesn't succumb to this fate, and that is to find the true successor to the last Blue Djinn of Babylon, the sister of their friend, Dybbuk Sachertorte, Faustina. They discover that an aging curse has been placed on their father and if the twins are gone too long, he will rapidly become an old man. As the twins and their friends travel around the globe on their rescue mission, they notice that something very strange is happening: An evil force has awakened the terracotta warriors created by an ancient Chinese emperor, and someone with very bad intentions has cast a spell possessing the soldiers with wicked spirits. And now, the very fate of the world hangs in the balance.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Rae

    1st Reactions: This book is different from Tamora Pierce which I just finished reading. In fact in the past few months, I've read 22 books by Tamora Pierce and P. B. Kerr has a different style then she does. P. B. Kerr's books (the ones that I've read so far) are targeted to a younger audience I think I'd say. The words are more simple and there isn't as much detail as in Twilight or New Moon, but the books are still entertaining. There is a sorta slow humor and this book is the forth in a series 1st Reactions: This book is different from Tamora Pierce which I just finished reading. In fact in the past few months, I've read 22 books by Tamora Pierce and P. B. Kerr has a different style then she does. P. B. Kerr's books (the ones that I've read so far) are targeted to a younger audience I think I'd say. The words are more simple and there isn't as much detail as in Twilight or New Moon, but the books are still entertaining. There is a sorta slow humor and this book is the forth in a series I've read as they've been published because it's nice to remember that you can still be a kid where there is such thing as magic and 3 wishes. The characters are lovable and believable as well as the fact that they end up travelling the world is quite entertaining. All in all I enjoyed this book.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jenne

    Not as good as the others, or perhaps i just missed listening to the narrator! Twins Philippa and John have only recently found out they have djinn power. A discovery that has lead to many adventures with their Uncle Nimrod. In this fourth book, in the bestselling series, the twins are up against new challenges as they race against time to save their mother from become the cold-hearted Blue Djinn of Babylon, stop the aging curse on their father and find out why museums in different countries are Not as good as the others, or perhaps i just missed listening to the narrator! Twins Philippa and John have only recently found out they have djinn power. A discovery that has lead to many adventures with their Uncle Nimrod. In this fourth book, in the bestselling series, the twins are up against new challenges as they race against time to save their mother from become the cold-hearted Blue Djinn of Babylon, stop the aging curse on their father and find out why museums in different countries are reporting hauntings and robberies. Follow John and Philippa as a new globe-trotting escapade begins, taking them from America to England, Venice and finally China in their attempt to avert disaster.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Yvensong

    This was an exciting, and well-written adventure following the Gaunt twins, two Djinn living in current day New York. As in the first three novels, we are taken on a whirlwind tour of the world and are exposed to some great geography lessons and cultural information. What sets this one apart from the first three is that Kerr seems to have found his stride with his writing. There were times, the first three felt a little awkward, but that has disappeared in this novel. It's as though he stopped st This was an exciting, and well-written adventure following the Gaunt twins, two Djinn living in current day New York. As in the first three novels, we are taken on a whirlwind tour of the world and are exposed to some great geography lessons and cultural information. What sets this one apart from the first three is that Kerr seems to have found his stride with his writing. There were times, the first three felt a little awkward, but that has disappeared in this novel. It's as though he stopped struggling with what he thought a young-person's novel should sound like and just wrote what he wanted to write. This book makes if fully worth your time to read the first three to obtain the history of the twins, their family and friends.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    I don't know what to say besides I love this YA series! I guess that it's fantasy. In this book, #4 of the Children of the Lamp, djinn twins John and Philippa race to save their mother from becoming the Blue Djinn of Babylon and forever being beyond their lives. On the way other things are happening, though. Who is stealing jade from museums all over the world? Why are ghosts being reported in museums all over the world? It ends up being another break-neck race for the twins and their Uncle Nimr I don't know what to say besides I love this YA series! I guess that it's fantasy. In this book, #4 of the Children of the Lamp, djinn twins John and Philippa race to save their mother from becoming the Blue Djinn of Babylon and forever being beyond their lives. On the way other things are happening, though. Who is stealing jade from museums all over the world? Why are ghosts being reported in museums all over the world? It ends up being another break-neck race for the twins and their Uncle Nimrod to save the mundane (uh, that's human) world from an evil plot masterminded by the evilist djinn of all. I love how the author takes things that we all know and take for granted and applies a magical reason for their being!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sam

    the tale contiues, the plot thickens, and the bad guys are some how Badder. Phillipa and john are pull into another adventure, which started with them trying to get there mother, and ended up with the classic saving the world ending, except with a little twist. Being Djinn makes each adventure somewhat different, and magical. Iblis the leader of the Ifrit, uses terra cotta warriors, children, and one of his own sons, in an attempt to turn the world upside down and its john and phillipa's job to the tale contiues, the plot thickens, and the bad guys are some how Badder. Phillipa and john are pull into another adventure, which started with them trying to get there mother, and ended up with the classic saving the world ending, except with a little twist. Being Djinn makes each adventure somewhat different, and magical. Iblis the leader of the Ifrit, uses terra cotta warriors, children, and one of his own sons, in an attempt to turn the world upside down and its john and phillipa's job to stop him. The catch is their Djinn power can't leave their own house in new york. Read it, and find out for yourself.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Doris

    This book started off with a continuation from a previous book, which although it worked well, required the knowledge of the previous actions to really make much sense. This refers to the Methuslah curse on Mr. Gaunt and the departure of Mrs. Gaunt to be the Blue Djinn. It also ended with what as an adult I saw as an obvious lead in to book #5(view spoiler)[ the possession of the housekeeper's body by the ghost of Mrs. Gaunt (hide spoiler)] . Was it a good read? It was entertaining, adequate, but This book started off with a continuation from a previous book, which although it worked well, required the knowledge of the previous actions to really make much sense. This refers to the Methuslah curse on Mr. Gaunt and the departure of Mrs. Gaunt to be the Blue Djinn. It also ended with what as an adult I saw as an obvious lead in to book #5(view spoiler)[ the possession of the housekeeper's body by the ghost of Mrs. Gaunt (hide spoiler)] . Was it a good read? It was entertaining, adequate, but overly busy and filled with activity that 2 children, especially those not raised to their power, would have trouble with. Just too over the top for the setting and characters.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Warren

    Kerr needs better research into the Chinese language. Some of the descriptions and usage are wrong or awkward. Claims no such "zombie" word in Mandarin even though it could be found in Chinese mythology. The Marco Polo history is a little interesting even though there were plot holes. The major inconsistency was that there's no explanation nor reference of the evil djinns found at the Xian site as mentioned in a previous book. Not one of the best book in the series. (listened to story on CD) Kerr needs better research into the Chinese language. Some of the descriptions and usage are wrong or awkward. Claims no such "zombie" word in Mandarin even though it could be found in Chinese mythology. The Marco Polo history is a little interesting even though there were plot holes. The major inconsistency was that there's no explanation nor reference of the evil djinns found at the Xian site as mentioned in a previous book. Not one of the best book in the series. (listened to story on CD)

  23. 4 out of 5

    Tyler Hedge

    it was REALLY CREEPY but it was probably my favorite of the 4 children of the lamp books that i have read. And i really like the Dong Xi warriors. they are trying reunite Faustina's spirit with her body so she can be the blue djinn of Babylon instead of Layla, John and Philippa Gaunt's mother. And they have to stop the dong xi warriors from absorbing more spirits. 4th book in the children of the lamp series and my favorite one of the 4 books that i have read:) - review by Tyler, 8.5 years old it was REALLY CREEPY but it was probably my favorite of the 4 children of the lamp books that i have read. And i really like the Dong Xi warriors. they are trying reunite Faustina's spirit with her body so she can be the blue djinn of Babylon instead of Layla, John and Philippa Gaunt's mother. And they have to stop the dong xi warriors from absorbing more spirits. 4th book in the children of the lamp series and my favorite one of the 4 books that i have read:) - review by Tyler, 8.5 years old

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    Definitely the best in the series so far. There were more unexpected plot twists, more drama, more cultural variety (after Egypt in book 1, Iraq in book 2 and India and Nepal in book 3, places where djinn might be expected to go, we have Italy, China and Scotland in the same book). There was an interesting and non-transparent puzzle to solve. And I absolutely loved the two (or three) spirits sharing one body thing. Hilarious.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Dayna Smith

    The fourth book in the Children of the Lamp series. John & Philippa set out to find Faustina's spirit and return her to her body so she can become the next Blue Djinn and their mother can come home. But nothing is ever easy, Iblis is plotting evil and his plot may destroy their plan. Can they defeat Iblis, save Faustina, themselves, and get their mother back? The ending to this installment is surprising and sets up another book in the series well. Loaded with action and suspense. The fourth book in the Children of the Lamp series. John & Philippa set out to find Faustina's spirit and return her to her body so she can become the next Blue Djinn and their mother can come home. But nothing is ever easy, Iblis is plotting evil and his plot may destroy their plan. Can they defeat Iblis, save Faustina, themselves, and get their mother back? The ending to this installment is surprising and sets up another book in the series well. Loaded with action and suspense.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Anthony ➳ KeepReadingForward ➳

    4/5 Stars Originally Reviewed: 21 December 2015 This book was originally read and reviewed some time ago and did not receive a proper review. Creating a new review today would not reflect the thoughts I had at the original time of reading, therefore, an updated review for this book does not seem likely in the future. In the case of an updated review, or of a rereading, this review will be updated with the new review.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    This is a pretty good read. I've finished now, and was very satisfied with the way the subplots got tied together and resolved. Character development is not as big as action in this book. More of that happened in the first 3 books of the series. The whole series is very good! I wonder if there will be any more books in this series?! This is a pretty good read. I've finished now, and was very satisfied with the way the subplots got tied together and resolved. Character development is not as big as action in this book. More of that happened in the first 3 books of the series. The whole series is very good! I wonder if there will be any more books in this series?!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Important portions of this story were set in Venice and in Xian, with the Terra Cotta warriors as big players, so that was really fun. The Gaunt twins are off again with their uncle Nimrod, trying to set right both a personal tragedy and the most recent (and perhaps most dastardly) plots of their nemesis as he tries to use spirits to alter the balance of luck in the world.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kate Hastings

    RL 840. This series never gets old. LOVE IT! In this book, the twins enter the spirit realm to reunite a replacement Blue Djinn with her body. Meanwhile, something strange is going on in the spirit world, and it may have something to do with a Djinn magician and some strange zombie-like Chinese terra cotta warriors.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jacqueline

    This is the continuing saga of John and Philippa, the djinn twins. As usual, they embark on adventures at foreign ports of call with their Uncle Nimrod. Lots of local color gives interest, and the plot moves right along. It was not awe inspiring, but I am in a hurry to get the next book to find out what happens!

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