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Armed forces veteran and seven-time New York Times bestselling author John Ringo delivers the sequel to contemporary urban fantasy thriller Princess of Wands.  John Ringo versus zombies! Soccer mom and demon fighter Barbara Everette has a problem.  It seems Janea, Barbara’s assistant and The Foundation for Love and Universal Faith's best operative, has been thrown into a co Armed forces veteran and seven-time New York Times bestselling author John Ringo delivers the sequel to contemporary urban fantasy thriller Princess of Wands.  John Ringo versus zombies! Soccer mom and demon fighter Barbara Everette has a problem.  It seems Janea, Barbara’s assistant and The Foundation for Love and Universal Faith's best operative, has been thrown into a coma by some very nasty magic she’s stirred up. Barbara must track down the perpetrators and break the spell or Janea's soul will be forever lost on the astral plane. Oh, and if she can't break the spell, zombies will destroy all mankind.      Meanwhile, Janea, a high-dollar call girl, stripper and High Priestess of Freya when she isn’t fighting demons, must contend with a spiritual journey of her own.  It’s a journey into Janea’s acceptance of herself in all her dimensions (and what dimensions they are!). Where to locate one’s true inner essence? At a science fiction convention, of course. But when rescuers pursue Janea into her vision of a geeky alternate reality, we find this is one science fiction convention where the Guest of Honor could turn out to be Death Himself.      Finally, the Christian soccer mom and the Norse priestess stripper face their greatest challenge ever when an ancient Old One rears Her ugly face, and the Mother of Darkness walks among us. Since this is one Mother who is quite immune to any conventional power, including nuclear weapons, it seems humanity’s only hope is God. The question being: Is God willing to save humanity? 


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Armed forces veteran and seven-time New York Times bestselling author John Ringo delivers the sequel to contemporary urban fantasy thriller Princess of Wands.  John Ringo versus zombies! Soccer mom and demon fighter Barbara Everette has a problem.  It seems Janea, Barbara’s assistant and The Foundation for Love and Universal Faith's best operative, has been thrown into a co Armed forces veteran and seven-time New York Times bestselling author John Ringo delivers the sequel to contemporary urban fantasy thriller Princess of Wands.  John Ringo versus zombies! Soccer mom and demon fighter Barbara Everette has a problem.  It seems Janea, Barbara’s assistant and The Foundation for Love and Universal Faith's best operative, has been thrown into a coma by some very nasty magic she’s stirred up. Barbara must track down the perpetrators and break the spell or Janea's soul will be forever lost on the astral plane. Oh, and if she can't break the spell, zombies will destroy all mankind.      Meanwhile, Janea, a high-dollar call girl, stripper and High Priestess of Freya when she isn’t fighting demons, must contend with a spiritual journey of her own.  It’s a journey into Janea’s acceptance of herself in all her dimensions (and what dimensions they are!). Where to locate one’s true inner essence? At a science fiction convention, of course. But when rescuers pursue Janea into her vision of a geeky alternate reality, we find this is one science fiction convention where the Guest of Honor could turn out to be Death Himself.      Finally, the Christian soccer mom and the Norse priestess stripper face their greatest challenge ever when an ancient Old One rears Her ugly face, and the Mother of Darkness walks among us. Since this is one Mother who is quite immune to any conventional power, including nuclear weapons, it seems humanity’s only hope is God. The question being: Is God willing to save humanity? 

30 review for Queen of Wands - Signed Limited Edition

  1. 4 out of 5

    Shawn

    First off, of all The John Ringo's Books, this is probably the one that is most "acquired taste." It's Contemporary Fantasy with a Christian protagonist in an All Myths Are True universe. Barbara Everett is a fun lead. Competent and yet not really knowing why she is. Earnest and faithful without being pushy and self-righteous. And yet, not perfect. The supporting cast is interesting as well. But some of them just don't strike me as deep when they are sent to the fore. As is the case with the "Ja First off, of all The John Ringo's Books, this is probably the one that is most "acquired taste." It's Contemporary Fantasy with a Christian protagonist in an All Myths Are True universe. Barbara Everett is a fun lead. Competent and yet not really knowing why she is. Earnest and faithful without being pushy and self-righteous. And yet, not perfect. The supporting cast is interesting as well. But some of them just don't strike me as deep when they are sent to the fore. As is the case with the "Janea" story in the middle. Parts of that are quite good. The beginning is a tad bewildering, and if it had been the 1st story of the book, would've been complete off-putting. That's another thing about this and its predecessor, "Princess of Wands." It's not a full novel. It's 2 almost novellas and a short story. All of it bound together by common characters. It's a throwback to the serial stories of Fafrhd and the Gray Mouser and Conan rather than true novels. So sometimes when you think the story is just getting ramped up, BOOM, it's done. Or as in the Janea story above, just when you *finally* figure out what's really going on, well...it's done. In the end, this isn't as good as the 1st book, IMHO. But if you liked Princess of Wands, there's no reason you shouldn't like this one as well. It's not Ringo's best. But even 80% of his capacity is better than 100% from 90% of the writers on the market.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lynne Cantwell

    As a Neopagan, I have to tell you that Queen of Wands annoyed the crap out of me. This book was in my freebie bag from last year's World Fantasy Convention. Ringo is known as a decent writer, and the title is the name of a Tarot card, which I thought might mean the story was Pagan-friendly. Alas, it's not. In the America that Ringo has created for this series (this is book two), there's a more-or-less clandestine organization for people with paranormal abilities who are called upon to fight, y'kno As a Neopagan, I have to tell you that Queen of Wands annoyed the crap out of me. This book was in my freebie bag from last year's World Fantasy Convention. Ringo is known as a decent writer, and the title is the name of a Tarot card, which I thought might mean the story was Pagan-friendly. Alas, it's not. In the America that Ringo has created for this series (this is book two), there's a more-or-less clandestine organization for people with paranormal abilities who are called upon to fight, y'know, The Big Evil -- demons and the like. On the side of The Big Good is Barbara Everette, Christian soccer mom and martial arts whirlwind. When she fights, she channels the power of the White God and turns into this unstoppable force. Yes, Jehovah's called the White God -- even by the Pagans, who admit that He's much more powerful than the gods they follow. Forget, for a moment, that I've never met a Pagan who believed that; it's Ringo's universe, and he can make it as unrealistic as he wants to. Anyway. The book is set up in three parts. In part one, Barbara is called to Chattanooga, TN, to work with the FBI in a battle against some demons. She also learns that her assistant Janea (an exotic dancer who's also a Norse priestess who follows Freya, because only a stripper would follow a sexy goddess like Freya, right?) has slipped into a coma due to interacting with some nasties; in part two, a bunch of Janea's friends must travel to a Dragoncon on some astral plane to rescue her. And then in part three, Barbara and Janea work together against some really nasty critters that threaten to destroy America -- prompting the President of the United States to tell every American that we all have to believe in God, or The Big Evil will win and we'll all die. So yeah, atheists are in deep trouble. But not for long! All it takes to get them to convert is one look at Barbara in action! Oy. Ringo writes a lot of military fantasy and it shows; the action scenes are well done. But I just can't buy his theology. And the whole Dragoncon sequence seemed to belong in another book entirely. I guess there's a "Warehouse 13" reference in the book, too, which I didn't get because I've never seen "Warehouse 13." I guess I'm just not the audience for this book. *** (Originally published at http://hearth-myth-rursday-reads.blog...)

  3. 4 out of 5

    Arthur

    Not as good as the first book (Princess of Wands), but then, the first book was pretty amazing, so it'll be hard to top. This book was still good and well worth reading, however. I AM a bit worried, though - Mr. Ringo is still in the middle of a couple other series I really want to see continue (Troy Rising, for one). Similar to David Weber, I suspect that Mr. Ringo has split his attention between too many good series and will never finish any of them. That's relevant to this book because the en Not as good as the first book (Princess of Wands), but then, the first book was pretty amazing, so it'll be hard to top. This book was still good and well worth reading, however. I AM a bit worried, though - Mr. Ringo is still in the middle of a couple other series I really want to see continue (Troy Rising, for one). Similar to David Weber, I suspect that Mr. Ringo has split his attention between too many good series and will never finish any of them. That's relevant to this book because the ending of the Queen of Wands basically opens a major event that I don't see ending in one more book... (unless maybe the event ends very badly, that is). Nonetheless, despite my worry I'm still happy to read pretty much anything by this author - it's ALL good. EDIT: ok, I take that back. Hadn't read "Ghost" yet. I got a little ways into it and decided that not EVERYTHING Ringo writes is worth reading. Bleh.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Rich

    The first part wasn't all that bad. I was actually liking it more than the first book. Lots of action after a slowish start. Barb has gone from confused soccer mom to hard-boiled ninja warrior mom in the space of just one year. She was kicking ass and not really bothering to take names in a major way before this one was thru. There were a lot of sliced off heads rolling around on the ground in this book, which was all lots of fun. When's she going to start showing these vaunted MMA skilss though The first part wasn't all that bad. I was actually liking it more than the first book. Lots of action after a slowish start. Barb has gone from confused soccer mom to hard-boiled ninja warrior mom in the space of just one year. She was kicking ass and not really bothering to take names in a major way before this one was thru. There were a lot of sliced off heads rolling around on the ground in this book, which was all lots of fun. When's she going to start showing these vaunted MMA skilss though? I was surprised that she didn't feel bad about a few of the people who's heads ended up on the ground. Maybe she's getting too hardcore? As much as the action was good, the non-action bits were just confusing. It seemed odd to me that Barb knows wayyy too much about just about everything. How the hell is she an expert in so much? The ancient Mesopotamian history knowlege she was pulling out of her butt was just too much. Does she have a Phd in History? She looks at some wall art and knows it's done by Hittites? Please. Also, why was she leading the cop in the investigation? She was doing more copwork and being more of a detective than he was, even though he was supposed to be a topnotch cop. Early on in the book Barb learned she had a great ability to help her in her fight against demons, then we never hear about it again. She learns she has this potentially very helpful ability, but she doesn't even use it? I just can't buy it. I think he wrote the first part last, and that's why it wasn't used during the bulk of the book. Didn't Ringo have any of his friends read this first? Sadly, the first book ended in a complete unending. Part II of the first book was just a trip that went nowhere for no real reason. It really seemed to me to be just another excuse for the author to regurgitate the last book's fascination with SciFi Cons. It was a waste of valuable wood pulp and my time. Are there really that many nerds affecting olde English speak at Cons? Ringo's nerdy in-jokery doth wear me greatly. Ringo uses Ichor often. Too often. Ichor, ichor, ichor. In fact, he used it so often that I couldn't help but wonder if he's using the word without really knowing what it means. Covered with ichor, ichor spilling here, ichor flying there, ichor covering that. It got pretty old pretty fast. I think he's just in love with the word. It was also bugging me during a cave hunt with some Army guys in search of demon baddies that they had this long, drawn out conversation about the nature of religion and belief. The conversation itself didn't bug me as much as the timing did. She was in this hole with these Green Beret types, and I can promise you that those guys would NOT be speaking out loud that deep in enemy territory. They'd be concentrating 100% on the mission and nothing but. Stupid. My eyes rolled greatly. The meeting with the Prez portion was just as biased as can be. Just another instance of his painting liberal politians in the worst possible light. It was completely unnecessary for the story, but totally expected from the author. I had liked him for exposing Barb to the fact that there were multiple Gods in the world, and I liked the way she came to terms with it. He didn't lay the political crap down in the last book like he did here either. Sadly, in this book we learned that her "White God" is actually the most powerful of the Gods, and not just another deity in the sandbox. And then the final battle just took it way too far for me. I'm over this series. Sadly, I'd have definitely liked the book a lot more if he'd cut the size in half and left out some (although the the book actually requires a certain amount) of the political/religious agenda. There's a good story in there, but there's just way too much typing. I wish he'd have just left the agenda behind and written a story. Whatever. There are plenty of other books in the world to read. At least it had a happy ending.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Wench

    I really like this book (and series), but wow do I have mixed feelings about it. I think it's got some really interesting takes on theology, Christian and otherwise. The mechanics of how this version of the world works are really, really interesting. Yeah Barbara Everette's a totally overpowered character but it's really interesting to see a woman in that role. And she manages to be SUPER CHRISTIAN without being an asshole about it, for the most part. Yeah, she struggles with different beliefs, a I really like this book (and series), but wow do I have mixed feelings about it. I think it's got some really interesting takes on theology, Christian and otherwise. The mechanics of how this version of the world works are really, really interesting. Yeah Barbara Everette's a totally overpowered character but it's really interesting to see a woman in that role. And she manages to be SUPER CHRISTIAN without being an asshole about it, for the most part. Yeah, she struggles with different beliefs, and working with people of different faiths... but she struggles, not hates. And the way her faith gets expanded is fascinating to watch. And then I get to the parts where it's really obvious that Barb Everette and/or John Ringo are REALLY FUCKING CONSERVATIVE, like the rant about the ADA and how ridiculous parts of it are in this book. And you just kind of go whooooooa there player. And there's some stuff regarding separation of church and state in this one that are also a little whoaaaa in places, although not as bad as it could be (and yes, that is damning faint praise). Also, FYI, this book, like its predecessor, is incredibly fucking violent and gory. There is mention of rape, there are things and people being shot and sliced up with swords and stabbed and eaten by monsters EVERYWHERE. BLOOD, GUTS, AND ICHOR EVERYWHERE. I was also really glad that it was still novellas packed in to one book. I was a little skeptical of how this was going to be a full-length novel, and it's not. I feel like a full-length would allow for too much down time and time to think and poke at the holes. As it is, the beginning of the first story sets up some interesting stuff and a struggle for Everette... and then it's just kind of handwaved away. THE DEMON NAME SHIT WAS INTERESTING and then TOTALLY DISAPPEARED. Frustrating. I mean, I enjoyed it, it's a solid 3.5, and much like its predecessor, I will probably read this repeatedly. And I want the next one, because shit has been getting really interesting and it seems like Ringo is trying to build some more over-arching stuff in to the series. But yeah these are... really problematic and if I look too closely not even written all that solidly but wow are they interesting stories.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Per Gunnar

    These books in John Ringo’s Special Circumstances series are a quite fun read. Sure they are a bit special and the references to God and faith are fairly abundant. But at the same time it’s not at all some Christian crusade. Faiths and Gods of all kinds are present in this fantasy tale. The first part of the book is very good. I really like Barbara Everette. A staunch Christian believer that never strays from her faith, never swears etc. but at the same time do not hesitate to tell the unfortunat These books in John Ringo’s Special Circumstances series are a quite fun read. Sure they are a bit special and the references to God and faith are fairly abundant. But at the same time it’s not at all some Christian crusade. Faiths and Gods of all kinds are present in this fantasy tale. The first part of the book is very good. I really like Barbara Everette. A staunch Christian believer that never strays from her faith, never swears etc. but at the same time do not hesitate to tell the unfortunate guy gloating a bit too much what she will do with their private parts if he does not get his act together. And she is definitely not the one to turn the other cheek when it comes to the real bad guys. Then there is a part in the middle which I didn’t like too much. This is primarily because Barbara is not in it. This part of the story focuses around Jaena and how she recovers from her coma. It’s a bit weird and it is definitely not my cup of tea. As with the previous book this one is not a single story. It is two books in one volume. The second book is also a nice read although I think the “solution” at the end is a bit silly. I also really do not like the cliffhanger at the end. It has nothing to do with Barbara Everette’s fight against the dark forces and it’s just soap-opera style crap as far as I’m concerned. Having said that, there’s another cliffhanger in the book in that it was quite clearly hinted that some really bad things where coming and that the events in this one was just a test. I really hope that John gives us the continuation of this story and that the silliness at the end of this book doesn’t play too much into the story of the next one.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Laney

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. While I am generally a fan of John Ringo and really enjoyed the first book of this series this sequel left me feeling flat. The story didn't hook me because it felt a little forced, no real flow to events things just happened. It was still a good "popcorn" action movie sort of book but not one I will feel the need to re-read at any point in the future. Spoilers but I also felt the ending was kind of a game killer. It doesn't matter what you believe in as long as you believe, filthy useless athei While I am generally a fan of John Ringo and really enjoyed the first book of this series this sequel left me feeling flat. The story didn't hook me because it felt a little forced, no real flow to events things just happened. It was still a good "popcorn" action movie sort of book but not one I will feel the need to re-read at any point in the future. Spoilers but I also felt the ending was kind of a game killer. It doesn't matter what you believe in as long as you believe, filthy useless atheists being the gist of the message. I might be reading too much into the ending but it felt unnatural and stiff to have the president ordering people to pray so that the good guys could shoot super faith lasers and defeat the big bad. Also while I enjoy sly references whole pages devoted to connecting your book to a Tv show (Warehouse 13) is distracting and detracts from your own mythos. The series has 2 books, the show has multiple seasons of established universe. It makes for an unnatural feel to the chapter it lies in. Normally his other references such as Sluggy Freelance aren't quite so obnoxiously in your face and fit a bit better. As a regular con goer I felt the entire Dragoncon bit felt like a way to do the same sort of thing, and wasn't it just the book before when they went to another con? Why every book do we need to visit nerd culture? Perhaps it could be any of a million other settings?

  8. 4 out of 5

    Julia

    When I read Princess of Wands I thought it was great fun so I was excited to see that the sequel had been published. Unfortunately I wasn't nearly as impressed with the second book. Although there is a little bit at the beginning about Barbara being uncomfortable with a new part of her powers, this is slid over quickly. For the rest of the book Barbara is a totally kick-ass, practically invincible heroine. The book is written as three separate stories. In the first, Barbara is called to work with When I read Princess of Wands I thought it was great fun so I was excited to see that the sequel had been published. Unfortunately I wasn't nearly as impressed with the second book. Although there is a little bit at the beginning about Barbara being uncomfortable with a new part of her powers, this is slid over quickly. For the rest of the book Barbara is a totally kick-ass, practically invincible heroine. The book is written as three separate stories. In the first, Barbara is called to work with an FBI agent to battle demons in Chattanooga TN after another paranormal agent, Janea, has been found in a coma. The second story is Janea's journey from geeky girl Doris Grisham to sexy self-confident Janea through experiences at Dragon Con (SF convention). The third story has Barbara and Janea working together on another case, this time to stop a monster that could ultimately destroy the United States. While I understand that Barbara's commitment to her Christian belief is integral to the story, I did not appreciate the author's digs at atheists.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Robert Jones

    Great book! Not sure where he will go from there, but looking forward to finding out.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jon

    I liked much of the same aspects of this story as the first novel about Barbara Everette, soccer mom turned supernatural warrior, and I disliked most of the same things, as well. Barb is the only member of the Foundation for Love and Universal Faith (FLUF) who is a born-again, bible thumping, fundamentalist Christian. The rest of the group who fight against the manifestations of evil worldwide are pagans. Ringo even gives Barb a monologue to spout as she and a group of special ops guys are spelu I liked much of the same aspects of this story as the first novel about Barbara Everette, soccer mom turned supernatural warrior, and I disliked most of the same things, as well. Barb is the only member of the Foundation for Love and Universal Faith (FLUF) who is a born-again, bible thumping, fundamentalist Christian. The rest of the group who fight against the manifestations of evil worldwide are pagans. Ringo even gives Barb a monologue to spout as she and a group of special ops guys are spelunking on their way to destroy the Mother of All Evil about how anyone who truly loves his fellow man and opposes evil is not going to be rejected by the christian God, when all is said and done. The ecumenism is all very kumbaya, but doesn't really accurately reflect theology. Barb discovers some new gifts in this novel - the ability to see the demons that infest much of the human population on Earth, and the ability to hear their voices, as well. This is balanced by being able to see angels, too. FLUF sends her to Chattanooga to combat an outbreak of madness that appears to be caused by the supernatural, and where her friend Janea, priestess of Freya, encountered something that left her basically in a coma. Barb, and her FBI sidekick must find out who the bad guys are, neutralize them, and figure out how to revive Janea, all without the general public becoming aware of Special Circumstances. The book has three sections, with the first one being set in Chattanooga, then the middle section appears to take place at DragonCon, but which is actually a supernatural version of the convention, where gods, demigods, and random souls attend. Janea's spirit is sent there to work her way back to consciousness, through truly "finding herself". The third section deals with a massive threat to the entire country by the Mother of All Evil, who is rapidly producing monster hordes to take over America and eventually overrun the world. The ending is a huge deus ex machina, which was sort of annoying. I think that Ringo is tired of writing a heroine who doesn't have any sex scenes, as at the very end, Barbara catches her husband in bed with someone when she returns home. I guess this is going to make it all right for her to fool around? Maybe in Ringo's christianity. Ringo tosses out a little in-joke about his Paladin of Shadows series at one point. "Fortunately, theres a group of Asatru covering the Caucasus. Led by a demon-possessed former SEAL. Good story...I could write a book. Too tired." This is a fun book, if you don't think about it too much.

  11. 4 out of 5

    David Casperson

    Here's information that may help you evaluate this review. I am a huge fan of fantasy, even contemporary urban fantasy, but this is the first John Ringo novel that I have read I found the story catchy enough that I willingly read the whole book, so there is something to be said for Ringo's ability to write a story that grabs your attention. However, I don't feel willing to recommend without reservation. I suspect that may be as much Ringo's world view not meshing with mine, but I am not sure. The Here's information that may help you evaluate this review. I am a huge fan of fantasy, even contemporary urban fantasy, but this is the first John Ringo novel that I have read I found the story catchy enough that I willingly read the whole book, so there is something to be said for Ringo's ability to write a story that grabs your attention. However, I don't feel willing to recommend without reservation. I suspect that may be as much Ringo's world view not meshing with mine, but I am not sure. The story is set in contemporary America. Religiously flavoured magic abounds with various human agents channelling the powers of their divine (or demonic) sponsors. The pantheon of gods feels just a wee bit like Neil Gaiman's American Gods, but Christianity and Wicca seem to play a more important role. The protagonists are a Southern soccer mom / kick-ass warrior of the Christian god, and a former stripper / priestess of Freya. What I dislike about this book is its strong identification with a certain US of American religious mindset. God is good; demon-spawn are bad. Contrast this say, with Elizabeth Bear's Blood and Iron, which is also set in contemporary America, and which has various Christian devils as part of its cast, but which doesn't presume to say who the "good guys" are, at least not in the blatant manner of The Queen of Wands. I also find the female protagonists suspiciously cliché. I think that Ringo is trying hard to write interesting kick-ass women, but they seem too close to trite male fantasies. The actual FBI related police work parts of the plot were the most interesting and the most enjoyable. Ringo sets one part of the plot in a Con. Parts of this are a lot of fun, but it doesn't have nearly the feel of authenticity as say Peter S. Beagle's The Folk of the Air. If your inner feminist is on holiday, and you are looking for an adventure book, give it a try.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Aaron Anderson

    The middle part of this book was super boring. The entire thing with J. being stuck in the astral realm, that was a version of DragonCon. Booooring. And then the end was especially annoying to me, where in order for the US to survive, the president had to ask the entire population to pray to God to save us. Just... I can't take that. I'd definitely have died, forget praying to God to save us from eldritch horrors. The middle part of this book was super boring. The entire thing with J. being stuck in the astral realm, that was a version of DragonCon. Booooring. And then the end was especially annoying to me, where in order for the US to survive, the president had to ask the entire population to pray to God to save us. Just... I can't take that. I'd definitely have died, forget praying to God to save us from eldritch horrors.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Brian Keller

    If you'll pardon the expression, this one gets a bit preachy. But, given that the characters are warriors for their gods, perhaps I shouldn't be surprised. A solid follow-on to Princess of Wands, though I fear that Ringo hasn't left room for a third book here, and it would be a shame to leave these entertaining characters behind. If you'll pardon the expression, this one gets a bit preachy. But, given that the characters are warriors for their gods, perhaps I shouldn't be surprised. A solid follow-on to Princess of Wands, though I fear that Ringo hasn't left room for a third book here, and it would be a shame to leave these entertaining characters behind.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Nehemiah

    Hard book to rate. I liked the books action but had trouble with Ringo's confusion views on theology, mythology, and religion. To me, mixing Christianity and pagan myths doesn't make sense. You cant say that all beliefs work together or are compatible together, that all gods are real, that all after lifes are posible; by their very nature they just dont mix. Hard book to rate. I liked the books action but had trouble with Ringo's confusion views on theology, mythology, and religion. To me, mixing Christianity and pagan myths doesn't make sense. You cant say that all beliefs work together or are compatible together, that all gods are real, that all after lifes are posible; by their very nature they just dont mix.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Tina Bales

    Kant wait for another one ! I love reading John Ringo's books every story just pulls me in for more ! I look forward to reading His next adventure whichever universe it is based in ! Kant wait for another one ! I love reading John Ringo's books every story just pulls me in for more ! I look forward to reading His next adventure whichever universe it is based in !

  16. 4 out of 5

    Joanne G.

    Middle-aged Christian soccer mom Barbara Everette fights demonic evil at DragonCon! I wanted to give a 1/2 star to the first book, so I added an entire star to this one. I'm hoping Barbara Everette will continue to battle evil, and I'd love to see her daughter join her. Middle-aged Christian soccer mom Barbara Everette fights demonic evil at DragonCon! I wanted to give a 1/2 star to the first book, so I added an entire star to this one. I'm hoping Barbara Everette will continue to battle evil, and I'd love to see her daughter join her.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Alexander Lemeshko

    Not worth time and money Complete failure. Yeah, bringing all the people you know from cons and writers workshop into the book may be fun for author and for these people but for readers it is BORING. Results of literary games should not be sold to unsuspecting public. Avoid.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Brian Gaston

    A colleague wore me down and convinced me to read this. It is military SF which is not in my interest. Surprisingly, it was an enjoyable read (but not enough to read another by the author).

  19. 4 out of 5

    David Caldwell

    The Christian hunting demon hunter is back. This time, a killer is stalking sci-fi conventions. Plenty of action with geeky fun thrown into the mix. A great read

  20. 4 out of 5

    Isaac

    I liked it. I liked it quite a bit. But there's also I didn't like. First off is Barbara. She's less of the Christian than she was in Book 1. Ringo made Barbara a tryhard to be "badass". Actually, it's not just Barbara, Janea is also a tryhard to be slutty. Ringo really tried to toss in lines that would make Barbara seem badass and Janea slutty. I'm seriously. In Part 3, Barbara and Janea got out of some underground cave and fights, so they are tired and exhausted and wanting to rest and sleep. Bu I liked it. I liked it quite a bit. But there's also I didn't like. First off is Barbara. She's less of the Christian than she was in Book 1. Ringo made Barbara a tryhard to be "badass". Actually, it's not just Barbara, Janea is also a tryhard to be slutty. Ringo really tried to toss in lines that would make Barbara seem badass and Janea slutty. I'm seriously. In Part 3, Barbara and Janea got out of some underground cave and fights, so they are tired and exhausted and wanting to rest and sleep. But Janea said she needs to "pray" to Freyja after all that work, which means she needs to have sex with someone. The book is also split into three parts. Part 1 and Part 2 is related but Part 3 is just "you're better off not reading". For starters, I said in my previous review of Book 1 that Special Circumstances is missing character development. Well, in Book 2, there is character development, sorta. We get to dive into Janea's life and who she was before she started her exotic dancer and being a call girl business. We get to know more about her and at the end, she's supposed to have became one with her two selves, which is the previous shy and innocent one and the current slutty and whining one. But in Part 3, she was reverted back to without this character development. I liked Janea's character much more when I finished Part 2. I also sorta understand why she became who she is. I don't agree or can make sense of it but I can see how she arrived there. But in Part 3, all of that is gone. Doris is gone instead of becoming one with Janea. You can argue that Barbara's character developed too. But it's not much of one and in the wrong way. It's better off without it. Before, she actually tried much more to avoid profanity and often prayed to her Lord. But now, she tosses out those profane words and phrases to sound "badass". Part 3 is a total mess because Ringo escalated the missions to global problem. In the end, Ringo pulls in the President and all those asking the whole world to pray. Seriously? I'm only going to rate the book with the first two parts only. I'm not saying the third part is poorly written. It's just one of those areas you don't want in any plot. It's lame. There IS a ton of politics and religious stuff that IS annoying but if you listen to it instead, it passes by pretty easily.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    Armed forces veteran and eight-time New York Times bestselling author John Ringo delivers the sequel to contemporary urban fantasy thriller Princess of Wands. Demonic, possessed Stepford wives versus a soccer mom demon slayer – plus, a zombie fight at an SF convention. Soccer mom and demon fighter Barbara Everette has a problem. It seems Janea, Barbara’s assistant and The Foundation for Love and Universal Faith's best operative, has been thrown into a coma by some very nasty magic she’s st Armed forces veteran and eight-time New York Times bestselling author John Ringo delivers the sequel to contemporary urban fantasy thriller Princess of Wands. Demonic, possessed Stepford wives versus a soccer mom demon slayer – plus, a zombie fight at an SF convention. Soccer mom and demon fighter Barbara Everette has a problem. It seems Janea, Barbara’s assistant and The Foundation for Love and Universal Faith's best operative, has been thrown into a coma by some very nasty magic she’s stirred up. Barbara must track down the perpetrators and break the spell or Janea's soul will be forever lost on the astral plane. Oh, and if she can't break the spell, zombies will destroy all mankind. Meanwhile, Janea, a stripper and High Priestess of Freya when she isn’t fighting demons, must contend with a spiritual journey of her own. It’s a journey into Janea’s acceptance of herself in all her dimensions (and what dimensions they are!). Where to locate one’s true inner essence? At a science fiction convention, of course. But when rescuers pursue Janea into her vision of a geeky alternate reality, we find this is one science fiction convention where the Guest of Honor could turn out to be Death Himself. Finally, the Christian soccer mom and the Norse priestess stripper face their greatest challenge ever when an ancient Old One rears Her ugly face, and the Mother of Darkness walks among us. Since this is one Mother who is quite immune to any conventional power, including nuclear weapons, it seems humanity’s only hope is God. The question being: Is God willing to save humanity? About John Ringo: “[Ringo’s work is] peopled with three-dimensional characters and spiced with personal drama as well as tactical finesse.” —Library Journal “. . . explosive. . . . fans. . .will appreciate Ringo’s lively narrative and flavorful characters.” —Publishers Weekly “. . .practically impossible not to read in one sitting . . . exceedingly impressive . . . executed with skill, verve, and wit.” —Booklist “Crackerjack storytelling.” —Starlog **

  22. 4 out of 5

    Gilbert Stack

    In Princess of Wands, John Ringo introduced the world to Barb Everette, a soccer Mom who discovers the hard way that the occult and the supernatural are very deadly perils in the world today. Fortunately, Barb is both a devout Protestant and a military brat with extensive martial arts and weapons training. The combination makes her a very effective warrior of the light in this enjoyable urban fantasy series. In Princess of Wands, Barb joins forces with a secret organization composed of an eclecti In Princess of Wands, John Ringo introduced the world to Barb Everette, a soccer Mom who discovers the hard way that the occult and the supernatural are very deadly perils in the world today. Fortunately, Barb is both a devout Protestant and a military brat with extensive martial arts and weapons training. The combination makes her a very effective warrior of the light in this enjoyable urban fantasy series. In Princess of Wands, Barb joins forces with a secret organization composed of an eclectic group of wiccans, devotes of the Norse gods, Buddhists, etc who for centuries have been trying to protect society from supernatural evil. They are secretly assisted by government teams investigating cases they euphemistically term “special circumstances”. In Queen of Wands, the supernatural forces (both the light and the dark) up the ante dramatically threatening the secret nature of the war. Barb, of course, is on the front line of the battles. It’s an exciting, action-packed pair of novellas (plus one short story), with a little important character development thrown in. Uncovering the nature of the supernatural threats is a major focus of the two novellas. In the first, this is very similar to a classic mystery as Barb attempts to find the bad guys. The second is more action oriented including two very exciting adventures in a tight and winding environment of cave networks. The novellas are completely satisfying and the second (a about fifty pages from the end of the book, throws a particularly unexpected curve at the reader. There are also hints dropped throughout the book that are both subtle and unsubtle hints at storylines to come. I was less pleased with the short story in the middle of the book than I was with the two novellas. Ringo attempts to show us an adventure on the astral plane and I suppose it was well done, but I found it less gripping than the other two books. Over all, I enjoyed Queen of Wands, reading it in a single weekend. I don’t think it was quite as strong as the first novel, mostly because the things that made that book strikingly original were being taken out for a second viewing here. Three and a half stars.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Alex Shrugged

    "Queen of Wands" by John Ringo is book 2 of a 2 book series. It was a reasonable sequel to the "Princess of Wands" but it wasn't as good and I didn't think book 1 was all that good. Still... if you are a church-going Christian it might hold appeal. It is violent, however. Just so you know. The Story: Barbara Everette is a homemaker whose children are near-grown and has been recruited into a secret force hunting down bad spirits and she is trying to reconcile her Christian faith with much of the p "Queen of Wands" by John Ringo is book 2 of a 2 book series. It was a reasonable sequel to the "Princess of Wands" but it wasn't as good and I didn't think book 1 was all that good. Still... if you are a church-going Christian it might hold appeal. It is violent, however. Just so you know. The Story: Barbara Everette is a homemaker whose children are near-grown and has been recruited into a secret force hunting down bad spirits and she is trying to reconcile her Christian faith with much of the paganism she sees in her fellow spirit hunters. (Think, Ghostbusters or Men in Black but not funny at all.) Any problems? Aside from the violence, I resented the attempt to bridge the various religions. I though it trivialized the differences. Nevertheless, if one is to work with people of different religions, some accommodation and tolerance (and frankly, looking the other way) is required. I'm not talking about that. This is a semi-religious organization she has joined and religious outlook becomes important to doing the job. I wasn't sold on the reasoning for bridging that gap. So... I might read the book again just to make sure I didn't make a mistake reviewing it. Sometimes I'm just in a bad mood, but the ending left a bog opening for a sequel and there was no sequel. That says something about the audience reception of this book. It didn't seem to work for others either. Too bad. It was a good idea. I would have liked to have seen it expanded upon.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Andreas

    The sequel to Princess of Wands sees “Soccermom-osaurus” Mrs. Barbara Everette as an experienced FLUF agent, defending America from evil supernatural and mystic creatures. As in the first book, this one also takes the form of three interlinked stories, the middle one of which is set (sort of) at Dragon*con. Ringo always delivers thrills and page-turnability. But this time he fell short of the mark. The story is bland. The stakes are nominally high, certainly. but I never felt like I cared that mu The sequel to Princess of Wands sees “Soccermom-osaurus” Mrs. Barbara Everette as an experienced FLUF agent, defending America from evil supernatural and mystic creatures. As in the first book, this one also takes the form of three interlinked stories, the middle one of which is set (sort of) at Dragon*con. Ringo always delivers thrills and page-turnability. But this time he fell short of the mark. The story is bland. The stakes are nominally high, certainly. but I never felt like I cared that much. The way the author has had to shoehorn belief into some sort of consistent reality makes for too many weird conversations. So a bit of a dud but still eminently readable. http://www.books.rosboch.net/?p=1575

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sharon Michael

    Second in the series and just as much fun as the first. I know there are lots of readers who don't care for this series and I'm usually one that doesn't deal well with overt Christian religion as a significant part of the storyline but Ringo makes this work for me. Yuppie, strongly Christian, married soccer mom character, allied with any number of other characters whose power comes from other religions and all work together to foil demons. What's not to like? The ongoing mildly 'anti-hero' charact Second in the series and just as much fun as the first. I know there are lots of readers who don't care for this series and I'm usually one that doesn't deal well with overt Christian religion as a significant part of the storyline but Ringo makes this work for me. Yuppie, strongly Christian, married soccer mom character, allied with any number of other characters whose power comes from other religions and all work together to foil demons. What's not to like? The ongoing mildly 'anti-hero' character in this case is soccer mom's husband, so sterotypical it's amusing. Even more amusing are the sidesteps the wife makes to avoid his self-centered, head of the household chauvinistic proclamations to continue to do her own thing. Looking forward to more of this series.

  26. 5 out of 5

    C.

    I have no doubt that this novel is going to seriously upset many, many readers. If the strongly faith based elements of the first one ( Princess of Wands ) bothered you, I would advise skipping this one entirely. As for myself, this book really "worked" for me, despite a bit of predictability and some fairly obvious flaws both in detail and plot; I applaud Ringo's courage, and I hope he is rewarded for it. I am certain I will be reading the these novels multiple times, and I sincerely hope there I have no doubt that this novel is going to seriously upset many, many readers. If the strongly faith based elements of the first one ( Princess of Wands ) bothered you, I would advise skipping this one entirely. As for myself, this book really "worked" for me, despite a bit of predictability and some fairly obvious flaws both in detail and plot; I applaud Ringo's courage, and I hope he is rewarded for it. I am certain I will be reading the these novels multiple times, and I sincerely hope there will be more in the series.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Amber

    The sequel to Princess of Wands was just as good as I had hoped. It had me laughing, it was fast paced, and it even gave the spotlight to other characters for a while. The ending went in a way different direction from what I had anticipated, which is good actually. However, it also set a much darker tone for the books to come. Not that it is much of a surprise given that Ringo seems to write best when it appears that basically everyone is screwed and there's no reason to really hope for anything The sequel to Princess of Wands was just as good as I had hoped. It had me laughing, it was fast paced, and it even gave the spotlight to other characters for a while. The ending went in a way different direction from what I had anticipated, which is good actually. However, it also set a much darker tone for the books to come. Not that it is much of a surprise given that Ringo seems to write best when it appears that basically everyone is screwed and there's no reason to really hope for anything at all good to happen. I am disappointed that I started reading the series so soon after it came out since that means waiting for the next book, but I can always re-read this one...

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ron

    Continuation of the story of Barb Everette (The Princess of Wands). Barb is upset in regard to new "Gifts" she is experiencing and is drawn into Janea's case in Chattanooga. The first story in the book plays out on two levels - Barb's in mundane Chattanooga, finding out and stopping evil forces at work and Janea's at a very strange version of Dragon Con. The second story develops out of the first and leads to a dramatic confrontation with an Old One. Sandwiched in Barb's tale is a Warehouse 13 r Continuation of the story of Barb Everette (The Princess of Wands). Barb is upset in regard to new "Gifts" she is experiencing and is drawn into Janea's case in Chattanooga. The first story in the book plays out on two levels - Barb's in mundane Chattanooga, finding out and stopping evil forces at work and Janea's at a very strange version of Dragon Con. The second story develops out of the first and leads to a dramatic confrontation with an Old One. Sandwiched in Barb's tale is a Warehouse 13 reference. Enjoy at your own risk.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Derek

    Followup to Princess of Wands Atypical soccer-mom (also Army brat, Martial arts specialist and firm believer in God) is 'drafted' to fight supernatural creatures on Earth by channeling the power of God. In Princess of Wands the demons are small. In Queen of Wands, not so much. A very creative astral trip to DragonCon and a major intervention are required. Decent. The other two are fine in length, the third one feels abrupt, chopped and not up to its potential. Also, the attempts at explaining the Followup to Princess of Wands Atypical soccer-mom (also Army brat, Martial arts specialist and firm believer in God) is 'drafted' to fight supernatural creatures on Earth by channeling the power of God. In Princess of Wands the demons are small. In Queen of Wands, not so much. A very creative astral trip to DragonCon and a major intervention are required. Decent. The other two are fine in length, the third one feels abrupt, chopped and not up to its potential. Also, the attempts at explaining the power of faith are a little too frequent for my taste.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Bruce Williams

    Another easy read. Entertaining. A bit surprising from Ringo as it's the first time I've ever seen him use more than religious faith to draw and define his characters. He's had characters in other series, especially his hard-bitten, fearless, military heroes who have drawn upon their beliefs/faith to gather strength and justify certain actions. But, this is the first I've read where he centers his main character so completely within a belief system. I wonder if some of my feeling about the author Another easy read. Entertaining. A bit surprising from Ringo as it's the first time I've ever seen him use more than religious faith to draw and define his characters. He's had characters in other series, especially his hard-bitten, fearless, military heroes who have drawn upon their beliefs/faith to gather strength and justify certain actions. But, this is the first I've read where he centers his main character so completely within a belief system. I wonder if some of my feeling about the author doing that are connected to my own feeling concerning religion...

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