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Politically Correct Bedtime Stories

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Once upon a time, in the olden days, heavy-set middle-aged men would congregate in their elitist clubs, sit in over-stuffed leather chairs, smoke air-choking cigars, and pitch story ideas and plots to each other. Problem was, these stories, many of which found their way into the general social consciousness, reflected the way in which these men lived and saw their world: t Once upon a time, in the olden days, heavy-set middle-aged men would congregate in their elitist clubs, sit in over-stuffed leather chairs, smoke air-choking cigars, and pitch story ideas and plots to each other. Problem was, these stories, many of which found their way into the general social consciousness, reflected the way in which these men lived and saw their world: that is, the stories were sexist, discriminatory, unfair, culturally biased, and in general, demeaning to witches, animals, goblins, and fairies everywhere. Finally, after centuries of these abusive tales, which have been handed down--unknowingly--from one male-biased generation to the next, James Finn Garner has taken it upon himself (that's right, yet another man) to enlighten and liberate these classic bedtime stories and retell them in a way that is much more in keeping with the society in which we live today. Politically Correct Bedtime Stories, then is the fruit of Garner's labors. We'd like to think that future generations of fairy-tale fans will see this as a worthy attempt to develop meaningful literature that is totally free from bias and purged from the influences of a flawed cultural past.


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Once upon a time, in the olden days, heavy-set middle-aged men would congregate in their elitist clubs, sit in over-stuffed leather chairs, smoke air-choking cigars, and pitch story ideas and plots to each other. Problem was, these stories, many of which found their way into the general social consciousness, reflected the way in which these men lived and saw their world: t Once upon a time, in the olden days, heavy-set middle-aged men would congregate in their elitist clubs, sit in over-stuffed leather chairs, smoke air-choking cigars, and pitch story ideas and plots to each other. Problem was, these stories, many of which found their way into the general social consciousness, reflected the way in which these men lived and saw their world: that is, the stories were sexist, discriminatory, unfair, culturally biased, and in general, demeaning to witches, animals, goblins, and fairies everywhere. Finally, after centuries of these abusive tales, which have been handed down--unknowingly--from one male-biased generation to the next, James Finn Garner has taken it upon himself (that's right, yet another man) to enlighten and liberate these classic bedtime stories and retell them in a way that is much more in keeping with the society in which we live today. Politically Correct Bedtime Stories, then is the fruit of Garner's labors. We'd like to think that future generations of fairy-tale fans will see this as a worthy attempt to develop meaningful literature that is totally free from bias and purged from the influences of a flawed cultural past.

30 review for Politically Correct Bedtime Stories

  1. 5 out of 5

    Miranda Reads

    When your memes show up in real life... I saw this on ifunny about 1-2 years ago and thought it was hilarious. Well...turns out, it was a real book. I picked up this copy in a little hole-in-a-wall used bookstore. Lucky find! This little novella transverses the most common fairytales and throws a completely new spin on them. A completely and utterly politically correct spin on them. Cinderella arrived. She was dressed in a clinging gown woven of silk stolen from unsuspecting silk-worms. Her h When your memes show up in real life... I saw this on ifunny about 1-2 years ago and thought it was hilarious. Well...turns out, it was a real book. I picked up this copy in a little hole-in-a-wall used bookstore. Lucky find! This little novella transverses the most common fairytales and throws a completely new spin on them. A completely and utterly politically correct spin on them. Cinderella arrived. She was dressed in a clinging gown woven of silk stolen from unsuspecting silk-worms. Her hair was festooned with pearls plundered from hard-working, defenseless oysters. And on her feet, dangerous though it may seem, she wore slippers made of finely cut crystal. The amount of sass condensed in this book is overwhelming. Red Riding Hood screamed, not out of alarm at the wolf's apparent tendency toward cross-dressing, but because of his willful invasion of her personal space. Hilarious in the extreme. My mother, sister and I took turns reading these stories out loud on a car ride. We had several moments where we literally could not speak because we were laughing so hard. This was certainly a fresh take on some old stories! One day an invitation arrived at their house. The prince was celebrating his exploitation of the dispossessed and marginalized peasantry by throwing a fancy dress ball. YouTube | Blog | Instagram | Twitter | Facebook | Snapchat @miranda_reads

  2. 4 out of 5

    Paige Bookdragon

    This was so much fun to read. I saw this post in tumblr: and after reading that, you bet your sweet ass I have to find the book and read it immediately. James Finn Garner did an amazing job in retelling the stories in a politically correct way best suited for modern times. My favorites are the following: The Little Red Riding Hood “And just what do you think you’re doing?” asked Red Riding Hood. The woodchopper-person blinked and tried to answer, but no words came to him. "Bursting in here like a N This was so much fun to read. I saw this post in tumblr: and after reading that, you bet your sweet ass I have to find the book and read it immediately. James Finn Garner did an amazing job in retelling the stories in a politically correct way best suited for modern times. My favorites are the following: The Little Red Riding Hood “And just what do you think you’re doing?” asked Red Riding Hood. The woodchopper-person blinked and tried to answer, but no words came to him. "Bursting in here like a Neanderthal, trusting your weapon to do your thinking for you!" she exclaimed. "Sexist! Speciesist! How dare you assume that womyn and wolves can't solve their own problems without a man's help!" The three little pigs By now the wolf was getting angry at the pigs' refusal to see the situation from the carnivore’s point of view. So he huffed and puffed, and huffed and puffed, then grabbed his chest and fell over dead of a massive heart attack brought on by eating too many fatty foods. Rumplestiltskin "That is how you turn straw into gold." Then his expression became menacing. "Now that I have done my work, you must fulfill your part of the bargain. You must give me your first-born child!" Esmeralda shot back at him, "I don't have to negotiate with anyone who would interfere with my reproductive rights! I can't wait to see the other book because, hey, it's fun to read something "right" without insulting another party.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Richard

    George Bernard Shaw once said that if something is funny, search it for truth. This book is full of truth, and it boldly and plainly illustrates the absurdity of political correctness. I love sarcasm and satire, and this book has plenty of it, so I found it delightful. It provides a marvelous picture of the current social and political landscape, and reveals the whole political correctness dogma for the foolish fraud that it is. Eleanor Roosevelt once said that no one can make you feel inferior George Bernard Shaw once said that if something is funny, search it for truth. This book is full of truth, and it boldly and plainly illustrates the absurdity of political correctness. I love sarcasm and satire, and this book has plenty of it, so I found it delightful. It provides a marvelous picture of the current social and political landscape, and reveals the whole political correctness dogma for the foolish fraud that it is. Eleanor Roosevelt once said that no one can make you feel inferior without your consent. We are the ones that decide to be offended, no matter what anyone else does. Anyone who doesn't find a least a little humor in this book needs to sit down and have a long talk with a mental health professional. Easy read; I finished it in just a few hours, even with interruptions. Highly recommended.

  4. 5 out of 5

    K.D. Absolutely

    Well, I find this book somewhat funny yet strange. Prior to this, my only idea of politically correct statements is not to say "poor" but say "financially challenged" or "short/dwarfish" but "vertically challenged". The reason is that most of us Filipinos speak pure English only when we talk to foreigners and because they are visitors here, they are probably too polite not to require us to be very careful with our language (as long as we don't curse or use vulgar terms) to the extent of using po Well, I find this book somewhat funny yet strange. Prior to this, my only idea of politically correct statements is not to say "poor" but say "financially challenged" or "short/dwarfish" but "vertically challenged". The reason is that most of us Filipinos speak pure English only when we talk to foreigners and because they are visitors here, they are probably too polite not to require us to be very careful with our language (as long as we don't curse or use vulgar terms) to the extent of using politically- correct statements. In our own language, the equivalent of these statements should be the S.I.R. (smooth interpersonal relationship) statements like when we say okay lang (she's okay) when we are referring to the looks of an ugly person. Communicating per se with a non-Filipino in the office is already somewhat of a struggle (we call it nosebleed) so requiring everybody to be politically correct will be quite difficult to do. This is the reason why I could not give this more than a 3-star rating. I find this book somewhat not too relevant. Yes, the way Garner tried to incorporate his politically correct statements and scenarios is commendable and for sure, it required a lot of his efforts and imagination. Also, tampering these well-loved classic fairy tales is a bit strange for me. I mean, while reading, I got reminded of the story of say Jack and the Beanstalk that I thought I only heard when I was still very young and while reading I was in a reminiscing mood trying to remember the kind face of my now dead teacher who I loved very much. So, the politically correct angle that Garner tried to incorporate in his version actually bot me distracted and made me want to find which of my Aesop, Grimms, Andersen books has that story of Jack and the Beanstalk so I can re-read it and remember how much I adored my dead teacher. But still I appreciate my friend for lending me this book that he rated with 5 stars and I do not want to break his heart so I am giving this 3 stars :)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Louise

    Fairy tales are strange, but these are the stranger. Examples are the “7 Towering Giants” and the Prince thinking they could use the comatose Snow White as a cure for impotence and at midnight Cinderella’s clothes disappear into rags which has a weird effect on other women and the men wind up dead. Every negative stereotype of PC is exaggerated beyond meaning, such as the guilt trip of the 3 Billy Goats Gruff and Goldilocks as an unethical academic. The PC targets are not always consistent. In R Fairy tales are strange, but these are the stranger. Examples are the “7 Towering Giants” and the Prince thinking they could use the comatose Snow White as a cure for impotence and at midnight Cinderella’s clothes disappear into rags which has a weird effect on other women and the men wind up dead. Every negative stereotype of PC is exaggerated beyond meaning, such as the guilt trip of the 3 Billy Goats Gruff and Goldilocks as an unethical academic. The PC targets are not always consistent. In Rapunzel capitalism is bad, but in other stories commercial success is a happily ever after. I wondered if this were part of the 1990’s backlash: The witch who imprisons Rapunzel is female; but Cinderella has a godperson; the foolish Chicken Little, Henny Penny and Loosey Goosey are females and Foxy Loxy, the lawyer is male and Goldilocks appears as a villain. “Womyn” obsessed with beauty is a theme, and in their liberation from it they wind up marketing some aspect of it. I’d like to see a real PC fairy tale book, or one with role reversals or one free of the macabre themes that characterize the genre.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Fatma

    A clever and witty telling for old fairy tales from a new and "politically corrected" prospective. A clever and witty telling for old fairy tales from a new and "politically corrected" prospective.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Damar dara

    James Finn Garner has taken 12 time-tested tales and retold them with the newfound sensitivity of our times. Here's a snippet from "Little Red Riding Hood": The wolf said, "You know, my dear, it isn't safe for a little girl to walk through these woods alone." Red Riding Hood said, "I find your sexist remark offensive in the extreme, but I will ignore it because of your traditional status as an outcast from society, the stress of which has caused you to develop your own, entirely valid, worldvie James Finn Garner has taken 12 time-tested tales and retold them with the newfound sensitivity of our times. Here's a snippet from "Little Red Riding Hood": The wolf said, "You know, my dear, it isn't safe for a little girl to walk through these woods alone." Red Riding Hood said, "I find your sexist remark offensive in the extreme, but I will ignore it because of your traditional status as an outcast from society, the stress of which has caused you to develop your own, entirely valid, worldview. Now, if you'll excuse me, I must be on my way." Leap into a fairy-tale world where trolls are "dirt-accomplished and odor-enhanced," witches are "kindness-impaired," and Cinderella wears a gown "woven of silk stolen from unsuspecting silkworms." We can only regret that Garner had to exclude "The Duckling That Was Judged on Its Personal Merits and Not on Its Physical Appearance" for space reasons.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    79 pages worth of garbage. Tries way to hard to be relevant. It also comes off as he just rushed into writing it and also that he plucked out sentences from the original and placed his in. His feminism is admirable but to me just comes off obtuse at times. I can do without political correctness because he destroyed the classic mentality of the original. Don’t make something into what it’s not. It just loses its value in showing how far we have come when it comes to the rights of others (yes we s 79 pages worth of garbage. Tries way to hard to be relevant. It also comes off as he just rushed into writing it and also that he plucked out sentences from the original and placed his in. His feminism is admirable but to me just comes off obtuse at times. I can do without political correctness because he destroyed the classic mentality of the original. Don’t make something into what it’s not. It just loses its value in showing how far we have come when it comes to the rights of others (yes we still have a ways to go). I really just despised everything about this book the unnecessary use of “big words” made him come off pretentious and irritating af.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Monnie

    As a card-carrying feminist carryover from the '60s, I've long been a proponent of concepts like gender equality and nonsexist language. That said, it's possible to cross the "roll up your pantlegs - it's too late to save your shoes" line at which political correctness becomes downright silly. Such is the case on occasion in this, a collection of well-known bedtime stories that have been revised for the modern generation. Still, it's amusing - and I got a kick out of all 11 stories that are in t As a card-carrying feminist carryover from the '60s, I've long been a proponent of concepts like gender equality and nonsexist language. That said, it's possible to cross the "roll up your pantlegs - it's too late to save your shoes" line at which political correctness becomes downright silly. Such is the case on occasion in this, a collection of well-known bedtime stories that have been revised for the modern generation. Still, it's amusing - and I got a kick out of all 11 stories that are in the version I read. Originally published in Great Britain in 1994, it's been updated and re-released, sent to me by our daughter-in-law who figured I'd enjoy it. At just 89 pages, it can be breezed through in an hour or less - so for those enlightened individuals looking for a chuckle or two, I recommend it, taking into account the author's opening caveat: "However much we might like to, we cannot blame the Brothers Grimm for their insensibility to women's issues, minority cultures and the environment." No, the good brothers did their thing long before Betty Friedan and the National Organization for Women, so the only thing left for the author to do is clean them up.There's no point in detailing any of the stories just because the book is so short, but I'll cite a few examples to give you a better idea of what's going on. In "Little Red Riding Hood," for instance, the woodsman becomes a "woodcutter" or, as he prefers, a "log-fuel technician." In The Emperor's New Clothes, the boy shouts to the crowd that the emperor is naked. "No, he isn't," the crowd fires back. "The emperor is merely endorsing a clothing-optional lifestyle!" Likewise, Cinderella's "sisters-of-step" are "differently visaged enough to stop a clock," and Cinderella has a "fairy godperson," a.k.a. "individual deity proxy." And there you have it - at the very least, if you've set a goal for the number of books you hope to read this year, it's a quick and relatively enjoyable way to get there.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kavita

    Have you heard of the emperor who made a clothing optional lifestyle popular in his kingdom? And how about the three little pigs that set up a model socialist democracy with free education, universal health care, and affordable housing for everyone after defeating the big bad wolf? Then there is Esmeralda who refused to negotiate with Rumpelstilskin on the grounds that she need not negotiate with anyone who would interfere with her reproductive rights. Surely, you must have heard of Cinderella w Have you heard of the emperor who made a clothing optional lifestyle popular in his kingdom? And how about the three little pigs that set up a model socialist democracy with free education, universal health care, and affordable housing for everyone after defeating the big bad wolf? Then there is Esmeralda who refused to negotiate with Rumpelstilskin on the grounds that she need not negotiate with anyone who would interfere with her reproductive rights. Surely, you must have heard of Cinderella who, along with her step-sisters, set up a clothing cooperative that produced only comfortable and practical clothes for women? What do you mean, no? These are the fairy tales of legend, passed down through generations! Pick up a copy right now and read these stories to your child. Disclaimer: I fully believe in political correctness, and I think that this book attempts to make a joke of it. But the way I read it, these stories also show us how racism, sexism, and other harmful biases had been normalised over the years and that there are always alternative ways in which we could tell stories.

  11. 4 out of 5

    PurplyCookie

    Leap into a fairy-tale world where trolls are "dirt-accomplished and odor-enhanced," witches are "kindness-impaired," and Cinderella wears a gown "woven of silk stolen from unsuspecting silkworms." We can only regret that Garner had to exclude "The Duckling That Was Judged on Its Personal Merits and Not on Its Physical Appearance" for space reasons. In this thin book Garner proposes to create "meaningful literature that is totally free from bias and purged from the influence of its flawed cultura Leap into a fairy-tale world where trolls are "dirt-accomplished and odor-enhanced," witches are "kindness-impaired," and Cinderella wears a gown "woven of silk stolen from unsuspecting silkworms." We can only regret that Garner had to exclude "The Duckling That Was Judged on Its Personal Merits and Not on Its Physical Appearance" for space reasons. In this thin book Garner proposes to create "meaningful literature that is totally free from bias and purged from the influence of its flawed cultural past." The results are extremely funny. Updated to account for modern political sensibilities, these revisionist folktales reflect wit and an engaging knack for irony. When a bandwagon reaches the point that it is subject to satirical spoofs, it's a good indication that said bandwagon has traveled way too far. `Political correctness' is one such bandwagon, and this little book is a pretty good attempt at poking pins in its over-inflated rhetoric. In "Little Red Riding Hood," Grandma exacts her feminist revenge on the woodchopper, who "assumes that womyn and wolves can't solve their own problems without a man's help." In "The Frog Prince," the princess, now an "eco-feminist warrior," discovers that her dream frog is not a prince, but a real-estate developer. In other tales, "Rapunzel" becomes a self-reliant coffee-house singer and the "Three Little Pigs" armed guerrillas, while cultural imperialists such as The Big Bad Wolf and "Goldilocks" get what has been coming to them for centuries. From "The Emperor's New Clothes" with disastrous consequences for our economically disadvantaged tailor to "Chicken Little's" (the name not being any attempt to classify said person as physically sized-disadvantaged) attempt to find a lawyer so she can sue whomever caused the sky to fall on her head causing her great emotional distress, the stories in this book will often bring a chuckle, and might cause one to reflect on the real world item the story is spoofing. However, I'd recommend that this be read one story at time, with long days between stories, as they do become somewhat repetitive when read all at one gulp, losing some of their charm in the process. Book Details: Title Politically Correct Bedtime Stories: Modern Tales for our Life & Times Author James Finn Garner Reviewed By Purplycookie

  12. 4 out of 5

    Johnny

    I'm doing a "summer reading challenge" for our local library with a friend, and one of the requirements is to read a bestseller from the year I graduated high school. In 1995, most of the NYT bestseller list were written by Danielle Steele and John Grisham, and I could barely stomach using up my precious summer reading time on their literary equivalents of paint-by-numbers artwork. I picked this one, remember a few friends from high school enjoying it. Unfortunately for me, the book is terribly d I'm doing a "summer reading challenge" for our local library with a friend, and one of the requirements is to read a bestseller from the year I graduated high school. In 1995, most of the NYT bestseller list were written by Danielle Steele and John Grisham, and I could barely stomach using up my precious summer reading time on their literary equivalents of paint-by-numbers artwork. I picked this one, remember a few friends from high school enjoying it. Unfortunately for me, the book is terribly dated and at points incredibly offensive. The narrative voice--a white man from the post-Reagan 90s trying to reconcile a world that embraces diversity and feeling his unearned privilege mortally threatened--is rank throughout the book. While some of the re-envisioning fairy tales here are indeed witty, its the tone of sarcasm about the pernicious impact of these stories on our culture. Thankfully for me, it is incredibly short, but I still regretted having spent $2.99 on the e-book version, especially when I read Garner's version of "Snow White" where the prince is suffering from impotence and suggests that the dwarfs leave him alone with the comatose maiden because his nether-regions are responding to her beauty. Yes, the character is asking the dwarfs to leave the room so that he can rape an unconscious woman. That alone should be reason enough for anyone to avoid this book now that it's heyday is more than twenty years past.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Basma

    It felt like he was trying so hard to make the stories politically correct and incorporate modern words. There was no flow to the story and reading it was weird. It's still a good idea though that I wish was handled differently. It felt like he was trying so hard to make the stories politically correct and incorporate modern words. There was no flow to the story and reading it was weird. It's still a good idea though that I wish was handled differently.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    Eh. It felt like the author created a PC feminist strawman and then wrote this book for it.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ray (user2637)

    Insulting men is not politically correct. This book tried hard, but the result is what a non-feminist thinks a feminist believes / would say. Disappointing.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Tawny

    I had wanted to use this book in a classroom setting, but since the stories were changed not only to include "politically correct" ideas, but also immorality and murder, I think I'll pass. Here's a sampling of the harmless stuff: Red Riding Hood entered the cottage and said, "Grandma, I have brought you some fat-free, sodium-free snacks to salute you in your role of a wise and nurturing matriarch." From the bed, the wolf said softly, "Come closer, child, so that I might see you." Red Riding Hood sa I had wanted to use this book in a classroom setting, but since the stories were changed not only to include "politically correct" ideas, but also immorality and murder, I think I'll pass. Here's a sampling of the harmless stuff: Red Riding Hood entered the cottage and said, "Grandma, I have brought you some fat-free, sodium-free snacks to salute you in your role of a wise and nurturing matriarch." From the bed, the wolf said softly, "Come closer, child, so that I might see you." Red Riding Hood said, "Oh, I forgot you are as optically challenged as a bat..."

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sascha

    Very funny

  18. 4 out of 5

    Vartika

    Once upon a time, there was a thing called the ‘fairy-tale’, which was not yet rid of its sexist, racist, ableist, colourist, lookist, speciesist, intellectualist and ageist biases, and did not give a dime about the environment. This changed in 1994 – in the midst of the battle and backlash regarding Political Correctness – when a man named James Finn Garner set himself upon re-writing these popular but problematic tales for his own “politically correct” collection of bedtime stories. What Garne Once upon a time, there was a thing called the ‘fairy-tale’, which was not yet rid of its sexist, racist, ableist, colourist, lookist, speciesist, intellectualist and ageist biases, and did not give a dime about the environment. This changed in 1994 – in the midst of the battle and backlash regarding Political Correctness – when a man named James Finn Garner set himself upon re-writing these popular but problematic tales for his own “politically correct” collection of bedtime stories. What Garner created here was a collection of humourous, tongue-in-cheek – and indeed, what he himself would call opportunist -- satire of 12 ‘fairy-tales’ of old (originally by nineteenth century patriarchal moralists of the likes of Hans Christian Andersen and the brothers Grimm). In Garner’s hands, the usage of political correctness – in both language and attitude – becomes a double-edged sword, with something to offend people on both sides of the PC debate. While these “politically correct” versions certainly improve upon stories which were originally meant to entrench the patriarchy, to estrange people from their own natural impulses, to demonize “evil” and to “reward” an “objective” “good” they also bring to these “enlightened times” other aspects of the author’s almost Swiftian sense of getting-away-with-laughing-at-everyone: that political correctness can often be overdone to the level of absurdity is exemplified here (a satire of political correctness itself?). In the wrong (?) hands, this absurdity could be corelated with wholesale ridicule. In most hands, however, this volume is bound to raise a good number of laughs. Is anyone surprised this was a bestseller? [My one big problem with Politically Correct Bedtime Stories, though, is that the collection tends to be inconsistent in its political correctness: in most stories, Capitalism is bad, but others park it as the site of their happily-ever-afters. Maybe Garner is just not ready to take sides, but I do see that in many regards he appears to be monarchist, something not “yet unnamed” in the 1990s.]

  19. 4 out of 5

    Joli Mamon

    I'm crying 😂😂😂😂 I don't even know how to explain this book but I hope the title says it all.the writing style gives me such a Cory o'Brien feel but like-in the opposite end of the spectrum Here's a little teaser from the first story "Red Riding Hood" "There was once a young person named Red Riding Hood who lived with her mother on the edge of a large wood. One day her mother asked her to take a basket of fresh fruit and mineral water to her grandmother’s house–not because this was womyn’s work, mi I'm crying 😂😂😂😂 I don't even know how to explain this book but I hope the title says it all.the writing style gives me such a Cory o'Brien feel but like-in the opposite end of the spectrum Here's a little teaser from the first story "Red Riding Hood" "There was once a young person named Red Riding Hood who lived with her mother on the edge of a large wood. One day her mother asked her to take a basket of fresh fruit and mineral water to her grandmother’s house–not because this was womyn’s work, mind you, but because the deed was generous and helped engender a feeling of community. Furthermore, her grandmother was not sick, but rather was in full physical and mental health and was fully capable of taking care of herself as a mature adult." It's a short read so give it a go if you have a free afternoon :)))

  20. 4 out of 5

    Manogna

    I did not realize that the stories we read and loved for so long were flawed in so many aspects until I read this book. It's pure genius, hilarious, revolutionary and yes , absolutely politically correct! I did not realize that the stories we read and loved for so long were flawed in so many aspects until I read this book. It's pure genius, hilarious, revolutionary and yes , absolutely politically correct!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ch_jank-caporale

    When this book was published, it was thought quite humorous. I find it rather trite. But it does raise some intersting questions about the evolution of traditional tales and the "moral lessons" that are embedded in them for children. Tongue-in-cheek, Finn Garner "cleans up" the offensive stereotypes. For instance, in the tale I studied this week, Little Red Riding Hood, when the wolf offers to offered accompany her through the dangerous woods, replies, "I find your sexist remark offensive in the When this book was published, it was thought quite humorous. I find it rather trite. But it does raise some intersting questions about the evolution of traditional tales and the "moral lessons" that are embedded in them for children. Tongue-in-cheek, Finn Garner "cleans up" the offensive stereotypes. For instance, in the tale I studied this week, Little Red Riding Hood, when the wolf offers to offered accompany her through the dangerous woods, replies, "I find your sexist remark offensive in the extreme, but I will ignore it because of your traditional status as an outcast from society, the stress of which has caused you to develop your own, entirely valid, worldview. Now, if you'll excuse me, I must be on my way." Grandma, too, exacts her feminist revenge on the woodchopper, who "assumes that womyn and wolves can't solve their own problems without a man's help." While the tales are often chosen for the entertainment of children, this collection is intended for older children or adults. The PC intentions are neither serious, nor particularly less offensive, though as revisionist tales they certainly have their place, and they do reflect a modern academic perspective in the absurd questions they pose. I would use these stories with High school age students and maybe mature middle school readers. They belong within a study of the genre but should not replace the traditional tales!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ioana Ioana

    1994, "In case I don't see you later, good afternoon, good evening, and good night!" James Finn’s idea is brilliant, but has little craft attached to it. I laughed all throughout the first 60 pages at the ridiculously self-righteous jargon used by characters. The turtle was performant in laziness, the minority was a “non-majority” haha and short people we’re “vertically impaired”. With more thought put into it, the book could have been a great satire piece. Unfortunately, it was plotted lazily an 1994, "In case I don't see you later, good afternoon, good evening, and good night!" James Finn’s idea is brilliant, but has little craft attached to it. I laughed all throughout the first 60 pages at the ridiculously self-righteous jargon used by characters. The turtle was performant in laziness, the minority was a “non-majority” haha and short people we’re “vertically impaired”. With more thought put into it, the book could have been a great satire piece. Unfortunately, it was plotted lazily and the humor petered out fast. But, for what it is, the first 60 or so pages are fun and draw attention upon the highly inauthentic language used by those with a self-absorbed worldview. https://youtu.be/Dgp9MPLEAqA

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kat Kennedy

    It was great at the start, but then the novelty wore off and it just became really boring.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Linda Lipko

    Witty, funny and spot on in throwing a light on how out of control the US society is regarding political correctness!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Serena.. Sery-ously?

    On the way to Grandma's house, Red Riding Hood was accosted by a wolf, who asked her what was in her basket. She replied, "Some healthful snacks for my grandmother, who is certainly capable of taking care of herself as a mature adult". The wolf said, "You know, my dear, it isn't safe for a little girl to walk through these woods alone", Red Riding Hood said, "I find your sexist remark offensive in the extreme, but I will ignore it because of your traditional status as an outcast from society, the On the way to Grandma's house, Red Riding Hood was accosted by a wolf, who asked her what was in her basket. She replied, "Some healthful snacks for my grandmother, who is certainly capable of taking care of herself as a mature adult". The wolf said, "You know, my dear, it isn't safe for a little girl to walk through these woods alone", Red Riding Hood said, "I find your sexist remark offensive in the extreme, but I will ignore it because of your traditional status as an outcast from society, the stress of which has caued you to develop your own, entirely vali, worldview. Now, if you'll excuse me, I must be on my way".

  26. 5 out of 5

    Richa Bhattarai

    Funny in parts, interesting in some, but mostly just a load of tiring balderdash. There are ways of retelling an old story that’s thoughtful and humorous, but this is not it. All the old stories become contrived and meaningless and have a weird climax that seems quite forced. The author seems to be quite a fun person, but I see this as a waste of his talent. This is a satire and a farce, but doesn’t quite have the intelligence or the ability to evoke that laughter. It just gets boring.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ban - Szilveszter Endre

    A good book on social satire, a reminder of how some people try to change the way we communicate in order to further their own political agenda and how this leads to a loss of a clear message, clarity and ease of communication. Very tought provoking!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Andragel

    This was a SPLENDID read. Seeing how evil political correctness could be when applied to mythical lands is so satisfying I'll probably read it again soon This was a SPLENDID read. Seeing how evil political correctness could be when applied to mythical lands is so satisfying I'll probably read it again soon

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mahmoud Yasseen

    Paradoxically Sarcastic.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Brooke Elden

    This book was just silly and weird. I was hoping it would expand my mind and reveal hidden political incorrectness in fairy tales, and change my world view somehow but... it did not do that. Maybe include role reversals? This book does make an effort to deny stereotypes in examples such as the quote below, but it still is using the stereotypes. Saying "financially challenged" instead of "poor" still means the character is poor... same with "chronologically challenged" for old. Thus exaggerating This book was just silly and weird. I was hoping it would expand my mind and reveal hidden political incorrectness in fairy tales, and change my world view somehow but... it did not do that. Maybe include role reversals? This book does make an effort to deny stereotypes in examples such as the quote below, but it still is using the stereotypes. Saying "financially challenged" instead of "poor" still means the character is poor... same with "chronologically challenged" for old. Thus exaggerating the stereotype that was used within that tale. This book was supposed to be funny, I think, but it wasn't. There were a few lines that made me chuckle, like the woodcutter from Red Riding Hood being referred to as "log-fuel technician." Okay, yeah, that's funny. But really, what is NOT politically correct about "woodcutter"? That's someone's legitimate job! I wish this book had been more serious and just told the tales from a new edge that was actually politically correct and not just ridiculous and weird. The fashion statement on Cinderella was nice. (moral basically that women follow ridiculous, uncomfortable trends all for the sake of beauty). As one reviewer said: the pc themes were inconsistent. It was more of a way for the author to preach to the world about his own morals and beliefs. Lame... But in Snow White, the only politically correct thing there was referring to the dwarfs as vertically challenged. What. They are DWARFS! And seeing as dwarfism is a real thing, and that is its actual name, and that even if you aren't referring to that, there's also the mythical creature dwarfs... and I highly doubt they would be offended if you called them by the name of their species. That would be like be getting offended by calling me a human being. (okay, to that note, I see the point now...) Nothing else about the tale was memorable. I read this for my research for RRH but I could have missed it. I don't even remember the RRH story from this, and I just read the book a few days ago. Give this one a miss.

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