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Tales of the Bounty Hunters

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In a wild and battle-scarred galaxy, assassins, pirates, smugglers, and cutthroats of every description roam at will, fearing only the professional bounty hunters---amoral adventurers who track down the scum of the universe...for a fee. When Darth Vader seeks to strike at the heart of the Rebellion by targeting Han Solo and the Millennium Falcon, he calls upon six of the m In a wild and battle-scarred galaxy, assassins, pirates, smugglers, and cutthroats of every description roam at will, fearing only the professional bounty hunters---amoral adventurers who track down the scum of the universe...for a fee. When Darth Vader seeks to strike at the heart of the Rebellion by targeting Han Solo and the Millennium Falcon, he calls upon six of the most successful---and feared---hunters, including the merciless Boba Fett. They all have two things in common: lust for profit and contempt for life.... Featuring original stories by Kevin J. Anderson, M. Shayne Bell, Daniel Keys Moran, Kathy Tyers, Dave Wolverton.


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In a wild and battle-scarred galaxy, assassins, pirates, smugglers, and cutthroats of every description roam at will, fearing only the professional bounty hunters---amoral adventurers who track down the scum of the universe...for a fee. When Darth Vader seeks to strike at the heart of the Rebellion by targeting Han Solo and the Millennium Falcon, he calls upon six of the m In a wild and battle-scarred galaxy, assassins, pirates, smugglers, and cutthroats of every description roam at will, fearing only the professional bounty hunters---amoral adventurers who track down the scum of the universe...for a fee. When Darth Vader seeks to strike at the heart of the Rebellion by targeting Han Solo and the Millennium Falcon, he calls upon six of the most successful---and feared---hunters, including the merciless Boba Fett. They all have two things in common: lust for profit and contempt for life.... Featuring original stories by Kevin J. Anderson, M. Shayne Bell, Daniel Keys Moran, Kathy Tyers, Dave Wolverton.

30 review for Tales of the Bounty Hunters

  1. 5 out of 5

    J.P. Ashman

    Read this many years ago, so I can't be specific on this review. What I do remember is loving it! Read this many years ago, so I can't be specific on this review. What I do remember is loving it!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lance Shadow

    This took an unusually long time for me to read because I have been going through some life changes, so I didn't have much time to read and review. I put Catalyst - A Rogue One Novel on higher priority because Rogue One was coming out and I wanted to read that book before I saw the film. But once I finished, I went back to reading Tales of the Bounty Hunters. In The Empire Strikes Back, Darth Vader hires the most famous bounty hunters in the galaxy to find Han Solo and the Millenium Falcon in or This took an unusually long time for me to read because I have been going through some life changes, so I didn't have much time to read and review. I put Catalyst - A Rogue One Novel on higher priority because Rogue One was coming out and I wanted to read that book before I saw the film. But once I finished, I went back to reading Tales of the Bounty Hunters. In The Empire Strikes Back, Darth Vader hires the most famous bounty hunters in the galaxy to find Han Solo and the Millenium Falcon in order to set up his trap for Luke Skywalker. Each of the despicable goons that appear in the meeting scene aboard the Executor gets their own little story in this anthology, with varying degrees of quality. I rated this book differently from most other books/comics I review: there's 5 stories, so for each story that I enjoyed, I awarded one star to the book as a whole. Hence, I gave the book 2 stars because I enjoyed 2 of the stories. THEREFORE I AM: THE TALE OF IG-88- *1 star The first story, focusing on the cone headed droid IG-88, is easily my least favorite story in the book. IG-88 is revealed to be an experimental model built by the empire, but it goes the way of the classic monster creation route as IG-88 turns on his creators. He then sets out to start a droid revolution and take over the galaxy. The second part is almost entirely why I found this story so stupid. What makes the stories in this book worth reading, aside from entertaining adventures, is the backstories, personalities, and traits given to these characters, and I disliked just about everything given to IG-88, except for the origin. The traits given to this droid were pretty ridiculous, the storyline was extremely dumb, and IG-88 himself had no personality whatsoever. (view spoiler)[ 4 identical bodies operating simultaneously? SERIOUSLY? Several metric tons? yeah no, I don't buy that. I also hated how he was characterized as this maniacal machine that wanted to take over the galaxy, making his motivation to be there on the executor and hunt Han Solo incredibly flimsy. And don't get me started on the whole "becoming the death star" nonsense. (hide spoiler)] I really liked Kevin J. Anderson's contributions to Tales of the Jedi, but if this kind of nonsense is prevalent in his writing for other Star Wars entries, I can understand some of the hate that he gets among the Star Wars EU fan community. PAYBACK: THE TALE OF DENGAR- ****4 Stars After the stupidity of IG-88's story, Dave Wolverton's take on the white-hooded human bounty hunter Dengar restored my faith in this book. Dengar's tale opens on Aruza, a planet occupied by the Empire, as he is hunting down an Imperial named Kritkeen. It turns out that Dengar was given cybernetic enhancements to make him a more efficient killing machine, which he uses to be an effective Bounty Hunter. During his misadventures on Aruza he rescues a native dancer named Manaroo, and his evolution to regaining his humanity begins here. Wolverton's background from writing The Courtship of Princess Leia definitely shows with the sappy romantic ending here, but I couldn't help but find it really sweet. Other than that though, I really dug this story. Dengar is given interesting character traits that connect excellently with his story of rediscovering humanity and human emotions through his romance with Manaroo, as well as his desire to take the mission of hunting Han Solo from Darth Vader. Most of the new characters introduced in these stories are quite bland and forgettable, but Manaroo is enjoyable and makes a great companion to Dengar. THE PRIZE PELT: THE TALE OF BOSSK- **2 stars Kathy Tyers, writer of The Truce at Bakura, and New Jedi Order entry Balance Point, provides the next story, centering on the Trandoshan Bounty Hunter Bossk. Honestly, I forgot what the story was about because it was pretty boring, even if there are some good aspects. The things we learn about the Trandoshan species and culture are definitely great. Even though I already knew about the Scorekeeper stuff from Quyzen Fess in SWTOR, it was neat to see where that information came from. I also really liked the creative spin that Bossk was actually more interested in hunting Chewbacca than Han Solo- but because Chewie is Han Solo's inseparable sidekick, Bossk still has motivation to take the mission from Vader. Aside from that though, we get a forgettable plotline with equally forgettable side characters. It would be fine if Bossk himself was more interesting, but he is given no characterization outside the things we learn about the Trandoshan species and culture, making his character an idea instead of an actual character. I learned about the trandoshans, but not enough about Bossk. And when I read this story to learn about Bossk, that's a big problem. OF POSSIBLE FUTURES: THE TALE OF ZUCKUSS AND 4-LOM: ****4.5 stars M. Shayne Bell is given not one, but two bounty hunters from the bounty hunter meeting scene, so he pairs them up a-la Dash Rendar and Leebo, only more evil. I'm not going to give a summary for this one because it would just be a spoiler. I think it is better if you go into this one not knowing what to expect. This is an excellent story, my favorite of the five, and the only one in the collection I found better than The Perfect Weapon, Delilah S. Dawson's canonical short story starring Bazine Netaal. This story is close to perfect. 4-LOM is well characterized, staying a bounty hunter and staying a droid but still having a loyal and distinct personality. Zuckuss was easily the most memorable character in this entire collection, feeling like a threatening bounty hunter at points but also being very sympathetic. His backstory, and as a result his motivations for hunting Han Solo are compelling and drive the story forward extremely well. Toryn was also a decent side character. THE LAST ONE STANDING: THE TALE OF BOBA FETT: ***2.5 stars The final entry in the book, written by Daniel Keyes Moran and starring everybody's favorite awesome armored Boba Fett, was probably the biggest let-down of the book. Parts of it were great but coming from the most important and popular bounty hunter in the group, I expected alot more from his short story. Most of "The Last One Standing" takes place post return of the jedi: Boba Fett is older now, and he's much more experienced. The problem with this story is the writing: it doesn't focus on the right elements. Han Solo gets alot of page time in this book, and I really disliked that aspect. I wanted to read about Boba Fett, not Han Solo's midlife crisis! Han and Boba do eventually meet up in the story, but the payoff is just not big enough to justify all the focus that Han Solo took from Boba Fett. Another problem I had, while not the writers' fault, is that the fact that the prequels changed Boba Fett's backstory and it really took me out of this. With Heir to the Empire by comparison, many of the snippets of pre original trilogy backstory may have been outdated when the prequels were released, but the story and characters were strong enough for me to forgive that aspect, as well as the fact that Timothy Zahn did such a great job keeping the focus going forward instead of relying on going backward and filling the gaps. Here, the past is part of why I want to read this story. But more importantly, it's just not written well. Even if the backstory is outdated, i would have at least given the story credit if it was well written. Instead, we get a pointless POV from young Han Solo and the backstory is way to glossed over regardless. The stuff concerning the events surrounding Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi is also barely adressed, and I would have really liked to see more of that. I liked the scene he had with Princess Leia in Jabba's palace, but his POV at the great pit of Karkoon and how he handled being in the Sarlacc Pit would have really helped developed the character and give us an interesting angle from that seen in Return of the Jedi. There are some good things in this story though. Great, even. Boba Fett is given a distinct and interesting personality, and provides a unique perspective on the Empire as well as the life of a bounty hunter. His dialogue is really good, making the conversations with Leia and Malloc some of this entire book's better character moments. It was also cool to read about his exploits after escaping the sarlacc (this is the biggest piece of legends aside from anything Old Republic Related that I want to see back in canon- I like the idea of Boba Fett surviving and thought his death in RotJ was lame). I can understand somebody else liking this story more than I did, but it just didn't work for me. THE CONCLUSION: Some of the stories are great, some are awful, but the book as a whole is not good. I enjoyed the stories about Dengar and 4-LOM/Zuckuss, but I would not have been happy with the purchase if I had to pay full price for this (thank you Crystal Starr Light for sending me the book! :D). If you want to read the book to know more about these characters, it's fairly pointless because of the book's non canon status, unless that does not bother you and/or you are a strict legends-only person. If you just want some fun adventures about your favorite intergalactic space-scum, I can't fully say that the book is good for that purpose. However, perhaps the book will resonate more with you than it did for me. Even so, there's 5 stories here, so you should at least find one or two that you'll like. The book has its good entrees, as well as bad ones, so take it for what it is.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jason Burrows

    I have to say... one of the best Star Wars books I've stumbled upon. The different stories are so magical I loved each and every one of them. Boba Fett's story is very entertaining and catches you from the first pages, although George Lucas decided to take the character in a totally different direction, which I have to say thought was soooo lame, because the Boba Fett of "Last Man Standing" is so awesome there are no words to describe it. Dengar's story is also very interesting, as he is a characte I have to say... one of the best Star Wars books I've stumbled upon. The different stories are so magical I loved each and every one of them. Boba Fett's story is very entertaining and catches you from the first pages, although George Lucas decided to take the character in a totally different direction, which I have to say thought was soooo lame, because the Boba Fett of "Last Man Standing" is so awesome there are no words to describe it. Dengar's story is also very interesting, as he is a character of whom we knew so little about, and the story manages to give us a very good insight of the characters personality. Although I must point out the my favourite one of the book is IG-88's story "Therefore I Am". I never though that a full story, a completely serious story, based around a droid would work so surprisingly well. Anderson has managed to give IG-88, a droid that has less than 3 screen minutes on the film, such a profound and strong personality. I totally fell for the story from the first lines and could not stop until I had read the full story through. "Therefore I Am" and "Last Man Standing" are with no doubt whatsoever, two of my most cherished all time Star Wars moments, and I will carry on reading the whole book over and over again.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Eric Farr

    I returned to Tales of the Bounty Hunters partly out of nostalgia, but partly because I'd rather enjoyed the other Tales that I've rediscovered in adulthood. On finishing, I was surprised to find that my original rating for this collection, based on childhood recollections, was pretty honest; I haven't altered that rating. The stories are good, extrapolating from our brief glimpse of Empire's bounty hunters into full adventures that are generally interesting, though rarely emotionally investing. I returned to Tales of the Bounty Hunters partly out of nostalgia, but partly because I'd rather enjoyed the other Tales that I've rediscovered in adulthood. On finishing, I was surprised to find that my original rating for this collection, based on childhood recollections, was pretty honest; I haven't altered that rating. The stories are good, extrapolating from our brief glimpse of Empire's bounty hunters into full adventures that are generally interesting, though rarely emotionally investing. The wildest part to me was realizing that "Therefore I Am: The Tale of IG-88," by Kevin J. Anderson, was nowhere as good as I remembered it. There was no way that it could be; I remembered it as a high-concept piece about artificial intelligence, droid rights, relative morality, and a fight for liberty. It's...not that. I can see how the basic story of IG-88's silent droid revolution allowed me to imagine these larger, richer themes; it stoked the fires of my young imagination, even if it didn't really execute such an epic story. IG-88 is an assassin droid; it thinks it's better than organics, so it's going to kill them all. It thinks droid independence is vital, but it's quite happy to overwrite other assassin droids to transplant its personality, and it views an override code that will launch a galactic-wide droid revolution as an essential part of its plan. IG-88 never seems to even consider that its own quest for independence is really a blood-stained path to change one oppressor (organics in general) to another (IG-88 in particular). I think that IG-88's vanity and arrogance are intended to be part of the story, but since we're largely limited to its perspective and that of a generic Imperial bureaucrat villain, there's not much effort to really emphasize the hypocrisy of the droid's plans. And so much of the story is couched in Ultra-Cool 90s Grittiness, with hyper-violent deaths, a mechanized factory world, the aforementioned generic villain, and mostly shoot-'em-up exploits that all feel more like the plot to a video game or very of-its-era comic book than a Star Wars story. I'm still amused that IG-88 ultimately decides to become the Death Star II; like its other copies, its perceived strength is a false image of arrogance, and it fails in its moment of triumph, rather like a certain Emperor occupying the halls of its final battle station form. There's a story for each bounty hunter, though, and IG-88's just the first. "Payback: The Tale of Dengar," by Dave Wolverton, attempts to make Dengar cool. His central motivation is revenge: revenge against Han Solo, who inadvertently caused him to crash in a swoop bike race, and revenge against the Empire, which used his swoop accident as an excuse to perform super-soldier experiments on his maimed body, erasing most of his emotions and augmenting him considerably. The story was engaging for me, with a lot of 007-esque action, but the central conceit is basically that Dengar is able to find himself in the love of a woman, and that's a tired trope. It's sort of interesting that he's able to find happiness when he essentially rejects a form of toxic masculinity that narrows the emotional spectrum to rage--here applied through the dual science-fiction elements of hyper-advanced surgeries that can precisely cut out specific emotions and of an advanced, pacifistic culture that has developed devices that allow shared emotional experiences. His dream girl can literally allow him to feel how she feels about him. It's certainly not winning any awards for progressive narrative, but this plot element did provide for a clear arc for Dengar. And it ends with Dengar recovering Boba Fett from near the Sarlacc, rejecting revenge against the man who betrayed him twice, and asking the Mandalorian super-commando to be his best man at a wedding, so there's that. (By the way, the more I think about it, the more that this story feels like the Star Wars version of Casino Royale, just with a happy ending). "The Prize Pelt: The Tale of Bossk," by Kathy Tyers, proved to be my favorite story, though I didn't remember it that strongly. Partially I enjoyed it as a continuation of the story of armament-company-heiress-turned-bounty-hunter Tinian, who appeared first in another short story by Tyers that was collected in Tales from the Empire. Tyers clearly enjoyed writing Tinian and Chenlambec, providing this story with perhaps the most heart and soul of any in the anthology. But I also enjoyed it because it's got convoluted plans, with crosses and double-crosses and backup options galore, and because Bossk isn't provided some redeeming narrative like most of the other characters--nor is he made to be "cool." Bossk is played up as an evil dude, a vile serial killer who hunts other sentients for fun. We want Bossk to be defeated in the end, and he's dangerous enough that points in the story are truly scary and nerve-wracking. "Of Possible Futures: The Tale of Zuckuss and 4-LOM," by M. Shayne Bell, was another story I was fond of as a kid, but it held up better than I expected. Look, I'll admit that part of what I loved about it was that two of the protagonists shared the surname Farr (hey, that's my name!), and they were both intimately involved in the Battle of Hoth, which always fascinated me. Now, though, I can appreciate the story for its incredible weirdness. Zuckuss has his own elaborate alien culture, barely touched on, and a desperate motivation to earn enough credits to repair or replace his oxygen-damaged lungs. 4-LOM was a simple protocol droid who overrode his own programming over time through twisted logic to become first a master thief and then a bounty hunter; he continues to test the bounds of his programming, and he's actually partnered with Zuckuss because he hopes to learn the art of intuition from his companion. His biggest ambition is to somehow learn to use the Force. Meanwhile, Toryn Farr (whom you may know as the background female officer who was one of the last to stay behind in the Echo Base control room) struggles with being thrust into a leadership situation in a crisis, balancing the needs of the crew with her protectiveness for her seriously wounded snowspeeder pilot sister, Samoc. While Legends wouldn't let Zuckuss and 4-LOM have the fate suggested at the end of this story, "Of Possible Futures" ends with them joining up as legitimate members of the Rebellion. I love not just the expansion of so many background characters, but the sheer amount of wild and weird. It's sad to me that we never got more of Toryn and Samoc. Finally, the last story is "The Last One Standing: The Tale of Boba Fett," by Daniel Keys Moran. This one still gets discussed in some fandom circles as one of the great Boba Fett stories. It's fine. Fett is a dispassionate killer, and apparently an ugly man. He's devoted to the concept of Justice, but he's perfectly fine with extrajudicial murder, even for lesser offenses like smuggling. He views a good deal of sex as immoral. He's a prude with a laser gun. There's an especially awkward scene where Jabba sends Leia to his room, and he promises to leave her untouched, safe in his chambers, for the night; they have a brief moral discussion in which his incomprehensible values are stated as obvious truths. It reads as the ultimate fanboy stand-in: so close to the beautiful Leia Organa, possessing great power over her in a sexually compromising situation, and choosing to be the Noble Gentleman who promises not to lay a finger on her. Frankly, it's a weird scene to me because I see no reason why, in the fiction of Star Wars, Leia ever had to be at any sort of risk of sexual assault, and I'd believe she could fight or talk her way out of any such situation anyway, so painting her as so vulnerable (and, in this scene, scared) is just downright uncomfortable. That all said, I did like the later sections of the story, as Fett deals with his traumas and wounds as he continues to hunt in old age, finding himself at the very end in a standoff with an equally exhausted Han Solo. The standoff cliffhanger ending, with its ambiguous outcome, is interesting, but I think we all know a character like Solo would never be killed off-screen, in or out of Legends. I think I can see how a story that attempted to provide a background and personality to Fett was so well-regarded at the time, but it hasn't aged well. In all, I think I mostly prefer the new canon versions of the characters. But the stories were still mostly enjoyable. Unless you are guided by nostalgia, like myself, I think you can pass over a purchase of the book, used or otherwise, and instead pick it up from the library to check out the tales of Bossk, Zuckuss, and 4-LOM.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Maegen

    Helped me feel better while sad and the stories were all quite good, so definitely 4 stars! :)

  6. 5 out of 5

    Meggie

    For 2020, I decided to reread (in publication order) all the Bantam-era Star Wars books that were released between 1991 and 1999; that shakes out to 38 adult novels and 5 anthologies of short stories & novellas. This week’s focus: the third of the short story collections edited by Kevin J. Anderson, Tales of the Bounty Hunters. SOME HISTORY: After Tales from Jabba's Palace debuted with nineteen stories about the Palace denizens, Anderson returned to edit one more collection of short stories--this o For 2020, I decided to reread (in publication order) all the Bantam-era Star Wars books that were released between 1991 and 1999; that shakes out to 38 adult novels and 5 anthologies of short stories & novellas. This week’s focus: the third of the short story collections edited by Kevin J. Anderson, Tales of the Bounty Hunters. SOME HISTORY: After Tales from Jabba's Palace debuted with nineteen stories about the Palace denizens, Anderson returned to edit one more collection of short stories--this one about the six bounty hunters that Darth Vader assembles on the Executor. We have five stories from established Star Wars writers: Anderson, Wolverton, and Tyers had written Star Wars novels at this point, and all five authors had contributed to the previous Tales collections. And like the other two collections, it didn’t seem to make it into the top 15 on the New York Times paperback bestseller list, because I can’t find any data on it. MY RECOLLECTION OF THE BOOK: With the Tales collections so far, I’m finding that I probably read Tales from Jabba's Palace, perhaps didn’t read Tales from the Mos Eisley Cantina, and I don’t think I read Tales of the Bounty Hunters either. A BRIEF SUMMARY: When Darth Vader seeks to strike at the heart of the Rebellion by targeting Han Solo and the Millennium Falcon, he calls upon six of the most successful bounty hunters with very different agendas in play... THE STORIES: “Therefore I Am: The Tale of IG-88” by Kevin J. Anderson This one didn’t really work for me. The title, of course, is taken from René Descartes (“je pense, donc je suis” = “I think, therefore I am”), and while it deals with droid sentience, I didn’t feel like Anderson delved into that subject with any depth. IG-88 wants to give all droids sentience, but also has no qualms completely overwriting their personalities. The IG-88s are supposedly these amazing assassin droids, but we don’t see much evidence of that. All but one of their assassin/bounty jobs occur offscreen, and Boba Fett manages to take out 3 of the models pretty easily. I’m also not sure how they managed to make it on the Executor when there was an Imperial order to dismantle them. It’s also filled with hyper-violent video game action and a cartoonish villain. IG-88 throws a droid arm as a spear at a technician, and it comes out the other side of his chest holding his heart. #1, that’s gross, and #2, that seems highly improbable. And did Anderson need to repeatedly bring up Gurdun’s large nose? Thinking back, a number of the human characters were grotesquely described. Maybe my least favorite story in the collection. “Payback: The Tale of Dengar” by Dave Wolverton I liked Dengar’s emotional arc, even if I wasn’t crazy about some other aspects of the story. Dengar wants to get Han Solo because he almost killed him in a swoop race and led to his cybernetic unemotional state. I think Dengar’s backstory is interesting, I just am not sure that the Solo connection is necessary. He ends up helping the Rebellion so that he can get closer to Han. He meets a woman who’s an empath; she can make him feel her emotions. They get married in the end! (It’s surprisingly sweet.) However, Dengar makes it to Cloud City in time to see Boba Fett take off with his bounty, heads to Jabba’s Palace to await Han’s escape, almost dies, and rescues Boba Fett after he blew up the Sarlacc. I know that Dengar is visible in the background of some of the Jabba’s Palace scenes in ROTJ, but I always thought that Lucas was just reusing old costumes (you can also see Bossk at some points). It strains my disbelief that Dengar manages to make it to so many of the movie locations. The timeline is also a little flimsy: Dengar spends weeks recuperating from the Teeth of Tatooine, then heads out to Sarlacc for some scavenging and discovers Fett. Yet in Tales from Jabba's Palace, Fett was only in the Sarlacc for a few days before escaping. We also have people partying the night away after Luke Skywalker kills Jabba’s rancor, but I thought they left for the Great Pit of Carkoon that same day? Weird quibble: the word “bushwhack” appears twice in the story, both in instances where Dengar wants to ambush Fett: “Dengar was tempted to bushwhack Boba Fett and steal his prize.” That’s a perfectly legitimate word with an appropriate meaning (came into wide use during the American Civil War), but it completely took me out of the story. “The Prize Pelt: The Tale of Bossk” by Kathy Tyers I liked that Bossk is interested in the bounty on Han Solo solely because he hunts Wookiees. We get an awful lot of information about Bossk and Trandoshans, which later works will use, but Bossk himself is irredeemably evil--and a bit underdeveloped for me. Fortunately, we also have two side characters to root for. Tinian and Chenlambec are characters that appeared in Tyers’ Star Wars Adventure Journal stories from issues 4, 6, and 10; while I’ve never read the stories, I thought she provided the reader with enough background on them. Tinian seems like a Firebird expy from Tyers’ early books (and Wookieepedia confirms this!), but I thought her background in armaments gave her some useful skills. Not quite sure how they got away with their scheme, though. “Of Possible Futures: The Tale of Zuckuss and 4-LOM” by M. Shayne Bell I finally have a mental image of Ooryl from the X-Wing books! I had no idea that Zuckuss was a Gand, and now I’m left wondering why Stackpole never seems to describe Ooryl wearing a protective suit and breathing apparatus. They breathe ammonia? Zuckuss hunts based on intuition and meditation, and 4-LOM partners with him so that he can gain these skills. 4-LOM also displays an advanced degree of intelligence and sentience that I was missing from IG-88’s tale. He started out as a protocol droid, acquired more criminal skills, and seems to be evolving into someone more honorable at the end. Zuckuss is a much more static character, and goes through less of a transformation. He’s injured, the Rebels heal him, the end. I liked Toryn Farr, and the hard decisions she had to make. She was perhaps a little naive in trusting Zuckuss and 4-LOM, but everything turned out OK in the end. Maybe she just had hope. “The Last One Standing: The Tale of Boba Fett” by Daniel Keys Moran Moran was surprised when Anderson approached him about doing another Star Wars story, because he had been so dissatisfied with the changes that Lucasfilm made to his story in Tales from Jabba's Palace that he published it under a pseudonym. But Anderson really pushed for him, so Moran got to write another Boba Fett story--and this one even dips into that pre-A New Hope period, which was unheard of at this point. Moran offered the first glimpse into Fett’s backstory--until it got retconned by Episode II. Jaster Mereel is a Journeyman Protector from Concord Dawn, who kills another Protector and is exiled for it. I like the stories that don’t just follow canon events, but this story was all over the place and thus a little too broad in scope. We see Fett right before he’s exiled; a glimpse of a young Han Solo; the bounty scenes from Empire Strikes Back; and then the narrative picks up 15 years later. Fett captures Labria the Devaronian from Moran’s previous story in Tales from the Mos Eisley Cantina, hears about Han Solo from an informant, and it ends with a standoff between Han and Fett. In this story at least, Boba Fett is a weirdo. He’s obsessed with justice, which makes it hard to reconcile his desire for money. He doesn’t do spice or other drugs, he doesn’t drink, he’s apparently celibate--which leads to an odd conversation with Leia in Jabba’s Palace. I don’t understand fans’ idolization of him, because here he’s just outright strange. I also could have done without his obsession with Han Solo--like Dengar’s story, I don’t think it’s necessary here. And would Fett really still want to kill Han after fifteen years. But while I didn’t enjoy “The Last One Standing,” I can see how it was pivotal and influential when it came out, and it was probably a lot of people’s favorite. ISSUES: This is really nitpicky, but I’m confused about the logistics of Darth Vader gathering bounty hunters to search for Han Solo. They seemed to arrive pretty quickly after the Battle of Hoth. How did he get the word out? Were only these six invited, or was there a general call sent out? (Tyers’ story suggests that some were turned away from the hunt.) How long had Vader been planning this? Bell’s story contains an initial bounty on Rebels during the Battle of Hoth, so perhaps the bounty hunters were already in the area? Multiple stories mentioned that the bounty hunter had almost caught Han Solo on Ord Mantell (I think Dengar and Bossk brought this up), but Han’s bounty hunter run-in on Ord Mantell is complicated...and involves neither of those guys: http://eleven-thirtyeight.com/2015/07... IN CONCLUSION: I think that Tales of the Bounty Hunters was an easier read than the first two collections, mostly because there were only five stories to wade through instead of 12-19. The first and last stories were not my favorites for widely different reasons, but I thought the middle three were OK. They all gave me a better sense of the various bounty hunters, so if you want to read more about that degenerate lot, I think this collection is worth a try. Next up: the fourth X-Wing book by Michael A. Stackpole, The Bacta War. My YouTube review: https://youtu.be/bCnCq-rzkJw

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    This is a collection of five short stories about six bounty hunters (most notoriously, the enigmatic Boba Fett) set in the Star Wars universe. Each story is a tale about one or more of the bounty hunters sent after Han Solo and the Millennium falcon during the film "The Empire Strikes Back." Basically, one short scene in that movie is the jumping off point for all of these stories. Since there are so many Star Wars books, many of them conflict with each other. Many of the details for these six bou This is a collection of five short stories about six bounty hunters (most notoriously, the enigmatic Boba Fett) set in the Star Wars universe. Each story is a tale about one or more of the bounty hunters sent after Han Solo and the Millennium falcon during the film "The Empire Strikes Back." Basically, one short scene in that movie is the jumping off point for all of these stories. Since there are so many Star Wars books, many of them conflict with each other. Many of the details for these six bounty hunters set down in these stories are conflicted with in other works--notably K.W. Jeter's "Bounty Hunter Wars" series. In that series, Jeter uses some small bits of information from this collection as canon, but he disregards the rest completely. These five stories are mediocre at best. Some are more entertaining than others. If I had to pick a favorite, it would be "Of Possible Futures," with "The Prize Pelt" coming a close second. I suspect the writers didn't get too much guidance in what they could do, only what they couldn't. Bounty hunters are more anti-heroes than heroes in the Star Wars universe, and that shows in how the stories are written. The stories are more enjoyable when they shift focus off the nefarious deeds of the bounty hunters. Or when the bounty hunters are redeemed by the choices they make. Trust me, I'm all for anti-heroes and moral ambiguity. But it has to be done well. Here, it really isn't. You have to be able to cheer for the anti-hero if they are the protagonist, which is hard to do in these stories. The fact that several books have been written about Boba Fett, Bossk, IG-88, 4-LOM, Zuckuss and Dengar show how popular the bounty hunter character and concept is with the fans. It's too bad that more wasn't done by the assembled authors to make these characters even more memorable.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Greg Pettit

    I first saw Star Wars when I was nine years old. I think that is quite possibly the perfect age at which to watch it. It was fantastic and glorious! Two years later, I had matured (a little) and Empire had too (a little). Two years after that came Return of the Jedi, and suddenly I felt too old, even then. As much as I wanted to love it the way I had the original, I just couldn't do it. Of course, that was a long time ago, in a childhood far, far away. I picked up this book on a nostalgic whim. M I first saw Star Wars when I was nine years old. I think that is quite possibly the perfect age at which to watch it. It was fantastic and glorious! Two years later, I had matured (a little) and Empire had too (a little). Two years after that came Return of the Jedi, and suddenly I felt too old, even then. As much as I wanted to love it the way I had the original, I just couldn't do it. Of course, that was a long time ago, in a childhood far, far away. I picked up this book on a nostalgic whim. Maybe I was hoping to recapture some of that original thrill, or maybe I just wanted to read something light and different. Sadly, it didn't hit the mark. This book is a collection of short stories, each one revolving around one of the bounty hunters seen in The Empire Strikes Back, including the notorious Boba Fett. The stories are mostly contemporary to that scene, telling you the history of the characters plus a little of what happened afterward. What I discovered quickly while reading this book is that I didn't really want to know that information. The mystery of how a droid became a bounty hunter fueled my imagination. Having it explained to me took away the magic. This is one of the major reasons the prequel trilogy failed in so many people's eyes. The thought of Darth Vader having once been a Jedi was thrilling and mysterious. Seeing him as a whiny brat was a bit of a let down, to put it mildly. The stories are well-written, and I'm sure that if I were much younger I would revel in them. But I am not. I skipped through most of them just because I didn't care or didn't want to know. What I learned from this book is that I am not as big a Star Wars fan as I thought, and that I'm no longer nine years old.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    A collection of five short stories about six bounty hunters. Therefore I Am: The Tale of IG-88 by Kevin J. Anderson Rating: ★ (1.25 stars) I found the start of IG-88’s story to be promising and not so bad, but then it started to lose my interest not even halfway through his tale. I contemplated skipping it and moving on to the next story or using the handy text-to-speech feature to get through it. In the end I decided to do the latter. And I’m somewhat glad I did because then I wouldn’t been gr A collection of five short stories about six bounty hunters. Therefore I Am: The Tale of IG-88 by Kevin J. Anderson Rating: ★ (1.25 stars) I found the start of IG-88’s story to be promising and not so bad, but then it started to lose my interest not even halfway through his tale. I contemplated skipping it and moving on to the next story or using the handy text-to-speech feature to get through it. In the end I decided to do the latter. And I’m somewhat glad I did because then I wouldn’t been greatly amused with IG-88’s decision to become the second Death Star. Payback: The Story of Dengar by Dave Wolverton Rating: ★★★★ (4 stars) I was not expecting to like this story as much as I did. The ending was cheesy and even came across as a little forced, but overall? It was still good. The Prize Pelt: The Tale of Bossk by Kathy Tyers Rating: ★ (1 star) Again, this time for Bossk’s tale, I used text-to-speech in order to get through it. I should have just skipped this one altogether, however, since it just ended up going through one ear and out the other. Of Possible Futures: The Tale of Zuckuss and 4-LOM by M. Shayne Bell Rating: ★★★★★ (5 stars) I really, really enjoyed Zuckuss and 4-LOM’s tale. This story is my favorite out of the five in this collection. And I wish these two characters had their own novel, especially if it picked up where this left off because I’d love to see more Zuckuss and 4-LOM (and Toryn Farr)! The Last One Standing: The Tale of Boba Fett by Daniel Keys Moran Rating: ★★★★ (4.75 stars) And now for the tale of my favorite bounty hunter: Boba Fett. We know Boba Fett’s backstory thanks to the Prequel Trilogy; however, this was written before the Prequel Trilogy existed, so of course it was going to be different. That said, even though it’s not canon, his background had been done quite well. I really liked how he was written in this. He’s a bounty hunter, but he’s a bounty hunter who has morals and values.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Fernando Bajo

    Precious piece of Star Wars ancient lore and weirdness

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sean Van

    I greatly enjoyed this anthology of star wars bounty hunters short stories. Everyone of the short stories went into a new character that in the end felt familiar, they all however had an overarching plot that carried through, which was really nice and gave each story a different perspective of the ongoings in the star wars universe. My only gripe is I had a difficult time trying to read Bossk's story, all other stories and authors were amazing, but I could not find personal interest in his chara I greatly enjoyed this anthology of star wars bounty hunters short stories. Everyone of the short stories went into a new character that in the end felt familiar, they all however had an overarching plot that carried through, which was really nice and gave each story a different perspective of the ongoings in the star wars universe. My only gripe is I had a difficult time trying to read Bossk's story, all other stories and authors were amazing, but I could not find personal interest in his character, side characters, or the writing style.

  12. 5 out of 5

    L.

    Tales of the Bounty Hunters is a collection of five stories by different authors concerning bounty hunters who captured our attention in Star Wars - IG-88, Dengar, Bossk. Zuckuss and 4-LOM, and, last but certainly not least, Boba Fett. The stories are well written and generally very entertaining. The common ground for the tales is that all of the bounty hunters have been given the opportunity by Lord Vader to find Han Solo and bring him in. Their approaches vary widely. Of course, we know alread Tales of the Bounty Hunters is a collection of five stories by different authors concerning bounty hunters who captured our attention in Star Wars - IG-88, Dengar, Bossk. Zuckuss and 4-LOM, and, last but certainly not least, Boba Fett. The stories are well written and generally very entertaining. The common ground for the tales is that all of the bounty hunters have been given the opportunity by Lord Vader to find Han Solo and bring him in. Their approaches vary widely. Of course, we know already which of the hunters actually gets Solo and what happens after that, but that advance knowledge does not spoil the stories. The first story is about IG-88 and his plan to claim the galaxy as his own domain. As a sideline to his more important goals, he also participates in the search for Han Solo under the orders of Darth Vader. I found the story to be completely absorbing. It shows a side to IG-88 that I had never expected. He is designed and built as an assassin droid and appears to be virtually unstoppable, especially when he develops three exact clones of himself. Basically, his plan is to deal no longer with the frailties of biological beings and simply to have droids take over the entire universe. He even snickers to himself at some of the efforts of Emperor Palpatine. (Question to readers: Can droids snicker?) Eventually he runs into serious problems when trying to deal with Boba Fett and even more serious problems when he inserts his intelligence into the second Death Star shortly before the Rebels take care of it. Never underestimate the power of the Rebel Alliance. The second story stars Dengar and was the weakest tale in the book to me. Dengar is a cybernetically enhanced Imperial assassin who has been surgically stripped of all superfluous emotion. This makes him a highly effective bounty hunter, but also means that he experiences almost none of the normal emotions that humans take for granted. So the main plotline for the story is Dengar's reacquisition of emotions and his surprising realization that he can fall in love. A bounty hunter's love story was just not what I was expecting with these tales. Bossk is the main character in Tale #3. He is a lizardlike Trandoshan hunter who has been slaughtering Wookies for their pelts. He agrees to a joint venture with two competitors in the search for Solo. His unlikely companions are Chenlambec, a silvertip Wookie, and Tinian L'att, a small human female. The partnership does not go smoothly as double crosses are frequent, plus Chenlambec's sole motive in joining forces was to stop Boskk's career and obtain a measure of revenge for the Wookie slaughtering that had happened in the past. Things do not go well for Bossk. The fourth tale is that of Zuckuss and 4-LOM, a Gand intuitive and his logic-driven droid partner. Their hopes for being the ones to nab Solo are based primarily on the intuitive powers of Zuckuss who always seems to be able to discern whatever they need to know. 4-LOM is great fun to listen to as he has a quick statistical analysis for any question that arises. The last tale in the book lets us travel through the years with Boba Fett. As we all know, he is the one who succeeds in grabbing Han Solo, albeit with a major assist from Darth Vader and the Imperial forces. As many of us did not know, he survived his fall into the Great Pit of Carkoon and the digestive system of the Sarlacc. This tale focuses on Fett in his later years as he is hampered by injuries suffered from years of bounty hunting and as he comes to grips with the realization that his best days are behind him. He does manage to collect a huge bounty offered for the capture of the Butcher of Montellian Serat. That is followed by a chance that he never expected to have again, i.e., another shot at killing Han Solo. This chance is primarily the result of Han's boredom at living on Coruscant and not being involved in smuggling and fighting bad guys any more. He takes off in the Millennium Falcon in search of adventure and finds it the form of a face-to-face encounter with Boba Fett at the end of the tale. Good stuff.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Dakota W.

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I liked the conflict between the characters Dengar and Boba Fett because at the beginning they are not friends but as the book goes on they become friends. Like when Boba Fett drugs Dengar after telling him that he is on his side. Also when Boba Fett blows up Dengar's ship trying to capture Han Solo first. I liked the conflict between the characters Dengar and Boba Fett because at the beginning they are not friends but as the book goes on they become friends. Like when Boba Fett drugs Dengar after telling him that he is on his side. Also when Boba Fett blows up Dengar's ship trying to capture Han Solo first.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Scarlett Sims

    This is a collection of stories about five bounty hunters who were sent after Han Solo. Most of the stories have a partial overlap with events that we see in the Star Wars movies and also discuss the past history of their own characters. One thing I found interesting is that even though the hunters were sent by Darth Vader to disrupt the rebels, I was still kind of rooting for them to succeed, even though I knew that wouldn't happen (spoiler... 30 years later spoiler?). Anyway, some of the stori This is a collection of stories about five bounty hunters who were sent after Han Solo. Most of the stories have a partial overlap with events that we see in the Star Wars movies and also discuss the past history of their own characters. One thing I found interesting is that even though the hunters were sent by Darth Vader to disrupt the rebels, I was still kind of rooting for them to succeed, even though I knew that wouldn't happen (spoiler... 30 years later spoiler?). Anyway, some of the stories were more interesting than others but I thought it was a cool book. It may have inspired me to look at some of the other Star Wars novels.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Thomas

    Man, it feels like it's been a couple of months since I've read anything for my Star Wars project. I got bogged down with a long, dense series of books that took a lot of time to read, so it was nice to return to the Expanded Universe, even if it was in a collection of shorter works, and not a full novel. I much prefer the novel-length stories, but I did commit to everything in the EU, so here we are. The first story of the bunch is Therefore I Am: The Tale of IG-88 by Kevin J. Anderson, and it's Man, it feels like it's been a couple of months since I've read anything for my Star Wars project. I got bogged down with a long, dense series of books that took a lot of time to read, so it was nice to return to the Expanded Universe, even if it was in a collection of shorter works, and not a full novel. I much prefer the novel-length stories, but I did commit to everything in the EU, so here we are. The first story of the bunch is Therefore I Am: The Tale of IG-88 by Kevin J. Anderson, and it's pretty stupid. Parts of the story don't make much sense (for the arsenal Anderson builds in to it, along with its weight, it would have to be about twenty feet tall), and by the end, the assassin droid tries to implant itself into the central computer of the second Death Star. It's not written well, either. It has lots of telling, and some of the dialogue is laughable. Payback: The Tale of Dengar by Dave Wolverton follows, and is a better-told story, but it smacks of a juvenile story. This isn't a surprise, since Wolverton has written a few juvenile books for the EU. I like how Wolverton develops the character, but his characterization isn't the best. I didn't feel any connection with any of his main characters, and given how he ends the story, that's pretty critical. Speaking of the ending, it's a little ridiculous. The next novella is The Prize Pelt: The Tale of Bossk by Kathy Tyers, and I had a hard time following parts of the story. It doesn't seem like a difficult story, but I kept checking out, so I lost some of the threads. Tyers telegraphs some details about the ending of the story by making some small parts of the story strangely significant when they're revealed. It's not the most gripping tale, but that could be due to the fact that Tyers doesn't make Bossk at all likeable. The best story in the collection is Of Possible Futures: The Tale of Zuckuss and 4-LOM by M. Shayne Bell. It's a touching story of redemption, loyalty, and friendship, made effective by Bell's characterization skills. He focuses on three characters, the titular bounty hunters and a Rebel commander, and even though the story is short, it resonates because of them. Some parts of the story were convenient, but the rest of it was so effective that I can overlook them. The anthology wraps up with The Last One Standing: The Tale of Boba Fett by Daniel Keys Moran, featuring everyone's favorite bounty hunter. Unfortunately, Moran doesn't do much with the story. He attempts to, going further back into Fett's life to establish an origin, and then takes him far beyond the events of Return of the Jedi to tell us about his end. This doesn't work as well as Moran thinks it does, not just because the ending is a cop-out with no real conclusion. He spoils a lot of the later books in the chronology, since this story spans so much time. That's on me, since I chose to read these in chronological order, but it still goes a lot further than expected. Plus, it's hard reconciling this story with the canon Lucas established in the prequels (though I'll admit, what Moran does with the character is far better than what Lucas did with it). If I were to recommend this book, it would only be for Bell's story. The rest don't have enough OOMPH to make them stand out, despite having a lot of potential. As anthologies go, though, this isn't a bad one, since the stories are longer than short stories, and allow for more development. It's just a shame the authors couldn't all make something better out of the source material.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Joel Kirk

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Therefore I Am: The Tale of IG-88 (3 out of 5) IG-88 is created and has delusions of grandeur, even becoming the brain of the second Death Star. It has gore for a Star Wars story, but it doesn’t take away from the story. I enjoyed it, and liked that IG-88 gets his comeuppance, but it still felt average to me. I didn't see myself running back to re-read it now that I'm done with the book. Payback: The Tale of Dengar (2.5 out of 5) Dengar (who also goes by the nickname ‘Payback’) is hired to assassin Therefore I Am: The Tale of IG-88 (3 out of 5) IG-88 is created and has delusions of grandeur, even becoming the brain of the second Death Star. It has gore for a Star Wars story, but it doesn’t take away from the story. I enjoyed it, and liked that IG-88 gets his comeuppance, but it still felt average to me. I didn't see myself running back to re-read it now that I'm done with the book. Payback: The Tale of Dengar (2.5 out of 5) Dengar (who also goes by the nickname ‘Payback’) is hired to assassinate an Imperial governor of an alien world. However, the aliens want Dengar to save them, take them to another world, since the Empire will just send another in the governor’s place. Dengar does fall in love with a beautiful dancer who goes with him instead, as Dengar’s main objective is to get Han Solo and deliver him to the Empire. It’s not until he’s dying after the battle between Jabba and the Rebels (from “Return of the Jedi”) that he realizes his quest for Solo is for naught and he’s ready to settle down with the alien girl. Boba Fett, who has escaped the Sarlacc is holding on to life, and later takes part in the wedding after he recovers. (I don’t recall if Dengar or the girl go back to try to save her people). The Prize Pelt: The Tale of Bossk (1 out of 5) A boring story that mostly takes place in various parts of Bossk’s ship. He is swindled by a Rebel Wookiee and his female companion to take part in a bounty that will actually save some imprisoned Wookiees. This story didn’t work for me because it felt tedious, and the writer didn’t do a good job of making me feel where the characters were in the ship; there wasn’t a good sense of location. Of Possible Futures: The Tale of Zuckuss and 4-LOM (2 out of 5) Zuckuss and 4-LOM take part in stopping some Rebels escaping Hoth, but once they get a sense of Rebellion kindness (taking a nod from Star Trek) these aliens become part of the Rebellion by the end. What brings down the score for me is the author having Zuckuss and 4-LOM worry about whether or not Darth Vader will get back at them for helping the Rebels previously (at a time when the bounty hunters were just trying to get paid). It’s a buildup that doesn’t have a payoff…and doesn’t mesh with the eventual ending we got. It felt disjointed. The Last One Standing: The Tale of Boba Fett (1.5 out of 5) Even though this had Han Solo wanting to still have a little fun (i.e. smuggle something) though he was married with kids, this story wasn’t exciting. The author definitely got his mannerisms and voice in the interactions with Luke and Leia, but the story just wasn't compelling. (Note: I did think this version of Han fits in well with "The Force Awakens"). Too, this story doesn’t tie into the earlier Dengar story as I thought it would. Yes, Fett has escaped the Sarlacc and not as agile as he was, but there is no Dengar wedding here. In its place is Fett and Solo going at it verbally, each realizing that their days of being reckless may be over; they have to ‘grow up’ in their own ways. While interesting, it was also a bit jarring. And given the quality of this story and majority of the others, I was disappointed.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Theresa

    Therefore I Am: The Tale of IG-88- well this story was dry. I kept counting off pages till it was done. Payback: The Story of Dengar- ever since I read another series involving Dengar, I've had a soft spot for him. When I realized this was the story of how he met Manaroo, I did a little dance of joy. The ending does not go with the story in the other book but I really liked this story anyway. The Prize Pelt: The Tale of Bossk- This story was pretty cool. Bossk and the rest of the bounty hunters we Therefore I Am: The Tale of IG-88- well this story was dry. I kept counting off pages till it was done. Payback: The Story of Dengar- ever since I read another series involving Dengar, I've had a soft spot for him. When I realized this was the story of how he met Manaroo, I did a little dance of joy. The ending does not go with the story in the other book but I really liked this story anyway. The Prize Pelt: The Tale of Bossk- This story was pretty cool. Bossk and the rest of the bounty hunters were after Chewbacca and Solo. Chewbacca's pelt was worth so much that when a seemingly rogue wookie and his human partner offered to help, Bossk took them up on it. Of course he planned on double crossing them. In his blind self assuredness, he didn't think they could double cross him. Of Possible Futures: The Tale of Zuckuss and 4-LOM- I really liked this story too. It was sort of about how 4-LOM was evolving. Zuckuss was dying and needed new lungs and they were running bounties to get money to help him. At that same time a Rebel fleet had been attacked and the survivors were trying to figure out what to do. When the two come together surprising things happen. I really liked Torryn Farr. I wonder if she's in any other stories. The Last One Standing: The Tale of Bobba Fett- Firstly, I don't picture Fett having such strict morals and strange ideas about what is right and wrong. That part aside, I think this was an interesting story of Fett's continual beef with Solo. It only stands to reason that Solo would never be happy playing the lap dog, so it's no surprise when he goes looking for trouble. Well he sure finds it, in the form of the long standing vendetta Fett has for him. The ending is kinda weird.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Eva-Joy

    (DNF, but only because I misplaced it and I didn't want it cluttering up my 'currently reading' shelf anymore. Plus, I was already partway through the final story - Boba Fett's - and it wasn't all that interesting. However, if/when I do finish the book, I'll come back and alter this review accordingly.) So I'm not 'into' Star Wars, but I do dig bounty hunters and since my brother bought this at a thrift store (he's not a Star Wars fan either, but he likes bounty hunters) I thought, hey, why not? (DNF, but only because I misplaced it and I didn't want it cluttering up my 'currently reading' shelf anymore. Plus, I was already partway through the final story - Boba Fett's - and it wasn't all that interesting. However, if/when I do finish the book, I'll come back and alter this review accordingly.) So I'm not 'into' Star Wars, but I do dig bounty hunters and since my brother bought this at a thrift store (he's not a Star Wars fan either, but he likes bounty hunters) I thought, hey, why not? Plus, sci-fi is my passion. Anyway, I'll be rating/mini-reviewing each story, 'cause that's fun (minus the last one, for reasons I explained above): ~Therefore I Am (Rating: 3 stars) - IG-88 seriously annoys me. I hate robots that are so nasty. The writing style was a little lack-luster, as well, and while the story was interesting enough, I didn't connect with any of the characters. ~Payback (Rating: 4.5 stars) - YESYESYES. Dengar, you. are. awesome. LOVED THIS ONE. Plus, even if the ending was a liiiittle forced, it's the kind of thing I adore (enemies turned BEST MAN AT THE OTHER GUY'S WEDDING), so...yeah. <3 (This was the one that made me eager to read Boba Fett's story, but it turned out to be disappointing - at least, as far as I've gotten). ~The Prize Pelt (Rating: 3 stars) - Nope. Bossk is horrid. Did not like this one overall, though the story was still interesting. ~Of Possible Futures (Rating: 4 stars) - Can I give all the characters in this a big hug? The author who wrote this one did a GREAT job with the characters because you end up liking all of them, even the flawed and kind of not-so-good ones. Wonderful.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jane Sparrow

    Reading this again for the first time since I was quite young - I read it repeatedly when I was in fourth grade or thereabouts. Most of the stories really don't hold up. It has the much commented-on effect of making the Star Wars G Galaxy seem very small indeed.the number of characters who have personal experiences with the movie main cast, the tendency towards chance encounter... And Kevin J Anderson is... not my favorite. It's very off-putting and frankly baffling how much emphasis he puts on the Reading this again for the first time since I was quite young - I read it repeatedly when I was in fourth grade or thereabouts. Most of the stories really don't hold up. It has the much commented-on effect of making the Star Wars G Galaxy seem very small indeed.the number of characters who have personal experiences with the movie main cast, the tendency towards chance encounter... And Kevin J Anderson is... not my favorite. It's very off-putting and frankly baffling how much emphasis he puts on the physical unattractiveness of his characters. He seems to revel in giving a villain or even a side character a grotesquely large nose or malformed hands. His story also manages to insert his chosen bounty hunter into seemingly every part of the movie trilogy, while also serving as another in the trend of making Boba Fett a Really Cool Guy. The IG-88 and Dengar stories have been my least favorite so far. The former has the problems noted before, and the latter similarly inserts its character into RotJ while also serving as a prime example of a "woman as reward" story where an enchanting, nubile young woman fixes all the heroes problems after being rescued / kidnapped repeatedly. :/

  20. 5 out of 5

    Will

    Star Wars: Tales of the Bounty Hunters by Kevin J. Anderson is a science fiction novel that takes place in the many planets of the galaxy. This book tells the story of the most famous hunters in all of the galaxy along with their origin and their journey to kill their most hated enemy: Han Solo. One of the things this book does well is filling in the audience on detail. An example from the text would be “And at this moment, sitting on a high mountain ridge under a rupin tree which smelled sickly Star Wars: Tales of the Bounty Hunters by Kevin J. Anderson is a science fiction novel that takes place in the many planets of the galaxy. This book tells the story of the most famous hunters in all of the galaxy along with their origin and their journey to kill their most hated enemy: Han Solo. One of the things this book does well is filling in the audience on detail. An example from the text would be “And at this moment, sitting on a high mountain ridge under a rupin tree which smelled sickly sweet and sighed softly as it breathed in the night air on Aruza, Dengar needed patience”. In all honesty, any sci-fi fan could read through this book and thoroughly enjoy it because the characters aren’t boring, the plot is filled with emotion, action, and detail, and Kevin J. Anderson does a really good job with explanation so that new fans to the Star Wars saga feel like they’ve known this series their whole life.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    the ONLY thing saving this from being a solid two-star book is the short story about zuckuss and 4-lom, which is by far the best and only reason you should read this. this book is pretty bad upsides of reading this book: the aforementioned short story (of possible futures) which is great. also when boba fett drinks a beer with a straw. downsides: everything else. the first story about ig-88 is awful. the one about boba fett is even worse. who the hell thought I wanted to read about space republica the ONLY thing saving this from being a solid two-star book is the short story about zuckuss and 4-lom, which is by far the best and only reason you should read this. this book is pretty bad upsides of reading this book: the aforementioned short story (of possible futures) which is great. also when boba fett drinks a beer with a straw. downsides: everything else. the first story about ig-88 is awful. the one about boba fett is even worse. who the hell thought I wanted to read about space republicans?!?!? it's absolutely terrible (did I read this in 2006?????? i don't remember it at all) (ETA: i called the zuckuss and 4-lom story "all possible futures" instead of "of possible futures" due to the fact that the former is a favorite music album. thanks miami horror. come fistfight me someday)

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mike Brandt

    A collection of five novellas from the Star Wars universe, each about those five bounty hunters standing on Darth Vader's bridge in Empire. Funny how they got a whole book out of this 30 seconds of film, but it is quite a book. Each story is well written, some of the bounty hunters are ruthless. Some are ruthless but show compassion and change by the end. Some have different motivations and are changed by what happens to them. I'm really surprised that it wasn't five stories that unfolded similar A collection of five novellas from the Star Wars universe, each about those five bounty hunters standing on Darth Vader's bridge in Empire. Funny how they got a whole book out of this 30 seconds of film, but it is quite a book. Each story is well written, some of the bounty hunters are ruthless. Some are ruthless but show compassion and change by the end. Some have different motivations and are changed by what happens to them. I'm really surprised that it wasn't five stories that unfolded similarly, the author really gave us some good complex characters. Bobba Fett's story is the fifth and by the time we get to it, the prior four were so well written and our expectations of the one and only Fett are so high, that it actually ranks as the least of the five. Still a good story though. Highly recommended for any Star Wars fan.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    This was such fun! My first step into the "Legends" expanded universe was easy and enjoyable. This was just a collection of short stories of all the OG minor bounty hunter characters. When I say minor, I mean that their names was either mentioned in passing or their body was shown briefly on screen (Fett later became a fan favorite because of the EU). Each story is written by different authors, with varying degree of storytelling quality. I loved that there was some semblance of crossover betwee This was such fun! My first step into the "Legends" expanded universe was easy and enjoyable. This was just a collection of short stories of all the OG minor bounty hunter characters. When I say minor, I mean that their names was either mentioned in passing or their body was shown briefly on screen (Fett later became a fan favorite because of the EU). Each story is written by different authors, with varying degree of storytelling quality. I loved that there was some semblance of crossover between stories...and of course the behind the scene adventures for the movie. Here's my individual ratings for each short story... Therefore I Am: The Tale of IG-88 (4 out 5) Payback: The Tale of Dengar (2 out of 5) The Pelt Belt: The Tale of Bossk (4.5 out of 5) Of Possible Futures: The Tale of Zuckuss & 4-LOM (3.5 out of 5) The Last One Standing: The Tale of Boba Fett (4.5 out 5)

  24. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Kukwa

    A solid collection, although it takes some time to warm up. The first two stories are suitably amusing, but there's a noticeable up-tick in the remaining three entries; an emotional investment in the characters that is both touching and engaging. It's also one of the most fanwank-heavy entries in the "Star Wars" canon, as all the stories weave themselves in & out of the events of "The Empire Strikes Back"...some more successfully than others. Not quite what I was expecting, but a worthwhile jour A solid collection, although it takes some time to warm up. The first two stories are suitably amusing, but there's a noticeable up-tick in the remaining three entries; an emotional investment in the characters that is both touching and engaging. It's also one of the most fanwank-heavy entries in the "Star Wars" canon, as all the stories weave themselves in & out of the events of "The Empire Strikes Back"...some more successfully than others. Not quite what I was expecting, but a worthwhile journey in the end.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Mayo

    I bought this years ago and never did get around to reading it until recently. It is a simple read, told in five parts, by five authors, each telling the tale of a bounty hunter (Zuckuss and 4-LOM had to share a chapter). Quite a bit of this has been has been superseded by the movies since its publication. At least in the story involving Boba Fett the author is planning a rewrite to retcon his story to the new story line. For a Star Wars book the stories were disjointed, being by five separate a I bought this years ago and never did get around to reading it until recently. It is a simple read, told in five parts, by five authors, each telling the tale of a bounty hunter (Zuckuss and 4-LOM had to share a chapter). Quite a bit of this has been has been superseded by the movies since its publication. At least in the story involving Boba Fett the author is planning a rewrite to retcon his story to the new story line. For a Star Wars book the stories were disjointed, being by five separate authors. Not particularly memorable or exciting, this one is something only a fanboy will love.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Bowling

    One of the anthology books that Anderson edited and contributed to before they were relegated to "legends", this book offers a short story for each of the bounty hunters who made an appearance in The Empire Strikes Back. They range in quality, but for the most part are really entertaining and a good diversion. The Boba Fett story is probably the one least relevant any more as it went out the window within a few years of being published. Still, a good entry in the anthology series, but not quite One of the anthology books that Anderson edited and contributed to before they were relegated to "legends", this book offers a short story for each of the bounty hunters who made an appearance in The Empire Strikes Back. They range in quality, but for the most part are really entertaining and a good diversion. The Boba Fett story is probably the one least relevant any more as it went out the window within a few years of being published. Still, a good entry in the anthology series, but not quite as good as the Mos Eisley Cantina or Jabba's Palace books.

  27. 5 out of 5

    JJ

    Star Wars: Tales of the Bounty Hunters is a collection of five long stories, each of which deals with a different bounty hunter (or team of hunters) attempting to track down Han Solo and his companions, in order to get a sizeable reward from Darth Vader. Each of the tales in this book is engaging and entertaining. The final tale, featuring the mighty Boba Fett himself, was my favorite. This collection of stories is a good, fun, light read.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Adam

    Really fun read, gives really unique backstories to otherwise forgettable characters. If you love lore, sci fi, and adventure, (to be generic), and Star Wars of course, this is definitely a good one. The backstory for Boba Fett before the prequels came out was also quite interesting, I liked how it shows you the different endings and stories Star Wars can take, yet each universe can simultaneously exist in your imagination. Fun to think about :)

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kellis Wiley

    This tells the story of the bounty hunters Darth Vader hired in star wars episode 5 to hunt Han Solo. It is made up of 5 short stories. First IG-88 then Dengar Then Bossk then Zukuss and 4-LOM and finally my favorite, Boba Fett. IG-88 goes from creation to destruction. Dengars shows his last bounty hunting mission. Bossk gets tricked and goes to jail. Zukuss gets his lungs healed and he and 4-LOM join the rebellion. Boba Fett retires after nearly dying.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ethan

    This was surprisingly fun! Each of the stories have strengths and weakness. My favorite of the five was Of Possible Futures. Of special note is the philosophical Therfore I Am and it’s epic ending. And a surprise was Dengar’s story Payback with it’s sudden turn to romance. A bit of a cheesy ending. But I did not see it coming. Worth reading for the die hards missing some good Legends material.

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