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The Eye of the World: The Graphic Novel, Volume Two

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The second volume of the magnificent New York Times bestselling graphic novel adaptation of Robert Jordan’s The Eye of the World   With the full cooperation of the Jordan estate, The Eye of the World has been turned into a stunning comic book series. Volume One of The Eye of the World: the Graphic Novel was published by Tor in the Fall of 2011 and was a New York Times bests The second volume of the magnificent New York Times bestselling graphic novel adaptation of Robert Jordan’s The Eye of the World   With the full cooperation of the Jordan estate, The Eye of the World has been turned into a stunning comic book series. Volume One of The Eye of the World: the Graphic Novel was published by Tor in the Fall of 2011 and was a New York Times bestseller.   In The Eye of the World: the Graphic Novel, Volume Two, scripted by Chuck Dixon and illustrated by Andie Tong, Rand al’Thor, Egwene al’Vere, and their friends flee their home village in the company of Moiraine and her Warder, Lan Mandragoran. Pursued by their enemies, the group seeks sanctuary in Baerlon. Rand’s nightmares grow darker. Moiraine takes Egwene under her wing. Lan warns them to trust no one, but should that distrust extend to Lan and Moiraine as well?   The Eye of the World: the Graphic Novel, Volume Two, collects six issues of Robert Jordan’s The Wheel of Time: The Eye of the World comic book published by Dynamite Entertainment. This book will feature bonus material that gives readers a behind-the-scenes look at the creation of a graphic novel.  


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The second volume of the magnificent New York Times bestselling graphic novel adaptation of Robert Jordan’s The Eye of the World   With the full cooperation of the Jordan estate, The Eye of the World has been turned into a stunning comic book series. Volume One of The Eye of the World: the Graphic Novel was published by Tor in the Fall of 2011 and was a New York Times bests The second volume of the magnificent New York Times bestselling graphic novel adaptation of Robert Jordan’s The Eye of the World   With the full cooperation of the Jordan estate, The Eye of the World has been turned into a stunning comic book series. Volume One of The Eye of the World: the Graphic Novel was published by Tor in the Fall of 2011 and was a New York Times bestseller.   In The Eye of the World: the Graphic Novel, Volume Two, scripted by Chuck Dixon and illustrated by Andie Tong, Rand al’Thor, Egwene al’Vere, and their friends flee their home village in the company of Moiraine and her Warder, Lan Mandragoran. Pursued by their enemies, the group seeks sanctuary in Baerlon. Rand’s nightmares grow darker. Moiraine takes Egwene under her wing. Lan warns them to trust no one, but should that distrust extend to Lan and Moiraine as well?   The Eye of the World: the Graphic Novel, Volume Two, collects six issues of Robert Jordan’s The Wheel of Time: The Eye of the World comic book published by Dynamite Entertainment. This book will feature bonus material that gives readers a behind-the-scenes look at the creation of a graphic novel.  

30 review for The Eye of the World: The Graphic Novel, Volume Two

  1. 4 out of 5

    Tina Haigler

    This second volume did not disappoint! It is as beautiful and entertaining as the first. Reading these makes me want to get back into reading the novels. I am so looking forward to reading Vol 3-6 😊

  2. 4 out of 5

    Marlowe

    I took all the Wheel of Time-related graphic novels out from the library and brought them along on vacation. Unfortunately, I didn't realize that The Eye of the World comes in six volumes, and only brought the three my library has. I got to the end of the third pretty certain that a good chunk was missing and, sure enough, I'm only halfway through. Still, I figured I'd better write a review, since I don't know when I'll be able to get my hands on the next three volumes. I was quite surprised by h I took all the Wheel of Time-related graphic novels out from the library and brought them along on vacation. Unfortunately, I didn't realize that The Eye of the World comes in six volumes, and only brought the three my library has. I got to the end of the third pretty certain that a good chunk was missing and, sure enough, I'm only halfway through. Still, I figured I'd better write a review, since I don't know when I'll be able to get my hands on the next three volumes. I was quite surprised by how much of the first novel's plot I could remember. The middle books, particularly around where it became obvious that Jordan had completely dropped the reigns of the plot, are a blur, but I had distinct memories of everything covered in the graphic novels. I've found the same thing with A Song of Ice and Fire - where the first book is also quite well plotted, with a much tighter storyline than later books. In both cases, I feel like the authors started off with a very clear idea of a beginning, and then much vaguer notes for the rest of the series. It's a shame. Regarding the graphic novels specifically, I found the text to be much better than what I saw in the New Spring graphic novel. It was much easier to follow what was going on, and I think I would have been able to read it even if I hadn't read the book first. I'm not sure how much of that is a real difference in quality and how much is just because the plot of Eye of the World is so much more action-oriented, relying less on narrative (and therefore more easily exportable to a visual medium), though. The artwork was a little disappointing, though. The images looked messy, for lack of a better word - like coloured sketches. This meant that it was often difficult to tell one character apart from another - particularly in the beginning. Some of that might have been intentional, to show how ordinary the three Ta'veren are at the start of the story, but I don't feel like that came through very well. There were also quite a few consistency issues, particularly with Moiraine's forehead pendant (which changed shape and style frequently from panel to panel). Generally, though, I thought it was fine. It was certainly readable. I'm just scratching me head over who the intended audience might be for these. There isn't really a lot of added value for someone who has already read the novels, and I'm not sure how well someone who hasn't read the novels would be able to follow along with the graphic novel version. It seems a bit superfluous. Or perhaps they are looking for people like me, who are at the end of the novels and want a refresher on the series without having to tackle the doorstopper tomes for a second time.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ms. Leigh-Reavis

    The graphic novels do an excellent job of telling the novel's story. Excellent graphics, characterization, plot, and conflicts. The graphic novels do an excellent job of telling the novel's story. Excellent graphics, characterization, plot, and conflicts.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Josh

    So, Volume 2 of The Eye of the World is out. I loved it; the artwork was great, and the graphic form makes the novel leap of the page. It was awesome seeing the meeting of some of my favorite characters such as Min and Nyneave. Also the prose and the dialogue are so good - I'm sure they're from the novel itself - that it only reminds me how much better The Wheel of Time is than any other series I've ever read. It just stands apart. As before, my only complaint would be with the pacing... How man So, Volume 2 of The Eye of the World is out. I loved it; the artwork was great, and the graphic form makes the novel leap of the page. It was awesome seeing the meeting of some of my favorite characters such as Min and Nyneave. Also the prose and the dialogue are so good - I'm sure they're from the novel itself - that it only reminds me how much better The Wheel of Time is than any other series I've ever read. It just stands apart. As before, my only complaint would be with the pacing... How many more of these until we're done with Eye of the World? Will it take up ten graphics novels? What about the rest of the series? Is there any hope that they'll ever all be done? I seriously doubt it... It would probably take 20 years for them all to be published... But I'll keep reading as long as they do!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Eamonn Murphy

    ‘The Wheel Of Time’ is a famous multi-volume fantasy saga written by Robert Jordan and finished, following his notes, by Brandon Sanderson who was a huge fan of the series long before he became a writer himself. This is volume 2 of a graphic novel adaptation of ‘The Eye Of The World’, the first book in the saga. I haven’t read volume 1 or any of the books, but there’s a useful summary of it in two pages of text here. On Winternight, Trollocs, servants of the Dark Lord, attacked the village of Edm ‘The Wheel Of Time’ is a famous multi-volume fantasy saga written by Robert Jordan and finished, following his notes, by Brandon Sanderson who was a huge fan of the series long before he became a writer himself. This is volume 2 of a graphic novel adaptation of ‘The Eye Of The World’, the first book in the saga. I haven’t read volume 1 or any of the books, but there’s a useful summary of it in two pages of text here. On Winternight, Trollocs, servants of the Dark Lord, attacked the village of Edmond’s Field looking for Rand, Mat and Perrin, three local lads. In one of them or perhaps all was an element of latent power that the Dark Lord feared. The boys fled their home in the company of Moiraine, an Aes Sedai, and her Warder, Lan. They had arrived in Edmond’s Field shortly before the Trollocs. Moraine insists that Egwene, a local girl, come with them for she has the potential to join the Aes Sedai, powerful sorcerers. Also with them was Thom Merillin, a gleeman who performed songs, told stories and so forth. Volume 2 opens with a group of people fleeing on horseback. They are harassed by a Draghkar, a sort of winged demon but make it to the riverside settlement of Taren Ferry. The ferryman and his crew are reluctant to work in the middle of the night but jingling coins entice them. So they journey on, stopping to make camp and getting to know each other. Secrets are slowly revealed along with much of the rich background to this fantasy world. ‘Wheel Of Time’ has a reputation as the archetypal multi-volume fantasy that stretched beyond mere trilogies into a seemingly endless future. It’s a publishing trend I’m not crazy about so I approached this warily. To my surprise, I really liked it. Oh, there are elements of Tolkien here with the happy farm boys wrenched away from their normal existence into a world-shaking conflict. So what? It’s certainly inspired by ‘Lord Of The Rings’ but Jordan introduces plenty of new elements. I liked the general moral tone of the thing, good people being good but not too good and with the different groups having their own agendas. The Ais Sedai are not entirely trusted and there’s a sort of cult called the Children of the Light who wear white cloaks and claim to be righteous but use hot irons when asking questions. In a dream, Rand meets Ba’Alzamon, a rather satanic-looking chap who gives him a spiel about all his evil works through history. It reads like the lyrics of ‘Sympathy For The Devil’. The art by Andie Tong is terrific, both in terms of telling the story and being easy on the eye. At the back of the book are several plates showing his work in ink, before it was coloured by Nicolas Chapuis, which shows the quality of the underlying drawing. The coloured work looks even better. Tong uses thick lines in places, reminding me of Chic Stone’s inks on Jack Kirby. ‘The Wheel Of Time’ series sold 40 million copies worldwide and has been out there a while, so I guess anyone interested in this graphic novel will already know the story. The adaptation is worth buying for the beautiful pictures and the book itself, certainly the hardback, is a quality artefact. I enjoyed it a lot but if you’re not a fan of epic fantasy you might think, what a load of Trollocs!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Isabella

    Rating: 5 stars You know what? Yeah, this deserves five stars. And not just because of Min. Though I would be lying if I said her presence didn't help. It's mostly because every major gripe I had with Volume One was pretty much non existent in this second volume. Lan still had a few moments of disco fever with his fluorescent warder cloak, and there were some strange far away faces, but the majority - the vast majority - of the graphic novel was perfect. And I even thought the artwork got better, Rating: 5 stars You know what? Yeah, this deserves five stars. And not just because of Min. Though I would be lying if I said her presence didn't help. It's mostly because every major gripe I had with Volume One was pretty much non existent in this second volume. Lan still had a few moments of disco fever with his fluorescent warder cloak, and there were some strange far away faces, but the majority - the vast majority - of the graphic novel was perfect. And I even thought the artwork got better, if that is possible (not that the first volume's art was terrible by any means). Plus, we got what I hoped for more of after reading Volume One: channeling artwork! Look at Moiraine being the badass Aes Sedai she is to all the Whitecloaks here: Woah! That is exactly what I have been waiting for! Good job artists! Keep it up! (I've decided that I like pictures in my reviews because when I go back and read them I get all excited like a child does when reading a picture book, a child whose maturity level I probably align with most, let's be honest) I will always be partial towards the traditional novel format, and it would be difficult for me to select a graphic novel to read purely based on the synopsis (I go by the theme of the novel, be it Doctor Who or Star Trek/Wars) so I can't say that I would give this five stars if I had not read and loved the source material. All the same, Volume Two has convinced me to continue on with the Wheel of Time graphic novels, and I'm going straight into Volume Three after I finish writing this review.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Claudia

    Took out the first three volumes of the illustrated The Eye of the World from the library and hoped that they would provide a great re-introduction to a series that I started over 20 years ago. Part of the beauty of Jordan's series is the detail he puts into words and unfortunately, with hundreds of pages of history and detail filtered into a series of artistic adaptations, parts get lost in translation. The three young men that the story revolves around are finally showing some differentiation Took out the first three volumes of the illustrated The Eye of the World from the library and hoped that they would provide a great re-introduction to a series that I started over 20 years ago. Part of the beauty of Jordan's series is the detail he puts into words and unfortunately, with hundreds of pages of history and detail filtered into a series of artistic adaptations, parts get lost in translation. The three young men that the story revolves around are finally showing some differentiation even if it is Rand has red hair, Perrin has a curl on his forehead and a bit bulkier than the other two. The two young women from their village are still very similar save their hair styles. But it's now the additional characters that need more definition - although some appear for only short periods. The townspeople of Emond's Field were a perfect example - I couldn't tell who was who for the most part in the first volume. But I am enjoying the re-visit to Jordan's excellent world-building epic. 2020-005

  8. 5 out of 5

    Nathanael Eoff

    Sat down a burned through this one in an afternoon. As with the first volume, art is inconsistent and characters don't look the same from panel to panel or page to page. Two characters stand out: Moiraine for some reason is actually pretty consistently drawn, and Perrin is probably the least consistently drawn. It's still fun to read, but I think at this point it's pretty obvious that the only thing that makes the paperback WOT series compelling is the time and care Jordan puts into his characte Sat down a burned through this one in an afternoon. As with the first volume, art is inconsistent and characters don't look the same from panel to panel or page to page. Two characters stand out: Moiraine for some reason is actually pretty consistently drawn, and Perrin is probably the least consistently drawn. It's still fun to read, but I think at this point it's pretty obvious that the only thing that makes the paperback WOT series compelling is the time and care Jordan puts into his characters. Graphic novels don't provide room for that type of development. It's fun to see some of these fantastic creatures and people come to life, but realism doesn't replace a fully fleshed out character. Anyway, I'll finish TEOTW, but I'm not sure I'm compelled to read any more of these adaptations unless I need a refresher on books I haven't read in a while.

  9. 5 out of 5

    KaitLphere

    This book was a lot of traveling and sneaking around and running away. I did love all the women in this story, and a dance scene in an inn. The boys all pretty much run together for me. I loved the character design for Min, although the women looked very similar to one another. I also liked the narration lettering, but I also thought this book relied too heavily on narration. The arosts draws hand and hand movements very well.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Peter

    Moiraine and Lan escort Rand and his group out of their village. They try to remain unnoticed and seek sanctuary in the town of Baerlon. The worldbuilding expands and if you have not read the books like me, it becomes a journey of lore and character exploration.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ellen

    this makes it so much easier to picture what's going on god bless this makes it so much easier to picture what's going on god bless

  12. 5 out of 5

    Nickolas

    It’s all Lord of the Rings to me

  13. 4 out of 5

    Dustin

    Things are heating up! Excited to move on to the next volume.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Fullfaun Faun

    This helped me refresh things that happened in the story.

  15. 5 out of 5

    mykittyquest17

    4 stars A pretty good graphic novel continuation of the eye of the world story. I’m enjoying reliving the book.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kat

    ***4 out of 5 stars***

  17. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    I won this book through First Reads. Thanks, Tor and to Goodreads! First, some background: I haven't yet read the first volume of the Eye of the World graphic novel, and I have really little familiarity with graphic novels as a medium in general. But I do know Robert Jordan! Since I first started reading the Wheel of Time books about ten years ago (!) they've always had a special place in my heart and I think that they still stand as a very good example of how to write Tolkien-style fantasy witho I won this book through First Reads. Thanks, Tor and to Goodreads! First, some background: I haven't yet read the first volume of the Eye of the World graphic novel, and I have really little familiarity with graphic novels as a medium in general. But I do know Robert Jordan! Since I first started reading the Wheel of Time books about ten years ago (!) they've always had a special place in my heart and I think that they still stand as a very good example of how to write Tolkien-style fantasy without feeling derivative or uninspired. So, in short, this review is based on how well it makes the transition from novel to graphic novel, and whether it works as an adaptation. I'll start with the good: the book is absolutely beautiful. Andie Tong frames his artwork really nicely, and gives each page a good sense of dynamism. The characters themselves are visually brought to life pretty well, with Perrin, Min, and Nynaeve as particular highlights. Moiraine is pretty nice as well. The best part, though, is the coloring. Nicholas Chapuis fills the images with purples and blues and greens and I think that the sudden jumps in colors, from light to shadow, from murky to bright, carries a lot of the weight in bringing Robert Jordan's world to life. I have a couple small criticisms as well: I think the change in medium shortchanges a couple of the characters as they disappear off into the background or seem more one-dimensional than they did in the novel. Mat's characterization is somewhat flattened and Perrin is mostly relegated to the background (though to be fair, this a particularly Rand-heavy part of of the story). I also thought that on occasion - especially near the beginning - the pages were a little bit wordier than necessary, and things would be explained via exposition when they could have been shown visually (this did get quite a bit better as things went along). I also thought that lots of the bad guys who showed up were not given the most imaginative of artistic treatments - a certain fellow who shows up in Rand's dreams about 1/2 of the way through looks almost comically evil, with fire bursting out of his eyes and mouth and all that. Finally, it seems kind of a bummer that the work was so short, clocking in at just over 150 pages. At this rate I'd guess they'll need about five volumes to finish off just The Eye of the World, which seems kind of excessive. Overall, though, they're relatively small complaints: I think it works well as an adaptation and the majority of the time it's absolutely lovely to look at. Definitely worth a look for Wheel of Time fans.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Magila

    2.5 The art still has a substantial way before this deserves a 4 or 5. I was pleased to see its quality and consistency to have improved from the first installment. It's still not there though. While the illustrations still leave something to be desired - when compared to even some children's books let alone graphic novels - its lettering was what really disappointed. The writing, and conveying of the story needs to be tightened up. Yes. But even still, there is a way to do better than the bubble 2.5 The art still has a substantial way before this deserves a 4 or 5. I was pleased to see its quality and consistency to have improved from the first installment. It's still not there though. While the illustrations still leave something to be desired - when compared to even some children's books let alone graphic novels - its lettering was what really disappointed. The writing, and conveying of the story needs to be tightened up. Yes. But even still, there is a way to do better than the bubbles and letters in this comic. I recently read Neil G.'s The Books of Magic, and comparing the skills of their letterer to this is night and day. Then there is the drop off between drawing and coloring. Looking at some of the original sketches, you can see they were done with skill and a neat style. After colors, they become a little weak, cartoony and sluggish. Inconsistent at times, in particular when you compare the main characters and how they are rendered in close ups, compared to mid-sized cells, and then smaller collage ones. I'd like to see them move away from a dated, photoshop-enabled B Saturday cartoon style. The Wheel of Time series is long. I doubt that my review will go far, but I hope that Tor is dedicated enough to the series to see the entire story is told through this medium. Graphic novels are clearly a good way of showcasing the WoT, but there is no comparison between S. King's Marvel adaptations, Neil G.'s DC stuff, and this. Do you really want to be compared to Rick Riordan and the other middling comic works? Commit and the improvements in quality will pay for themselves in spades!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kellie

    I have read this book to review the content in order to purchase the item for our library collection. While I have not read the Wheel of Time series the graphic novel is quite intriguing. Like the first volume some of the graphics work could use a little refining. There seems to be a lot of back and forth between cartoony images and more mature graphic work. Other than that and the obvious bad female forms (big boobs and tiny waists) this series looks as though it would fit into our library. As f I have read this book to review the content in order to purchase the item for our library collection. While I have not read the Wheel of Time series the graphic novel is quite intriguing. Like the first volume some of the graphics work could use a little refining. There seems to be a lot of back and forth between cartoony images and more mature graphic work. Other than that and the obvious bad female forms (big boobs and tiny waists) this series looks as though it would fit into our library. As far as the storyline goes in some places I also felt like I had missed something. It was as though the storyline skipped ahead somewhere. This would probably not be a problem if I had already read the book. My greatest concern is how the graphic novel version is following the actual book in other words how many graphic novels will it take to cover one book? Our library is small and there is only so much shelf space.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Gautam Surath

    In most cases reading the graphic novel right after finishing the book can be disappointing because for all its visual appeal a graphic novel does not do justice to the vivid descriptions of the book. In this case though I found that the Graphic novel helped me relive in the initial books of the franchise and enjoy them all over again without having to read the whole series again. The depth on the this novel is pretty good and most of the improtant storylines are covered in depth. Volume 2 bring In most cases reading the graphic novel right after finishing the book can be disappointing because for all its visual appeal a graphic novel does not do justice to the vivid descriptions of the book. In this case though I found that the Graphic novel helped me relive in the initial books of the franchise and enjoy them all over again without having to read the whole series again. The depth on the this novel is pretty good and most of the improtant storylines are covered in depth. Volume 2 bring more action and we visit Shadar Logoth. Each of the characters is not getting more rich and so is the overall plot. Definite improvement over the first volume and I look forward to more in this vein.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mary Baldwin

    I have read RJ's The Wheel of Time series from end to end twice, yet somehow the existence of the graphic novels escaped me. Until now. I am a huge fan of Chuck Dixon mainly for his work on Batman and he hasn't disappointed in bringing to life the characters in these novels. I would absolutely recommend anyone who, like me, has read the novels then goes on to read the graphics. It's such a powerful visual reminder of the world you grow to love in the novels. As standalone graphic novels though, I I have read RJ's The Wheel of Time series from end to end twice, yet somehow the existence of the graphic novels escaped me. Until now. I am a huge fan of Chuck Dixon mainly for his work on Batman and he hasn't disappointed in bringing to life the characters in these novels. I would absolutely recommend anyone who, like me, has read the novels then goes on to read the graphics. It's such a powerful visual reminder of the world you grow to love in the novels. As standalone graphic novels though, I'm not sure the cuts of the story would hit the mark. I'll have to trust someone else's judgement for that.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    The actual cover is different than the one in this image. In fact, Shelfari has pretty much messed up the order of the books by listing New Spring as book 1. Anyway, this volume continues Eye of the World up through the group running towards Shadar Logoth. The art is still great and of course the story is amazing. I'm not sure if those who haven't read the books will really get everything that's happening as it's been so long since I was a new reader for the series, but I like to think it would The actual cover is different than the one in this image. In fact, Shelfari has pretty much messed up the order of the books by listing New Spring as book 1. Anyway, this volume continues Eye of the World up through the group running towards Shadar Logoth. The art is still great and of course the story is amazing. I'm not sure if those who haven't read the books will really get everything that's happening as it's been so long since I was a new reader for the series, but I like to think it would at least be enjoyable.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Christian McKay

    I think the moment I felt truly released from this series was when I had to read four pages of one character explaining to another why she was the one chosen from the village to track him down. This has no bearing on the story whatsoever. Four pages is a lot of comic real estate, and I can only imagine that the book-version is just as needlessly exhaustive. I mean, we are talking about seventeen 1,000 page volumes here. So, that's it. I'm finished. Not particularly interesting, no engaging chara I think the moment I felt truly released from this series was when I had to read four pages of one character explaining to another why she was the one chosen from the village to track him down. This has no bearing on the story whatsoever. Four pages is a lot of comic real estate, and I can only imagine that the book-version is just as needlessly exhaustive. I mean, we are talking about seventeen 1,000 page volumes here. So, that's it. I'm finished. Not particularly interesting, no engaging characters, no fun.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Nina

    I think that I enjoy these more because tEotW is one of my favorite books more than anything else. It's sort of fun to see the book in a different way, but also a little disconcerting because they characters look so different from what I pictured - and from volume to volume. It's a little frustrating that the art design keeps changing. Hopefully it will continue to improve - I liked this art much better than the art in volume one, which was way too dark. For fans of the book, I'd say it's a fun li I think that I enjoy these more because tEotW is one of my favorite books more than anything else. It's sort of fun to see the book in a different way, but also a little disconcerting because they characters look so different from what I pictured - and from volume to volume. It's a little frustrating that the art design keeps changing. Hopefully it will continue to improve - I liked this art much better than the art in volume one, which was way too dark. For fans of the book, I'd say it's a fun little distraction. If you've never read the book, stick with the real thing!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ema-Lilly Dream

    I love the artwork in this book. I really do. It's colorful, realistic, bold. It's awesome. The problem? It's so bright, it physically makes your eyes hurt after awhile. Then you add in the fact that the paper is glossy, and so it reflects the light back into your eyes, and it makes it hard to read these. Besides that, You can tell that this derives from a very large, complicated novel. The info feels squeezed sometimes. The story itself is pretty good, and again, the artwork is really pretty. I I love the artwork in this book. I really do. It's colorful, realistic, bold. It's awesome. The problem? It's so bright, it physically makes your eyes hurt after awhile. Then you add in the fact that the paper is glossy, and so it reflects the light back into your eyes, and it makes it hard to read these. Besides that, You can tell that this derives from a very large, complicated novel. The info feels squeezed sometimes. The story itself is pretty good, and again, the artwork is really pretty. I want to find out what happens next, so I will continue with the story. 2.5 Stars.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Morrell

    I am loving these graphic adaptations of the first book in the Wheel of Time series. I've read the original novel many, many times yet I still find this fresh and new, the visuals and languid pace that come with the format change are a joy, to see scenes mostly as I imagined but so much more detailed. Highly recommended if you're a die hard fan. I am loving these graphic adaptations of the first book in the Wheel of Time series. I've read the original novel many, many times yet I still find this fresh and new, the visuals and languid pace that come with the format change are a joy, to see scenes mostly as I imagined but so much more detailed. Highly recommended if you're a die hard fan.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Michael Nash

    Better than the first one because of noticeably superior artwork and the fact that it covers a part of the story where things are actually happening. Still, the translation from novel to comic doesn't work terribly well Better than the first one because of noticeably superior artwork and the fact that it covers a part of the story where things are actually happening. Still, the translation from novel to comic doesn't work terribly well

  28. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    I love seeing EotW in this format (hence the four stars), but the artwork is just good, not great.

  29. 4 out of 5

    James

    Full review on HorrorTalk.com: http://www.horrortalk.com/comic-revie... Full review on HorrorTalk.com: http://www.horrortalk.com/comic-revie...

  30. 4 out of 5

    Laurel

    Can't wait to read the third! Can't wait to read the third!

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