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The Blonde Lady by Maurice Leblanc, Fiction, Historical, Action & Adventure, Mystery & Detective

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My excuse for duplicating reports that we all heard from the newsboys is that I can supply something new: I can furnish the key to the puzzle. There is always a certain mystery about these adventures: I can dispel it. I reprint articles that have been read over and over again; I copy out old interviews: but all these things I rearrange and classify and put to the exact tes My excuse for duplicating reports that we all heard from the newsboys is that I can supply something new: I can furnish the key to the puzzle. There is always a certain mystery about these adventures: I can dispel it. I reprint articles that have been read over and over again; I copy out old interviews: but all these things I rearrange and classify and put to the exact test of truth. My collaborator in this work is ArsEne Lupin himself, whose kindness to me is inexhaustible. I am also under an occasional obligation to the unspeakable Wilson, the friend and confidant of Holmlock Shears. (For this is the adventure where ArsEne Lupin and Holmlock Shears came face to face. And a thrilling adventure it is.)


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My excuse for duplicating reports that we all heard from the newsboys is that I can supply something new: I can furnish the key to the puzzle. There is always a certain mystery about these adventures: I can dispel it. I reprint articles that have been read over and over again; I copy out old interviews: but all these things I rearrange and classify and put to the exact tes My excuse for duplicating reports that we all heard from the newsboys is that I can supply something new: I can furnish the key to the puzzle. There is always a certain mystery about these adventures: I can dispel it. I reprint articles that have been read over and over again; I copy out old interviews: but all these things I rearrange and classify and put to the exact test of truth. My collaborator in this work is ArsEne Lupin himself, whose kindness to me is inexhaustible. I am also under an occasional obligation to the unspeakable Wilson, the friend and confidant of Holmlock Shears. (For this is the adventure where ArsEne Lupin and Holmlock Shears came face to face. And a thrilling adventure it is.)

30 review for The Blonde Lady by Maurice Leblanc, Fiction, Historical, Action & Adventure, Mystery & Detective

  1. 5 out of 5

    Praveen

    Arsene Lupin! Such a wonderful creation by Maurice Leblanc! Arsene Lupin is a stylish and dashing French character with all daring, charm and panache. He is called literature’s greatest gentleman thief and detective. I was never aware of this gentleman thief, but after reading this first book, I became an immediate fan of his elegance and alacrity, at the same time the prowess and brilliance of Leblanc’s storytelling earned a special place right away in the list of my loved authors. In the intr Arsene Lupin! Such a wonderful creation by Maurice Leblanc! Arsene Lupin is a stylish and dashing French character with all daring, charm and panache. He is called literature’s greatest gentleman thief and detective. I was never aware of this gentleman thief, but after reading this first book, I became an immediate fan of his elegance and alacrity, at the same time the prowess and brilliance of Leblanc’s storytelling earned a special place right away in the list of my loved authors. In the introduction, I came to know that in 1905 Leblanc was solicited to contribute a short story to be written in the manner of Sherlock Holmes. The interesting fact is that in the book where Lupin first appeared, there was a tale called “Sherlock Holmes arrives too late” where Leblanc introduced the famous Baker Street detective to his mix. After a legal objection from Canon Doyle, the name of British master sleuth was changed to Herlock Sholmes. This second book of collection of two long stories was Arsene Lupin Contre Herlock Sholmes in France. It was published in the UK under the title of Arsene Lupin versus Holmlock Shears in 1909. I began this and did not stop till the end that is always an achievement for me as I am a reader, who reads a book in installments, taking my time, switching to other books to avoid boredom and having multiple tasks in between. Lupin is a master of disguise and keeps smiling through difficulties and dangers. Though this is crime fiction, the writing of the author is very witty and an element of fun lingers everywhere. ‘Do you mean you are still vegetarian? ‘Yes more than ever,’ said Lupin. ‘From taste? Conviction? Habit ?’ ‘For reason of health.’ ‘And do you never break your rule?’ ‘Óh yes …. When I go out to dinner, so as not to appear eccentric.’ This book has two long stories; “The Fair-haired lady’’ and “the Jewish lamp.” In the first story, an antique desk is stolen from the house of a mathematics professor and then there is a theft of blue diamond in the city. Police inspector Ganimard suspects the role of Lupin and his accomplice, the fair-haired lady but is not able to prove it. He takes the service of English detective Holmlock Shears, who is a perfect match for the Lupin. He is as smart and alert as Lupin. The combat and fight between the Lupin and Holmlock Shears are written in a very mystified way, lots of unpredictable turns in the story and all with such precision and elegance that it gives the readers a sense of atonement. Similar is the case with the second story. The most enjoyable part for me was the graceful and refined ways of functioning of both the enemies; The greatest burglar Lupin and the smartest detective Holmlock. This is a very lively book full of humor and mystery are woven together that keeps the reader hooked to this page-turning crime mystery. Writing is very good. Precision and logic just near perfect. I loved it! A deserving '5 star' from a contented reader!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Adrian

    Enjoyable fun but not great. Review to follow after Hols 😀

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lau

    I received a copy of this via NetGalley, for an honest review. My expectations for this book were incredibly high. I loved the first book, especially the last bit where Herlock and Lupin met, and I was really looking forward to this one. Unfortunately, I wasn’t blown away by it as I thought I would be. The first story wasn’t very entertaining to me. Herlock and Lupin’s interactions were amazing and I absolutely loved how cheeky Lupin was. That being said, I found the actual crime not interesting a I received a copy of this via NetGalley, for an honest review. My expectations for this book were incredibly high. I loved the first book, especially the last bit where Herlock and Lupin met, and I was really looking forward to this one. Unfortunately, I wasn’t blown away by it as I thought I would be. The first story wasn’t very entertaining to me. Herlock and Lupin’s interactions were amazing and I absolutely loved how cheeky Lupin was. That being said, I found the actual crime not interesting at all and both Herlock and Wilson were very dense. When he wasn’t talking to Lupin, Herlock acted just like the silly detectives that were trying to catch Lupin instead of a real match for the Thief. The second story, on the other hand, was more interesting. Again, Herlock and Lupin’s showdown was wonderful and I loved how Lupin teased Herlock about their roles being switched. Good but not as good as I expected.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Max

    Follow up to the first Arsene Lupin book. A little less enjoyable to be, I don't really care for Herlock Sholmes and his numbnut assistant. Some of these adventures felt too fake to me, whereas in the first book you felt like the thievery could really happen, felt more realistic. Hopefully the third book is focused on Lupin more and his relationship with Ganimard! Follow up to the first Arsene Lupin book. A little less enjoyable to be, I don't really care for Herlock Sholmes and his numbnut assistant. Some of these adventures felt too fake to me, whereas in the first book you felt like the thievery could really happen, felt more realistic. Hopefully the third book is focused on Lupin more and his relationship with Ganimard!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    The review from afar – No. 2 Foreword to these overseas reviews: Being committed to a month-long work trip to Malaysia, I decided to forego bring a handful of paperbacks and carry my as-yet-unused, gifted Kindle 3G instead. In preparation of said trip, I visited the Project Gutenberg site and loaded up some old, but enticing titles. (No, not bodice rippers, sorry guys.) So, for the first time I am reviewing books deployed on 21st century technology rather than that of the 15th (earlier, if you cre The review from afar – No. 2 Foreword to these overseas reviews: Being committed to a month-long work trip to Malaysia, I decided to forego bring a handful of paperbacks and carry my as-yet-unused, gifted Kindle 3G instead. In preparation of said trip, I visited the Project Gutenberg site and loaded up some old, but enticing titles. (No, not bodice rippers, sorry guys.) So, for the first time I am reviewing books deployed on 21st century technology rather than that of the 15th (earlier, if you credit the Chinese even though they never commercialized it.) Enjoy. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- It was not long before the very visible popularity and success of Arthur Conan Doyle’s World’s Greatest Consulting Detective produced two very strong and opposite reactions: 1  Conan Doyle, despairing of his future as a “serious writer”      sent Holmes on the vacation to eternity, leaving Watson      holding the bag, as it were, for all the distraught readers. 2  Enterprising sorts latched on to the idea, “if he can do it,     so can I”. And thus, the Holmes clones and pastiches arose     for the first time and have walked the Earth ever since. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Arsene Lupin versus Herlock Sholmes By Maurice Leblanc This is another early (1906/7) pastiche of Holmes, but instead of altering his speech patterns and attitude, Leblanc transports Sholmes and Watson to Paris. Being French, one supposes it is natural, n’est-ce-pas? The volume contains two tales of the elusive, gentlemanly, and magnanimous thief/rogue and how he is pursued both by the French police and the English Duo. The stories were longer and more difficult than the Mystery of the Eleven Cuff-Buttons (but that may have been due to the additional fatigue of being snowed in for three hours before taking off to miss my planned connection in Tokyo.) What was surprising was to realize that the storyline alluded to another tale of Lupin in which Sholmes must have appeared even if as a minor character. Part one is the tale of The Blonde Lady. A mysterious woman who seems to have melted through walls (or thin air) after making mischief. The trail is both long and cloudy as Sholmes takes one erroneous turn after another while the Police go even further astray. Of course, it is not too long before Sholmes reveals that he has been paying out the line in the hope of catching the true mastermind, Monsieur Lupin. Evincing similar respect for ability, but much warmer in spirit and humor than Professor Moriarty, Lupin dances around his adversaries both literally (no spoilers, now) and verbally. The story is fairly long, lasting six chapters (none of your attention-span-of-a-gnat 1-page chapters, either.) It ends with a pretty good wrap up, also. Part two is the tale of The Jewish Lamp. While only two chapters long, it starts with an explanation-defying theft that almost immediately drags Sholmes back into conflict with the still affable Lupin. (I was reminded of the contemporaneous gentlemen troublemakers, such as Raffles when pausing between chapters.) A letter arrives at 221-B begging him to take up the chase. As he is reading it, a second letter arrives the contents of which madden him enough to take up the case that he had decided to blow off. So, it’s off to Paris again with his pet scribbler in two. Once again, we have the dance of the criminal and detective with moments of low comedy as well as humor keeping things lively. But, as things must always be, Sholmes solves the case, yet does not conclude it as he had set out to do. Given the age of the manuscript (it passed 100 five years ago) and the translation from the French, it is pretty readable (especially so if you are not in a tube of aluminum at 40,000 feet for tens of hours). It’s out of copyright and free in various flavors from the (always free and never linked to any charges) Gutenberg Project (and a few other sources.) If you like the Great Detective and bemoan the finite number of stories written by anyone about him, then this is a pretty worthy addition to the unofficial canon. Another solid tale that deserves Three Full Stars (3.0).

  6. 4 out of 5

    Tiffany

    I enjoyed reading this book as much as I enjoyed reading the other Arsene Lupin book. The thing that this one has that the other didn't is that this is more of a cohesive unit: while each chapter still feels like its own short story (for the most part), put together, they make an overarching story. Still, it's just as fun as the short stories are. I love how smart Lupin is, and how he can outsmart even the brilliant detective, Herlock Sholmes. Reading this has actually made me want to go back and I enjoyed reading this book as much as I enjoyed reading the other Arsene Lupin book. The thing that this one has that the other didn't is that this is more of a cohesive unit: while each chapter still feels like its own short story (for the most part), put together, they make an overarching story. Still, it's just as fun as the short stories are. I love how smart Lupin is, and how he can outsmart even the brilliant detective, Herlock Sholmes. Reading this has actually made me want to go back and give Sherlock Holmes stories another shot. Maurice Leblanc makes Herlock Sholmes seem like such an ass at times (especially to his assistant, Wilson), and Herlock gets outsmarted by Lupin so often (it wasn't until the final chapter that I felt like Herlock Sholmes was actually intelligent and holding his own against Lupin), that I wonder how this compares to Doyle's version of Holmes.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Katie Oldcorn

    Very witty and enjoyable mystery - looking forward to reading more in this series!

  8. 4 out of 5

    idkhello

    I<3 arsene lupin. Also the end was nice - he literally pointed out how he made some good while shelrock(sorry HERLOCK) made things only worse but still none of the lost anything

  9. 5 out of 5

    John

    This was my introduction to Arsène Lupin, the French Raffles; thanks to Project Gutenberg, I have several other of Maurice Leblanc's novels about him sitting on my e-reader. The novel consists of two closely linked novellas, in each of which the renowned English detective Herlock Sholmes is commissioned to come to Paris, accompanied as ever by stout-hearted numbskull amanuensis Dr. Wilson, to solve a crime that's assumed to have at its heart the legendary figure of master criminal Arsène Lupin. F This was my introduction to Arsène Lupin, the French Raffles; thanks to Project Gutenberg, I have several other of Maurice Leblanc's novels about him sitting on my e-reader. The novel consists of two closely linked novellas, in each of which the renowned English detective Herlock Sholmes is commissioned to come to Paris, accompanied as ever by stout-hearted numbskull amanuensis Dr. Wilson, to solve a crime that's assumed to have at its heart the legendary figure of master criminal Arsène Lupin. For his part, Lupin relishes the challenge of crossing mental swords with the only man on earth intelligent and resourceful enough to be a worthy rival. The cases themselves, as cases, aren't especially interesting -- these are adventures rather than exercises in ratiocination or the profundities of human motivation -- but the tales dance along entertainingly enough, with some pleasing twists of plot. All in all, this is light, fluffy stuff: I imagine that by this time next week I'll be hard-pressed to remember much about the book, but it was fun while I was reading it.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kinga

    I borrowed this one from a colleague of mine and I quite enjoyed it, a short story Arthur Conan Doyle-style, funny and witty. I also loved how I was somehow rooting for the villain...

  11. 4 out of 5

    Edward

    A wonderful read, and a fine example of Victorian mystery novels. We finally see the great English detective (called Herlock Sholmes due to Sir Doyle's lack of support for a crossover) and his Gallic counterpart clash in a battle of wits. Although I wouldn't recommend it as an introduction to Leblanc's work, as it was for me. Like Doyle, Lupin is not predominantly featured in the novels, the reader is only exposed to his workings as he hides in the background (although we do see him in the end u A wonderful read, and a fine example of Victorian mystery novels. We finally see the great English detective (called Herlock Sholmes due to Sir Doyle's lack of support for a crossover) and his Gallic counterpart clash in a battle of wits. Although I wouldn't recommend it as an introduction to Leblanc's work, as it was for me. Like Doyle, Lupin is not predominantly featured in the novels, the reader is only exposed to his workings as he hides in the background (although we do see him in the end undisguised and about), much like the person was experiencing an investigation unfold. Still a wonderful novel, and I find it a shame that Lupin's success has mostly been centered in the francophone world, unlike Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Edward Butler

    It's not every day you get to read a Sherlock Holmes story written from an adversarial viewpoint, and not the sort you'd get from, say, Moriarty, either, but a perspective on Holmes which acknowledges his talents without a trace of awe, as though Holmes was a real person who simply, inevitably, fails to live up to his reputation. No tragic flaw, just mundane imperfections exploited by Lupin repeatedly. The only thing that really detracts from it is the cruel treatment of Watson, which I found ta It's not every day you get to read a Sherlock Holmes story written from an adversarial viewpoint, and not the sort you'd get from, say, Moriarty, either, but a perspective on Holmes which acknowledges his talents without a trace of awe, as though Holmes was a real person who simply, inevitably, fails to live up to his reputation. No tragic flaw, just mundane imperfections exploited by Lupin repeatedly. The only thing that really detracts from it is the cruel treatment of Watson, which I found tasteless.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ghostcat

    My mom read Leblanc for years and I was quite excited to discover his Arsene Lupin series by a funny parody with Sherlock Holmes, whom I like a lot. But I was disappointed: bad writing, lame story, stereotyped characters and most of all, a really harsh mockery of Conan Doyle's icons described as stupid men, it was pathetically not funny. My mom read Leblanc for years and I was quite excited to discover his Arsene Lupin series by a funny parody with Sherlock Holmes, whom I like a lot. But I was disappointed: bad writing, lame story, stereotyped characters and most of all, a really harsh mockery of Conan Doyle's icons described as stupid men, it was pathetically not funny.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Mirela

    It was an audiobook. Interesting.

  15. 4 out of 5

    booklearner

    Oh, these obscure vintage mysteries don’t get enough love in the book world! They make for lively reads with very original plot twists. Lupin makes an interesting heist-genre character in that he is too bad to be a Robin Hood, yet has a heart enough not to be a complete cold blooded con man. He’s very choosy—not every valuable is worth stealing in his estimation. And he plays matchmaker on occasion! Even so, we should know enough not to believe one word of what he says. The battle of English and Oh, these obscure vintage mysteries don’t get enough love in the book world! They make for lively reads with very original plot twists. Lupin makes an interesting heist-genre character in that he is too bad to be a Robin Hood, yet has a heart enough not to be a complete cold blooded con man. He’s very choosy—not every valuable is worth stealing in his estimation. And he plays matchmaker on occasion! Even so, we should know enough not to believe one word of what he says. The battle of English and French wits was fun and Sholmes’ interactions with his worshiping sidekick Wilson were hilarious and made for some of my favorite scenes. A spoof on the popular Sherlock, of course. But this isn’t purely a case of bumbling investigator against brilliant villain. No, both are geniuses in their own vein—the question is, who is a step ahead of whom? Arsene Lupin Versus Herlock Sholmes is the second in the series by Maurice LeBlanc and they are translated from the original French. I believe I enjoyed this book better than the previous, as the first one was more of a collection of short stories about Lupin whereas this felt connected enough to make a novel. Short stories have just never been a thing with me. These stories might have been written over a century ago, but there is something about them that make them so modernly appealing. I encourage you to give these a try!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jonigno

    Loved it. The Sholmes and Wilson antics are hilarious and honestly, Conan Doyle had it coming. Leblanc could have even done worse but I guess he still had a shred of respect for the characters and their author. Will be reading more of the gentleman-thief this year, probably (and more of his grandson lol)

  17. 5 out of 5

    Alex Crozier

    It’s been like a year since I’ve read this but I’ve gotta post something because the more I think about it the more I realise that this is the perfect book. Holmes’ obsession with Lupin? Exceptional. The restaurant scene? Exquisite. Watson getting cast aside in increasingly arbitrary comic relief antics? Incredible, 10/10, A+ storytelling, the literary peak of the Belle Époque.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    What an amazing and thrilling showdown. My only complaint is that Wilson (fake Watson) gets treated like trash or hurt every story. Other than that I enjoyed how the stories in this collection were more like chapters rather than the first collection where the stories were random.

  19. 5 out of 5

    T i n a

    2.5 Stars

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tim Hicks

    Not bad, got a bit samey after a while. Lupin's a little TOO clever, and the logistics of his arrangements are well beyond credible. The note will arrive at 11, Holmes will be on the noon train, etc. And Lupin has half of Paris working for him, with instant communications that suggests cellphones in 1906. Sholmes isn't quite as sharp as Conan Doyle's, and the Sholmes-Wilson relationship would be called a bit creepy these days, with a besotted admirer and a hero who gets Wilson injured regularly Not bad, got a bit samey after a while. Lupin's a little TOO clever, and the logistics of his arrangements are well beyond credible. The note will arrive at 11, Holmes will be on the noon train, etc. And Lupin has half of Paris working for him, with instant communications that suggests cellphones in 1906. Sholmes isn't quite as sharp as Conan Doyle's, and the Sholmes-Wilson relationship would be called a bit creepy these days, with a besotted admirer and a hero who gets Wilson injured regularly and doesn't seem to think anything of it. "Only four millimetres from the heart? Hah, as I expected." I won't look for more of these. Maybe I'll check out Lecoq.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jehan Shaker

    I finished the book in 1 day i couldn't put the book down!!! Super detailed and thrilling, i had an Adrenaline rush! Wonderful! I finished the book in 1 day i couldn't put the book down!!! Super detailed and thrilling, i had an Adrenaline rush! Wonderful!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Arianna Arianna

    Charming Arsene races for the next piece of jewellery to steal against the traps that the intuitive Sherlock Holmes has carefully laid down for him.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Nanosynergy

    Arsène Lupin vs. Herlock Sholmes. The brilliant, mischievous, French gentleman thief matches wits with the brilliant British detective. Not sure it completely works, but a funny concept. Originally Sherlock Holmes, but Arthur Conan Doyle protested so the name was changed to Herlock Sholmes. Now that copyright has expired, a newer translated edition has changed it back to Sherlock Holmes. Arsène Lupin vs. Herlock Sholmes. The brilliant, mischievous, French gentleman thief matches wits with the brilliant British detective. Not sure it completely works, but a funny concept. Originally Sherlock Holmes, but Arthur Conan Doyle protested so the name was changed to Herlock Sholmes. Now that copyright has expired, a newer translated edition has changed it back to Sherlock Holmes.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ritika

    Just recalled that I had read this a few years ago. Do not remember much, but a fun time was had.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Alejandra

    Not great. At all. Leblanc had the chance of revamping Holmes, yet chose a silly mockery. Mostly boring, loses Lupin in his efforts to make him greater.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Grips

    Herlock Sholmes, that's hilarious. While Lupin remained the same charming, mischievous troublemaker from the first book, Leblanc's rendition of the legendary detective did him less good justice. I'm sure there's a sophisticated irony there somewhere. "Sholmes" was very unlike himself. Losing his temper, betraying his principles, his smearing wasn't enjoyable at all. Leblanc made a buffoon of him at times, in a conspicuous attempt by the author to uplift his own hero. But to do so at the expense Herlock Sholmes, that's hilarious. While Lupin remained the same charming, mischievous troublemaker from the first book, Leblanc's rendition of the legendary detective did him less good justice. I'm sure there's a sophisticated irony there somewhere. "Sholmes" was very unlike himself. Losing his temper, betraying his principles, his smearing wasn't enjoyable at all. Leblanc made a buffoon of him at times, in a conspicuous attempt by the author to uplift his own hero. But to do so at the expense of a dignified figure like Sholmes is rather cheap.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Cameron

    What another fantastic book with Lupin's goes up against his most challenging opponent Sherlock Holmes. While the book loosely following the same framework as the first it varies as Lupin's adventures are all tied together. Can't wait for the next one. What another fantastic book with Lupin's goes up against his most challenging opponent Sherlock Holmes. While the book loosely following the same framework as the first it varies as Lupin's adventures are all tied together. Can't wait for the next one.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kynan

    TL: Ugh. A poor interpretation of Holmes and Watson in an attempt to prove Lupin's worthiness to be Holmes' nemesis. TL;DR: The cover claims that this book is "A Classic Tale of the World's Greatest Thief and the World's Greatest Detective". I'm not sold on the former claim and I found the portrayal of Holmes and, in particular, Watson to border on offensive. Watson, or "Wilson" as copyright claims required him to be named, is not even a parody, he's a lumbering idiotic dolt and Leblanc does ever TL: Ugh. A poor interpretation of Holmes and Watson in an attempt to prove Lupin's worthiness to be Holmes' nemesis. TL;DR: The cover claims that this book is "A Classic Tale of the World's Greatest Thief and the World's Greatest Detective". I'm not sold on the former claim and I found the portrayal of Holmes and, in particular, Watson to border on offensive. Watson, or "Wilson" as copyright claims required him to be named, is not even a parody, he's a lumbering idiotic dolt and Leblanc does everything he can to remove him from the story whenever he pops his head up. Herlock Sholmes (again, thanks copyright) is a better interpretation and the original material occasionally shines through but there's so much time dedicated to making a fool of him that the more nuanced and clever parodying is hidden. Additionally, I felt that the very first story removed Lupin's (dubious) claims from the first book that he's a harmless Robin Hood. Complaining aside, there are elements of this book that are quite good! The Blonde Lady thread is very well done...and I think I've run out of nice things to say now actually. I've given this 1-star because, well, I legitimately didn't like it. 1-star is maybe harsh but I certainly wouldn't recommend it to anyone, which I think effectively pushes it out of "OK" territory.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Hope

    Stalwart fans of Sherlock Holmes may take umbrage at the way Maurice Leblanc pokes fun at him, but the rest of us can enjoy it as light-hearted amusement. Two mysteries are recorded in this tale: the blue diamond and the Jewish lamp. In both stories "Sholmes" is sure that gentleman thief Arsene Lupín is the culprit, and is determined to arrest him. Lupín always manages to escape. Who will be the winner in this battle of wits? The man known for his cold calculation of facts or the one known for h Stalwart fans of Sherlock Holmes may take umbrage at the way Maurice Leblanc pokes fun at him, but the rest of us can enjoy it as light-hearted amusement. Two mysteries are recorded in this tale: the blue diamond and the Jewish lamp. In both stories "Sholmes" is sure that gentleman thief Arsene Lupín is the culprit, and is determined to arrest him. Lupín always manages to escape. Who will be the winner in this battle of wits? The man known for his cold calculation of facts or the one known for his reckless joie de vivre? Though not great literature, the story is full of wonderful old-fashioned language and gentle humor. Nice, clean escapist reading.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Janina Woods

    Read it in the Japanese version to practice, so I probably didn‘t get everything, but what I got was a funny story with so many twists I could barely keep up! It was quite clear from the start that Lupin would be able to escape Holmes time and time again, and while the author did male fun of Holmes (and especially Watson) I don‘t think he got away too badly. :)

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