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The True Bounds Of Christian Freedom

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A clear, scriptural exposition of the place of the law in the life of the Christian. One of the few works currently available which show the danger of Antinomianism, while also avoiding legalism.


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A clear, scriptural exposition of the place of the law in the life of the Christian. One of the few works currently available which show the danger of Antinomianism, while also avoiding legalism.

30 review for The True Bounds Of Christian Freedom

  1. 5 out of 5

    Argin Gerigorian

    Best book by far that I've read on Mosaic covenant and the issue of law and gospel! Bolton is fresh air from the past! Best book by far that I've read on Mosaic covenant and the issue of law and gospel! Bolton is fresh air from the past!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    This little book exceeded my expectations. Far from a ham-fisted defense of the third use of the law, this is a closely reasoned, carefully nuanced look at gospel, law, and freedom, organized around six questions. 1. Does our being made free by Christ free us from the law? 2. Does our being made free by Christ deliver us from all punishments or chastisements for sin? 3. Is it consistent with Christian freedom to be under obligation to perform duties because God has commanded them? 4. May Christ’s f This little book exceeded my expectations. Far from a ham-fisted defense of the third use of the law, this is a closely reasoned, carefully nuanced look at gospel, law, and freedom, organized around six questions. 1. Does our being made free by Christ free us from the law? 2. Does our being made free by Christ deliver us from all punishments or chastisements for sin? 3. Is it consistent with Christian freedom to be under obligation to perform duties because God has commanded them? 4. May Christ’s freemen come into bondage again through sin? 5. Is it consistent with Christian freedom to perform duties out of respect for the recompense of the reward? 6. Does the freedom of a Christian free him from all obedience to men? I found it very, very helpful.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Johnny Zacchio jr.

    I believe every Christian should read this book!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Coyle

    Unfortunately, I read this book out loud with the wife over the last few months. That is not the best way to read this particular Puritan writer. As a result, it was at times hard to keep track of the broad scope of the argument and the specific points Bolton raises or rebuts. With that said, what I did catch from this book was worthwhile. Bolton walks the middle road of faithful obedience between the twin heresies of antinomianism and legalism. He responds to arguments common in his time about Unfortunately, I read this book out loud with the wife over the last few months. That is not the best way to read this particular Puritan writer. As a result, it was at times hard to keep track of the broad scope of the argument and the specific points Bolton raises or rebuts. With that said, what I did catch from this book was worthwhile. Bolton walks the middle road of faithful obedience between the twin heresies of antinomianism and legalism. He responds to arguments common in his time about whether/how much/in what way we ought to obey the law, if at all. While not all of these arguments (either his or the ones he responds to) have passed down to our time, given the current discussions over the use of the law by Christians, this book is worth reading. A selection of citations (sorry, we read the Kindle edition so I can't give page numbers): -Christ himself shall as soon be called to account for your sin as you yourself. If you have an interest in Him, sin shall never condemn you, for Christ has made satisfaction for it. Those whose standing in Christ have made satisfaction in Christ to all the requirements of God and His law. -God has thoughts of love in all He does to His people. The ground of His dealings with us is love (though the occasion may be sin), the manner of His dealings is love, and the purpose of His dealings is love. He has regard, in all, to our good here, to make us partakers of His holiness, and to our glory hereafter, to make us partakers of His glory. -Sin is dead judicially. Christ has sentenced it. Christ has condemned sin the flesh.. Sin met its death blow in the death of Christ. And it is dying actually... But notice that God has chosen to put sin to a lingering death, to a death upon the cross, and this for the greater punishment of sin, that it might die gradually. But also, it is for the further humiliation of saints that they might be put upon the exercise of prayer and cast upon the hold of their faith. It is intended to exercise their faith for the daily breaking of the power of sin and corruption in them. -In brief, then, if your appeal is a right one and such as will do you good, it must be a total, not a partial, appeal. You must not come to Christ for some relief only, but for all. Christ must have the honour of all. Also, it must be an appeal for grace as well as mercy, for sanctification as well as salvation, an appeal to be made holy by Christ as well as to be made happy by Christ. In short, this book is excellent and worth reading.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Gabriel Barnes

    Excellent book! A must read!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Peter Bringe

    Bolton carefully makes good, biblical distinctions on questions regarding Christian liberty, the law of God, and our obedience that are still relevant today. I only occasionally disagree with him, mostly in his view of the Mosaic covenant as a "subservient covenant" to the covenant of grace, but he goes on to respectfully explain the view of "the majority of our holy and most learned divines" that the Mosaic covenant was an administration of the covenant of grace, noting that both opinions gener Bolton carefully makes good, biblical distinctions on questions regarding Christian liberty, the law of God, and our obedience that are still relevant today. I only occasionally disagree with him, mostly in his view of the Mosaic covenant as a "subservient covenant" to the covenant of grace, but he goes on to respectfully explain the view of "the majority of our holy and most learned divines" that the Mosaic covenant was an administration of the covenant of grace, noting that both opinions generally come to the same conclusion on the points he is making (this is discussed in pages 94-101). It is interesting that in discussing the law, he says that "in respect of the ceremonial and the judicial law we find few dissenters. All the controversy arises from the third part, the moral law" (p. 56). Well, in modern discussions among Presbyterians, a bit of controversy does arise in respect of the judicial law. Here is how he explains the view of the judicial law from which he found few dissenters: "As for the judicial law, which was an appendix to the second table, it was an ordinance containing precepts concerning the government of the people in things civil, and it served three purposes: it gave the people a rule of common and public equity, it distinguished them from other peoples, and it gave them a type of the government of Christ. That part of the judicial law which was typical of Christ's government has ceased, but that part which is of common and general equity remains still in force. It is a common maxim: those judgements which are common and natural are moral and perpetual" (p. 56).

  7. 5 out of 5

    NerdyTheologians

    I knew that when I bit into this book that it was going to be more than I could chew, but that didn’t take away from the experience in the slightest. You know that you’re in for a ride when one of the Westminster Divines is at the wheel. * I thoroughly enjoyed my time with this book. Samuel Bolton, a puritan writes with vigor and clarity but each sentence is more than a shovel full to digest. Each page is packed with information and it felt like would need more than one pen to annotate. * I had many I knew that when I bit into this book that it was going to be more than I could chew, but that didn’t take away from the experience in the slightest. You know that you’re in for a ride when one of the Westminster Divines is at the wheel. * I thoroughly enjoyed my time with this book. Samuel Bolton, a puritan writes with vigor and clarity but each sentence is more than a shovel full to digest. Each page is packed with information and it felt like would need more than one pen to annotate. * I had many questions about the Law and Gospel and some of the gold I mined from this book helped clarify so many things for me. Naturally, as a Reformed Baptist, I was at odds at some his conclusions with the covenants. But, I still harvested more than I could possibly recapitulate here. It’s a fantastic book, and you need to buy it. * The biggest takeaway I grabbed from this book was incredibly simple: “We are set free from the [moral] law as covenant, but not as a rule”. I think about that simple sentence almost every day.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Alyssa Bohon

    Solid gospel doctrine with lots of those great little pithy statements in the classic Puritan style. (E.g. "It is as easy to separate the sunbeam from the sun as holiness and obedience from the person God has justified.") Also this book has way more content than its title suggests. The first section on all the various freedoms that the believer enjoys in Christ is especially glorious and encouraging, before the book delves into the nitty gritty of scruples about the law etc. Great stuff. Solid gospel doctrine with lots of those great little pithy statements in the classic Puritan style. (E.g. "It is as easy to separate the sunbeam from the sun as holiness and obedience from the person God has justified.") Also this book has way more content than its title suggests. The first section on all the various freedoms that the believer enjoys in Christ is especially glorious and encouraging, before the book delves into the nitty gritty of scruples about the law etc. Great stuff.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Clint Lum

    Helpful and clear. In true Puritan fashion, Bolton is simultaneously rational and devotional. Crystal clear thinking while offering a soothing balm for the Christian’s soul. I would highly recommend this work especially given the immensely important and perennially controversial topic of it: the law. Is the law relevant to the New Testament? What was the purpose of the law? Are we still accountable to uphold the law? Bolton tackles all of these questions and more in this book.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    Incredible book! A writing characteristic that is quite attractive to me is a logical thought process. I think this is why I especially love Bolton. But this is true for the Puritans in general. Bolton is quite thorough and sticks hard to correct doctrine. His logic and strict commitment to structure are outstanding.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Hannah Graham

    An excellent Puritan work on the Law and Gospel! Though a harder read, it would prove helpful to every Christian to understand these crucial truths of our freedom in Christ. That is freedom from sin, death, Satan and the law as a covenant, and freedom to life, glory and obedience to the law, which is love.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Andres Valencia

    Increible que en 1600 estos hombres tuvieran tal doctrina desarrollada sobre la libertad cristiana.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Peter Stonecipher

    Great discussion of Reformed thinking on the Mosaic covenant. I found Bolton readable and winsome in many areas.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Justin Dillehay

    Do Christians still have a duty to obey the law of God? Is it wrong to obey God in order to receive rewards? Does God discipline his children for their sin? These questions, which are still hot topics today, were all deal with here in 1645 by Puritan Samuel Bolton. Anyone pastor or teacher who wants help navigating the current controversies about antinomianism, law, and grace needs to have Bolton as a dialogue partner.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Nathan Good

    This book makes a great case for the place of the law in the life of a Christian. He shows how Christian obedience fits in with God's grace and the effects of sin upon a believers life. This book is fairly indepth and definitely not a beginner read, however for someone who has questioned how it is that a believer is to obey God without being again bound to the law and therefore legalism, this is a great book. This book makes a great case for the place of the law in the life of a Christian. He shows how Christian obedience fits in with God's grace and the effects of sin upon a believers life. This book is fairly indepth and definitely not a beginner read, however for someone who has questioned how it is that a believer is to obey God without being again bound to the law and therefore legalism, this is a great book.

  16. 5 out of 5

    B

    While parts were difficult to follow, I profited from this treatment of Christian liberty, freedom to obey with joy, and relationship with the law. Bolton did a good job of distinguishing how we follow the law out of Christian duty-in the freedom to enjoy that duty granted by salvation- as our guide, but in no way our hope.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Justin Andrusk

    An accurate exposition of what Christian liberty really means. Not the freedom to sin, but the freedom from sin.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tom

  19. 4 out of 5

    Andy

  20. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

  21. 4 out of 5

    David

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Warner

  23. 4 out of 5

    cody bailey

  24. 5 out of 5

    John

  25. 5 out of 5

    Dave

  26. 4 out of 5

    Paul Barth

  27. 4 out of 5

    Timothy

  28. 5 out of 5

    Richard Tiburzi

  29. 5 out of 5

    Addison Frank

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Shelnutt

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