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The Horror in the Museum & Other Revisions

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H. P. Lovecraft, the creator of Cthulhu Mythos, is the acknowledged modern master of the macabre, but he also worked with many younger pulp writers. Collected here are a dozen of their experiments in arcane terror, unearthly horror, and inhuman evil. Adding his inimitable touch, Lovecraft revised these tales of terror into frightful shadows of his own unique imagination. " H. P. Lovecraft, the creator of Cthulhu Mythos, is the acknowledged modern master of the macabre, but he also worked with many younger pulp writers. Collected here are a dozen of their experiments in arcane terror, unearthly horror, and inhuman evil. Adding his inimitable touch, Lovecraft revised these tales of terror into frightful shadows of his own unique imagination. "Lovecraft's fiction is one of the cornerstones of modern horror."—Clive Barker "H. P. Lovecraft has yet to be surpassed as the 20th century's greatest practitioner of the classic horror tale."—Stephen King


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H. P. Lovecraft, the creator of Cthulhu Mythos, is the acknowledged modern master of the macabre, but he also worked with many younger pulp writers. Collected here are a dozen of their experiments in arcane terror, unearthly horror, and inhuman evil. Adding his inimitable touch, Lovecraft revised these tales of terror into frightful shadows of his own unique imagination. " H. P. Lovecraft, the creator of Cthulhu Mythos, is the acknowledged modern master of the macabre, but he also worked with many younger pulp writers. Collected here are a dozen of their experiments in arcane terror, unearthly horror, and inhuman evil. Adding his inimitable touch, Lovecraft revised these tales of terror into frightful shadows of his own unique imagination. "Lovecraft's fiction is one of the cornerstones of modern horror."—Clive Barker "H. P. Lovecraft has yet to be surpassed as the 20th century's greatest practitioner of the classic horror tale."—Stephen King

30 review for The Horror in the Museum & Other Revisions

  1. 4 out of 5

    Graham

    I begin this review with a confession. I stole this book. At the age of 12, I found this in my school library. I borrowed it, devoured it and loved it so, so much that I couldn’t bear to part with it. So I lied to the library staff, telling them that I’d lost the book. They charged me a fee, but I was more than happy to pay, because it meant the book was mine. And still is! This is the book that introduced me to Lovecraftian and Cthulhu fiction. I’ll never forget the thrills, chills and sheer joy I begin this review with a confession. I stole this book. At the age of 12, I found this in my school library. I borrowed it, devoured it and loved it so, so much that I couldn’t bear to part with it. So I lied to the library staff, telling them that I’d lost the book. They charged me a fee, but I was more than happy to pay, because it meant the book was mine. And still is! This is the book that introduced me to Lovecraftian and Cthulhu fiction. I’ll never forget the thrills, chills and sheer joy that came to me when reading. Ever since, when I’ve gone back and read it, I still experience those feelings and I believe this is one of the finest anthologies out there. IMPORTANT NOTE - For some reason, the ‘70s UK edition (Panther paperback) I read has different stories to the US editions. Some are missing, and others are included (the C. M. Eddy ones). I’ve listed the entire contents in my book in any case. We open with the titular story of THE HORROR IN THE MUSEUM by Hazel Heald. As with all the stories collected in this anthology, H. P. Lovecraft isn’t actually the author; but he had a hand in helping the individual authors give a distinctly Lovecraftian feel to their work, so his presence is obvious. This effort, by Hazel Heald, is truly top dollar: packed with hideous creatures, plenty of suspense and foreboding and some gruelling, slithering horror. Thoroughly engrossing stuff. THE CRAWLING CHAOS, by Elizabeth Berkeley, is less effective, more of a macabre fantasy than true horror. It concerns an opium eater’s vision of a future Earth transformed into alien landscape, and packs some impressive detail. The next, Sonia Greene’s FOUR O’CLOCK, is a straightforward story of supernatural revenge, with nothing very memorable about it. Hazel Heald’s second story is WINGED DEATH and it’s another cracker. The diary format is put to fantastic use in the story of a doctor in African breeding a horrific revenge on a rival. I found this sickening, disturbing stuff and I’ve never looked at a common bluebottle in the same way since. C. M. Eddy, Jr.’s THE LOVED DEAD is the book’s most controversial work, a much-banned tale of a ghoulish necrophile scouring the countryside, looking for food and more besides. The descriptive text provokes images of dank crypts, rotting corpses and filthy hovels and as a whole the story is a masterpiece of the grotesque. The author’s follow-up, THE GHOST-EATER, is less memorable and a more traditional pulp horror outing, but still an atmospheric effort set in some haunted woods. William Lumley’s THE DIARY OF ALONZO TYPER is Lovecraft through and through: a man living in a haunted house discovering something unnameable beneath the foundations of the building. There are slimy trails in the basement, ancient gods and rituals, standing monoliths and a hero whose adventures are contained within an abruptly-ending journal. I loved it to bits. THE ELECTRIC EXECUTIONER, by Adolphe de Castro, is a lesser effort about a man trapped in a train carriage with a psychopath, but not without merit. It’s a classic two-hander with moments of suspense and a macabre climax. And then we have the last story. My personal favourite, and indeed one of my favourite Lovecraftian stories of all time: THE MOUND, by Zealia Bishop. This is splendid stuff. In essence, an archaeologist investigates a strange burial mound in Oklahoma which is reputed to be haunted. He soon uncovers a complex series of events involving a historical diary and a whole subterranean world outside of man’s knowledge. This is a lengthy story, told at novella length, and quite slow moving in places, but I loved every second of it. It builds atmosphere admirably and has an undercurrent of unseen horror running throughout, right up until a memorable climax. For me, this is brilliance in writing, and on par with Lovecraft’s best work. A tremendous way to end what is one of the greatest horror anthologies of all time.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Still

    I'm done. Too much too soon. Too tough to live, too young to die. These co-authored pastiches are bleeding my eyes dry. Tried to be a good sport. Tried to play the game. The game got repetitive. This is over & out as per this collection of Lovecraft-ish novellaes & short stories. MUST READ: THE MOUND I'm done. Too much too soon. Too tough to live, too young to die. These co-authored pastiches are bleeding my eyes dry. Tried to be a good sport. Tried to play the game. The game got repetitive. This is over & out as per this collection of Lovecraft-ish novellaes & short stories. MUST READ: THE MOUND

  3. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Valle-Hoag

    HP Lovecraft’s stories, to me, are often characterized by the phrase “this would be a masterpiece if it weren’t so racist.” That being said, but for the racism, these stories are typical and satisfying Lovecraft. If you’re a big fan of his work published under his own name, you’ll enjoy these deep cuts he ghostwrote. The second half of the collection, the stories he merely edited or revised, are considerably weaker than the first half, but again, if you’re really into Lovecraft, you’ll find thin HP Lovecraft’s stories, to me, are often characterized by the phrase “this would be a masterpiece if it weren’t so racist.” That being said, but for the racism, these stories are typical and satisfying Lovecraft. If you’re a big fan of his work published under his own name, you’ll enjoy these deep cuts he ghostwrote. The second half of the collection, the stories he merely edited or revised, are considerably weaker than the first half, but again, if you’re really into Lovecraft, you’ll find things to love in most of these stories.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Chris Matney

    In my quest to re-read the Lovecraft canon, I just finished The Horror in the Museum. I picked up a copy of the Joshi hardcover addition because I was interested in his editorial notes. This is a solid edition which should be a must read on any Lovecraft list. The book is divided into Primary revisions and Secondary revisions - depending on the amount of "Lovecraft" in each story. Within these broad categories the tales are chronological (starting in 1918 and ending in 1936). In some ways, my th In my quest to re-read the Lovecraft canon, I just finished The Horror in the Museum. I picked up a copy of the Joshi hardcover addition because I was interested in his editorial notes. This is a solid edition which should be a must read on any Lovecraft list. The book is divided into Primary revisions and Secondary revisions - depending on the amount of "Lovecraft" in each story. Within these broad categories the tales are chronological (starting in 1918 and ending in 1936). In some ways, my three-star rating of the book is probably biased by reading the other Joshi volumes first. The bar was set very high, and not everything Lovecraft edited was gold. The biggest disappointment in this volume was the lack of Lovecraft's voice - that poetic prose that makes you want to re-read stories just to hear the words again in your head. While several of the stories have elements of the Great Old Ones and the horrors of the vast coldness of the universe, a number of the stories were more Poe-like horror. Nice, but not what I read Lovecraft for. My favorite stories were The Diary of Alonzo Typer and the Tree on the Hill - both of which are five-star stories - well-written and compelling. Both managed to capture the horror of Lovecraft's spirit to a certain extent. Most of the stories are short - which allows you quickly move through those less compelling works. Overall, I can recommend this book to hardcore fans, but for those of you looking for a taste of Lovecraft - the other volumes in this series will serve you better.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy Reaban

    The other side of Lovecraft. His works are well known, but he also ghost wrote or revised many tales for other authors (mostly amateur but even a couple professionals). About two-thirds of this book are tales he mostly wrote. Some of these works are quite good, up there with his best. The Mound, in particular, about a subterranean city and lost race. Out of the Aeons, about a mummy for pre-historic times is a strong tie in with Robert Howards prehistory (Conan and co). The title story, The Horror The other side of Lovecraft. His works are well known, but he also ghost wrote or revised many tales for other authors (mostly amateur but even a couple professionals). About two-thirds of this book are tales he mostly wrote. Some of these works are quite good, up there with his best. The Mound, in particular, about a subterranean city and lost race. Out of the Aeons, about a mummy for pre-historic times is a strong tie in with Robert Howards prehistory (Conan and co). The title story, The Horror in the Museum I didn't like at first, but could be the strongest tale in the book. Other stories are fairly pedestrian, just given a veneer of the Cthulhu Mythos. The Last Test, for instance, about a mad scientist. Or The Man of Stone, about a crazy artist that turns people into stone. About of the third of the book are tales that were mostly written by the other person, but Lovecraft had a hand in. Most of these are totally forgettable, plot wise. Lovecraft mostly seems to have help out in the descriptions in them.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Natalia

    It's something quite different from everything I've read before. To be honest I didn't thought I would like it when I first saw it, since it's about horror and that kind of things. But as I kept reading the short stories of the master of horror H.P. Lovecraft, I really started liking it. As mentioned before, it IS different. The perspective is dark, and the way it's written keeps the classic, formal literature of the time when Lovecraft lived. There are some stories that creep down into the read It's something quite different from everything I've read before. To be honest I didn't thought I would like it when I first saw it, since it's about horror and that kind of things. But as I kept reading the short stories of the master of horror H.P. Lovecraft, I really started liking it. As mentioned before, it IS different. The perspective is dark, and the way it's written keeps the classic, formal literature of the time when Lovecraft lived. There are some stories that creep down into the reader and attack the most basic human fears, making you feel close and showing you what true horror is.

  7. 4 out of 5

    William

    This is a collection of ten stories: The Crawling Chaos The Green Meadow Winged Death The Horror in the Museum The Diary of Alonzo Typer The Horror in the Burying Ground The Electric Executioner The Curse of Yig The Mound Two Black Bottles Excellent fiction, including some of my favorites. It would be hard for me to pick the best, but maybe it is The Diary of Alonzo Typer by a narrow margin.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kenton Schassberger

    The Mound was extremely vivid in descriptives and so engrossing i ccouldn't put it down. When i first heard of The Mound I had to find it and read it. It is a keeper in any format that it can be found in. Lovecraft may have done most of the writing in this collaboration with Zealia Bishop it only adds to the story its a stand alone story. This Cover image is the same that is also used on the official Lovecraft web page. The Mound was extremely vivid in descriptives and so engrossing i ccouldn't put it down. When i first heard of The Mound I had to find it and read it. It is a keeper in any format that it can be found in. Lovecraft may have done most of the writing in this collaboration with Zealia Bishop it only adds to the story its a stand alone story. This Cover image is the same that is also used on the official Lovecraft web page.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Pretty good. It wasn't clear how much this was "Lovecraft inspired," and how much was "Lovecraft originally, but revised." There needs to be an intro or something. Pretty good stories. I didn't sense the fear of the different characters very much.... it was kind of indicated, as in "I felt horror at the sight of her." etc. Kind of bland horror, but the imagery was cool, and I liked a lot of the stories. Pretty good. It wasn't clear how much this was "Lovecraft inspired," and how much was "Lovecraft originally, but revised." There needs to be an intro or something. Pretty good stories. I didn't sense the fear of the different characters very much.... it was kind of indicated, as in "I felt horror at the sight of her." etc. Kind of bland horror, but the imagery was cool, and I liked a lot of the stories.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Cathy Austin

    Quite a handful of stories in this collection. Horror style that can't be savoured in one go. Took a while to finish this. My favourite tale is still Horror in the Museum. Creepy, eerie, perfectly rendered scary story. Put me in mind of the great horrible creature in Little Heaven by Nick Cutter, a modern tale, indeed! Lovecraft was a bit of a troubled soul and a lot of that shows in this book, in the tales he conjured up. He did pave the way for horror writers who came after. A couple of the sto Quite a handful of stories in this collection. Horror style that can't be savoured in one go. Took a while to finish this. My favourite tale is still Horror in the Museum. Creepy, eerie, perfectly rendered scary story. Put me in mind of the great horrible creature in Little Heaven by Nick Cutter, a modern tale, indeed! Lovecraft was a bit of a troubled soul and a lot of that shows in this book, in the tales he conjured up. He did pave the way for horror writers who came after. A couple of the stories were just too ethereal, let's call them, for me but I do recommend this for lovers of the genre.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    Honestly such an amazing read! I loved how each story was so different, so beautifully written and so spooky despite being so old! The stories set in the future were interesting and quite creepy too! Honestly such a work of art!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Abdenoor Laouer

    I think the HP Lovecraft short stories are highly underrated. I've just recommended them somewhere in a facebook group. Loved the chilling scenarios he so vividly draws. I think the HP Lovecraft short stories are highly underrated. I've just recommended them somewhere in a facebook group. Loved the chilling scenarios he so vividly draws.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    Nice collection of short stories edited/ghost-written by HPL.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Teemu

    Slow to read, but definitely worth it. The language used here is uncommon and lends very well to the overall mood the author creates with his depictions. It is truly a piece of art.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Eric Reese

    This is my second collection of Lovecraftian stories (the first being The Watchers Out of Time), and I really enjoyed it. This particular version doesn't have an introduction or forward, which while unnecessary, would have been a welcome addition for a casual reader such as myself. I highly recommend The Mound, the longest of the stories, specifically because of how the author takes great care to flesh out the mythology of the world. I also would recommend the namesake of this collection, The Ho This is my second collection of Lovecraftian stories (the first being The Watchers Out of Time), and I really enjoyed it. This particular version doesn't have an introduction or forward, which while unnecessary, would have been a welcome addition for a casual reader such as myself. I highly recommend The Mound, the longest of the stories, specifically because of how the author takes great care to flesh out the mythology of the world. I also would recommend the namesake of this collection, The Horror in the Museum, a spooky tale of an obsession with the eldritch taken too far.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Deathmetalroze

    This book is AMAZING in a very silly way. It seemed that most of the works were penned by someone else - seemingly normal and having absolutely nothing to do with the Cthulhu mythos - but then LOVECRAFT got involved... It's sort of like that SNL comedy sketch about BOC and the cowbell --- "Know what this story calls for? MORE CTHULHU!" This book is AMAZING in a very silly way. It seemed that most of the works were penned by someone else - seemingly normal and having absolutely nothing to do with the Cthulhu mythos - but then LOVECRAFT got involved... It's sort of like that SNL comedy sketch about BOC and the cowbell --- "Know what this story calls for? MORE CTHULHU!"

  17. 5 out of 5

    Todd

    I loved seeing Lovecraft's twist on other people's story ideas. Sometimes you wouldn't know they weren't Lovecraft stories, but in other cases they (such as The Loved Dead) were of a noticeably different intent or direction that his writing. Even in these cases the master made his stamp on the work. I loved seeing Lovecraft's twist on other people's story ideas. Sometimes you wouldn't know they weren't Lovecraft stories, but in other cases they (such as The Loved Dead) were of a noticeably different intent or direction that his writing. Even in these cases the master made his stamp on the work.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Dirck de Lint

    Some of these collaborations are rather hard to fight through (moreso than unalloyed Lovecraft, even at his more sesquipedalian), but there's usually something in even the most tedious that rewards the effort. Some of these collaborations are rather hard to fight through (moreso than unalloyed Lovecraft, even at his more sesquipedalian), but there's usually something in even the most tedious that rewards the effort.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Mickopops

    For the completist, but a very useful addition to the Lovecraftian canon nonetheless.I'd say my favourite story was 'Out of the Aeons'. A typical well-written Lovecraft with mummies, intrigue and lots of suspense. Why don't we get good-ole-fashioned horror writers like this any more? For the completist, but a very useful addition to the Lovecraftian canon nonetheless.I'd say my favourite story was 'Out of the Aeons'. A typical well-written Lovecraft with mummies, intrigue and lots of suspense. Why don't we get good-ole-fashioned horror writers like this any more?

  20. 4 out of 5

    Tony

    More of a mixed bag than other Lovecraft comps published by Arkham House, still vintage Lovecraft but more one-offs, polishing or revising existing works by other authors. Hit or miss.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Corey

    The last in the 4-part collected works of H.P. Lovecraft. Contains revisions and incomplete works for the hardcore fan.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Timothy

    I liked this anthology, especially "The Mound." What do other people have to say about these Lovecraft revisions? I liked this anthology, especially "The Mound." What do other people have to say about these Lovecraft revisions?

  23. 5 out of 5

    Henry

    I didn't get much out of the Secondary Revisions, but enjoyed the Primary Revisions. My picks are: The Curse of Yig, Medusa's Coil, and The Horror in the Museum. I didn't get much out of the Secondary Revisions, but enjoyed the Primary Revisions. My picks are: The Curse of Yig, Medusa's Coil, and The Horror in the Museum.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jeannie Sloan

    Loved the book.Not all of the stories are Cthulhu Mythos either.The Mound,I think, was my favorite.Very scary!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas Hunter

    An expanded collection of HPL's revisions and secondary revisions of other authors' work. An expanded collection of HPL's revisions and secondary revisions of other authors' work.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mark Singer

    H P Lovecraft made money re-writing stories for other authors, and most of them were much better than the original versions. For Lovecraft completests only.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    I'm about halfway through, still reading occasionally... I'm about halfway through, still reading occasionally...

  28. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    Things HPL helped other authors revise. He's good, as usual. Things HPL helped other authors revise. He's good, as usual.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas Hunter

    Love these Beagle editions.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Shumate

    A bunch of substandard Lovecraft that can be blamed on other people.

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