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Write. 10 Days to Overcome Writer's Block. Period.

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Karen Peterson presents a way to beat writer's block in 10 days. Based on new brain research and psychological principles, her method shows writers how to conquer their handicap using exercises, techniques, checklists and parallel monologue. Karen Peterson presents a way to beat writer's block in 10 days. Based on new brain research and psychological principles, her method shows writers how to conquer their handicap using exercises, techniques, checklists and parallel monologue.


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Karen Peterson presents a way to beat writer's block in 10 days. Based on new brain research and psychological principles, her method shows writers how to conquer their handicap using exercises, techniques, checklists and parallel monologue. Karen Peterson presents a way to beat writer's block in 10 days. Based on new brain research and psychological principles, her method shows writers how to conquer their handicap using exercises, techniques, checklists and parallel monologue.

30 review for Write. 10 Days to Overcome Writer's Block. Period.

  1. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

    I bought this book back in 2009 and read it a little, but then got bored. So, this month, I decided to try again and started from the beginning. I'll admit, some things the author wrote were interesting, but the dominant hand/non-dominant hand exercises were overdone and pointless to me. I mean, I had the same answers -- maybe it's because I already know that I'm both-brained. Anyway, there was nothing in it that actually helped me at all. Duh, I don't have to write in chronological order. Duh, I bought this book back in 2009 and read it a little, but then got bored. So, this month, I decided to try again and started from the beginning. I'll admit, some things the author wrote were interesting, but the dominant hand/non-dominant hand exercises were overdone and pointless to me. I mean, I had the same answers -- maybe it's because I already know that I'm both-brained. Anyway, there was nothing in it that actually helped me at all. Duh, I don't have to write in chronological order. Duh, I can make webs to pre-write (but that doesn't work for me). Duh, a bunch of other stuff I already knew about the actual process of writing. I wouldn't recommend this book, unless you're really into analyzing the brain (the author is a psychologist, after all). Instead, just use The Pocket Muse by Monica Wood. It actually gives you ideas, prompts, tips, and more that are -- imagine that -- useful.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Tani

    I didn't really buy the 'Communicate with your right brain by writing with your nondominant hand' thing, and since that's what the book is based on, clearly it wasn't a great choice for me. It did have some good advice, but very little that I feel would be helpful to me. I didn't really buy the 'Communicate with your right brain by writing with your nondominant hand' thing, and since that's what the book is based on, clearly it wasn't a great choice for me. It did have some good advice, but very little that I feel would be helpful to me.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Violet Laflamme

    Maybe this is a concept that can work for some, but the system presented here just didn't click with me at all, and neither did the 10 day "plan" at the end, which turned out to be a plan for one day repeated 10 times (with the strong encouragement to do it another 10 times after that). Not too mind-blowing and furthermore also didn't really speak to me. If someone has told you this is a great book, I wouldn't dismiss it out of hand. It just sure wasn't the right one for me. Maybe this is a concept that can work for some, but the system presented here just didn't click with me at all, and neither did the 10 day "plan" at the end, which turned out to be a plan for one day repeated 10 times (with the strong encouragement to do it another 10 times after that). Not too mind-blowing and furthermore also didn't really speak to me. If someone has told you this is a great book, I wouldn't dismiss it out of hand. It just sure wasn't the right one for me.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Tope

    The right brain/left brain stuff is more than a little woo woo and is rather annoying as the main framework for Peterson's advice on working through writer's block. Answering questions with my dominant and then nondominant hand gave me the same or almost identical answers on most of the exercises I bothered with. But there's useful information in here about the kinds of attitudes and mindsets that contribute to writer's block, on task and mood management, self-care, etc. It would be nice if the The right brain/left brain stuff is more than a little woo woo and is rather annoying as the main framework for Peterson's advice on working through writer's block. Answering questions with my dominant and then nondominant hand gave me the same or almost identical answers on most of the exercises I bothered with. But there's useful information in here about the kinds of attitudes and mindsets that contribute to writer's block, on task and mood management, self-care, etc. It would be nice if the task management charts were available to download and print out - I hate writing in books, much less tiny books like this one, and the charts seem like they'd useful to have on hand outside the book. As it is I made some copies for my personal use.

  5. 5 out of 5

    JSA Lowe

    Definitely for fiction writers and not poets. Can be adapted, but with some difficulty.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Caroline

    This book was pretty irritating and poorly-written. The entire thing is based on the left brain right brain dichotomy and the idea that you can talk to your non dominant brain simply by writing with your non dominant hand. I can hardly write with my non dominant hand so that was irritating. Then the only examples of other people's results doing this were of herself, but she believes very specific things about the "personalities" of each hemisphere and is trying to sell a book based on them, so o This book was pretty irritating and poorly-written. The entire thing is based on the left brain right brain dichotomy and the idea that you can talk to your non dominant brain simply by writing with your non dominant hand. I can hardly write with my non dominant hand so that was irritating. Then the only examples of other people's results doing this were of herself, but she believes very specific things about the "personalities" of each hemisphere and is trying to sell a book based on them, so obviously her results to these exercises will be highly biased. She then has you self measure one metric(energy) and wants you to somehow use that to address 2 separate measures (energy and tension) but never explains how to turn one metric into 2, and most of the suggestions she gives for activities to help address both so everything is very muddled. She made promises early in the book to explain certain things later and then didn't. I could go on. Overall, I really don't recommend this book.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Wes

    Honestly, this book is so weird. The thesis here is that your right brain (an immature, untamable child) is keeping your left brain (the adult here) from writing. The author attempts to get the reader to establish a dialogue between the two sides of their brain, which may or may not work if you really buy into it. I think that the idea has some merit though, even if you don't actually do the dialogue exercises she suggests. It's interesting to look at interior dialogue and mental life in a new w Honestly, this book is so weird. The thesis here is that your right brain (an immature, untamable child) is keeping your left brain (the adult here) from writing. The author attempts to get the reader to establish a dialogue between the two sides of their brain, which may or may not work if you really buy into it. I think that the idea has some merit though, even if you don't actually do the dialogue exercises she suggests. It's interesting to look at interior dialogue and mental life in a new way. The author also talks a lot about forgiving yourself for what you don't write, and writing whatever you can write, which I think is good advice. The later chapters did get quite repetitive, but I think it's worth reading the first couple of chapters.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ietrio

    Peterson must know this stuff, after all Peterson proudly shows PhD on the cover. Inside there is the usual motivational stuff, rather boring and unoriginal with a strong New Age influence about "calm energy" and other mysticism related stuff. Peterson must know this stuff, after all Peterson proudly shows PhD on the cover. Inside there is the usual motivational stuff, rather boring and unoriginal with a strong New Age influence about "calm energy" and other mysticism related stuff.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Michaela

    I didn't find this book particularly helpful or insightful. I don't really buy the left and right brain stuff in it to the level that the book takes it and felt that was focused on too much. A lot of the advice (such as a reward system) felt fairly obvious. I didn't find this book particularly helpful or insightful. I don't really buy the left and right brain stuff in it to the level that the book takes it and felt that was focused on too much. A lot of the advice (such as a reward system) felt fairly obvious.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Simone Anderson

    Insightful. I found a lot of the exercises are helpful.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn

    Although, I do not have writer's block writing issues, I still found the book useful in reaffirming what I have found to be helpful. Although, I do not have writer's block writing issues, I still found the book useful in reaffirming what I have found to be helpful.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jan Hansen

    Not very helpful. Lots of to do lists that were just wordy and not very helpful. Lots of discussion about the difference between right and left brain thinking and actions.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ana Raffali

    Brain science is definitely a subject that I love to explore, especially if it involves subtopics that are closer to home such as writing. If you're looking for a book that explains your indecisiveness towards accomplishing writing or other tasks in your daily lives, this might be it. The most important principle that I got from this book that I think was well worth the buy is the simple fact that you have the option to engage in two sets of thinking that could definitely put a spin to your writ Brain science is definitely a subject that I love to explore, especially if it involves subtopics that are closer to home such as writing. If you're looking for a book that explains your indecisiveness towards accomplishing writing or other tasks in your daily lives, this might be it. The most important principle that I got from this book that I think was well worth the buy is the simple fact that you have the option to engage in two sets of thinking that could definitely put a spin to your writing. Although this is definitely up for debate in the psychological and scientific world, but I like the concept. And it's as easy as writing your abc's with both hands. I love the idea that the two halves of your brain have a mind of their own. And a way to directly tap into these two different areas of the brain, one at a time, is by consciously engaging their writing-hand counterparts. I'm right-handed so now I make it a point to explore my writing in my left-hand to engage my right-brain, which is said to cover emotions and creativity, while the left resorts to logic and reasoning. The book puts forth the notion that the excuses you keep telling yourself just when you are about to write are largely your right-brain's fault. Writer's block is seen as a threat and you will unconsciously try to steer clear from it, so it's more of a defense mechanism, a fight or flight or freeze response. And a way to overcome this is through the bi-vocal approach suggested by the book. (view spoiler)[Ask yourself what your problems are and have both hands the pleasure of writing their insights, starting from your non-dominant hand. You will tend to see a pattern to your answers. The right-brain will let you know that girls just wanna have fun. And if you can appease her with the promise of fun after a good writing workout that would not take up such a long time, say 30 minutes only, you will have the key to your success. (hide spoiler)] I find that writing with my non-dominant hand totally lifts off much pressure from having to scrutinize every single word if I were to use my right hand since I can be quite the perfectionist. I'm more free to write whatever that comes to my (right) mind and sometimes the results can be very surprising. I will then use whatever I have from this and work it out. This is similar to the concept of shitty first drafts, it definitely makes writing less painful for me. Somehow, it prepares you for the actual writing/re-writing, that engages both brains. And I very much agree with the idea of putting writing as a process rather than a product and to write in small pockets of time. I find that I've increased my productivity not just in writing, but in reading and doing other activities. Before, I tend to get caught up in things for hours at a time and completely disregard other stuff that takes importance, so this book definitely helps to remind me that the small pleasures in life are more meaningful when they are given as rewards for the time you spent working. I've read the book and managed to acquire so much without having to follow the bi-vocal approach of answering the same questions with both hands, one at a time to see which part of the brain has the issue, to the letter. I might do this later, but I feel that it's not really necessary for me at this time, since I've already found a way to overcome my 'not-writing'.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Anna Boudinot

    Though some of the writing occasionally veers toward the pedantic, Peterson effectively makes the following points: A- The right and the left brain of the writer are constantly in conflict. The right brain wants to be free and creative, while the left brain wants to be able to complete tasks swiftly and efficiently. Since it's impossible to satiate both halves at the same time, many writers instead freeze, writing nothing. B- Most writers do not have unlimited time and resources to write. Work, fa Though some of the writing occasionally veers toward the pedantic, Peterson effectively makes the following points: A- The right and the left brain of the writer are constantly in conflict. The right brain wants to be free and creative, while the left brain wants to be able to complete tasks swiftly and efficiently. Since it's impossible to satiate both halves at the same time, many writers instead freeze, writing nothing. B- Most writers do not have unlimited time and resources to write. Work, family, life get in the way. If writing is viewed as a process rather than a product, one can satisfy both right and left brains by writing in short increments: 20 minutes at a time, or even less. C- Writing is not limited to putting words down on paper. Writing is also research, editing, rereading what's already written, and getting feedback from others. By taking a moment to decide what type of writing you're in the mood for, and how many minutes of writing you can realistically complete, you will have a better chance at getting some writing done every day. D- Rewarding yourself for writing makes the process more fun and eliminates that guilty feeling of "I should be writing instead" while you're doing other things. E.g. two hours of writing time "buys" you two hours of watching a movie, and you can then sit down to watch the movie guilt-free. These principles helped me, in one week, rack up five hours of writing time in twenty and thirty minute increments. This is five more hours of writing than I had done in a long, long, time. Looking at my writing process in a completely different way may be exactly what I needed to finally incorporate my writing into my daily routine.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Grace

    So, I think this book makes some good points, but it lost me somewhere in the middle. I really liked the first few chapters, where it delved into the chemistry of procrastination. I understand why I procrastinate, most the time it's because I would rather do something more fun or relaxing, other times it comes down to intimidation and a loss for where to start. But this book goes to the root of those feelings and gets into the chemistry of the central nervous system. It was enlightening. And for So, I think this book makes some good points, but it lost me somewhere in the middle. I really liked the first few chapters, where it delved into the chemistry of procrastination. I understand why I procrastinate, most the time it's because I would rather do something more fun or relaxing, other times it comes down to intimidation and a loss for where to start. But this book goes to the root of those feelings and gets into the chemistry of the central nervous system. It was enlightening. And for that, I really wish I had read this book earlier, like before I went to college. But that was pretty much where the effectiveness of this book ended for me. The rest of the book was mostly full of worksheets and left-brain/right-brain delineations that I didn't feel were necessary after reading through the first half. Maybe it's because I'm more of a do-it-yourself person, and once I know why things happen, I can usually figure out what I need to do. Anyway, I quickly found myself just trying to finish the book for the sake of finishing it and not getting much more out of it once I got past that first part. I recommend reading the first few chapters, which I did find groundbreaking in my own life. The rest of the book gets a meh, though.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Catherine

    This book sat on my shelf for a whole year before I began reading this last month. What a waste of time too. I thought this book was all about writer's block and I didn't believe I ever had writer's block. What I learned while reading this book was I did have writer's block just by a different label. It was a good awakening process. The author did go too much into writing with the dominant hand and nondominant hand exercises. I did skip a few of these. All in all, this book is a must read for anyo This book sat on my shelf for a whole year before I began reading this last month. What a waste of time too. I thought this book was all about writer's block and I didn't believe I ever had writer's block. What I learned while reading this book was I did have writer's block just by a different label. It was a good awakening process. The author did go too much into writing with the dominant hand and nondominant hand exercises. I did skip a few of these. All in all, this book is a must read for anyone trying to write and getting as much completed as they want to. You will be pleasantly surprised as to what Ms. Peterson says writer's block is. I know I was. This keener awareness allowed me to begin to change my beliefs, thus my thinking, thus my writing. I found this to be shifting process that required me to allow some extra space to swift from one level to another. At first I found this difficult, only because of my impatience, yet I learned. And the results were much clearer thoughts and getting them to the page. Thank you Karen for writing this book.

  17. 5 out of 5

    David Earle

    Write is focused on conquering writer's block, with a heavy focus on the conflict between the logical left brain and the emotional right brain. Basically, Karen Peterson focuses on techniques to convince your right brain to stop sabotaging your efforts to write. It's an unusual approach to the problem, and Peterson offers some good insights into the reasons a writer might be blocked. You'll probably recognize some excuse you've used not to write before, unless you're totally awesome or something Write is focused on conquering writer's block, with a heavy focus on the conflict between the logical left brain and the emotional right brain. Basically, Karen Peterson focuses on techniques to convince your right brain to stop sabotaging your efforts to write. It's an unusual approach to the problem, and Peterson offers some good insights into the reasons a writer might be blocked. You'll probably recognize some excuse you've used not to write before, unless you're totally awesome or something. Every chapter includes exercises designed to get your right brain talking to your left brain, most of which boil down to using different hands to answer the same questions. I admit I skipped all of them, and only skimmed Peterson's explanations of how the exercises worked for her. Some of Peterson's anecdotes and case studies, as well as the quotes from other authors preceding each chapter, were very enjoyable. Overall I'd recommend this book to anyone who is looking for a spur to get back to writing, as long as you don't have anything against psychology.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    There are few books that I wanted to like better, and while this one is definitely in that category, it fails so horribly that it's amazing that's it's around at all. I guess that there is some truth in the statement that books are written not to be read, or used, but sold. First off, her previous and first book, On Procrastination, is far better and follows the same exact format. I'm just about finishing that one up. Second and the real problem in the book, she is good at analysis but poor on There are few books that I wanted to like better, and while this one is definitely in that category, it fails so horribly that it's amazing that's it's around at all. I guess that there is some truth in the statement that books are written not to be read, or used, but sold. First off, her previous and first book, On Procrastination, is far better and follows the same exact format. I'm just about finishing that one up. Second and the real problem in the book, she is good at analysis but poor on solution. So you find out that the your Dominant Hand is scared of writing because it's worried what people will say and your Non-Dominant Hand says that it's reason is that it does not like to be alone. Well that's the problem in a nutshell, so? She has no answer to any of this...she is a typical psychotherapist, no solutions, let's just talk or have our hands do the talking for us by circling their issues. Without solutions knowing the problem isn't really half of the problem -- there still is a problem and you are still not writing. Well as she likes to brag, works for her.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ari Jarvis

    2016 Popsugar Reading Challenge: A Self-improvement book I think it is still to be seen how well this book works for me. I'm not exactly sold on the whole idea of writing with my left hand for my right brain and vice versa. I don't think my brain is that separate. I think I mostly faked it. I think "talking" to my right brain actually does help. I was able to pinpoint my anxiety a couple times. It reminds me a lot cognitive behavior therapy. A lot of her encouragement felt helpful. The (seemingly) 2016 Popsugar Reading Challenge: A Self-improvement book I think it is still to be seen how well this book works for me. I'm not exactly sold on the whole idea of writing with my left hand for my right brain and vice versa. I don't think my brain is that separate. I think I mostly faked it. I think "talking" to my right brain actually does help. I was able to pinpoint my anxiety a couple times. It reminds me a lot cognitive behavior therapy. A lot of her encouragement felt helpful. The (seemingly) obvious idea of taking big writing tasks one step at a time should help me. I think I'm mostly in need of hardcore deadlines. I really liked the 10-day program. It was like having a class to check in with someone everyday. I think her charts were a little confusing and convoluted. I wasn't exactly sure the difference between "writing task" and "subtask." "Self-improvement" books seem to be made fun of a lot. I chose this one for my 2016 challenge because writing is what I really want to do. I hope this book does help me improve.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Angelica Gonzales

    The title of the book caught my interest. As I started reading the first two chapters of the book, I felt like “I want to finish it overnight”. But as I go on, I noticed that it was more of brain physiology, the left brain versus the right and dominant hand versus the non dominant. There comes a time that I unintentionally skip the dominant vs. non dominant hand activity. I don’t know if it’s because I am not a writer, just a hopeful one, that’s why I didn't appreciate it that well. I like the The title of the book caught my interest. As I started reading the first two chapters of the book, I felt like “I want to finish it overnight”. But as I go on, I noticed that it was more of brain physiology, the left brain versus the right and dominant hand versus the non dominant. There comes a time that I unintentionally skip the dominant vs. non dominant hand activity. I don’t know if it’s because I am not a writer, just a hopeful one, that’s why I didn't appreciate it that well. I like the quotations. The mood classification helps me understand that it is better to write if you are in the state of calm-energy and worst in tense-tired. The task and to do lists are also useful. She is also right that we should reward ourselves in every writing task that we accomplish. I rated it 2 out of 5 stars because in some way it was helpful but it makes me feel idle reading the last half chapter.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jackie

    An interesting take on the role of right/left sides of the brain in the writing process, and their completely disjointed independence from each other. Lots of actual brain-testing exercises. It's refreshing to hear the author emphasize that you don't need to devote huge chunks of time to writing, but she advocates devoting small, reasonable amounts of time to writing, fit in with the rest of your day. This is something I do already and it was a nice validation. One detraction: The plan she sets u An interesting take on the role of right/left sides of the brain in the writing process, and their completely disjointed independence from each other. Lots of actual brain-testing exercises. It's refreshing to hear the author emphasize that you don't need to devote huge chunks of time to writing, but she advocates devoting small, reasonable amounts of time to writing, fit in with the rest of your day. This is something I do already and it was a nice validation. One detraction: The plan she sets up a very complicated system (in my view) system to find time to write. I probably won't adopt it.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    The thing about writing books is that one should really take time to research the book before buying it. What is it really about? Will it be helpful? If possible, get your hands on a copy of the book before taking the purchase plunge. These are not things I asked myself, and this is not an action I performed, before I purchased "Write. 10 Days to Overcome Writer's Block. Period." Which is a shame when you consider the fact that I did not buy this book online but in a bookstore. I've consulted th The thing about writing books is that one should really take time to research the book before buying it. What is it really about? Will it be helpful? If possible, get your hands on a copy of the book before taking the purchase plunge. These are not things I asked myself, and this is not an action I performed, before I purchased "Write. 10 Days to Overcome Writer's Block. Period." Which is a shame when you consider the fact that I did not buy this book online but in a bookstore. I've consulted this book during stretches of writer's block, but it has never helped combat the block in 10 days. While I wouldn't recommend the book to you, you should definitely make that call for yourself.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ali M.

    Sadly, this was a blind buy that just didn't work out. The book is mostly about the science of brain patterns, and how that plays in to writer's block. While I don't doubt the research, and was certainly fascinated by some of it, I ultimately think that writer's block can be explained (and dealt with) in much plainer terms than the ones found here. It's an emotional and psychological problem. Yes, brain chemistry does affect both of those things, but I can talk about my insecurities and mental o Sadly, this was a blind buy that just didn't work out. The book is mostly about the science of brain patterns, and how that plays in to writer's block. While I don't doubt the research, and was certainly fascinated by some of it, I ultimately think that writer's block can be explained (and dealt with) in much plainer terms than the ones found here. It's an emotional and psychological problem. Yes, brain chemistry does affect both of those things, but I can talk about my insecurities and mental obstacles without talking about serotonin and dopamine.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    If you are looking for a book that is just full of information to help you get over writers block but is also a dull and boring read that makes you not want to continue reading. You have the wrong book. Yup. This book was nothing like other writing books that I have read. Yes it is pact full of tips and examples, but NO, it is NOT boring. The tips are very helpful, the example stories are funny. And overall the way the book is delivered is humorous. This book had me laughing in parts. I would say If you are looking for a book that is just full of information to help you get over writers block but is also a dull and boring read that makes you not want to continue reading. You have the wrong book. Yup. This book was nothing like other writing books that I have read. Yes it is pact full of tips and examples, but NO, it is NOT boring. The tips are very helpful, the example stories are funny. And overall the way the book is delivered is humorous. This book had me laughing in parts. I would say its a good helpful read for writers that suffer from constant writers block.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    Misleading title. Not a bad book-- the brain research was interesting and can be applicable to many, I'm sure, but it reads like it's a mix between a therapy session and a psych textbook. It assumes your writer's block is strictly due to personal or mental or physical issues, and not because of the writing itself. Disappointed... Misleading title. Not a bad book-- the brain research was interesting and can be applicable to many, I'm sure, but it reads like it's a mix between a therapy session and a psych textbook. It assumes your writer's block is strictly due to personal or mental or physical issues, and not because of the writing itself. Disappointed...

  26. 4 out of 5

    Dylan

    This book is 10 years old and I bought it when it was new but never got into it. I found it in my old bedroom closet and decided to give it a go for real. Since the myth of the left-right brain has been fairly debunked, it makes this book seem irrelevant (since the left-right argument is what this book works heavily off of). I found that it didn't work for me. This book is 10 years old and I bought it when it was new but never got into it. I found it in my old bedroom closet and decided to give it a go for real. Since the myth of the left-right brain has been fairly debunked, it makes this book seem irrelevant (since the left-right argument is what this book works heavily off of). I found that it didn't work for me.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Titus Hjelm

    Looking at the reviews below, I can understand how this book divides people. For the truly interested, there is a nice touch of popularised science here, but the 'liberating' exercises did not work for me at all. Not the worst book on writing, but definitely not the bag of tricks it promises to be. Looking at the reviews below, I can understand how this book divides people. For the truly interested, there is a nice touch of popularised science here, but the 'liberating' exercises did not work for me at all. Not the worst book on writing, but definitely not the bag of tricks it promises to be.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sidra

    I didn't get the whole left brain/right brain exercises--meaning, I didn't find anything different depending upon the hand I used to write with. I wanted to like this book--writing AND science?! But felt it fell short of its promise. I didn't get the whole left brain/right brain exercises--meaning, I didn't find anything different depending upon the hand I used to write with. I wanted to like this book--writing AND science?! But felt it fell short of its promise.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    It's helpful to realize you can be of many minds about a goal or task, such as writing, and if those minds disagree, there's more than just tension there; there may also be the inner argument that keeps you stuck. Good quick read. It's helpful to realize you can be of many minds about a goal or task, such as writing, and if those minds disagree, there's more than just tension there; there may also be the inner argument that keeps you stuck. Good quick read.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Neva

    Fabulous! Am working exercises as I go along.

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