website statistics Charlie Bone and the Shadow of Badlock - PDF Books Online
Hot Best Seller

Charlie Bone and the Shadow of Badlock

Availability: Ready to download

The enchanter Count Harken - the shadow in the painting of the Red King - is determined to stop Billy from discovering a life-changing family secret. His incredible power reaches out from the dark land of Badlock to wreak revenge on Charlie and his friends. Charlie's ancestor, Otus Yewbeam - a giant, married to Amoret, the Red King's daughter - has been imprisoned in Badlo The enchanter Count Harken - the shadow in the painting of the Red King - is determined to stop Billy from discovering a life-changing family secret. His incredible power reaches out from the dark land of Badlock to wreak revenge on Charlie and his friends. Charlie's ancestor, Otus Yewbeam - a giant, married to Amoret, the Red King's daughter - has been imprisoned in Badlock by Count Harken. Charlie is sucked into a painting of Badlock and tries to rescue Otus. But can he outwit the shadow's troll army? Interest age: 9+


Compare

The enchanter Count Harken - the shadow in the painting of the Red King - is determined to stop Billy from discovering a life-changing family secret. His incredible power reaches out from the dark land of Badlock to wreak revenge on Charlie and his friends. Charlie's ancestor, Otus Yewbeam - a giant, married to Amoret, the Red King's daughter - has been imprisoned in Badlo The enchanter Count Harken - the shadow in the painting of the Red King - is determined to stop Billy from discovering a life-changing family secret. His incredible power reaches out from the dark land of Badlock to wreak revenge on Charlie and his friends. Charlie's ancestor, Otus Yewbeam - a giant, married to Amoret, the Red King's daughter - has been imprisoned in Badlock by Count Harken. Charlie is sucked into a painting of Badlock and tries to rescue Otus. But can he outwit the shadow's troll army? Interest age: 9+

30 review for Charlie Bone and the Shadow of Badlock

  1. 4 out of 5

    Lily Jessica

    Amazing! I used to be a big fan of Charlie and Lola when I was little, then as I got older I’d started to read Clarice Bean. In the Clarice Bean books, Clarice is a big fan of a secret spy agent 'Ruby Redfort' I had always wondered about this young spy, and the adventures she had. Clarice thought she was brilliant. Now I have to agree with her! I was really excited when Lauren Child brought out the book 'Ruby Redfort, Look Into My Eyes' and I'd gotten a hard back. I started reading and I was ins Amazing! I used to be a big fan of Charlie and Lola when I was little, then as I got older I’d started to read Clarice Bean. In the Clarice Bean books, Clarice is a big fan of a secret spy agent 'Ruby Redfort' I had always wondered about this young spy, and the adventures she had. Clarice thought she was brilliant. Now I have to agree with her! I was really excited when Lauren Child brought out the book 'Ruby Redfort, Look Into My Eyes' and I'd gotten a hard back. I started reading and I was instantly hooked. It was amazing. It had many unpredictable moments, twists and turns witch I liked very much, cool kind of font through out the book, a great story line and Ruby wore some really funny slogan shirts witch made me laugh. It took me about 9 days to finish, considering it was a big book with small font I was impressed. Lauren Child is such a great author, I recommend this book to those who like mystery novels, adventure books and an interesting read. Child has also written 3 other books to the series, 'Take Your Last Breath' and 'Catch Your Death' and 'Feel The Fear,’ Available soon. Happy Reading!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Izzy

    Can I firstly just commend this book for it's AWESOME front cover? I love hardbacks (however ridiculously priced they may be) and the design is really brilliant. The actual book behind the cover is white, with a green fly on it. I've been a massive fan of Charlie and Lola and Clarice Bean ever since I was really little. My parents would read me the picture books, and then when the first CB novel came out they read it to me as well. When I read it on my own it was the first chapter book I had eve Can I firstly just commend this book for it's AWESOME front cover? I love hardbacks (however ridiculously priced they may be) and the design is really brilliant. The actual book behind the cover is white, with a green fly on it. I've been a massive fan of Charlie and Lola and Clarice Bean ever since I was really little. My parents would read me the picture books, and then when the first CB novel came out they read it to me as well. When I read it on my own it was the first chapter book I had ever read with no help at all, and I was immensely proud of myself. I bought the second book and waited avidly for the third and last. My best friend's mother used to work in publishing and she happened to be at Lauren Child's book signing, and bought me a signed edition of Don't Look Now. I've been waiting for Ruby Redfort books to come out for ages, and I'm so glad I got it for Christmas. It looks like a thick book - 390 pages - but the print is quite big so actually it doesn't take that long to read. It's really, really worth it though. Ruby herself is pretty damn awesome, the other characters are mostly brilliant, the plot is really, really well thought out, the puzzles are clever (good luck trying to read Ruby and Clancy's coded messages) and the villains, though slightly over the top (but it is a children's spy novel so what do you expect?) are more or less ~chilling. I could write pages and pages on this book, but right now I really must go and look at rubyredfort.com

  3. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    There's really not much to say about this book - it's a very typical, very bland mystery. It's not quite as predictable as it seems at first, but it's also not very likely to surprise any mystery fans. The tropes on display - the James Bond gadgets, the 'clever' riddles - aren't unique, and nothing new is done with them. Ruby is meant to be kind of a subversion of the typical Harriet the Spy-type heroine, but her brand of snarkiness just ends up becoming another cliche. The writing was alright, There's really not much to say about this book - it's a very typical, very bland mystery. It's not quite as predictable as it seems at first, but it's also not very likely to surprise any mystery fans. The tropes on display - the James Bond gadgets, the 'clever' riddles - aren't unique, and nothing new is done with them. Ruby is meant to be kind of a subversion of the typical Harriet the Spy-type heroine, but her brand of snarkiness just ends up becoming another cliche. The writing was alright, I guess - I do wish Child hadn't chosen to set the novel in America, since quite a bit of British slang came though, and most of the American slang felt artificial. But really, there's just not much that's noteworthy in this story. I certainly won't be reading the sequels.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sweet on Books

    Ruby Redfort is a perfect candidate for the spy world, so when a secret agency comes knocking, Ruby is ready for action. Ruby is not your ordinary 7th grader. She's smart, independent, and a bit quirky. Solving puzzles and cracking codes are her idea of a good time. At the same time, she's pretty much your average kid. She has friends, plays sports, ignores her parents on occasion, and watches lots of crime shows on TV. I guess she offers a little something for everyone. The best thing about Rub Ruby Redfort is a perfect candidate for the spy world, so when a secret agency comes knocking, Ruby is ready for action. Ruby is not your ordinary 7th grader. She's smart, independent, and a bit quirky. Solving puzzles and cracking codes are her idea of a good time. At the same time, she's pretty much your average kid. She has friends, plays sports, ignores her parents on occasion, and watches lots of crime shows on TV. I guess she offers a little something for everyone. The best thing about Ruby, though, is how she stands up for herself. She's no fairytale character, waiting for someone to rescue her out of a tower. Ruby Redfort can take care of herself. Ruby remains calm even as her house is completely ransacked, her long-time housekeeper disappears, she's recruited by a secret spy agency called Spectrum, and she comes face to face with the villainous Count. Her wealthy, slightly dimwitted parents don't have a clue what's going on around them and are completely absorbed in a museum charity event featuring the Jade Buddha of Khotan. They have no idea that Ruby is now spending her days helping Spectrum crack the code that will lead them to the bad guys and that the Jade Buddha may be in danger. She gets a little help from her best friend, Clancy Crew and her new butler, Hitch (who also happens to work for Spectrum), but mostly she figures things out on her own. In doing so, she does end up impersonating adults, lying, sneaking around, and snagging a few Spectrum gadgets that don't belong to her. Despite the tense nature of a spy story, the tone is light, and the dialogue is amusing. Ruby even manages to keep up the clever banter in the most dangerous circumstances. Although the focus is more on action than on thoughts and feelings, there is a strong friendship between Ruby and Clancy and a nice rapport between Ruby and Hutch. Other than the fancy gadgets, there is no mention of modern technology. Ruby even uses a pay phone!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Erin Pradeep

    (This will be a short review!) Lauren Child, you have really outdone yourself, this time!! Right has anyone heard of Charlie & Lola or read when they were young? Or perhaps Clarice Bean? Me too!! ;_; *cries at the memories* Guess what?! She's done it again. This is an amazing series!! It is an engaging book, which automatically makes you turn the pages at lightning speed, in order to find out what happens next. We follow Ruby Redfort who is unlike anyone you've met. She's quirky, intelligent, witty (This will be a short review!) Lauren Child, you have really outdone yourself, this time!! Right has anyone heard of Charlie & Lola or read when they were young? Or perhaps Clarice Bean? Me too!! ;_; *cries at the memories* Guess what?! She's done it again. This is an amazing series!! It is an engaging book, which automatically makes you turn the pages at lightning speed, in order to find out what happens next. We follow Ruby Redfort who is unlike anyone you've met. She's quirky, intelligent, witty and an excellent code-breaker. In other words, she's the perfect candidate for a spy so it's not surprising when Spectrum, a spy agency, comes knocking at her door, with a mystery for her to solve. The mystery was incredible. It was well-thought out. Trust me, it isn't your normal "Oh no! A mystery! Who did it?" kind of thing. The characters are excellente. They are amazingly orchestrated and the banter between all the characters was hilarious. What was refreshing was the bond between Clancy & Ruby. No. Let me guess, Romance? Nope, it's not. It's pure friendship. No, the antagonists have my respects. They were likeable, a bit dramatic, but awesome! This series has stole my heart! NEED THE NEXT BOOK!!! *runs to the library* 5 SOLID STARS P.S. Good luck with figuring out Ruby and Clancy's codes!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Elevetha

    2.5 stars It was okay. Nothing special. The story was pretty weak. But the one factor that I could not get over was the dialogue. It physically hurt to read it. You could tell the author (English), who was attempting to set her book in America, failed miserably as no one here talks like that. Now, maybe, maybe, if this book was set in the 40's, I could forgive some of the dialogue, but it wasn't, so I can't. Hitch, the only character I liked, talked like this, "Kid, if you don't listen to me, you' 2.5 stars It was okay. Nothing special. The story was pretty weak. But the one factor that I could not get over was the dialogue. It physically hurt to read it. You could tell the author (English), who was attempting to set her book in America, failed miserably as no one here talks like that. Now, maybe, maybe, if this book was set in the 40's, I could forgive some of the dialogue, but it wasn't, so I can't. Hitch, the only character I liked, talked like this, "Kid, if you don't listen to me, you'll end up in a bad place. " "You should see what we do at the Academy, kid." He says "kid" at the beginning or end of EVERY SENTENCE. Not acceptable. Ruby uses "boy" at the beginning or end of almost every sentence. I even spotted a "the cat's pajamas" thrown in there. But weird phrasing aside, just the way the characters talked and acted felt really off. There are better MG spy books out there if you're looking for one.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Esther Jackson

    This is an incredible book for a younger and older audience. If I could describe this book in three words, I would say it is comical, delightful, and neat. I was amazed about how much I admired this book, and it’s super cute and an easy read. It is very creative with many bewildering and mystifying puzzles, that make you feel absolutely dumbfounded. This is a change from what I ordinarily read, but I enjoyed it nonetheless. If you are ready for a journey with many ups, downs, and in betweens pi This is an incredible book for a younger and older audience. If I could describe this book in three words, I would say it is comical, delightful, and neat. I was amazed about how much I admired this book, and it’s super cute and an easy read. It is very creative with many bewildering and mystifying puzzles, that make you feel absolutely dumbfounded. This is a change from what I ordinarily read, but I enjoyed it nonetheless. If you are ready for a journey with many ups, downs, and in betweens pick up this book!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Devon Flaherty

    The Ruby Redfort series by Lauren Child, 2011-2014. I read the first two of six total books. The first four are titled Look Into My Eyes, Take Your Last Breath, Catch Your Death, and Feel the Fear. The other two titles are not yet released, but will be in the next couple years. The reason I only read the first two is that the third and fourth are only available in hardcover until this summer and I simply didn’t want to pay hardcover price, even though it was very tempting. I don’t really like har The Ruby Redfort series by Lauren Child, 2011-2014. I read the first two of six total books. The first four are titled Look Into My Eyes, Take Your Last Breath, Catch Your Death, and Feel the Fear. The other two titles are not yet released, but will be in the next couple years. The reason I only read the first two is that the third and fourth are only available in hardcover until this summer and I simply didn’t want to pay hardcover price, even though it was very tempting. I don’t really like hardcover books as much as paperback, anyhow. So I wait. I go into this with full disclosure: I already love Lauren Chlld. She is the brilliant writer and artist responsible for the marvelous Charlie and Lola series, as well as Clarice Bean (see review HERE) and a ton of other superb art, including lovely covers for two of my favorite books, Anne of Green Gables and Pippi Longstocking. So I fully expected to love these books. (And who wouldn’t? Just look at the rad covers.) More on all this to come; I just wanted to let you know where I stood. There are some things about these books. The thing is… my daughter doesn’t like them. She is a fan of fantasy and mystery and also very much of mixed-up fairy tales. Ruby Redfort falls into the secret agent mystery category. Although not a big fan of Clarice Bean, I thought Windsor would like these more because of the mystery. But she has set them aside, twice, to continue plowing through yet another mixed-up fairy tale series (even though I found the other series inferior…) and has yet to finish even the first one. The thing is… I love Lauren Child. Love her. I know I already said that, but there is something (or many somethings) that I really like about her and her style and her voice. From her children’s book illustrations to the spunky attitude of all her characters, I have been caught by the whole shebang hook, line, and sinker. So perhaps its not for everyone, but it is for me. And it is for plenty of people. Especially Brits? Maybe. But Charlie and Lola hold their own here in the US. The thing is... these are a British thing. Which needs to be further explored beyond my last comment. It’s not just about where Child is popular, it’s also about where her style resonates and where her plots and characters make sense. I am one of those typical ravenous-reader Anglophiles, so not only am I fairly comfortable with British stuff from all the English literature I have read over the years (and the history class I endured and the many, many movies and TV shows I have ingested), but I truly enjoy English culture. So I love all the pink milk and the butlers and the “toodle-oos.” But I did, as an American, find Ruby Redfort a little awkward in this respect. Whereas Child’s other works take place in England, Ruby Redfort takes place in the USA. I found myself wondering more than once if Child had regretted placing the super sleuth in the US during the writing of her Clarice Bean series. I just, as an American, found lots of times when a character would refer to an object by its very British term or would do things that are quite un-American. Redfort, true, is British, but everyone else is not. The thing is… I really like them. I must think I’m ten again, because I can’t wait until the next two come out in paperback so I can read them immediately and I also can’t wait until I have them all lined up on the shelf and can read the code on the spines. The adult in me loves (as always with Child) the artistic choices (except perhaps the font on the main type, inside). The cover of the second book is perhaps my favorite cover on my whole entire bookshelf. (The display on a computer screen does not quite do it justice.) I think these books are fun and I just get more and more into the characters as we go along. There’s a real style here that I find fun and refreshing while at the same time being extremely retro-modern. My critiques: Child violates one of my biggest novel pet peeves: she sometimes doesn’t tell us what people look like until it’s too late. I hate getting to book two and finding out John has blonde hair when I had been picturing black for 300 pages. She even makes this mistake with the main character! Also, as mentioned, the American/British thing gets fuzzy. And poor Clancy becomes vaguely unlikeable at times. But pretty much: enjoyed, enjoyed, enjoyed and looking forward to continuing the series. ***REVIEW WRITTEN FOR THE DEVON TREVARROW FLAHERTY BLOG***

  9. 4 out of 5

    papalbina

    i feel confused about this book. i did like ruby, but probably because she is so precocious, most of the time she felt like an older teenager and the way she talked with her friends using "old pal" and "old friend"? who is she? colombo?? fO.o every teenage character in this book felt stuck-up to me (perhaps, because they are rich kids?), that's probably why i didn't like the story as much as i was supposed to. anyway, i can imagine that this book could be very appealing to my twelve-year-old self, i feel confused about this book. i did like ruby, but probably because she is so precocious, most of the time she felt like an older teenager and the way she talked with her friends using "old pal" and "old friend"? who is she? colombo?? fO.o every teenage character in this book felt stuck-up to me (perhaps, because they are rich kids?), that's probably why i didn't like the story as much as i was supposed to. anyway, i can imagine that this book could be very appealing to my twelve-year-old self, so probably any twelve to thirteen-year-old right now can find it interesting. i just have a question: is the book playing in the 70s? I ask because, first, nobody else has referred to that anywhere; second, ruby doesn't use any computer, there is no talk about mobile phones and her parents use a slide projector for their photo slide show; and last, there is this quote in the book that tipp me off, but i'm beginning to doubt myself: "The Redfort house, dubbed the Green-Wood house on account of its environmental features, had been designed in 1961 by famous architect Arno Fredricksonn. Even now, a decade or so later, it was still considered state of art." anyone can help me here??

  10. 4 out of 5

    Christy

    The cover got me! A middle-reader mystery novel about a precocious super spy. It has some great elements and some gaping flaws. I loved the relationship between Ruby and her best friend Clancy, and I felt like Clancy and Hitch (Ruby's handler) were well-drawn. Most of the other characters, Ruby's parents in particular and all of the villains in general, were flat flat flatter than flat - even giving leeway for the genre. I'm guessing that young readers won't notice this stuff and just go along f The cover got me! A middle-reader mystery novel about a precocious super spy. It has some great elements and some gaping flaws. I loved the relationship between Ruby and her best friend Clancy, and I felt like Clancy and Hitch (Ruby's handler) were well-drawn. Most of the other characters, Ruby's parents in particular and all of the villains in general, were flat flat flatter than flat - even giving leeway for the genre. I'm guessing that young readers won't notice this stuff and just go along for a good time, but it's not one I'm going to be gifting to the tweens in my life.

  11. 5 out of 5

    BM

    This is one of my favourite book series and this book made me feel in a different place and always kept me going from start to end this would be a perfect book/series for an 10/11/12 year old to read, I loved this and thought the idea was perfect and everything was so perfect, spectrum and the colours on the wall, all of Ruby’s friends, and the whole town and the parents with their social life.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Elena

    I reread this book some time ago, remembering how much I liked it, and though I had read it beforehand it still is excellently written. This is the type of book you could read over and over again, and still love it all the same. When I was younger I loved the idea of spies and secret agents, this book really captured that feeling. If you have the chance you should definitely read this book.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Reinders

    Good book. Definately recommend. :)

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ella

    4.5 stars. At this point, I think I'm getting a little old for this book, but it's still reasonably entertaining. And, I mean, will Hitch ever get less awesome?? 4.5 stars. At this point, I think I'm getting a little old for this book, but it's still reasonably entertaining. And, I mean, will Hitch ever get less awesome??

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lesr Kew

    3.75. a cute spy mystery for younger readers. It was fun.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Zoe

    Lent to me by a friend and at first I thought it might be a bit young but the content definitely doesn’t betray the writing style. Definitely going to find the next book.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Tresillian

    Re-reading for about the 50th time. I will never not love this series!

  18. 5 out of 5

    ∂єє∂єє! {∂σ уσυ єνєя ѕєє мє αѕ ωнσ Ι яєαℓℓу αм?}

    This is such a great series. I absolutely love this book and all the other ones. DON'T READ IF YOU DO NOT LIKE UNREALISTIC BOOKS. That is my review :) This is such a great series. I absolutely love this book and all the other ones. DON'T READ IF YOU DO NOT LIKE UNREALISTIC BOOKS. That is my review :)

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kaylee Johnson

    Ruby-1 of the main characters-had a problem with a redhead.If you want to find out what the problem was,go read the book for yourself.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lorna Hetherington

    Ruby Redfort is a spin off from Lauren Child’s, Clarice Bean and this first book in the series introduces us to Ruby’s beginnings as a detective. Some pretty weird things have being going on lately in Ruby’s world and they are about to get a whole lot weirder now that she has being recruited by the secret organisation, Spectrum. She finds herself in all sorts of sticky situations, cracking top-secret codes and even risking her life occasionally. With the help of her undercover butler, Hitch and Ruby Redfort is a spin off from Lauren Child’s, Clarice Bean and this first book in the series introduces us to Ruby’s beginnings as a detective. Some pretty weird things have being going on lately in Ruby’s world and they are about to get a whole lot weirder now that she has being recruited by the secret organisation, Spectrum. She finds herself in all sorts of sticky situations, cracking top-secret codes and even risking her life occasionally. With the help of her undercover butler, Hitch and her best friend, Clancy Crew, will she be able to save the day? Look Into My Eyes is filled with lots of unique elements of humour and suspenseful moments. Super cool Ruby is an extremely likeable character with her laid-back attitude and comedy slogan t-shirts. Codes and puzzles are scattered throughout the book for the reader to solve, which is a nice added novelty. The fun text layout makes the book that little bit more enjoyable to read. However, Look Into My Eyes does seem to be quite lengthy, which some young readers may find off-putting. On the plus side, this story would make a great T.V or film adaptation. Female readers of ages 10-15 years are the most likely to find Ruby Redfort’s adventures entertaining. Although, there is a chance that boys would really enjoy it as well, if they were to give it a try. This book would be ideal for independent reading and may provide some good inspiration for story writing ideas.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ellen

    One of the joys of introducing new books to children is that sometimes they return the favor. Ruby Redfort: Look into my Eyes is one of those books. One of my students chose this book as part of a school project. I'd never heard of it, so I took the opportunity to check it out. Ruby is a spunky kid with an independent mind whose powers of observation rival Holmes himself. It's only natural that someone who subscribes to code-cracking magazines would be approached by a super-secret spy organizati One of the joys of introducing new books to children is that sometimes they return the favor. Ruby Redfort: Look into my Eyes is one of those books. One of my students chose this book as part of a school project. I'd never heard of it, so I took the opportunity to check it out. Ruby is a spunky kid with an independent mind whose powers of observation rival Holmes himself. It's only natural that someone who subscribes to code-cracking magazines would be approached by a super-secret spy organization like Spectrum, right? The fact that the author includes the puzzles and codes right in the book for us to crack on our own is a fun bonus. Even better, the answer is not automatically revealed for the reader, but encouragement to keep trying to solve it pops up at the end of the book and also on the website. This first installment of the series, a spin-off of Child's Clarice Bean books, is packed with adventure and mystery. A missing housekeeper is replaced by an unusual butler named Hitch who isn't a butler at all and strange things keep happening leading up to the attempted theft of a Jade Buddha that Ruby's clueless parents are obsessed with. Far from the predictable and somewhat pedantic Nancy Drew, Ruby Redfort will draw in today's young mystery reader and have everyone chuckling in the process. I look forward to reading more. Thanks, Julianna, for introducing me to her.

  22. 5 out of 5

    The Styling Librarian

    Ruby Redfort Look Into My Eyes by Lauren Child. I guess my only disappointment was that there were no illustrations in the book. I kept picturing them as I read based on what Lauren Child’s illustrations were in the past in books, but I know, it was more mature than her other books. I’d say it is a terrific book for students who love Mysterious Benedict Society by Trenton Lee Stewart, Winston Breen series by Eric Berlin, Meg Cabot’s Allie Finkle series, and Wendelin Van Draanen’s Sammy Keyes mys Ruby Redfort Look Into My Eyes by Lauren Child. I guess my only disappointment was that there were no illustrations in the book. I kept picturing them as I read based on what Lauren Child’s illustrations were in the past in books, but I know, it was more mature than her other books. I’d say it is a terrific book for students who love Mysterious Benedict Society by Trenton Lee Stewart, Winston Breen series by Eric Berlin, Meg Cabot’s Allie Finkle series, and Wendelin Van Draanen’s Sammy Keyes mystery series. I enjoyed the quirky characters, the way Lauren Child was descriptive and made scenes in the story come to life in my head, even to when Ruby was chewing gum the LB spy said “Could you lose the gum”… Just made me chuckle here and there in surprise. Also, I love chapter title headings and some chapter headings did not disappoint, they guided me to think about what was coming next: from the beginning, here are a few: There Was a Girl Named Ruby; There’s a Lot of Truth in Fiction; and also Time Waits For No Man. I also loved the rules that Ruby mentioned throughout the book: Rule 33: MORE OFTEN THAN NOT THERE IS A VERY ORDINARY EXPLANATION FOR THE “EXTRAORDINARY” HAPPENING. Rule 13: THERE IS MORE TO MOST THINGS THAN MEETS THE EYE. Rule 12: ADJUST YOUR THINKING AND YOUR CHANCES IMPROVE. FINALLY: Rule 19: PANIC WILL FREEZE YOUR BRAIN.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Max

    So here we go, another book of my sister's I'm reading. I'll admit that I really didn't like Ruby Redfort at first. The story isn't all that original, the character's dialogue is wholly unbelievable, and the quality of writing is pretty bad on the whole. It wasn't though, as it turned out, a terrible book. Here's what impressed me: The character Hitch was very cool,; I got the sense of some action packed back story to him. He was probably my favourite. The whole book had style, from Ruby's amusing t So here we go, another book of my sister's I'm reading. I'll admit that I really didn't like Ruby Redfort at first. The story isn't all that original, the character's dialogue is wholly unbelievable, and the quality of writing is pretty bad on the whole. It wasn't though, as it turned out, a terrible book. Here's what impressed me: The character Hitch was very cool,; I got the sense of some action packed back story to him. He was probably my favourite. The whole book had style, from Ruby's amusing t-shirts to her love of banana milk to the fact that her phone is shaped like a donut. Those details gave it a certain charm. Froghorn was an ass, and that made me smile. What I didn't like: Stilted dialogue. WHO TOLD THE WRITER THAT USING DASHES IS A GOOD LITERARY TECHNIQUE? (spoilers) Mrs Digby randomly escaped - with no explanation as to why she had been kidnapped. It was probably as an excuse - for Hitch to turn up. It was never explained why - anyone wanted to steal the Jade Buddha of Khotan. But maybe Ruby's adventures are for younger readers anyway, who wouldn't pick up on this stuff. What did my sister think? "What did you think?" "Of what?" she replies. "Of Ruby Redfort," I say. She pauses. "I can't remember." ... Oh. Guess it didn't make much of an impression. So for all of that, three stars, Bozo!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

    I wanted to like this more than I did. I love lauren child - my daughter and I used to watch charlie and lola together. I never read the clarice bean books (ruby redfort was first introduced in them, apparently). part of it is, I am just growing out of children's books! at age 45! not all of them, but lately a couple of them have just bored me, the same way that some children's programs bore me. I mean, if I'm going to be reading a kid's book, I want it to be a treat, I don't want to slog throug I wanted to like this more than I did. I love lauren child - my daughter and I used to watch charlie and lola together. I never read the clarice bean books (ruby redfort was first introduced in them, apparently). part of it is, I am just growing out of children's books! at age 45! not all of them, but lately a couple of them have just bored me, the same way that some children's programs bore me. I mean, if I'm going to be reading a kid's book, I want it to be a treat, I don't want to slog through it. ruby was sassy and tough and smart but for all that, she didn't have a lot of character, it felt like. just sort of a generic smart tough sassy girl. I mean, don't get me wrong, I'm glad that's common enough to be generic. I guess I kept wanting her to be more quirky. this reminded me a little of lemony snicket's all the wrong questions, except much less odd. I would have preferred more odd. ruby has a best friend who is a boy and he's also smart and incredibly loyal...in a YA novel, he would be in love with her. I'm just tired of that combo. I'd just as soon the best friend be a girl. or in the YA instance, a gay boy. or a gay girl. let's shake it up. I loved the cover design. I probably would have loved the book when I was 8 or 9. I have another in the series (there are at least five) out from the library but I don't know if I'll bother reading it.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Clare Cannon

    A fun, contemporary detective story that will especially appeal to fans of Nancy Drew. Ruby Redfort is a juvenile genius who has a knack for sensing anything out of the ordinary. It just so happens that her family finds themselves smack bang in the middle of a detective case, and Ruby's quick observation and talent for code breaking is called upon to save the day. Though the plot and puzzles will appeal to kids who like the idea of being smart, they'll need to tolerate the affected 'attitude-tal A fun, contemporary detective story that will especially appeal to fans of Nancy Drew. Ruby Redfort is a juvenile genius who has a knack for sensing anything out of the ordinary. It just so happens that her family finds themselves smack bang in the middle of a detective case, and Ruby's quick observation and talent for code breaking is called upon to save the day. Though the plot and puzzles will appeal to kids who like the idea of being smart, they'll need to tolerate the affected 'attitude-talk' of the characters: "So, Clance, what gives?" "Not a whole lot actually." "So to what do I owe the pleasure of this call?" "Boredom," yawned Clancy. "So why don't you get yourself over here, bozo?" "Well, I would, you know, Rube, but my dad wants me home...". However, though it might be irritating for older readers, younger readers may find it entertaining, and it does at least maintain a believable voice for a young, somewhat precocious, genius detective. At nearly 400 pages it's not for reluctant readers, but the narrative's alternating between action and puzzle solving will hold the average reader's attention right to the end, where all is finally, convincingly resolved. Great fun for budding detectives. www.GoodReadingGuide.com

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    A delightful treat for girls and boys ages 8-12. A fan of Nancy Drew, Trixie Belden, Harriet the Spy and Enola Holmes; Ruby Redfort has made her debut in this prestigous group of tween/teen detectives. Child has a winner in this tie-in to her Clarice Bean books for middle-grade readers. Fan of Clarice? You will certainly become a fan of Ruby! (In the Clarice Bean books, Ruby is Clarice's mystery solving hero) In Look Into My Eyes, Ruby has been employed by a secret agency called Spectrum, to cra A delightful treat for girls and boys ages 8-12. A fan of Nancy Drew, Trixie Belden, Harriet the Spy and Enola Holmes; Ruby Redfort has made her debut in this prestigous group of tween/teen detectives. Child has a winner in this tie-in to her Clarice Bean books for middle-grade readers. Fan of Clarice? You will certainly become a fan of Ruby! (In the Clarice Bean books, Ruby is Clarice's mystery solving hero) In Look Into My Eyes, Ruby has been employed by a secret agency called Spectrum, to crack a code that has left them desperate. Along with her butler Hitch and best friend Clancy Crew, Ruby begins an action-packed adventure full of puzzles to solve, codes to crack, and fun secret agent gadgets to test. Child's writing is both funny and clever, creating criminals with names such as Hog-Trotter, Nice Lives, and the Count von Viscount. Ruby has also developed some common sense and curiously apropos rules to sleuth by; my favorite being "If you want to keep something secret don't leave it lying around." Ruby is indeed a gem.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    What's not to like about a smart, wisecracking, codebreaking thirteen-year-old who sees herself as a spy? Well, there's not a lot readers won't enjoy about Ruby Redfort except maybe her clueless but well-meaning parents. Ruby has always been intelligent and observant, and as the prologue shows, she once watched as dognappers stole her neighbor's prize-winning Pekinese. After that incident, she started keeping notebooks about spying. In this title, the first of a promised series, Ruby is hired by What's not to like about a smart, wisecracking, codebreaking thirteen-year-old who sees herself as a spy? Well, there's not a lot readers won't enjoy about Ruby Redfort except maybe her clueless but well-meaning parents. Ruby has always been intelligent and observant, and as the prologue shows, she once watched as dognappers stole her neighbor's prize-winning Pekinese. After that incident, she started keeping notebooks about spying. In this title, the first of a promised series, Ruby is hired by an agency to crack a code left unfinished by a previous sleuth. She and her friend Clancy eventually find themselves in peril as a plot concerning a jade Buddha is revealed. The bad guys in the story are really bad, and Ruby is brave and determined to get to the root of things. This one was fun to read, and the inclusion of codes to crack adds to the delight. For those readers who are code-challenged, solutions are provided on a website.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Tracie

    Three and a half stars. 13-year-old Ruby Redfort is a smart kid surrounded by perfectly clueless adults, and her code-cracking skills draw the attention of Spectrum, a secret intelligence agency. Spectrum has learned that a group of villains is planning to break into the town's unbreakable safe, and Ruby is hired to crack the code that will foil their plot. The mystery and intrigue, murder and mayhem are presented with a light tone, making this novel a good choice for readers who like a good laug Three and a half stars. 13-year-old Ruby Redfort is a smart kid surrounded by perfectly clueless adults, and her code-cracking skills draw the attention of Spectrum, a secret intelligence agency. Spectrum has learned that a group of villains is planning to break into the town's unbreakable safe, and Ruby is hired to crack the code that will foil their plot. The mystery and intrigue, murder and mayhem are presented with a light tone, making this novel a good choice for readers who like a good laugh as much as a good cipher. Codes and puzzles are sprinkled throughout the text, challenging readers to test the limits of their own minds and follow in Ruby's footsteps. Hand this to fans of Chasing Vermeer by Blue Balliet and The Mysterious Benedict Society by Trenton Lee Stewart.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Burbank Library Children's Department

    This excellent book is a spinoff from Lauren Child's Clarice Bean chapter book series. Ruby Redfort, however, is for a slightly older audience. Middle schooler Ruby Redfort is tasked with code cracking and villian thwarting all while maintaining her cool composure and signature style. A word of advice - this book must be read in the style of the old black and white detective shows! It really brings out Ruby's character! A.R. 5.6 This excellent book is a spinoff from Lauren Child's Clarice Bean chapter book series. Ruby Redfort, however, is for a slightly older audience. Middle schooler Ruby Redfort is tasked with code cracking and villian thwarting all while maintaining her cool composure and signature style. A word of advice - this book must be read in the style of the old black and white detective shows! It really brings out Ruby's character! A.R. 5.6

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ciara

    After reading the Clarice Bean books a year or so ago, I expected this book to be a a short book with some illustrations, as that was the way the Clarice Bean books were laid out. However, I was pleasantly suprised when the book was 300-and-something pages long and I was very impressed with it! Some of the chapters lacked in plot at times, but the very good times made up for that.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.