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Poems. O, Tempora! O, Mores! -- To Margaret -- "To Octavia" -- Tamerlane -- Song -- Dreams -- Spirits of the dead -- Evening star -- Imitation -- Stanzas -- Dream -- "The happiest day -- the happiest hour" -- Lake: to -- -- Sonnett: To science -- Al Aaraaf -- "Mysterious star!" -- Romance -- Introduction -- To -- ("The bowers whereat") -- To the River -- -- To -- ("I heed not") -- Fairy land -- Fair Poems. O, Tempora! O, Mores! -- To Margaret -- "To Octavia" -- Tamerlane -- Song -- Dreams -- Spirits of the dead -- Evening star -- Imitation -- Stanzas -- Dream -- "The happiest day -- the happiest hour" -- Lake: to -- -- Sonnett: To science -- Al Aaraaf -- "Mysterious star!" -- Romance -- Introduction -- To -- ("The bowers whereat") -- To the River -- -- To -- ("I heed not") -- Fairy land -- Fairy-land -- Alone -- "To Isaac Lea" -- Elizabeth -- From an album -- "Lines on Joe Locke" -- To Helen -- Israfel -- Sleeper -- Valley of unrest -- City in the sea -- Lenore -- To one in paradise -- Hymn -- Enigma -- Serenade -- Coliseum -- To F -- s S. O -- d -- To F -- -- Bridal ballad -- Sonnet -- To Zante -- Haunted palace -- Sonnet -- Silence -- Conqueror worm -- Dream-land -- Eulalie -- A song -- Raven -- Valentine -- "Deep in earth" -- To Miss Louise Olivia Hunter -- To M.L.S -- -- To -- Ulalume: A ballad -- Enigma -- Bells -- To Helen -- Dream within a dream -- For Annie -- Eldorado -- Sonnet -- To my mother -- Annabel Lee -- Scenes from "Politian." Fiction. Metzengerstein -- Duc De L'Omelette -- Tale of Jerusalem -- Loss of breath -- Bon-bon -- Four beasts in one -- the Homo-Cameleopard -- MS. Found in a bottle -- Assignation -- Unparallelled adventure of one Hans Pfaall -- Lionizing -- Shadow: A parable -- Silence: A fable -- Berenice -- Morella -- King Pest -- Mystification -- Ligeia -- How to write a Blackwood article -- Devil in the belfry -- Man that was used up -- Fall of the House of Usher -- William Wilson -- Conversation of Eiros and Charmion -- Some account of Stonehenge, the giant's dance -- Why the little Frenchman wears his hand in a sling -- Instinct vs Reason: A black cat -- Business man -- Philosophy of furniture -- Man of the crowd -- Island of the fay -- Murders in the Rue Morgue -- Descent into the maelström -- Colloquy of Monos and Una -- Never bet the devil your head -- Eleonora -- Three Sundays in a week -- Oval portrait -- Masque of the red death -- Pit and the pendulum -- Mystery of Marie Rogêt -- Morning on the Wissahiccon -- Tell-tale heart -- Gold bug -- Black cat -- Diddling considered as one of the exact sciences -- Byron and Miss Chaworth -- Spectacles -- Oblong box -- Tale of the ragged mountains -- Premature burial -- Purloined letter -- System of Doctor Tarr and Professor Fether -- Mesmeric revelation -- "Thou art the man" -- Balloon-hoax -- Angel of the odd -- Literary life of Thingum Bob, Esq. -- Thousand-and-second tale of Scheherazade -- Some words with a mummy -- Power of words -- Imp of the perverse -- Facts in the case of M. Valdemar -- Sphinx -- Cask of Amonrillado -- Domain of Arnheim -- Mellonta Tauta -- Landor's cottage -- Hop-frog -- Von Kempelen and his discovery -- "X-ing a Paragrab." Eureka, a prose poem -- Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket.


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Poems. O, Tempora! O, Mores! -- To Margaret -- "To Octavia" -- Tamerlane -- Song -- Dreams -- Spirits of the dead -- Evening star -- Imitation -- Stanzas -- Dream -- "The happiest day -- the happiest hour" -- Lake: to -- -- Sonnett: To science -- Al Aaraaf -- "Mysterious star!" -- Romance -- Introduction -- To -- ("The bowers whereat") -- To the River -- -- To -- ("I heed not") -- Fairy land -- Fair Poems. O, Tempora! O, Mores! -- To Margaret -- "To Octavia" -- Tamerlane -- Song -- Dreams -- Spirits of the dead -- Evening star -- Imitation -- Stanzas -- Dream -- "The happiest day -- the happiest hour" -- Lake: to -- -- Sonnett: To science -- Al Aaraaf -- "Mysterious star!" -- Romance -- Introduction -- To -- ("The bowers whereat") -- To the River -- -- To -- ("I heed not") -- Fairy land -- Fairy-land -- Alone -- "To Isaac Lea" -- Elizabeth -- From an album -- "Lines on Joe Locke" -- To Helen -- Israfel -- Sleeper -- Valley of unrest -- City in the sea -- Lenore -- To one in paradise -- Hymn -- Enigma -- Serenade -- Coliseum -- To F -- s S. O -- d -- To F -- -- Bridal ballad -- Sonnet -- To Zante -- Haunted palace -- Sonnet -- Silence -- Conqueror worm -- Dream-land -- Eulalie -- A song -- Raven -- Valentine -- "Deep in earth" -- To Miss Louise Olivia Hunter -- To M.L.S -- -- To -- Ulalume: A ballad -- Enigma -- Bells -- To Helen -- Dream within a dream -- For Annie -- Eldorado -- Sonnet -- To my mother -- Annabel Lee -- Scenes from "Politian." Fiction. Metzengerstein -- Duc De L'Omelette -- Tale of Jerusalem -- Loss of breath -- Bon-bon -- Four beasts in one -- the Homo-Cameleopard -- MS. Found in a bottle -- Assignation -- Unparallelled adventure of one Hans Pfaall -- Lionizing -- Shadow: A parable -- Silence: A fable -- Berenice -- Morella -- King Pest -- Mystification -- Ligeia -- How to write a Blackwood article -- Devil in the belfry -- Man that was used up -- Fall of the House of Usher -- William Wilson -- Conversation of Eiros and Charmion -- Some account of Stonehenge, the giant's dance -- Why the little Frenchman wears his hand in a sling -- Instinct vs Reason: A black cat -- Business man -- Philosophy of furniture -- Man of the crowd -- Island of the fay -- Murders in the Rue Morgue -- Descent into the maelström -- Colloquy of Monos and Una -- Never bet the devil your head -- Eleonora -- Three Sundays in a week -- Oval portrait -- Masque of the red death -- Pit and the pendulum -- Mystery of Marie Rogêt -- Morning on the Wissahiccon -- Tell-tale heart -- Gold bug -- Black cat -- Diddling considered as one of the exact sciences -- Byron and Miss Chaworth -- Spectacles -- Oblong box -- Tale of the ragged mountains -- Premature burial -- Purloined letter -- System of Doctor Tarr and Professor Fether -- Mesmeric revelation -- "Thou art the man" -- Balloon-hoax -- Angel of the odd -- Literary life of Thingum Bob, Esq. -- Thousand-and-second tale of Scheherazade -- Some words with a mummy -- Power of words -- Imp of the perverse -- Facts in the case of M. Valdemar -- Sphinx -- Cask of Amonrillado -- Domain of Arnheim -- Mellonta Tauta -- Landor's cottage -- Hop-frog -- Von Kempelen and his discovery -- "X-ing a Paragrab." Eureka, a prose poem -- Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket.

30 review for Fiction and Poetry: Complete and Unabridged

  1. 4 out of 5

    Henry Avila

    Edgar Allan Poe, is best known for the Raven, still the greatest and most famous American poem ever written (in my opinion).Inventor of the detective story, master of the short story, especially the macabre, writer, editor , critic, essayist, gambler, beggar, drunk, drug user, widower, and manic depressive.In other words, an American original. A hard life he lived partly his own fault however being an orphan wasn't conducive for happiness in the harsh 1800's . Still you could not help but root f Edgar Allan Poe, is best known for the Raven, still the greatest and most famous American poem ever written (in my opinion).Inventor of the detective story, master of the short story, especially the macabre, writer, editor , critic, essayist, gambler, beggar, drunk, drug user, widower, and manic depressive.In other words, an American original. A hard life he lived partly his own fault however being an orphan wasn't conducive for happiness in the harsh 1800's . Still you could not help but root for him. A brilliant man full of angst he could never escape from his doom sadly quite predictable. NEVERTHELESS his SHORT LIFE left US many splendid reads. Poe's only novel, in 1838, The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket, is included in this book. Which I will review... The strange book has a unearthly view as if this was on another planet, anyone seeing the pages fly by will feel the creepiness a ghoulish atmosphere falls on the unfortunate victims . His great poems and splendid stories no one else could write so well, oozing the weird and you my friends must find yourselves... Young Pym befriends Augustus, the son of a sea captain. Wanting adventure , this teenager has his friend stow him away, in his father's ship.But something goes wrong . After many days hidden and starving, Arthur leaves his secret place and discovers there has been a mutiny on board! Luckily Augustus is still alive and gives his friend food and water.The mutineers have a power struggle on ship causing much turmoil. When a hurricane hits, most of the drunken crew perish, with the vessel capsizing.The survivors cling to the bottom of the ship, for their lives, which is now the top. Finally picked up after many days at sea by the Jane Guy and landing in Africa. Later they go to the Antarctic and Arthur Pym disappears in that vast, lonely , cold land. Will he ever be seen again? This novel's failure caused Poe not to write another a shame for it was too weird for the 19th century but not for now...

  2. 5 out of 5

    Bailey Jane

    Definitely not light reading, but perfect for the fall and winter. My grandmother bought this leatherbound collection for me when I was 12 or so and it took me 5 years or so to read it in its completion. I have to be in the mood to read Poe, but when I am it's the best reading in the world. Very dark and poetic. Great stories, and each story is just short enough to maintain attention span. I recommend this to anyone who appreciates a challenging read. Definitely not light reading, but perfect for the fall and winter. My grandmother bought this leatherbound collection for me when I was 12 or so and it took me 5 years or so to read it in its completion. I have to be in the mood to read Poe, but when I am it's the best reading in the world. Very dark and poetic. Great stories, and each story is just short enough to maintain attention span. I recommend this to anyone who appreciates a challenging read.

  3. 4 out of 5

    John Wiswell

    Holy crap, it’s a brick of brilliance! This doorstop-sized volume contains the complete works of Edgar Allen Poe. The poetry, the essays, the short stories – you got it here. Holy crap. Pick this up and skim a few of his works and you’ll know whether or not you want it. If you’re studying authors, though, why wouldn’t you get this? It gives you unparalleled access to the complete artistic thoughts of one of America’s most important early writers. In reading this I was surprised by how many good one Holy crap, it’s a brick of brilliance! This doorstop-sized volume contains the complete works of Edgar Allen Poe. The poetry, the essays, the short stories – you got it here. Holy crap. Pick this up and skim a few of his works and you’ll know whether or not you want it. If you’re studying authors, though, why wouldn’t you get this? It gives you unparalleled access to the complete artistic thoughts of one of America’s most important early writers. In reading this I was surprised by how many good ones were in here. Previously I’d been assigned to read the terribly dated and melodramatic or borderline nonsensical Poe classics, like “The Raven” and “The Pit and the Pendulum.” But reading through his works freely I found a lot of variety and interesting stories I’d never heard of. “Hop Frog,” the revenge story of an abused dwarf. “Black Cat,” of a bizarre murder plot. “Annabel Lee,” of a lost beauty and the sea. Gothic thinking, careful plotting and macabre morality for hundreds of pages. Come and get your Poe.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Emm - "That Book You Like is Coming Back in Style"

    A lasting piece of written silver and obsidian, still as dark and haunting as it was over a century ago. Poe's influence is as far-reaching as that of the thematically similar Grimms or even Carroll's Alice. The ghosts and creatures of his imagination still float powerfully through the culture, and continues to earn respect for horror and poetry as literature. His stories explore primal and preternatural fears with wit and eloquence. Being trapped, being driven to insanity and not knowing if the A lasting piece of written silver and obsidian, still as dark and haunting as it was over a century ago. Poe's influence is as far-reaching as that of the thematically similar Grimms or even Carroll's Alice. The ghosts and creatures of his imagination still float powerfully through the culture, and continues to earn respect for horror and poetry as literature. His stories explore primal and preternatural fears with wit and eloquence. Being trapped, being driven to insanity and not knowing if the horror you see is real or hallucination, being face to face with the grim reaper. They are not necessarily formulaic - some begin as an average event and descend so gradually into madness. Some begin on a dark note and only get creepier. Personal favourite is "Masque of the Red Death", about a group of influential and wealthy people sheltering themselves in a ballroom while the town below dies of plague, that is, until the plague himself arrives in person. Some other favourites, "The Black Cat", "The Tell Tale Heart", "Fall of the House of Usher", and "The Conqueror Worm". Most, if not all of these are in public domain, but in my opinion is well-worth having a beautiful bound copy of. I also highly recommend the illustrated editions by Gris Grimly.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Natalie

    I received an advance reader copy of this book to read in exchange for an honest review via netgalley and the publishers. The complete tales and poems of Edgar Allan Poe is a beautiful collection of stories and poems brought together within this beautiful, gothic book. Some tales and poems are relatively unsettling but beautiful and so well written. Edgar Allan Poe formed a new style of writing in his day and his poems and tales have always been a fascination to many. Having never read any of Poe I received an advance reader copy of this book to read in exchange for an honest review via netgalley and the publishers. The complete tales and poems of Edgar Allan Poe is a beautiful collection of stories and poems brought together within this beautiful, gothic book. Some tales and poems are relatively unsettling but beautiful and so well written. Edgar Allan Poe formed a new style of writing in his day and his poems and tales have always been a fascination to many. Having never read any of Poes tales or poetry, I grabbed the chance to read them with the ARC of this book and I wasn't disappointed in any way. This is an amazing book and one I want to read through again.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mike (the Paladin)

    This is sort of a "what more can you say" book, it's Poe. I was introduced to Poe when I was around 11 by a (young) school teacher. I suppose I never looked back and in a way it effected my taste in literature as I still like most types of fantasy reads and enjoy what is usually (somewhat loosely) called "weird" literature. Edgar Allan Poe, a man who carved out the classic short story, the classic detective story all the while telling blood chilling stories that have been copied ever since. I hav This is sort of a "what more can you say" book, it's Poe. I was introduced to Poe when I was around 11 by a (young) school teacher. I suppose I never looked back and in a way it effected my taste in literature as I still like most types of fantasy reads and enjoy what is usually (somewhat loosely) called "weird" literature. Edgar Allan Poe, a man who carved out the classic short story, the classic detective story all the while telling blood chilling stories that have been copied ever since. I have read that a good deal of the "character assassination" of Poe was exaggerated. We know that he was at least emotionally fragile and was shattered by the loss of his wife. More than that and that he was an extraordinary writer I'm not sure of. BUT if you like horror, try. It all started here.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Michael Sorbello

    I absolutely love Poe's gothic tales. The Raven is a macabre poem depicting a man driven to excruciating loneliness and grief from being unable to let go of the memories of his dead lover Lenore. It's a tragic tale full of death and sorrow, a tale of how one's unwillingness to let go of dark memories and past tragedies will only push them to the edge of insanity. The Cask of Amontillado is a haunting revenge story. The ending of this classic tale of revenge is where it really hits home. The pain I absolutely love Poe's gothic tales. The Raven is a macabre poem depicting a man driven to excruciating loneliness and grief from being unable to let go of the memories of his dead lover Lenore. It's a tragic tale full of death and sorrow, a tale of how one's unwillingness to let go of dark memories and past tragedies will only push them to the edge of insanity. The Cask of Amontillado is a haunting revenge story. The ending of this classic tale of revenge is where it really hits home. The pain that the narrator feels after exacting his vengeance, after seeing how much anger and hatred flows from his words, it is a shock to see hints of possible guilt, compassion and remorse for his cruel punishment. The Tell-Tale Heart is the scariest of Poe's horror stories in my opinion. Poe effectively showcases the classic symptoms and behaviors of paranoia-induced insanity, a symptom that many violent serial killers display. Poe also shows an impressive knowledge and understanding of a deranged criminal's mind in a time when not too much was known about human psychology. The disturbed protagonist shows psychotic symptoms including fixation, obsessiveness, dehumanization and paranoia, leading him to do something utterly despicable to an old man without any ulterior motives. He tries to justify his delusions by fixating on his victim's vulture-like eye, treating it as a separate entity from the old man so he doesn't have to experience the guilt of his terrible crime. His guilt eventually manifests in the sound of the old man's heart beating beneath his floorboards, driving him mad until he finally confesses to murdering and dismembering the old man for reasons he can't seem to properly explain. It's a disturbing look into the psychology of a severely troubled individual and an early study of criminal behavior. These are just a few of my favorites. Though I love Poe's gothic horror tales and several of his poems, I really can't say I enjoyed any of his satires or mystery/crime stories. *** If you're looking for some dark ambient music for reading horror, dark fantasy and other books like this one, then be sure to check out my YouTube Channel called Nightmarish Compositions: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCPPs...

  8. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    When I was in college I took an English class which was an overview of the Horror genre. One of the books we covered was a collection of the tales and poems of Edgar Allan Poe...I was immediately enthralled. Edgar Allan Poe is awesome! One of the best writers I've ever read. I did not read this whole book in its entirety, I chose the most famous poems and about twenty-three of his short stories to read. My favorite poems were The Raven and The Bells. I enjoyed The Pit and the Pendulum and The Te When I was in college I took an English class which was an overview of the Horror genre. One of the books we covered was a collection of the tales and poems of Edgar Allan Poe...I was immediately enthralled. Edgar Allan Poe is awesome! One of the best writers I've ever read. I did not read this whole book in its entirety, I chose the most famous poems and about twenty-three of his short stories to read. My favorite poems were The Raven and The Bells. I enjoyed The Pit and the Pendulum and The Tell-Tale Heart very much. This is a volume of literature which I shall revisit again and again and again...

  9. 5 out of 5

    Nitzan Schwarz

    OMG I HAVE THIS BOOK! IT FREAKIN' LOOKS LIKE A COLLECTIBLE!! ~ swooning over the gorgeous edition~ IT LOOKS SO PERFECT SITTING ON MY SHELF! AND I PROBABLY WENT BROKE BY BUYING IT! no matter. if there is one thing worth getting broke for - it's books. OMG I HAVE THIS BOOK! IT FREAKIN' LOOKS LIKE A COLLECTIBLE!! ~ swooning over the gorgeous edition~ IT LOOKS SO PERFECT SITTING ON MY SHELF! AND I PROBABLY WENT BROKE BY BUYING IT! no matter. if there is one thing worth getting broke for - it's books.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    I am perpetually reading this book, it used to have a big sign on it that said "for really big poops" but it got lost along the way. Although, the spirit of the book still remains and it lives in the bathroom with its other toilet brethren. All that aside, this book is awesome, it has the good and the bad in one easy to read volume. The poems were stellar, but the stories that are unpopular are that way for a reason. They drag on seemingly endlessly, but I can't give all of them a negative review I am perpetually reading this book, it used to have a big sign on it that said "for really big poops" but it got lost along the way. Although, the spirit of the book still remains and it lives in the bathroom with its other toilet brethren. All that aside, this book is awesome, it has the good and the bad in one easy to read volume. The poems were stellar, but the stories that are unpopular are that way for a reason. They drag on seemingly endlessly, but I can't give all of them a negative review yet since I haven't read them all. However, so far, unpopular equates to not so awesome...

  11. 5 out of 5

    John Adams

    I reviewed this volume for the Horror Tree website this month. Just click on the link to read my review. https://horrortree.com/epeolatry-book... I reviewed this volume for the Horror Tree website this month. Just click on the link to read my review. https://horrortree.com/epeolatry-book...

  12. 5 out of 5

    Tanya

    I first came in touch with Poe's writing when I was around thirteen and bought a collection of his stories solely because of the title, which translated to something like "fascination for dread", which was right up my emo alley at the time. I never made it through that one—I remember that I couldn't fight my way through The Gold Bug, which came right after The Murders in the Rue Morgue, and was also kind of a chore to read back then (it's still definitely not a favorite, but I did appreciate it I first came in touch with Poe's writing when I was around thirteen and bought a collection of his stories solely because of the title, which translated to something like "fascination for dread", which was right up my emo alley at the time. I never made it through that one—I remember that I couldn't fight my way through The Gold Bug, which came right after The Murders in the Rue Morgue, and was also kind of a chore to read back then (it's still definitely not a favorite, but I did appreciate it a little bit more than when I was a teenager). I read and absolutely adored The Pit and the Pendulum when I was in high school, and wrote an essay about it that got me the best grade in American Lit that anyone managed to get that semester, and I was familiar with his most famous stories. I'm rating it two stars because overall I was underwhelmed, and the other option would be to not rate it at all—how do you rate someone's life's work? You can't. So I'll write down my thoughts on the four sections the book is divided in: POETRY I don't read a lot of poetry, so this wasn't a great way to start off—and his poems are mostly dense, inaccessible and/or highly problematic. After all, in The Philosophy of Composition he famously reasoned "of all melancholy topics what, according to the universal understanding of mankind, is the most melancholy? Death, was the obvious reply. And when is this most melancholy of topics most poetical? When it most closely allies itself to Beauty: the death then of a beautiful woman is unquestionably the most poetical topic in the world, and equally is it beyond doubt that the lips best suited for such topic are those of a bereaved lover". Which is, well, gross, and results in a lot of very emo poems written about/for a lot of different maidens (whether dead or not, I can't attest to). I liked The Raven, A Dream Within A Dream, as well as Alone, which I didn't know before picking this up, so that means I truly enjoyed three out of sixty-three poems, not the best odds. What I thought was odd was that his only (and unfinished) play Politan was included in the poetry section as well, rather than having its own, but it's not the only odd grouping choice in this edition. FICTION Most of the works collected here were short stories, which he is credited with having pioneered/popularized. He is best known for his psychological horror tales, which are by far his most outstanding works. I was let down by a lot of the short stories included, and didn't find very many new favorites. The first atypical tale that I came across and enjoyed was The Unparalleled Adventure of One Hans Pfaall, which was published in a magazine in 1835 as a hoax, because that's the kind of asshole that Poe was (it wasn't the only hoax he published, either, the second one was about the exact same subject matter—could you be a little more original? It retroactively tainted my enjoyment of the first). He is credited with writing the first detective story with The Murders in the Rue Morgue. The same main character recurs in The Mystery of Marie Roget and The Purloined Letter, which were just okay. I've never liked the genre, and while I can appreciate it as the pioneering work that it is, those kind of tales are absolutely not my cup of tea. My favorite is still The Pit and the Pendulum, followed, in no particular order except that of appearance in this book, by these: Berenice, Morella, The Fall of the House of Usher, The Oval Portrait, The Masque of the Red Death, The Tell-Tale Heart, The Black Cat, The System of Doctor Tarr and Professor Fether, "Thou Art The Man", The thousand-and-second-tale of Scheherazade, and The Cask of Amontillado. You'll notice that all of these are tales of psychological horror; I have no use for his satires, fables and parables. I also felt that some of the works included read like essays, and I'm confused as to why they were collected under the fiction chapter, like Some Account of Stonehenge, the Giant's Dance, Instinct VS. Reason—A Black Cat, The Philosophy of Furniture or Diddling Considered as One of the Exact Sciences. EUREKA: A Prose Poem As someone who completed scientific studies and has great respect for the scientific process, this is the most painful thing I've ever had to read. It is adapted from a lecture he presented, clocks in at nearly 40k words, and describes... well, what Poe thinks the nature of the universe is, without having done any scientific work to reach his conclusions or back them up. He considered it his masterpiece and is quoted to having written to his aunt that he had no further desire to live after finishing it, because he could accomplish nothing more. Frankly, the most infuriating thing about it is that he actually anticipated some scientific discoveries and theories (e.g. the Big Bang). It's been interpreted in many different ways—some say that he wasn't serious, another hoax, so-to-speak, others think it was a sign of his declining mental health (he died the next year), but either way, it was received very unfavorably, with friends even cutting ties with him over it, and I hated every single word of it. THE NARRATIVE OF ARTHUR GORDON PYM OF NANTUCKET His only finished novel, which I enjoyed until the last third or so—the beginning was just okay, I really liked the section aboard the Grampus, but it went downhill—mostly due to the blatant racism—once they voyage further south after being rescued by the crew of the Jane Guy. It read like two separate narratives, and it would've been vastly improved by scrapping the latter. Overall, reading his complete works kind of killed the love I thought I had for Poe. His psychological horror tales are truly excellent and most of my favorite books wouldn't exist without him having paved the way... but those stories are few and far between. I'll stick to those in the future—as for his other works, I have no desire whatsoever to revisit them.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Andre Odysseus

    Edgar Allan Poe, in my humble opinion, is the greatest horror writer of all time. He doesn't only care with the story (that most horror writers nowadays only care about), he is a master of structure and writing as well. It makes you cringe, not exactly by what he is saying to you, but the way he tells it. Going from poetry to prose, you will feel that you are in Poe's world. You will be waiting to be taken to the realm of the dead by the raven, you will be dancing in a ball with the masque of the Edgar Allan Poe, in my humble opinion, is the greatest horror writer of all time. He doesn't only care with the story (that most horror writers nowadays only care about), he is a master of structure and writing as well. It makes you cringe, not exactly by what he is saying to you, but the way he tells it. Going from poetry to prose, you will feel that you are in Poe's world. You will be waiting to be taken to the realm of the dead by the raven, you will be dancing in a ball with the masque of the read death, and be taken to places where horror reigns. It is spectacular, and totally worth your time. Amazing the way Poe deals with writing, form and structure. A great example of this is The Pit and the Pendulum. The way it is written, it has a cadence that follows the pendulum. This is great, and you all should read it.

  14. 4 out of 5

    S.N.

    I’ve read this many times in my life. Poe will forever be my favorite gothic/classic author. He’s a great inspiration to me and my writing, and even lived close to my home. I’ve visited his grave and taken a peek inside his old house even :). Was a great time. Will forever love the tell tale heart the most , and the masque of the red death second 🖤🖤 I recently broke this gorgeous copy of his works back out, which inspired me to do this quick review. Poe def deserves the hype! His work is so haunt I’ve read this many times in my life. Poe will forever be my favorite gothic/classic author. He’s a great inspiration to me and my writing, and even lived close to my home. I’ve visited his grave and taken a peek inside his old house even :). Was a great time. Will forever love the tell tale heart the most , and the masque of the red death second 🖤🖤 I recently broke this gorgeous copy of his works back out, which inspired me to do this quick review. Poe def deserves the hype! His work is so haunting, mysterious, ironic, and dark. Not a huge fan of the poetry. There are a few I like. But I genuinely love almost all of his short stories.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    Just purchased this book to replace a collection lost long ago after one of various moves... It will be delivered Wednesday! I am looking forward to this book immensely... I haven't ready any Poe in so long, I imagine reading this will feel a bit like sliding your feet into a pair of warm slippers after standing in strappy stiletto heels for 18 hours... *sigh* Just purchased this book to replace a collection lost long ago after one of various moves... It will be delivered Wednesday! I am looking forward to this book immensely... I haven't ready any Poe in so long, I imagine reading this will feel a bit like sliding your feet into a pair of warm slippers after standing in strappy stiletto heels for 18 hours... *sigh*

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jazzy Lemon

    Finished as part of my Edgar Allan Poe Challenge, for a 'complete' book, there are a couple shorts missing from the book, but they can easily be found online. Finished as part of my Edgar Allan Poe Challenge, for a 'complete' book, there are a couple shorts missing from the book, but they can easily be found online.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Malak Alrashed

    Poe is a weirdo writer and I am all over weirdos, specially brilliant ones. His poetic gothic writing is so hunting and beautiful, the way he describes things and people is just amazing, although he has this thing where he loves to challenge the readers not to use a dictionary pretty often, but you'd never hate him for that because his words are all sentimental and idealistic and somehow you will feel smart reading them.. Okay, "the tales part", well... The Fall of House of Usher is my favorite; Poe is a weirdo writer and I am all over weirdos, specially brilliant ones. His poetic gothic writing is so hunting and beautiful, the way he describes things and people is just amazing, although he has this thing where he loves to challenge the readers not to use a dictionary pretty often, but you'd never hate him for that because his words are all sentimental and idealistic and somehow you will feel smart reading them.. Okay, "the tales part", well... The Fall of House of Usher is my favorite; I could relate a lot to how the narrator feels toward this creepy, gloomy dark house, which makes me wonder if the House of Usher is not a mere house, but maybe a state of being, like some sort of heavy weight pressing down one's chest. From the very start of the story, the narrator describes the way he feels as well as the things he observes while approaching the house, Poe uses such poetic, complex, deep words to describe this. Take a look; “During the whole of a dull, dark, and soundless day in the autumn of the year, when the clouds hung oppressively low in the heavens, I had been passing alone, on horseback, through a singularly dreary tract of country, and at length found myself, as the shades of the evening drew on, within view of the melancholy House of Usher. I know not how it was—but, with the first glimpse of the building, a sense of insufferable gloom pervaded my spirit. I say insufferable; for the feeling was unrelieved by any of that half-pleasurable, because poetic, sentiment, with which the mind usually receives even the sternest natural images of the desolate or terrible. I looked upon the scene before me—upon the mere house, and the simple landscape features of the domain—upon the bleak walls—upon the vacant eye-like windows—upon a few rank sedges—and upon a few white trunks of decayed trees—with an utter depression of soul which I can compare to no earthly sensation more properly than to the after-dream of the reveller upon opium—the bitter lapse into every-day life—the hideous dropping off of the veil. There was an iciness, a sinking, a sickening of the heart—an unredeemed dreariness of thought which no goading of the imagination could torture into aught of the sublime." This whole gothic themes, and the sadness, Poe puts you in is scary. I mean the power of words, people. I could take out that quote and compare it to a five hundreds pages written book and yet Poe would still win with just that quote. Gotta love him. When it comes to his poems, there are few ones that I genuinely loved, and others that I could not understand. My favorites: A Dream Within A Dream, Tamerlane, Annabel.. and so many more. On a side note, I was REALLY astonished of how Poe was influenced by so many Islamic\Quran themes. Great book.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Marvin

    I didn't read this exact volume. But I've read ALL of Poe's short stories and poetry. There is no writer of horror and suspense that will ever surpass him. Period. Update: OK, I still love Poe. But I don't think I will ever read Tell-Tale Heart again without giggling... I didn't read this exact volume. But I've read ALL of Poe's short stories and poetry. There is no writer of horror and suspense that will ever surpass him. Period. Update: OK, I still love Poe. But I don't think I will ever read Tell-Tale Heart again without giggling...

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    Love the poems, the short stories weren't my cup of tea. Love the poems, the short stories weren't my cup of tea.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Victoria Ellis

    The Complete Tales and Poems of Edgar Allan Poe [Updating as I go, what I have read is in bold) Poetry: O, Tempora! O, Mores! To Margaret “To Octavia” Tamerlane Song Dreams Spirits of the Dead Evening Star Imitation Stanzas A Dream “The Happiest Day— The Happiest Hour” The Lake: To— Sonnet— To Science Al Aaraaf “Mysterious Star” Romance Introduction To — (“The bowers whereat) To the River To— (“I heed not”) Fairy Land Fairy-Land Alone “To Issac Lea” Elizabeth From an Album “Lines on Joe Locke” To Helen Israfel The Sleeper Th The Complete Tales and Poems of Edgar Allan Poe [Updating as I go, what I have read is in bold) Poetry: O, Tempora! O, Mores! To Margaret “To Octavia” Tamerlane Song Dreams Spirits of the Dead Evening Star Imitation Stanzas A Dream “The Happiest Day— The Happiest Hour” The Lake: To— Sonnet— To Science Al Aaraaf “Mysterious Star” Romance Introduction To — (“The bowers whereat) To the River To— (“I heed not”) Fairy Land Fairy-Land Alone “To Issac Lea” Elizabeth From an Album “Lines on Joe Locke” To Helen Israfel The Sleeper The Valley of Unrest The City in the Sea Lenore To One in Paradise Hymn Enigma Serenade The Coliseum To F—s S. O—d To F— Bridal Ballad Sonnet— To Zante The Haunted Palace Sonnet— Silence The Conqueror Worm Dream-Land Eulalie— A Song The Raven A Valentine “Deep in Earth” To Miss Louise Olivia Hunter To M.L.S To — — — Ulalume— A Ballad An Enigma The Bells To Helen A Dream Within a Dream For Annie Eldorado Sonnet— To My Mother Annabel Lee Scenes for “Politian” Fiction Metzengerstein The Duc De L’Omelette A Tale of Jerusalem Loss of Breathe Bon-Bon Four Beasts in One— The Homo-Cameleopard MS. Found in a Bottle The Assignation The Unparalleled Adventure of One Hans Pfaall Lionizing Shadow— A Parable Silence— A Fable Berenice Morella King Pest Mystefication Ligeia How to Write a Blackwood Article The Devil in the Belfry The Man That Was Used Up The Fall of the House of Usher William Wilson The Conversation of Eiros and Charmion Some Account of Stonehenge, The Giant’s Dance Why the Little Frenchman Wears His Hand in a Sling Instinct vs Reason— The Black Cat The Business Man The Philosophy of Furniture The Man of the Crowd The Island of the Fay The Murders int he Rue Morgue A Decent into Maelstrom The Colloquy of Monos and Una Never Bet the Devil Your Head Eleonora Three Sundays in a Week The Oval Portarait The Masque of the Red Death The Pit and the pendulum The Mystery of Marie Roget Morning on the Wissahiccon The Tell-Tale Heart The Gold Bug The Black Cat Diddling Considered as One of the Exact Sciences Byron and Miss Chaworth The Spectacles The Oblong Box A Tale of the Ragged Mountains The Premature Burial The Purloined Letter The System of Doctor Tarr and Professor Fether Mesmeric Revelation “Thou Art the Man” The Balloon-Hoax The Angel of the Odd The literary Life of Thingum Bob, Esq. The Thousand and Second Tale of Scheherazade Some Words With a Mummy The Power of Words The Imp of the Perverse The Fact in the Case of M. Valdemar The Sphinx The Cask of Amontillado The Domain of Arnheim Mellonta Tauta Landor’s Cottage Hop-Frog Von Kempelen and His Discovery “X-ing a Paragrab” Eureka: A Prose Poem The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket

  21. 4 out of 5

    ♥Mary♦Sweet♣Dreams♠Are♥Made♦of♣This♠

    I absolutely adore this book. I remember reading the dumbed down stories in elementary and middle school. I'm thankful for that because it is the reason why I like Poe so much today. I decided to re-read his works and boy am I glad I did. Poe brings you to his dark, imaginative world of horror. Something that was unheard of in his time. The book still gives us chills without any of the special effects. Don't read this book if you're easily offended because you have to remember what time period h I absolutely adore this book. I remember reading the dumbed down stories in elementary and middle school. I'm thankful for that because it is the reason why I like Poe so much today. I decided to re-read his works and boy am I glad I did. Poe brings you to his dark, imaginative world of horror. Something that was unheard of in his time. The book still gives us chills without any of the special effects. Don't read this book if you're easily offended because you have to remember what time period he lived in. The stories still give me chills and the poems are beautifully written. I have to admit that sometimes I have to ask my parents what something means or look it up. You can't just read his work through because you'll miss the point of a lot of things. This book is very beautiful, leather bound, with silver page edges, cover stamping and a silver ribbon. It makes a great addition to any library. You won't regret buying this book now that it only costs around $20.

  22. 5 out of 5

    LGandT

    All Poe in one place with a gorgeous cover, what more could I ask?? See full review here - Reviews for each story still in progress https://gszengarden.wixsite.com/mylit... All Poe in one place with a gorgeous cover, what more could I ask?? See full review here - Reviews for each story still in progress https://gszengarden.wixsite.com/mylit...

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    Nom.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Aarontheweirdreader

           On this home by horror haunted Desolate yet all undaunted perched upon my chamber door Thrilled me filled me with fantastic terrors never felt before. But let me see then what this mystery explore 0ne word it spoke only as if his soul in that word he did outpour. Nothing further than he uttered not a feather than he fluttered Merely this and nothing more Tell me truly tell me what thy lordy name is I emplore What this grim ungainly ghastly gaunt ominous bird of yore wandering on this nig        On this home by horror haunted Desolate yet all undaunted perched upon my chamber door Thrilled me filled me with fantastic terrors never felt before. But let me see then what this mystery explore 0ne word it spoke only as if his soul in that word he did outpour. Nothing further than he uttered not a feather than he fluttered Merely this and nothing more Tell me truly tell me what thy lordy name is I emplore What this grim ungainly ghastly gaunt ominous bird of yore wandering on this nightly shore Meant in croaking NEVERMORE There was a writer who was ahead of his time he revolutionized the horror genre and it's said that he actually invented the detective story as we know it with The Murders of Rue Morgue which also predates the first appearance Sherlock Holmes by 50 years. Experience stories as you've never done before enter the world of the one and only Edgar Allan Poe Firstly I want to start by mentioning how absolutely gorgeous this leatherboud edition is he's my all time favorite author and poet's as well and as I'm sure you can tell The Raven is easily a personal favorite of mine so it's no surprise that I couldn't ask for a more perfect cover but inside end pages again a raven with the midnight sky and the moon very mysterious captures that tone and feeling of what his work meant just L0VE IT though I do appreciate how grim the earlier leatherboud edition looked I still prefer this volume the spine has a symbol of a heart I assume reference of his other famous work The Tell Tale Heart HE WAS A POE BOY FROM A POE FAMILY once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered weak and weary. Born Jan, 18 1908 the son of two actors his father left when he was about a year old and his mother ended up passing not long after he was then adopted by the allans which in a way sorta began his legacy giving him the full name Edgar Allan Poe but there was continue problems with them as he grew up mostly cause of depts that cause alot friction with the family which is why he didn't like association with them even though they raised him he then moved to Baltimore to try and make it as a full time writer which wasn't best career choice at the time at least not back then and caused him to have financial problems and long term depression which also explains some of his writing Poe's work clearly reflected his longlife struggles and shattering life experience with personal loss and grief triggered by his father's abandonment and early death of his mother Most of you probably learn or heard about him while in school as he is considered one of the greatest gothic writers of the 19th century or just American Literature in general Now depending on your age the word gothic different things probably come to mind The origins of gothic literature is rather complex but it's usually tribute to three things Mary Shelly Frankenstein, Bram Stoker's Dracula and basically anything ever written by Edgar Allan Poe While Poe is best remembered today for his tales of terror he has written several horrific short stories about madness torture death you know, all that good stuff such a cheerful guy lol but mostly known for his POE-try see what I did there (pun totally intended) in my opinion he is the most literary genius of his time the only option to give his writing ability justice is to read his stories and poems in their entirety However there is a lot of pain in his writing along with love and loss and death which seemed out of the ordinary for many writers of the 19th century But it was because he was able to push those boundaries that he became not only one of the MOST well known authors of his time but also of future generations Presently my soul grew stronger hesitating then no longer My first taste with this Brilliant Madman was when I was 12 or so watching a episode of The Simpson's where Bart was the Raven torturing homer while James Earl Jones told the story publication of The Raven 1845 made POE a household name he was now famous enough to draw large crowds to his lectures and it's his most popular work till this day yet he never reached financial success in his lifetime but he left behind a treasure of literary riches POE'S influences can be found all throughout culture As I saying When I first found this author he immediately grabbed my interest I needed more of anything about this extraordinary man there was just something about his choice of (words) that really spoke to me his work was like a deliciously deranged nursery rhyme You can sense his spirit and sadness feel his longing I've always love all things dark and strange But now I never felt so comforted by these types of themes in other words he feeds my creepy soul like no other as if someone for the first time understood me such BEAUTIFUL GL00M POE is America's most enduring writer and what really make him so remarkable is that 170 years later his stories continues to shock, terrify and move modern reader we are still surprise of his suspenseful tales his works are compelling today as they were more than a century ago I would love to read a history of the life of Edgar Allan Poe since his work is a reflection of his life in comparison His darkness provided him with such beauty he may not have been love much in his life but he is truly celebrated in his death I think P0E deserves to be recognized as one of the most original imaginative and ingenious authors of our society his magnificent literature will live on "Quote the Raven"  FOREVERMORE

  25. 5 out of 5

    Trish

    This is a collection of poems, short stories, and longer stories by Poe. Overall it was enjoyable, but only a handful I would consider reading again. None of them the poetry, bar a couple. Stories I particularly enjoyed was Hop-Frog, Black Cat, The Cask of Amontillado, The Pit and the Pendulum, and The Tell-Tale Heart. The last two "books" Eureka and The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym on Nantucket were disappointing. The later more so as it started off so intriguing, but then tapered off and lost This is a collection of poems, short stories, and longer stories by Poe. Overall it was enjoyable, but only a handful I would consider reading again. None of them the poetry, bar a couple. Stories I particularly enjoyed was Hop-Frog, Black Cat, The Cask of Amontillado, The Pit and the Pendulum, and The Tell-Tale Heart. The last two "books" Eureka and The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym on Nantucket were disappointing. The later more so as it started off so intriguing, but then tapered off and lost me and the former was just boring.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Emma Bookwalter

    Edgar Allan Poe is a well known 19th century author and poet, sometimes credited as the man who wrote the first murder mystery story. However, Poe is most known for his horror stories as well as his poems and short stories that bring a feeling of despair and sorrow. Each story is as terrifying or melancholy as the next, most proving to be a great, worthwhile read. Although some stories and poems are hard to read and boring, most of Poe’s work is alluring. In The Complete Tales and Poems of Edgar Edgar Allan Poe is a well known 19th century author and poet, sometimes credited as the man who wrote the first murder mystery story. However, Poe is most known for his horror stories as well as his poems and short stories that bring a feeling of despair and sorrow. Each story is as terrifying or melancholy as the next, most proving to be a great, worthwhile read. Although some stories and poems are hard to read and boring, most of Poe’s work is alluring. In The Complete Tales and Poems of Edgar Allan Poe, the reader is exposed to all different kinds of Poe literature. Put together in 2014, the stories range from 1829 to 1849. Each of Poe’s characters are well developed, and each of them helps drive their story. In the short story “The Tell Tale Heart,” the main character is a deranged man, driven insane by his roomate. In the story, the narrators descent into madness is what pushes the story to its climax. In one of Poe’s other famous short stories, “The Murders in the Rue Morgue”, the main character, Detective C. Auguste Dupin’s curiosity and analytical thinking allows the story to develop into the monumental mystery story that it is today. Each poem is different in its own, from intriguing and captivating poems like “The Raven”, to the despicable “Eldorado”. The totality of Poe’s complete tales include stories about love, jealousy, hate, and terror. The stories like “Berenice” is the story of a man who is infatuated with his cousin’s teeth, and would do anything to get to them; the story “The Pit and the Pendulum” centers around a man who is trapped as time counts down the seconds to his death; the story “The Fall of the House of Usher” revolves around Roderick Usher and his ill sister, both of whom strive to keep their bloodline alive. These three stories, as well as Poe’s numerous others, all prove to be compelling and suspenseful. His stories are nothing like the stories of this time, as his writing was revolutionary; however, since then, Poe’s writing has been compared to other horror genre authors like Stephen King and Bram Stoker, due to their similar blood chilling aspects. Although Poe’s stories are strong reads, they have many aspects that were deemed acceptable at the time, but may seem controversial now. His stories include topics like inbreeding, drug use, and most often, murder. Due to these aspects of the short stories and poems, I would recommend his work for mature readers who do not mind the use of such topics in literature.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Peta Garside

    honestly just really love his writing and am a fan of the dark gothic genre, some poems better than others but very engaging

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    I won't be reading all of this, because fuck poetry. But there are a handful of poems I love, and Poe wrote one of them. I might read a couple of the literary critiques, and will probably hit all of the tales eventually, but I plan to cherry pick them. As of this writing (10/23/16), I'm going to read a few that fall in the horror genre to finish up spooky month reading. I may or may not review all of them, because reviewing short stories is sometimes tedious. We'll see. If I do review it, I'll p I won't be reading all of this, because fuck poetry. But there are a handful of poems I love, and Poe wrote one of them. I might read a couple of the literary critiques, and will probably hit all of the tales eventually, but I plan to cherry pick them. As of this writing (10/23/16), I'm going to read a few that fall in the horror genre to finish up spooky month reading. I may or may not review all of them, because reviewing short stories is sometimes tedious. We'll see. If I do review it, I'll provide a link unless Goodreads doesn't have a unique entry for it in which case I'll put it here. And for full disclosure please be aware that I'm not a huge short story fan to begin with. This is an exercise in stepping out of my comfort zone (except rereading a couple that I know I like), so bear that in mind when considering my ratings. Read in 2016: Horror Poem: "The Raven" ★★★★★ Horror short stories: "Metzengerstein", ★★✰✰✰ "The Assignation", ★★✰✰✰ "Berenice", ★★★✰✰ "Morella", ★★★✰✰ "King Pest: A Tale Containing and Allegory", ★★★✰✰ Read in 2017: "Shadow: A Parable", ★★✰✰✰ "Silence: A Fable", ★✰✰✰✰ "Ligeia", ★★★✰✰ "The Fall of the House of Usher", ★★★✰✰ "William Wilson", ★★★★✰

  29. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    To be edited and added to later -Proprieties of place, and especially of time, are the bugbears which terrify mankind from the contemplation of the magnificent. - The Assignation Quick Summary: Layered, eloquent, colorful, deep, frightening, sometimes comedic, often agonizingly multi-lingual and occasionally excessively verbose, Edgar Allen Poe is, without doubt, a master of the English language, the short story, and writing in general. He's certainly not for everyone to enjoy, and for those that To be edited and added to later -Proprieties of place, and especially of time, are the bugbears which terrify mankind from the contemplation of the magnificent. - The Assignation Quick Summary: Layered, eloquent, colorful, deep, frightening, sometimes comedic, often agonizingly multi-lingual and occasionally excessively verbose, Edgar Allen Poe is, without doubt, a master of the English language, the short story, and writing in general. He's certainly not for everyone to enjoy, and for those that venture into his lesser known works may find that he's not only the master of the macabre he's been labeled. He also wrote detective stories, a large number of comedic pieces, expressive and eloquent laments and prose pieces, several metaphysical explorations, and even post-apocalyptic tales. He was not limited by genre, style, or even a single language. He certainly deserves his title as one of the most influential American writers of the 19th century. -Horrors of a nature most stern and most appalling would too frequently obtrude themselves upon my mind, and shake the innermost depths of my soul with the bare supposition of their possibility. - The Unparallelled Adventures of One Hans Pfall I reflected that man is the veriest slave of custom, and that many points in the routine of his existence are deemed essentially important, which are only so at all by his having rendered them habitual. - The Unparallelled Adventures of One Hans Pfall -But, for myself, the Earth’s records had taught me to look for widest ruin as the price of highest civilization. - The Colloquy of Monos and Una And, of course: Quoth the Raven "Nevermore."

  30. 4 out of 5

    James

    For the short time that I engaged in speech competitions, I always used the works of Poe beginning with "El Dorado". In this complete collection, I am reminded time and time again why I have a fondness for this author dating back to my school days. Poe's writing evokes mood and, despite the general belief that all of his writings are generally dark, often is invigorating in its belief in the human spirit. If there is commentary on how the protagonist feels loss and longing, it is only because th For the short time that I engaged in speech competitions, I always used the works of Poe beginning with "El Dorado". In this complete collection, I am reminded time and time again why I have a fondness for this author dating back to my school days. Poe's writing evokes mood and, despite the general belief that all of his writings are generally dark, often is invigorating in its belief in the human spirit. If there is commentary on how the protagonist feels loss and longing, it is only because there once was something, someone, or so forth that was so amazing. The complete works give us the tales of Dupin, the first modern detective alongside poetry such as "The Raven"... having this all in one place was enough for five stars, but to explore the lesser known and more positive works of Poe is a discovery everyone should have. Though the title is macabre, I recommend anyone who thinks that Poe was always dark to pick this up and read "The Premature Burial" and not realize that Poe believed, amongst other things, in a life that needs to be lived, to engage everyday. If nothing else, pick it up and engage a little Poe everyday. Poe was a unique American voice who was able to engage the reader in different ways in different stories. Do not stop with just one or two well known works, but rather pick up a collection like this and work through it all and see a very human Poe with humor ("The Sphinx") and wonder....

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