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Invisible Sun

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Mars roars Durango has lost his crew and his father, but he still has his second-in-command, Vienne, for now, anyway. And they have a mission: discover everything—absolutely everything—about the secret government project his father was desperate to cover up. Not to mention that Durango's determined to prove himself to Vienne even if he dies trying. As he races through flood Mars roars Durango has lost his crew and his father, but he still has his second-in-command, Vienne, for now, anyway. And they have a mission: discover everything—absolutely everything—about the secret government project his father was desperate to cover up. Not to mention that Durango's determined to prove himself to Vienne even if he dies trying. As he races through flood and fire and across a violent and terrifying planet, there's a 97% chance he's going to die trying. The chase is on.


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Mars roars Durango has lost his crew and his father, but he still has his second-in-command, Vienne, for now, anyway. And they have a mission: discover everything—absolutely everything—about the secret government project his father was desperate to cover up. Not to mention that Durango's determined to prove himself to Vienne even if he dies trying. As he races through flood Mars roars Durango has lost his crew and his father, but he still has his second-in-command, Vienne, for now, anyway. And they have a mission: discover everything—absolutely everything—about the secret government project his father was desperate to cover up. Not to mention that Durango's determined to prove himself to Vienne even if he dies trying. As he races through flood and fire and across a violent and terrifying planet, there's a 97% chance he's going to die trying. The chase is on.

30 review for Invisible Sun

  1. 4 out of 5

    Terry

    This one didn't grab me like its predecessor. I think the cover is a major fumble, as the intended audience probably won't want to be seen reading something that looks vaguely like Fabio-meets-Jersey Shore. There's clever dialogue and loads of action, but there is also a lot of unexplained bunkum. This reads like a Kung-Fu movie set on Mars with monks and quasi-supernatural powers and fight after fight. There's a major slow-down after the explosive opening, which I didn't think the story ever re This one didn't grab me like its predecessor. I think the cover is a major fumble, as the intended audience probably won't want to be seen reading something that looks vaguely like Fabio-meets-Jersey Shore. There's clever dialogue and loads of action, but there is also a lot of unexplained bunkum. This reads like a Kung-Fu movie set on Mars with monks and quasi-supernatural powers and fight after fight. There's a major slow-down after the explosive opening, which I didn't think the story ever really recovered from. Macinnis Gill failed to world-build enough for me to care about what was going on - and there's a lot going on - and he again left way too many plot threads untied. I think fans of the first will be happy with "Invisible Sun" but it won't be winning many converts.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Barbara ★

    Vienne takes Durango to meet her "family," and they get embroiled in a plot to overthrough the government. (They are trying to stop it not encourage it.) Vienne's family was crazy and provided some comic relief after tense situations. I thought both Durango and Vienne showed wonderful growth in this installment and acted as young people should act minus all the crazy angst. A very different feel to this one than the first book but I guess when you're on "sabbatical" you can expect to live it up Vienne takes Durango to meet her "family," and they get embroiled in a plot to overthrough the government. (They are trying to stop it not encourage it.) Vienne's family was crazy and provided some comic relief after tense situations. I thought both Durango and Vienne showed wonderful growth in this installment and acted as young people should act minus all the crazy angst. A very different feel to this one than the first book but I guess when you're on "sabbatical" you can expect to live it up a little. I thoroughly enjoyed this and will definitely be reading the conclusion.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ravenous Biblioworm

    I had such high hopes for this book because I really enjoyed the first book. On the cover of Invisible Sun, it says it’s the companion to Black Hole Sun when they should have used sequel. Do you need to have read the first book to understand this book? No. But if you read this one first, the things that happen in this book will make the first book senseless as this one does a few critical things to place it rigidly in book spot number 2. If you’ve seen for my review on the first book you can see I had such high hopes for this book because I really enjoyed the first book. On the cover of Invisible Sun, it says it’s the companion to Black Hole Sun when they should have used sequel. Do you need to have read the first book to understand this book? No. But if you read this one first, the things that happen in this book will make the first book senseless as this one does a few critical things to place it rigidly in book spot number 2. If you’ve seen for my review on the first book you can see that the book has dropped a point in rating. I’ll begin with the good stuff. The things I liked in the first book are still here. The action, the explosions, and the cool Mars colony space idea. I loved all of it. The story stayed true and consistent with what was given… Durango is still a dalit – a disgraced soldier reject and his second in command (of a team of 2.5 people) is still Vienne. The humorous and witty banter is still here and as well written as ever. This is one of the reasons why I enjoyed this book (and the previous one). The banter just feels natural to me and is very much enjoyable. Sometimes an authors tries too hard to be humorous and you can see through the humor… there are times that happens here, but for the most part and even during those less effective times, the witty statements felt true because they happen enough and they happen consistently, making it a personality of the characters rather than an author trying to make its reader laugh. The plot seemed to stray a bit. It was laid out well. We get hints and foreshadows of what was bound to happen, but even still the plot seemed to slow a bit in areas… like the noddle arm dancing practice or the bath with a pot scrubber. Sure, they revealed aspects of the Mistress and Master, but where the characters that count, where there should have been slow moments – there were none. Characters like Riki Tiki and Stain. Stain’s part in the story seemed lacking… the build up wasn’t built enough for his role in this book. Gill does well, creates the tension really well when Stain is about, raising Durango’s hackles, but the overall force of Stain’s character was a bit weak as he had a somewhat very important role in the story. Riki Tiki has a lot of show time in the book, but these moments were never intimate enough for the end results. Near the end, where I’m suppose to feel deeply for her, I instead just accepted the deal and moved on. There was no reaction from me (or maybe I’m just an emotionless bastard). These two characters had important roles in the story and yet their roles don’t have the weight I felt they should have had in the book. The slow moments to get to know the characters better were bunched all into one area the first 2/4 of the book and nowhere else… having them interspersed would have been nice. Vienne. I liked her. Recently, I’ve been hearing about kick-a$$ girls in YA. Most girls, I feel that are supposedly kick-buttom aren’t. Yes, maybe for girl readers, but to a guy… they’re not. Kinda like when a girl think something is cute… to a guy it’s absolutely hideous. So when girl’s thinks a girl is kick butt usually it means, the girl is a little aggressive than normal and cute. To a guy that’s not kick a$$. So what makes a chick kick ass for a guy? Well, for one she has to be hot, which Vienne is… she has to know how to fight, which Vienne does very well (I bet she can totally pulverize Durango, which he would agree)… and she has a set of convictions and belief she follows and sticks too rigidly. That last one is key. This is what makes her tough, makes her bad a$$, makes her a must have for guys… all those wanna be kick butt girls in those other YA novels they lack this code of behavior rule. They pretend to have it and then a guy comes along and they become noddle face and limbs. Or they are just violent without this last part (*ahem* Throne of Glass) and then they become wannabes. Vienne has rules. She does not falter for love. She thinks things throughly – well maybe she shoots stuff first and then thinks afterwards – but she at least contemplates at one point what could and wouldn’t have happened. She doesn’t let her emotions get in the way and when she cracks, when the emotions surfaces, you understand her, but then she closes up so damn fast you blink not sure it even happens… but it did and you know she’s not all boot in your arse hole because you saw but her reactions and response to you seeing her vulnerable is rough and hardcore, you know you shouldn’t ever bring it up because she can and most definitely either will shoot you, break your arm, nose, or face, and kick your butt till it’s redder than the Martian planet. So with that all said, that’s Vienne in the first book and here in the second… only in this second one things take a turn and she becomes something completely different. Yes, I understand why, but I don’t believe it. The change in her was too abrupt, too sudden, and thus I couldn’t believe it. Maybe it’s because I like her too much… but the scenes showing or alluding to these changes are too cheesy and too weak to make that believable. Which brings me too our villain in this book. Archibald is a man who is the shadow of everyone he knows. He’s an heir to a legacy and rich kid like Durango, but lives in shadows Durango’s excellence (when Durango still had the social pride) and merits. Archie also lived in the shadow of his mother’s accomplishment… He’s the guy who gets compared to everyone else and people would say why he couldn’t be more like the person he is compared to. Sure, that can make any angry and evil, but Archie’s evilness is too silly to be taken seriously. It’s like he’s the evil character from a Disney movie inserted into the Transformer movies. It does not match. So I couldn’t take him seriously. As hence, I couldn’t take what happen to Vienne seriously. There’s a connection I promise, I refuse to spoil it. The romance in this book shows its face. Initially, it was well done. We got glimpses from both characters involved. Enough so to raise an interest, but again what was done to Vienne kind of shatters the romance, turning the romance into wallowed self-pity…. though understandable via the circumstances, not 100% believable. There’s also a surprise twist at the end, which I didn’t expect, but made me piped my interest enough to maybe get the next book. Overall, the explosions and pacing of the story flowed majorly fast and quick. But the character development took a turn down and for the secondary characters they weren’t done well enough or evenly. This book is tons of fun, and feeds the guy in me, but lacks the polish sheen like the first. Verdict: Library check out. If there’s a young man needing to read something, I would recommend this book/series. I bought this book. I don’t regret as it’s fits my personality on what I enjoy to read for fun. Visit my book review blog at http://ravenousbiblioworm.wordpress.com

  4. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    A very enjoyable read. I was dubious about reading this as I had not read Black Hole Sun, the first book in this series, but the blurb said this could be read as a stand-alone companion to that so figured I would give it a go, and I am glad I did so. Although it is possible to read this without having read BHS, I think it may have helped some of my understanding on the world-building and terminology used if I had done so. As such, it took me a while to get to grips with some of the content until A very enjoyable read. I was dubious about reading this as I had not read Black Hole Sun, the first book in this series, but the blurb said this could be read as a stand-alone companion to that so figured I would give it a go, and I am glad I did so. Although it is possible to read this without having read BHS, I think it may have helped some of my understanding on the world-building and terminology used if I had done so. As such, it took me a while to get to grips with some of the content until about a third of the way through. Although the book itself is well written there were a few things I did not understand straight away or felt I had to wait a long time to get an explanation. Here is a small list of things I did not understand straight away and I think this was down solely to not having read the first book: Mimi – who is she? We are given this explanation 13% into the book: “You could have told her that you have the consciousness of another woman flash-cloned to your brain”. Before I saw this sentence (and highlighted it), I had no idea who Mimi actually was because there was no explanation for her or an introduction, leaving me confused as to why there seemed to be a three-way conversation happening but could not understand why Vienne was not responding directly to her. Once I found out who Mimi was though, it made a lot more sense but further questions arose, such as, ‘how did her consciousness become embedded onto Durango’s mind? Was she a real woman? If so, what has happened to her body?’ I am sure these events must have happened in the first book and that alone makes me want to read it so I can find out. Regulator(s) – like Mimi, the role of the Regulators is eventually explained but going into this book blind made me wonder a lot more than necessary who they were and what they did. Dalit – see ‘regulator(s)’. (Additional, ‘dalit’ is explained more fully 39% into the book). Orthocracy – this history of Mars since humans started living there is explained in snippets throughout the book but ‘Orthocracy’ seemed to be a major event and I have no idea what it is. Again, I am hoping it is something that will be explained in the first book. Sturmnacht – see ‘regulator(s)’ and ‘dalit’. Symbiarmor – at first I had no idea what made this armour so special but it is explained and referenced throughout the book. Draeu – these are only mentioned at and not really seen in this book. I am guessing they play quite a big part in the first book. There were others but they become pretty obvious what they are/did fairly quickly after their initial introduction into this book so did not seem worth highlighting them here. Other than these few things which I did not understand immediately, the book itself is great, I just feel like I missed too much from not having read BHS beforehand. Now for a few things I loved about this book. For the most part, this was extremely well written (I noticed towards the end there were more and more spelling mistakes cropping up, such as ‘explosiosn’ and ‘you’ instead of ‘your’, but other than that I did not notice anything else, and these mistakes would be fixed before the general release anyway). The book is action-packed and the story moves along at a quick pace, but not too quick as to confuse the reader. I found the writing extremely witty and even found myself chuckling on more than one occasion. I also loved the use of Chinese instead of actually swearing in English, but then I am a massive Firefly so that would have appealed to me regardless. The amalgamation of Chinese philosophy with Martian laws and new way of life was extremely interesting as well and I loved the visits to the Tengu monastery. World-building was excellent and even though and I believe it would be even better had I read the first book it was still very well detailed. Character development was excellent as well, especially with the two main characters: Durango was a strong protagonist and although some of his actions were questionable (and sometimes he did get a bit whiney), he was very fun to read and the conversations between himself and Mimi were more often than not humorous and informative; Vienne seemed slightly two-dimensional but I think this adds to her air of mystery, and she does show real character development during the course of the book (view spoiler)[especially after she is kidnapped and tortured by Archibald (hide spoiler)] . Secondary characters, such as Stain, Riki-Tiki and Ghannouj to name but a few, are all very interesting to read about and help add a bit more background and base, which I think helps ground this book so it is not TOO action-packed. The villain(s) are great as well. It is quite a rarity to read a good book with a good villain and this book offers two of them! Archibald played an effective villain but seemed bitter he was not the main villain and showed definite signs of mother issues. The main villain however, Mr Lyme, does not feature as much as Archibald in this book but it is obvious all the evil plans are his idea ultimately. Finding out who Mr Lyme is towards the end of the book leaves us on a quite a cliff-hanger and sets up the third book very nicely so I expect to see a lot more of him in the next instalment. Overall an excellent book, strong characterisation's throughout and strong world-building. Highly recommended to those who like action-packed books and a decent villain or two. I feel like I've missed out on some background and plot developments for not having read the first book but I hope to rectify that shortly. It is possible to read and enjoy this book as a stand-alone as it is not really a sequel but I think reading them in order would definitely help with the world-building. An advance reader copy was kindly supplied by Netgalley.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    Last September, I reviewed a book that I’d picked up based on what I thought was a striking cover that just happened to have a rec from Suzanne Collins. That book was Black Hole Sun by David Macinnis Gill. I loved Black Hole Sun. I loved that there was a male lead. I loved that it was a sci-fi book that felt like it was a western. I loved that the female lead could kick the male lead’s ass. And I loved that it was going to have a sequel. Invisible Sun is that sequel, and I pretty much loved it t Last September, I reviewed a book that I’d picked up based on what I thought was a striking cover that just happened to have a rec from Suzanne Collins. That book was Black Hole Sun by David Macinnis Gill. I loved Black Hole Sun. I loved that there was a male lead. I loved that it was a sci-fi book that felt like it was a western. I loved that the female lead could kick the male lead’s ass. And I loved that it was going to have a sequel. Invisible Sun is that sequel, and I pretty much loved it too. I don’t love the cover (or the re-release of the Black Hole Sun cover), but you have to look past that and get to the completely under appreciated gem that is this series. This review shall be as spoiler free as I can make it for Invisible Sun, but some spoilers for Black Hole Sun might sneak their way in. I can’t review this book without making comments about the writing in general, which is pretty much perfection for a sci-fi novel. This book and its predecessor have some of the snappiest, most entertaining dialogue I’ve read in a long time. It felt really organic, and was always pitch perfect for whatever the mood is in the background. I laughed out loud more than once, and I grinned through almost every scene with any hint of banter. The tone of the dialogue alone is enough to tell the reader what two characters mean to each other and the kind of relationship they have. It was a great way to show and not tell, and I think that’s what made the characters work sow ell together and as individuals. Oh, the characters. The best thing about these books for me is the fact that the characters are complete people. With sci-fi, it’s easy to get bogged down in the cool world-building and the neat gadgets, but David Macinnis Gill has written two novels now where the neat stuff coexists with these great characters he has given us. The gadgets and gizmos are part of the story, yes, but they enhance the characters. We see the pieces the characters see and touch and use. And we see the way the cool science stuff is literally integrated with the characters. It’s a great balance and it lets these books be action packed while keeping their soul. First and foremost, there’s Durango. I love him. I love that he’s smart. I love that he knows when to ask for help, knows when he’s been beat, and also knows that there are things too important to give up on even when beaten. Durango had a great evolution between Black Hole Sun and Invisible Sun. I liked that we got to see him grow in his skills and maturity while still remaining a teenage boy who is confused about girls and what to do with his feelings for a certain girl in particular. What I really liked was how perfectly paced the exploration is of Durango’s backstory. In Black Hole Sun, we got a big piece that let us know what motivates Durango to do what he does. Then, in Invisible Sun, we get to find out the smaller ways that this has not only affected him, but everyone around him. We get enough pieces to move the plot forward, but not so much that there’s nothing to look forward to or so little that it feels liek the author is hiding the ball. I also really enjoyed the back story we got for Vienne. Vienne was one of my favorite parts of this first book because she was pretty unapologetically badass. She’s the kind of girl who can do anything a boy can do, only better. And she doesn’t try to hide how awesome she was from Durango because, well, she has a level of awesome that can’t be hidden. In Invisible Sun, we get to find out where that strength and toughness came from. We also get to see that the strength and toughness is so amazing because it doesn’t dominate the caring, loyal aspects of Vienne’s personality. Durango and Vienne work well within the plot of this book. The way they are and the way they think and the things they do fit perfectly into the puzzle going on in the background. And really, I can’t say a lot about it without spoiling the whole thing. But, let’s just say this book has a wonderful beginning, an exciting middle, and a clutch your chest kind of ending. I can’t express how much I appreciate that even though there is clearly more story to tell, Invisible Sun was it’s own complete piece of that story. The one thing about this book I didn’t love, and I felt this way in Black Hole Sun, is the “villain” point of view. It works in the sense that things are happening offscreen that the reader needs to know about, but it also had a tendency to pull me out of the intensity of the story. The buildup of tension in scenes is awesome in these books, but then I’d flip the page and I wouldn’t be with Durango anymore and that would all sort of fizzle. We spend enough time with the bad guy point of view that I’d be intrigued, but not quite enough to hook me on his character. But then again, it might just be that I was so hooked on Durango and Vienne that I was impatient to get back to them. Overall, the name of the game in Invisible Sun is balance: the balance of characters and plot, the balance of maturity and age appropriate behavior, and the balance between taking the easy way out and hoeing the tough row. Invisible Sun comes out on March 27, 2012 (thanks to NetGalley and the publisher, for letting me read this early!), so use the time until then wisely, go pick up Black Hole Sun, and buckle in for an awesome ride.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

    Invisible Sun is an action-packed roller coaster ride, with lots of humor and cute romance. I have been reading a lot of Young Adult novels written by men lately, and I'm loving the way they write. David Macinnis Gill’s Black Hole Sun series is super fantastic. David Macinnis Gill had me holding on to my chair while reading this adventurerous wild ride, and laughing all the way to the end. But I will say that David Macinnis Gill did put some tender, heartfelt moments into this story, and I found Invisible Sun is an action-packed roller coaster ride, with lots of humor and cute romance. I have been reading a lot of Young Adult novels written by men lately, and I'm loving the way they write. David Macinnis Gill’s Black Hole Sun series is super fantastic. David Macinnis Gill had me holding on to my chair while reading this adventurerous wild ride, and laughing all the way to the end. But I will say that David Macinnis Gill did put some tender, heartfelt moments into this story, and I found a few tears rolling down my cheeks. I loved the main character, Durango. He's like a Halo Master Chief/Indian Jones. Oh yeah, Durango is a wild ride and Vienne is the perfect girl to put a little fear in this macho guy. David Macinnis Gill also created an amazing storyline along with a incredible Dystopia world. Durango and Vienne are disgraced Regulator Mercenary soldiers who are also known as Dalit. They do dirty, dangerous jobs for little pay. Durango is a mission to steal the data of project MUSE before Lyme, the notorious crime lord of Mars, can get his hands on it. But Durango has come to a crossroad in is life, and if he makes the wrong choice, he might not be able to live with consequences of his decision. And the person whose life will pay for the price of his pride. There are two other characters that I fell in love with. One is Mini, who’s an Artificial Intelligence, who's like a computer inside Durango's head. She’s definitely the comic relief side kick, and had me laughing. There’s nothing like having a sarcastic, smart mouthed woman in a guy’s head to deflate his ego. Then there is Riki-Tiki, who’s a six year old kick-butt, head strong little girl. She’s a monk who thinks and acts like a twenty year old. Riki-Tiki’s character gave me lots of laughs, but she’s also the one that had me shedding the tears. There was never a dull moment in Invisible Sun with its action-packed storyline, also with plenty of humor and romance. This is one I definitely recommend as a fantastic read.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Caressa

    The first novel in this series, Black Hole Sun, was s tightly written scifi action novel, so I was looking forward to the sequel, Invisible Sun. Boy, was I disappointed. This second novel read like an after school anime, complete with cartoony shaolin monks, clunky "romance" scenes, and an overly giggly girl named Riki-Tiki. Yeah. After the exasperated Durango was dubbed "Noodle Arms" by the male monk teaching him how to dance, I vomitted in my mouth a little. What happened to the battle hardene The first novel in this series, Black Hole Sun, was s tightly written scifi action novel, so I was looking forward to the sequel, Invisible Sun. Boy, was I disappointed. This second novel read like an after school anime, complete with cartoony shaolin monks, clunky "romance" scenes, and an overly giggly girl named Riki-Tiki. Yeah. After the exasperated Durango was dubbed "Noodle Arms" by the male monk teaching him how to dance, I vomitted in my mouth a little. What happened to the battle hardened warriors with awesome tech? I can handle wise cracking squad members, but not monks behaving like drunk Jackie Chan. The action & suspense that propelled me through Black Hole Sun was completely absent in the first third of Invisible Sun. I couldn't bear to watch Durango make a fool of himself any longer than that. And I won't be picking up the next installation either.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Skip

    The second book involving Durango and Vienne, two rogue mercenaries, who defend those that need help. Vienne takes Durango to meet her "family," which turn out to be monks. They start off the rescue some farmers as Archibald and Mr. Lyme are burning towns and Vienne gets captured and tortured, forcing Durango to risk everything to rescue her. Was waffling between a 3 and 4, but went with the latter because of the excellent surprise ending. Kudos for that to DMG. The second book involving Durango and Vienne, two rogue mercenaries, who defend those that need help. Vienne takes Durango to meet her "family," which turn out to be monks. They start off the rescue some farmers as Archibald and Mr. Lyme are burning towns and Vienne gets captured and tortured, forcing Durango to risk everything to rescue her. Was waffling between a 3 and 4, but went with the latter because of the excellent surprise ending. Kudos for that to DMG.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Cindy

    read during summer uk trip. full of twists and non stop action. loved getting to know both vienne and durango more--they are even better (together) than before. gill never fails to surprise me with his prose and storytelling.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    For readers who liked BLACK HOLE SUN, this is a welcome sequel. Durango and Vienne continue their fight against the evil power-brokers on Mars, their romantic relationship matures, and the story is packed with all kinds of carking action and surprises.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Stacy

    What a carking good read!! I'm not sure why I didn't write a real review of this book, but believe me when I say this is a great, and terrific followup to Black Hole Sun. What a carking good read!! I'm not sure why I didn't write a real review of this book, but believe me when I say this is a great, and terrific followup to Black Hole Sun.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ray ☼ Ray

    O-M-Freaking!- G I am SOOO excited for this to come out!!! Black Hole Sun is my favorite book so this is going to be great!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Cheri Scott

    More Durango--what else do you need to know?! Review to come...

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lydia

    This was definitely one of the worst books I have read this year. Let's start with the absolutely cliche mediocre white boy playing hero and consistently screwing everything up, which consequently gets people killed. If you are a female in this book, either you are really old or you have a sexual abuse backstory, are drugged and tortured until you are a mindless killing machine who is referred to as a dog and not worth saving multiple times OR you are too pure for this world so you are killed du This was definitely one of the worst books I have read this year. Let's start with the absolutely cliche mediocre white boy playing hero and consistently screwing everything up, which consequently gets people killed. If you are a female in this book, either you are really old or you have a sexual abuse backstory, are drugged and tortured until you are a mindless killing machine who is referred to as a dog and not worth saving multiple times OR you are too pure for this world so you are killed due to the mediocre white boys incapability. Spoilers but I honestly don't care because the book was that awful. Now, the author decided to inject some foreign curse words to, I dunno, inject some color into this story. Honestly, after looking up the phrases, it seems like he went online and looked up foreign curse words and just plugged in whichever ones sounded cool. In the instance of two Chinese curses that are spelled almost the same, one letter different in pinyin, the author flips them so the phrases they are used in don't make sense. There is one he misused so instead of saying "what the fuck?" as I assume he intended, instead he said, "what the your mother?" These are just two examples in a book riddled with these kinds of mistakes. There's some bastardizing of the Japanese Obon Festival in a way to move the romance plot that falls on it's face. Basically a white male author went and dabbled in other cultures but it's all so superficial in a way that is so very appropriative. I unfortunately have to read the next book and I honestly do not have high hopes for it. The world does not need any more stories about mediocre white boys playing hero while blithely paving a trail of violence and death for their companions, especially those who are female.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Whatchyareading

    Last September, I reviewed a book that I’d picked up based on what I thought was a striking cover that just happened to have a rec from Suzanne Collins. That book was Black Hole Sun by David Macinnis Gill. I loved Black Hole Sun. I loved that there was a male lead. I loved that it was a sci-fi book that felt like it was a western. I loved that the female lead could kick the male lead’s ass. And I loved that it was going to have a sequel. Invisible Sun is that sequel, and I pretty much loved it t Last September, I reviewed a book that I’d picked up based on what I thought was a striking cover that just happened to have a rec from Suzanne Collins. That book was Black Hole Sun by David Macinnis Gill. I loved Black Hole Sun. I loved that there was a male lead. I loved that it was a sci-fi book that felt like it was a western. I loved that the female lead could kick the male lead’s ass. And I loved that it was going to have a sequel. Invisible Sun is that sequel, and I pretty much loved it too. I don’t love the cover (or the re-release of the Black Hole Sun cover), but you have to look past that and get to the completely under appreciated gem that is this series. This review shall be as spoiler free as I can make it for Invisible Sun, but some spoilers for Black Hole Sun might sneak their way in. I can’t review this book without making comments about the writing in general, which is pretty much perfection for a sci-fi novel. This book and its predecessor have some of the snappiest, most entertaining dialogue I’ve read in a long time. It felt really organic, and was always pitch perfect for whatever the mood is in the background. I laughed out loud more than once, and I grinned through almost every scene with any hint of banter. The tone of the dialogue alone is enough to tell the reader what two characters mean to each other and the kind of relationship they have. It was a great way to show and not tell, and I think that’s what made the characters work sow ell together and as individuals. Oh, the characters. The best thing about these books for me is the fact that the characters are complete people. With sci-fi, it’s easy to get bogged down in the cool world-building and the neat gadgets, but David Macinnis Gill has written two novels now where the neat stuff coexists with these great characters he has given us. The gadgets and gizmos are part of the story, yes, but they enhance the characters. We see the pieces the characters see and touch and use. And we see the way the cool science stuff is literally integrated with the characters. It’s a great balance and it lets these books be action packed while keeping their soul. First and foremost, there’s Durango. I love him. I love that he’s smart. I love that he knows when to ask for help, knows when he’s been beat, and also knows that there are things too important to give up on even when beaten. Durango had a great evolution between Black Hole Sun and Invisible Sun. I liked that we got to see him grow in his skills and maturity while still remaining a teenage boy who is confused about girls and what to do with his feelings for a certain girl in particular. What I really liked was how perfectly paced the exploration is of Durango’s backstory. In Black Hole Sun, we got a big piece that let us know what motivates Durango to do what he does. Then, in Invisible Sun, we get to find out the smaller ways that this has not only affected him, but everyone around him. We get enough pieces to move the plot forward, but not so much that there’s nothing to look forward to or so little that it feels liek the author is hiding the ball. I also really enjoyed the back story we got for Vienne. Vienne was one of my favorite parts of this first book because she was pretty unapologetically badass. She’s the kind of girl who can do anything a boy can do, only better. And she doesn’t try to hide how awesome she was from Durango because, well, she has a level of awesome that can’t be hidden. In Invisible Sun, we get to find out where that strength and toughness came from. We also get to see that the strength and toughness is so amazing because it doesn’t dominate the caring, loyal aspects of Vienne’s personality. Durango and Vienne work well within the plot of this book. The way they are and the way they think and the things they do fit perfectly into the puzzle going on in the background. And really, I can’t say a lot about it without spoiling the whole thing. But, let’s just say this book has a wonderful beginning, an exciting middle, and a clutch your chest kind of ending. I can’t express how much I appreciate that even though there is clearly more story to tell, Invisible Sun was it’s own complete piece of that story. The one thing about this book I didn’t love, and I felt this way in Black Hole Sun, is the “villain” point of view. It works in the sense that things are happening offscreen that the reader needs to know about, but it also had a tendency to pull me out of the intensity of the story. The buildup of tension in scenes is awesome in these books, but then I’d flip the page and I wouldn’t be with Durango anymore and that would all sort of fizzle. We spend enough time with the bad guy point of view that I’d be intrigued, but not quite enough to hook me on his character. But then again, it might just be that I was so hooked on Durango and Vienne that I was impatient to get back to them. Overall, the name of the game in Invisible Sun is balance: the balance of characters and plot, the balance of maturity and age appropriate behavior, and the balance between taking the easy way out and hoeing the tough row. Invisible Sun comes out on March 27, 2012 (thanks to NetGalley and the publisher, for letting me read this early!), so use the time until then wisely, go pick up Black Hole Sun, and buckle in for an awesome ride. Reviewed at WhatchYAreading on February 9, 2012.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Afifah Liyana

    I honestly don’t know how David Macinnis Gill makes this book so incredibly more wonderful than the first one..I didn’t think I could love Durango any more than I already did, but it turns out I could..His fears, his determination; everything about him makes me love him even more than before.. In this book, David shows more of Mars and the world that he has built there..more characters that are well-explained you’d think you’ve known them forever..and more sides to the characters that you think y I honestly don’t know how David Macinnis Gill makes this book so incredibly more wonderful than the first one..I didn’t think I could love Durango any more than I already did, but it turns out I could..His fears, his determination; everything about him makes me love him even more than before.. In this book, David shows more of Mars and the world that he has built there..more characters that are well-explained you’d think you’ve known them forever..and more sides to the characters that you think you knew, but well, there’s actually a lot more to them than we all think..monks on Mars, power-hungry people and a damsel in distress? Not to mention, a freaking hot hero..sign me in!

  17. 5 out of 5

    GrumpyCap

    Just a few points: + good action, never gets boring + never getting tired of Durango's and Mimi's "discussions" + Vienne gets a backstory - plot 100% forseeable - some cringy scenes you would expect from a teen drama (also, the author might like anime) - he could use a better translator for his foreign curse words *** SPOILER ALERT *** He just had to pull the Darth Vader one, didn't he? It was as obvious as day, though. Just a few points: + good action, never gets boring + never getting tired of Durango's and Mimi's "discussions" + Vienne gets a backstory - plot 100% forseeable - some cringy scenes you would expect from a teen drama (also, the author might like anime) - he could use a better translator for his foreign curse words *** SPOILER ALERT *** He just had to pull the Darth Vader one, didn't he? It was as obvious as day, though.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

    3 3/4 stars.

  19. 5 out of 5

    usagi ☆ミ

    Damn, middle books of 2012! There’s almost no middle book syndrome for any of the #2s in series I’ve read so far this year, and that’s awesome. “Invisible Sun” is no exception to that, either – it was absolutely fantastic and I feel like Gill grew leaps and bounds with this book compared to the first book (and his debut) “Black Hole Sun”. This brings back the Space Western and generally gave me warm fuzzies because it was so great. If you’re going to read a Space Opera/Space Western this year, y Damn, middle books of 2012! There’s almost no middle book syndrome for any of the #2s in series I’ve read so far this year, and that’s awesome. “Invisible Sun” is no exception to that, either – it was absolutely fantastic and I feel like Gill grew leaps and bounds with this book compared to the first book (and his debut) “Black Hole Sun”. This brings back the Space Western and generally gave me warm fuzzies because it was so great. If you’re going to read a Space Opera/Space Western this year, you’re going to have to make it “Invisible Sun”! I was really surprised at how far Gill’s come from the first book. Where it dragged in parts of the first book, this second book didn’t drag in any places whatsoever and was so finely tuned and airtight it really surprised me. I literally could NOT put it down and finished it within a few hours. Durango and Vienne felt so much more rounded out as MCs this time – they really did feel like real people. The villains this time around were far more tangible and uglier than ever, too. While we don’t really get to see the major Big Bad (Mr. Lyme) too much throughout this book, by the end some of the other characters we did see (Rebecca, for one) really starts to make us wonder as an audience if Durango’s an unreliable narrator, or if the Big Bads really are that cunning. Maybe it’s a bit of both, because all of those reveals knocked me on my ass and left me begging for more. One thing I will definitely say – I feel like I was hearing the voices of a younger Mal, Zoe, and Kaylee from “Firefly” when reading this – Mal being Durango, Zoe as Vienne (though in “Firefly” there is no romantic aspect to that, and in “Invisible Sun”, there is), and Mimi as Kaylee. I love it when this sort of thing happens, and it’s really rare that it does. There’s a very Whedonesque feeling to the whole thing – the fact that both Asia and the Western World colonized other planets in the future, the way language is used (especially when it comes to swearing – and the Japanese was accurate! Holla!), and the general space western theme. However, it feels like Gill really made his characters his own this time around, and I ended up loving this volume way more than the first because all of these characters really do have their own voices so much more developed. The sensory language improved by leaps and bounds, the settings were breathtaking, and the brawls even more fun than ever. By making his characters go on extremely uncomfortable journeys, he makes them grow, and the character development arc (which is essential in any book), which seems like it’s starting to falter a bit in YA, is really really strong here. Gill also isn’t afraid to torture the hell out of his characters (both physically and mentally) and in my book, that makes him awesome as an author. I don’t think I can gush about this book enough. Really. It was that good. But the big reveal leaves room for book 3, and you know what? I’m excited. Really excited. I know that I say I’m sick of series, but there are a few exceptions to the rule, and the “Black Hole Sun” series is definitely one of those exceptions. Especially when the biggest of big reveals concerning how Durango and Vienne met as well as who Mr. Lyme REALLY is (and the final fight scene between Vienne, Stain, and Durango is pretty insane, too!) are laid out – Gill has laid out his cards and quite well. I don’t know if book 3 will be the final book, or when it’ll even be out, but since the first book was out in 2010, it may be another 2 years before we get another one. And the wait is going to be agonizing. But for now, we have these first two books. “Invisible Sun” is out March 27, 2012 in North America from HarperTeen. If you like space westerns, regular westerns, or stuff on Mars – this is the book for you. But I highly recommend this and it’s made my best of 2012 so far list, so PLEASE go out and read it when you can! So, uh, can I have that last book now? (posted to goodreads, shelfari, and birthofanewwitch.wordpress.com)

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kristin (MyBookishWays Reviews)

    You may also read my review here: http://www.mybookishways.com/2012/03/... Invisible Sun is a companion novel to the wonderful Black Hole Sun, so you don’t have to have read Black Hole Sun first, but it will definitely make the experience that much more fun. That said, as much as I loved the first one, Invisible Sun blew me away! The action starts right away, with Durango and Vienne on a job to steal some rather sensitive data, and as soon as they wrap that up, they head out to meet Vienne’s fami You may also read my review here: http://www.mybookishways.com/2012/03/... Invisible Sun is a companion novel to the wonderful Black Hole Sun, so you don’t have to have read Black Hole Sun first, but it will definitely make the experience that much more fun. That said, as much as I loved the first one, Invisible Sun blew me away! The action starts right away, with Durango and Vienne on a job to steal some rather sensitive data, and as soon as they wrap that up, they head out to meet Vienne’s family. It’s not quite what you think, though. Vienne was raised at a monastery, and watching as tough guy Durango deals with quiet, contemplative monastery life is entertaining to say the least. Not to mention the dance lessons! Seeing this gentler side of Vienne (who’s about as tough as they get) is new for Durango, but just reinforces his feelings for her. When trouble at a nearby collective stirs our Regulators into action, this kicks off a series of events that tests the very limits of our heroes. I did say I love this series, yes? I do, and I adore Durango and Vienne, so this one was hard for me to read in places. Durango’s love for Vienne carries the book, and they’re both nearly done in by what the bad guys put them through. Vienne’s ordeal is particularly bad, and my heart broke for her repeatedly. The bad guys (especially the star baddie, the sniveling Archibald), are really bad and have no problem with mowing down anyone that gets in the way of their plans. Seriously, Archibald’s preoccupation with fire is chilling and terrifying. Durango makes a new friend in Riki-Tiki, the young Tengu initiate who would rather be in the middle of the action, and she’s sure to charm your socks off. Also ever present is Mimi, Durango’s AI that only he can hear, and who’s sarcasm steals the show repeatedly. Speaking of action…it rarely lets up and there are a few revelations that had my jaw on the floor. I hate that I’ll have to wait until March 2013 for the next one, but it will be worth it. Totally.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Pixie

    My review can also be found at my blog, The Bookaholic: http://the-bookaholic.blogspot.com I unfortunately have to rate Invisible Sun on the low side of the scale for myself--not because of terrible writing or a bad storyline, but simply because it wasn’t in my tastes. It was on the younger side of the YA genre than I had initially expected (in my opinion from the writing style), and a sequel to boot that I was unaware of. This being said though, I didn’t think it being the second book (the first My review can also be found at my blog, The Bookaholic: http://the-bookaholic.blogspot.com I unfortunately have to rate Invisible Sun on the low side of the scale for myself--not because of terrible writing or a bad storyline, but simply because it wasn’t in my tastes. It was on the younger side of the YA genre than I had initially expected (in my opinion from the writing style), and a sequel to boot that I was unaware of. This being said though, I didn’t think it being the second book (the first book being titled “Black Hole Sun”) affected my opinion. It made for a stand-alone and I wasn’t really lost in the characters either. It even says before the first page that it can be read as a stand-alone without having read the first, so I didn’t quite worry about it once I found out I mistakenly picked up a follow-up. I do enjoy science fiction to a degree, but I’m insanely picky I guess you could say. When things get too high tech, or space fiction for me, it can start to be a bit of a turn off or almost dull on my end I’m sorry to say. I’ve never been into the space thing (in most cases). I even dislike Star Wars (oh the horror!). The writing in Invisible Sun was really solid, and I liked the witty-ness of the characters at times. However, this sci-fi tech space adventure was a little more juvenile than the books I tend to read and not quite my tastes. I would recommend it to anyone who enjoys the genres though--or who’ve read the first book and enjoyed it. I’ve seen some fantastic reviews on the first, and some recent good ones on Invisible Sun, so don’t let mine deter your from your own opinions. Perhaps I would have liked it much better if I had read the first beforehand, and maybe one day I will. Just not my usual style--but I still give it 2.5 stars for the unique and solid world building and interesting characterization. I did read it all the way through, so it managed to hold my attention that much at least and I appreciate the opportunity to read. 2.5 stars. <3 Pixie

  22. 4 out of 5

    Karen Chan

    4.5* Man, what an exciting book! I didn't realise how much I missed Durango until I read this! I kind of forgot most of the first book (sad, I know), but I'm glad this could be considered a stand-alone novel. However, I'm eagerly anticipating the next book! (view spoiler)[ I pretty much need to know what happens to Vienne. I mean seriously, why would you end it like that?! Oh, right--to tortue us all! (hide spoiler)] I love the banter between Durango and his AI (artificial intelligence) in his 4.5* Man, what an exciting book! I didn't realise how much I missed Durango until I read this! I kind of forgot most of the first book (sad, I know), but I'm glad this could be considered a stand-alone novel. However, I'm eagerly anticipating the next book! (view spoiler)[ I pretty much need to know what happens to Vienne. I mean seriously, why would you end it like that?! Oh, right--to tortue us all! (hide spoiler)] I love the banter between Durango and his AI (artificial intelligence) in his brain, Mimi (a.k.a. his previous chief); they are quite entertaining (view spoiler)[ and I felt Durango's loss when Mimi was almost gone! So sad :( (hide spoiler)] . Vienne becomes more a character in this book; I felt like I got to know her more, and I'm very curious as to her feelings (like choosing to become dalit , which are like renegades thought of as scum, with Durango instead of dying a Beautiful Death). Readers really get to see more about her, like with her past and I read this on my 10 hour flight to NY, which was an extremely uncomfortable flight, but this book made it more bearable. Also, because I had no access to the internet, I had to bookmark all the times Durango swore in a different language! I love the bookmarking feature on my Kindle now--why didn't I use this before?! Anyways, if you like Sci-Fi or action packed stuff (with a hint of romance), read this book now! Well, read the first one if you haven't already, too. :D PS! I was very confused when they said that a certain new character was six... and that Durango was six when he decided to be a Regulator (like a military-ish person). About three quarters or so in, it registered that the age is in MARS years. Not Earth years. So, the real age is like 15-ish, I think? (Can't remember) It completely changed my image of the new character, which is fine because I thought it was odd for a six-year-old to have spiked, pink hair. Haha

  23. 4 out of 5

    P.J.

    For those of you who don't remember or who didn't read the blog a year ago, BLACK HOLE SUN by David Macinnis Gill was one of my absolute favorite reads of 2010. So when it came to my most anticipated sequels, David could not get this one out fast enough (which means you need to write faster, David). I was thrilled to snag an ARC of this sequel at ALA Midwinter. INVISIBLE SUN by David Macinnis Gill (Greenwillow, March 27, 2011) I'm going to give you five reasons you have to read INVISIBLE SUN, and t For those of you who don't remember or who didn't read the blog a year ago, BLACK HOLE SUN by David Macinnis Gill was one of my absolute favorite reads of 2010. So when it came to my most anticipated sequels, David could not get this one out fast enough (which means you need to write faster, David). I was thrilled to snag an ARC of this sequel at ALA Midwinter. INVISIBLE SUN by David Macinnis Gill (Greenwillow, March 27, 2011) I'm going to give you five reasons you have to read INVISIBLE SUN, and then you get a chance to win an ARC of it! 1) The writing in INVISIBLE SUN is top-notch. Actually, as each page went by, I was more and more impressed with just how fantastic of an author David really is. This book was like a showcase of his writing ability. 2) The characters cared about each other, which of course, is our goal. But the level of their caring leaped off the page. It was deep and it made me care so much more. 3) Okay, I'll admit it. I was so into this book and then something happened and I was furious. So mad I was ready to send David an email pronto. As then, as I finished reading, the situation resolved and left me hanging and waiting for book 3. I love when I read a book where the plot and consequences matter so much to me. 4) The main characters, Durango and Vienne, are just plain awesome. They are independent yet need each other. There is nothing they can't do, yet still they have so much to learn. I love that! 5) The future shown is INVISIBLE SUN, though dark, is compelling. It's the perfect mix of science-fiction and dystopia and young adult fiction. The adventure is something teens will crave, both boys and girls, fans of science fiction or not. Highly recommended! Do yourself a favor and read this book! Actually read both books. It's YA writing at its best. Source of book: From publisher at ALA midwinter

  24. 4 out of 5

    Christina (A Reader of Fictions)

    I read the first book Black Hole Sun after I got an ARC at ALA 2010. I liked it, but wasn't especially into it. Actually, I gave away my copy of that one. My memories of that one are very limited, as in I basically only remembered Mimi and that there was a ton of action. So, basically, I am starting over with a clean slate. My first impressions of this were highly positive, except for the CW-style cover. Skeptical as I was going in, I'm really glad I gave this series another try. What I really li I read the first book Black Hole Sun after I got an ARC at ALA 2010. I liked it, but wasn't especially into it. Actually, I gave away my copy of that one. My memories of that one are very limited, as in I basically only remembered Mimi and that there was a ton of action. So, basically, I am starting over with a clean slate. My first impressions of this were highly positive, except for the CW-style cover. Skeptical as I was going in, I'm really glad I gave this series another try. What I really like about Invisible Sun is how it defies gender norms. Durango may be a regulator, basically a mercenary badass, but he knows that his partner Vienne has so much more skills than he does. And he's totally cool with his female partner and girlfriend being more powerful than he is. Gotta love a guy that appreciates a strong woman. Another thing I really enjoyed was that people swore largely in foreign languages. Why do I like this? Because of Firefly. That's really all I have to say on that, except that if you haven't seen that show, you should go watch it immediately. The one recommendation I would make to improve this book is to better distinguish between Durango's conversations with Mimi and those with people. As is, it is very difficult to tell when he stops talking with Mimi and begins conversing with someone else. Also, I'm not really sure if he's talking out loud to Mimi or just thinking to her. I just think it would have been a lot more comprehensible if the exchanges with Mimi were in italics. Invisible Sun is an action-packed read. I recommend it to anyone who is sick of the typical gender dynamics and gender roles in YA lit. This was refreshing and I look forward to the next installment!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Becky Soledad

    *ARC provided by Net-Galley* What I Liked: Um well everything for the most part. I love Durango and his sarcastic wit. I love the play between Mimi and Durango and between Durango and Vienne. Although there was not enough Vienne here to hold me over for another year. In the first book I found it confusing when Durango spoke to Mimi because there was no indication that she wasn't in his head. This time he started most conversations with "I subvocalized." That helped a lot but so did knowing who Mi *ARC provided by Net-Galley* What I Liked: Um well everything for the most part. I love Durango and his sarcastic wit. I love the play between Mimi and Durango and between Durango and Vienne. Although there was not enough Vienne here to hold me over for another year. In the first book I found it confusing when Durango spoke to Mimi because there was no indication that she wasn't in his head. This time he started most conversations with "I subvocalized." That helped a lot but so did knowing who Mimi was so I'm not sure which really helped the most. I love that Gill is able to bring the western into a new frontier. (Ha get it :) Durango is the John Wayne of space, seemingly indestructible, full of bravado, and compassionate too. If I had to have a space cowboy boyfriend it would be Durango...or Mal Reynolds. What I Didn't Like: I'm too lazy to look up the swear words in other languages...that's more of a reflection on me than on the book though. Cliff hangers...ugh. I really did enjoy the book but sometimes it felt like a bridge to the third book. For this reason I am not a fan of trilogies. Also I have to wait ANOTHER year to find out how it all ends. The Verdict: Would give to fans of the first. In my opinion not good as a stand alone and must be read with the first. Not for my library as it is too old for 5th and 6th grade but definitely for a high school or junior high library. Beware of the occasional 'asshole' or swear words in Chinese.

  26. 5 out of 5

    A

    Invisible sun Book review Read as a stand-a-lone there is never a boring moment in this book filled with action and Mischief we are a welcomed into a dystopian, crazy awesome world. Did that not sell you on the book? Well, there’s more, so much more. Firstly I would like to thank the publishers allowing me to receive the Arc and can I just say what an Arc. I’m not in the Habit of writing all rave reviews but …I made an exception. Having never read the predecessor of this book, I can’t give a ful Invisible sun Book review Read as a stand-a-lone there is never a boring moment in this book filled with action and Mischief we are a welcomed into a dystopian, crazy awesome world. Did that not sell you on the book? Well, there’s more, so much more. Firstly I would like to thank the publishers allowing me to receive the Arc and can I just say what an Arc. I’m not in the Habit of writing all rave reviews but …I made an exception. Having never read the predecessor of this book, I can’t give a full review, but this book can be read on its own. So to the review! The writing was fast paced and perfect for this Sci-fi book with snappy dialogue which was original (aren’t you tired of reading the same book in a different cover) and definitely kept me entertained. The dialogue helps communicate what the characters mean to each other with no forced ermm’s and aah’s. The Characters themselves were original distinct and you could not help but fall in love with them and can I mention there awesome gadgets (props to Gill) these gizmos’s are ingrained into the characters and aren’t there for looks. This book itself tells a story that you would literally believe could happen in oh I don’t know …a couple thousand years’ time. An all-round entertaining book that I would recommend to you it has something for everyone may I mention the tension and an intensity of a thousand burning suns , romance and well I’ll definitely be picking up Black whole! Buckle in for an awesome ride! Out March 27th

  27. 4 out of 5

    Roselyn

    3.5 I rarely have a chance to read two books in a series in a row, so when I realized that Invisible Sun was still lying in my living room (left there by my brother), I picked it up to read as soon as I'd finished Black Hole Sun. The story picked up right where the previous one left off and once again starts with a crazy stunt. The book pretty much followed the same structure as the first book, but was so much better. Where I was feeling seriously deprived of descriptions in BHS, this book had gre 3.5 I rarely have a chance to read two books in a series in a row, so when I realized that Invisible Sun was still lying in my living room (left there by my brother), I picked it up to read as soon as I'd finished Black Hole Sun. The story picked up right where the previous one left off and once again starts with a crazy stunt. The book pretty much followed the same structure as the first book, but was so much better. Where I was feeling seriously deprived of descriptions in BHS, this book had great descriptions of characters and places, so I wasn't left feeling confused. It also had more emotional content; family bonds, relationships and even death. I found I was able to connect to the characters better as I learned more about their personalities. What I really enjoyed was that there were chapters from the villain's point of view. And, unlike how in BHS these chapters were only at the beginning of the book, in Invisible Sun, they were carried through to the end. I always enjoy books that give me both sides of the story as it shows that the villains are normal people too, and usually have a reason for doing evil deeds, and this book was a really good example of that. I was also finally able to understand all the things that confused me in the first book, mainly what all the different organizations were. The plot twist at the end was amazing, as were the cliffhangers that will keep me in suspense till the next book.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Crystal ✬ Lost in Storyland

    This is going to be a short review for a book that deserves way more than this. However, it's a good book, and I do not want to give away too much. The world building and culture development are excellent. The Martian laws and the people's ways of life both incorporate Chinese elements from Chinese philosophy to swearing in Chinese. It is amazing to read about, and I can only imagine what it would be like to live there. The characters are strong as well. I'd be pressing hard to ask for a better c This is going to be a short review for a book that deserves way more than this. However, it's a good book, and I do not want to give away too much. The world building and culture development are excellent. The Martian laws and the people's ways of life both incorporate Chinese elements from Chinese philosophy to swearing in Chinese. It is amazing to read about, and I can only imagine what it would be like to live there. The characters are strong as well. I'd be pressing hard to ask for a better character to follow than Durango. He is a fun character with great humor, and I enjoyed reading his conversations with Mimi. Vienne is mysterious and interesting, the latter of which applies to many secondary characters. Not to mention the terrific villains. The writing is as witty and interesting as the characters. There was never a dull moment. Overall, Invisible Sun is an epic read that I highly recommend. Silly me didn't realize that this is the second book in a series. While it works as a stand alone, I definitely missed out on something here and will be revisiting this book as soon as I've read book one. Original post at Imaginary Reads

  29. 5 out of 5

    Angie

    Vienne and Durango are back in the second in the Black Hole Sun trilogy. This book is just as action packed as the first in the series with just as much snappy dialog and great fight scenes. This series definitely reminds me a bit of Firefly with its mix of new technology, old world Asian influences and new world settlers. Then there is the big global corporation that has taken over the planet, doing experiments on people perhaps??, ex-army members fighting the corporation. It does seem like a l Vienne and Durango are back in the second in the Black Hole Sun trilogy. This book is just as action packed as the first in the series with just as much snappy dialog and great fight scenes. This series definitely reminds me a bit of Firefly with its mix of new technology, old world Asian influences and new world settlers. Then there is the big global corporation that has taken over the planet, doing experiments on people perhaps??, ex-army members fighting the corporation. It does seem like a lot of Firefly influences in the storylines. Not that it is a bad thing...I loved firefly and am one who was sorry to see it taken off the air so soon. This was a fun book to read and it went really fast. Vienne and Durango are awesome characters with great chemistry and repartee. I love the AI Mimi and her relationship with Durango as well. She is like the mother hen who gives him the swift kick he needs. I will say that since this book was so action packed that the plot got a little convoluted at times...it seemed like there was a lot going on and the motivations were not always clear. Still not at the end of the book, which did end on a cliffhanger. So I guess we are going to have to wait until the next book to see how this all plays out.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Courtney

    Here's another installment in the life of Durango, aka Jacob Stringfellow. He's been busy falling in love with Vienne, arguing with his delightfully sarcastic AI and attempting to find out the secrets behind his father's downfall. The same downfall that caused Durango to become "dalit". Durango and Vienne are on their way to steal some more information from a corporate military base when they make a stop-over at the monastery the Vienne grew up in. The time there is bittersweet. They move on to Here's another installment in the life of Durango, aka Jacob Stringfellow. He's been busy falling in love with Vienne, arguing with his delightfully sarcastic AI and attempting to find out the secrets behind his father's downfall. The same downfall that caused Durango to become "dalit". Durango and Vienne are on their way to steal some more information from a corporate military base when they make a stop-over at the monastery the Vienne grew up in. The time there is bittersweet. They move on to the military base only to have Vienne captured by bad-guy Archibald, who promptly begins messing with her head in order to create a perfect soldier. There's so much destruction and chaos in this book that it's hard to imagine what will be left for the rest of the series. Seriously, tons of explosions and fights here. Plenty of folks die. I had fun reading this one, but it would probably have helped if I had reread "Black Hole Sun". I had a lot of trouble remembering relationships between characters and the larger story arc. The tone is humorous and suspenseful, with tons of action to keep readers interested. The ending is an obvious cliff-hanger, leaving plenty of room for the next book.

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