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Autobiography of Theodore Roosevelt (Original Version) (Formatted & Optimized for Nook)

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The e-text comes with a full Table of Contents, allowing you to easily move between chapters. Within seconds, you'll be able to read any part of the book that you want! It's been formatted for the Nook to allow you the best reading experience. Theodore Roosevelt’s writing has the same verve, panache, and energy as the life he lived. Perhaps no president in U.S. history—not The e-text comes with a full Table of Contents, allowing you to easily move between chapters. Within seconds, you'll be able to read any part of the book that you want! It's been formatted for the Nook to allow you the best reading experience. Theodore Roosevelt’s writing has the same verve, panache, and energy as the life he lived. Perhaps no president in U.S. history—not even Jefferson—had so many opinions and intellectual interests, believed in so many causes, or worked so hard to translate his beliefs into action. A hard-headed idealist, an unabashed interventionist, a crusader on behalf of environmental preservation and against big business ”trusts,” he was also a writer of uncommon grace and passion with a gift for the memorable phrase. His autobiography, one of the two or three finest ever written by a U.S. president, abounds in exciting episodes of personal transformation and insights into the bitter politics of the day. Roosevelt was a sickly youth who steeled himself for a life of vigor, growing up surrounded by wealth in nineteenth-century Manhattan but vacationing in the West, where he rode with cowboys and learned to revere and study the natural world. His book describes his early failures in his political career and his ascent from the New York City police board to assistant secretary of the Navy where he advocated war with Spain, to his brief stint and public renown as a Rough Rider; and on to the governorship of New York, vice presidency under McKinley, and finally the presidency itself. Elting Morison’s new introduction analyzes what Roosevelt has included—and not included—about his many political conflicts, his role in the acquisition of the Panama Canal, and the deaths of his wife and his mother.As everywhere in his writing, the personality of T.R.—alert, voluble, forceful, compassionate—shines forth from this book, which remains a singular study of a dynamic and, in many respects, exemplary man who was also a key figure in the Age of Reform.


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The e-text comes with a full Table of Contents, allowing you to easily move between chapters. Within seconds, you'll be able to read any part of the book that you want! It's been formatted for the Nook to allow you the best reading experience. Theodore Roosevelt’s writing has the same verve, panache, and energy as the life he lived. Perhaps no president in U.S. history—not The e-text comes with a full Table of Contents, allowing you to easily move between chapters. Within seconds, you'll be able to read any part of the book that you want! It's been formatted for the Nook to allow you the best reading experience. Theodore Roosevelt’s writing has the same verve, panache, and energy as the life he lived. Perhaps no president in U.S. history—not even Jefferson—had so many opinions and intellectual interests, believed in so many causes, or worked so hard to translate his beliefs into action. A hard-headed idealist, an unabashed interventionist, a crusader on behalf of environmental preservation and against big business ”trusts,” he was also a writer of uncommon grace and passion with a gift for the memorable phrase. His autobiography, one of the two or three finest ever written by a U.S. president, abounds in exciting episodes of personal transformation and insights into the bitter politics of the day. Roosevelt was a sickly youth who steeled himself for a life of vigor, growing up surrounded by wealth in nineteenth-century Manhattan but vacationing in the West, where he rode with cowboys and learned to revere and study the natural world. His book describes his early failures in his political career and his ascent from the New York City police board to assistant secretary of the Navy where he advocated war with Spain, to his brief stint and public renown as a Rough Rider; and on to the governorship of New York, vice presidency under McKinley, and finally the presidency itself. Elting Morison’s new introduction analyzes what Roosevelt has included—and not included—about his many political conflicts, his role in the acquisition of the Panama Canal, and the deaths of his wife and his mother.As everywhere in his writing, the personality of T.R.—alert, voluble, forceful, compassionate—shines forth from this book, which remains a singular study of a dynamic and, in many respects, exemplary man who was also a key figure in the Age of Reform.

30 review for Autobiography of Theodore Roosevelt (Original Version) (Formatted & Optimized for Nook)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Craig Cunningham

    This is a brilliant book, and Roosevelt creates a wonderful autobiography. This is required reading for most in the area of American History, begining of the 20th century, and late 19th century. This is wonderful primary source material.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Bertcrabbe

    This book was ridiculously good. Roosevelt was a one-of-a-kind. I wish we had more like him. His 'speak softly and carry a big stick' rhetoric won him the reputation of a war monger but the fact is that in his 7 1/2 year term as president (he took over for McKinley when he was assassinated 6 months into his presidency), America was totally at peace and not one round was fired at an enemy. A couple of other interesting facts about TR: - He lived in Oyster Bay, Long Island. - He started life asthmat This book was ridiculously good. Roosevelt was a one-of-a-kind. I wish we had more like him. His 'speak softly and carry a big stick' rhetoric won him the reputation of a war monger but the fact is that in his 7 1/2 year term as president (he took over for McKinley when he was assassinated 6 months into his presidency), America was totally at peace and not one round was fired at an enemy. A couple of other interesting facts about TR: - He lived in Oyster Bay, Long Island. - He started life asthmatic and puny. - He spent in the west driving cattle and working on ranches. - He led the "Rough Riders" in the Spanish-American war in Cuba and came home a war hero. This led to his being elected governor of New York during one of the state's most corrupt periods. - He won his second term election by a true landslide. - Has the first American to be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize; an honor he was given for brokering peace between Japan and Russia in the Russo-Japanese War. Not bad for a war-loving Republican!! - He authored more than 35 books. - He had a photographic memory. - He was frequently referred to as 'Teddy' but never to his face. He was called that by his first wife, who died young and he had a strong aversion to it. - 'Teddy' bears are actually named after Teddy Roosevelt. He was an avid hunter and outdoorsman and on one particular trip, he didn't bag any game. It's said that the well meaning guides had captured a bear and wanted TR to shoot it just so he wouldn't have to come home empty-handed. TR refused as it was totally unsportsmanlike. A cartoonist created an image of Roosevelt, shotgun in hand, turning away from a small bear tied to a tree. The image became so famous that children began to refer to small stuffed bears as 'Teddy's Bear.' And the rest is history. Reading his words was like stepping back 100 years in history. It was a long read, but well worth it.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ron

    "Whether in national or in private affairs it is ordinarily not advisable to make a bluff which cannot be put through." Many of us don't recognize the fourth person on Mount Rushmore. Many more, knowing only the caricature he's become, don't know why Teddy Roosevelt is there. Reading his autobiography helps bridge that gap. Roosevelt was a Progressive. We who see the world through the lens of Democrat or Republican will not readily understand what that means. In our terms, Roosevelt was a liberal "Whether in national or in private affairs it is ordinarily not advisable to make a bluff which cannot be put through." Many of us don't recognize the fourth person on Mount Rushmore. Many more, knowing only the caricature he's become, don't know why Teddy Roosevelt is there. Reading his autobiography helps bridge that gap. Roosevelt was a Progressive. We who see the world through the lens of Democrat or Republican will not readily understand what that means. In our terms, Roosevelt was a liberal in domestic politics and a conservative in international, but even that falls far short of explaining him. He was an honorable and an honest man, not ruled by fear but filled with hope. He was famous for his short military career, yet just as proud that not a shot was fired by the nation during his administration. He confronted both big unions and big business, being the first "trust buster." He was an avid hunter, who was equally avid as a naturalistic. He read voraciously. This book is not for the casual reader: it is long and dense and heavily laced with the politics of the first decade of the twentieth century. Yes, and its self-serving and self-justifying. But, like the tale told by the "unreliable narrator", that bias makes the whole both more entertaining and more enlightening. It's laced with wit and quotable expressions. It also gives moderns a glimpse at the attitudes which moved our nation from unregulated freedom to the social contract which dominated the last century. "It is better for government to help a poor man make a living for his family than to help a rich man make more profit for his company." A very, if exhausting good read.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Colin Darby

    TR's autobiography suffers from two problems. First, the author has an exceptionally high opinion of himself and his causes, and never acknowledges the slightest possibility of error in principle even when he acknowledges that his opponents were equally high-minded men. As often as not, he lacks that acknowledgement, though, which leads to his autobiography being a series of moments where he describes his awesomeness as awesome stuff happens while he does awesome deeds because he is a man and me TR's autobiography suffers from two problems. First, the author has an exceptionally high opinion of himself and his causes, and never acknowledges the slightest possibility of error in principle even when he acknowledges that his opponents were equally high-minded men. As often as not, he lacks that acknowledgement, though, which leads to his autobiography being a series of moments where he describes his awesomeness as awesome stuff happens while he does awesome deeds because he is a man and men have a duty to do things, whether awesome or otherwise, and his opponents are a conniving breed of milksops and do-nothings, else they are equally energetic but of thoroughly black character. Roosevelt lives opposed by a world of Shakespeare characters, whether Richard III or Falstaff. They are, of course, all overcome by our hero, for that is precisely what he is in this book - the hero of his own story. This would be, in its natural state, quite entertaining to read. This leads us to the second problem. Edmund Morris described in "Colonel Roosevelt" how Roosevelt's memoirs were written, or rather, dictated to a secretary who transcribed it. This worked well when it was just TR and the secretary, and when TR was telling anecdotes (though as described those get tiresome too, only occasionally leavened by a flash of self-deprecation). However, when he indulges his natural tendency to lecture, or when his wife was in the room, it turns well-nigh unreadable, leading to a page about capital punishment in the middle of the otherwise splendid little narrative of San Juan Hill. In conclusion, reading his own words made me admire the man less, and understand how his opponents would find him so infuriating that they simply refused to allow his program to succeed even when they might agree with him.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Stefania Dzhanamova

    No one knows you better than you know yourself. Theodore Roosevelt’s autobiography is a brilliant first source material. I was intrigued to see the political affairs of the age through this prominent politician’s eyes. His beautiful descriptions of his childhood, nature and family make the book really enjoyable. For me, Roosevelt is an admirable character. Although his “Speak quietly and carry a big stick” became a famous quote, his administration was remarkably peaceful. A big part of the book i No one knows you better than you know yourself. Theodore Roosevelt’s autobiography is a brilliant first source material. I was intrigued to see the political affairs of the age through this prominent politician’s eyes. His beautiful descriptions of his childhood, nature and family make the book really enjoyable. For me, Roosevelt is an admirable character. Although his “Speak quietly and carry a big stick” became a famous quote, his administration was remarkably peaceful. A big part of the book is dedicated to politics, but it was written well enough not to be boring. Roosevelt comprises a lot of aspects of his life. His work is a wholesome autobiography. Definitely worth a read both as a biography and a memoir.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Marty Reeder

    After reading H.W. Brands’s biography on Theodore Roosevelt, I knew that I wasn’t done with him. I needed more. And who better to go to than the horse’s mouth? At first, I simply read some of his speeches and his account of the Rough Riders, but then I found his autobiography and decided to take a big bite. As writers go, Roosevelt is engaging. It’s comforting to be able to recognize his own style and know that you’re not dealing with a ghost writer. That brash, sincere, and self-aware voice is n After reading H.W. Brands’s biography on Theodore Roosevelt, I knew that I wasn’t done with him. I needed more. And who better to go to than the horse’s mouth? At first, I simply read some of his speeches and his account of the Rough Riders, but then I found his autobiography and decided to take a big bite. As writers go, Roosevelt is engaging. It’s comforting to be able to recognize his own style and know that you’re not dealing with a ghost writer. That brash, sincere, and self-aware voice is no doubt the boomingly confident Teddy. Whether you agree with his politics and positions, Roosevelt will not be duplicated and will almost always demand attention. Conveniently, if he doesn’t grab attention, then you can skip to the next chapter, which will take off on a new subject that may be of more interest. Of course, my reading ethics do not allow such an approach, but it was kind of nice to know that once you had your fill of one stage of Roosevelt’s life or take on a particular issue, then you would be given a sampling of a whole new, unexplored area. Not surprising is the lack of information on Roosevelt’s involvement in the Progressive “Bull Moose” Party and his subsequent loss in the general election to Wilson. The only hint we get of that aspect of his life is his rebuttal to a piece that President Wilson wrote demeaning him and his party. As far as Teddy’s politics go, he offers a lot of sound advice for anyone who is a level-headed, moderate-leaning person. And if you were unsure as to how he felt about any sort of policy, specific or ambiguous, rest assured he will clarify for you. For the most part, I found Roosevelt to have an anchor of common sense when it comes to political standings--something that makes me envious when taking into account modern day politicians. Sometimes, he manages to simplify too much, and sometimes this unwavering man of principle is too quick to glorify his position as an absolute, when it is really just a matter of policy. But by and large, I will take a passionate man of principle tampered with common sense over a cool-headed man of opportunity driven by ambition. And that leads into the final thing of note about Theodore Roosevelt: his character. Sure, he is strong-headed and perhaps overly-intense in some of his opinions, but in spite of these externally annoying traits, internally Roosevelt genuinely seems to be a good and pure man. Would that more politicians fell under that category. Would that all of us might.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    It pains me to only give 2 stars to a book written by my favorite president, but "it was okay" is an honest and accurate assessment. I'm not into political history at all, and a large chunk of this book is long-winded descriptions of political things from 100+ years ago. Snooze. I skimmed over most of these chunks. It got too tedious after a while. The segments where Roosevelt is talking about nature and books were a complete tone shift, and I actually would love to read more of this sort of thing It pains me to only give 2 stars to a book written by my favorite president, but "it was okay" is an honest and accurate assessment. I'm not into political history at all, and a large chunk of this book is long-winded descriptions of political things from 100+ years ago. Snooze. I skimmed over most of these chunks. It got too tedious after a while. The segments where Roosevelt is talking about nature and books were a complete tone shift, and I actually would love to read more of this sort of thing from Roosevelt instead of political/governmental babble. It was remarkable to go from the snooze-fest of government to Roosevelt describing birds and telling entertaining stories instead. Much more fun to read. I think people who are interested in political minutae would enjoy this quite a bit. Roosevelt is fairly boasty in parts as well, which is to be expected, obviously. I found it quite amusing.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Garrett

    This is an excellent volume. Roosevelt's autobiography is quite interesting, particularly how he describes his time out West as well as with the Rough Riders. It's also quite valuable because he gives an estimate of his own actions in office and defends them according to his principles. He does go into quite a bit of detail on several situations so it can be a bit dry reading at times. Included in this volume is "The Strenuous Life" a speech T. R. gave in Chicago. Absolutely fantastic and quite This is an excellent volume. Roosevelt's autobiography is quite interesting, particularly how he describes his time out West as well as with the Rough Riders. It's also quite valuable because he gives an estimate of his own actions in office and defends them according to his principles. He does go into quite a bit of detail on several situations so it can be a bit dry reading at times. Included in this volume is "The Strenuous Life" a speech T. R. gave in Chicago. Absolutely fantastic and quite timely for the generations alive today, especially young people out to make their mark on the world. Highly recommended.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Eileen

    3.5 stars (liked it)

  10. 4 out of 5

    Donald Owens II

    I was surprised at how well President Roosevelt wrote. With few exceptions, he kept my attention, and with good humor. Like most autobiographies, the book was partly a defense of his beliefs and actions. On periphery and personal character matters I agreed, but I was not convinced by his core political views, especially his "ends justify the means" defense of government overreach and his overstepping the constitutional limits of his office. But personally he appears to have been a courageous, li I was surprised at how well President Roosevelt wrote. With few exceptions, he kept my attention, and with good humor. Like most autobiographies, the book was partly a defense of his beliefs and actions. On periphery and personal character matters I agreed, but I was not convinced by his core political views, especially his "ends justify the means" defense of government overreach and his overstepping the constitutional limits of his office. But personally he appears to have been a courageous, likeable, leader of men. And I can't help having affection for a man who would write, "Books are all very well in their way, and we love them at Sagamore Hill, but children are better than books." and, "There are many kinds of success in life worth having... but for unflagging interest and enjoyment, a household of children, if things go reasonably well, certainly makes all other forms of success and achievement lose their importance by comparison."

  11. 5 out of 5

    Arlen

    I wasn't sure I would ever finish this. Teddy really needed a editor. One hundred word sentences tend to be hard to follow. Despite the wordy style the content was quite interesting, although, except for some childhood memories, it was devoid of family remembrances. He gave great descriptions of cattle drives in North Dakota, but said nothing about the family tragedies that drove him out there. His military and political careers are covered in great detail and, considering today's political mess I wasn't sure I would ever finish this. Teddy really needed a editor. One hundred word sentences tend to be hard to follow. Despite the wordy style the content was quite interesting, although, except for some childhood memories, it was devoid of family remembrances. He gave great descriptions of cattle drives in North Dakota, but said nothing about the family tragedies that drove him out there. His military and political careers are covered in great detail and, considering today's political mess, you can appreciate his integrity, honesty and tenacity in getting laws passed that, for the most part, helped the working man and woman, and kept big business from destroying the environment. I think you probably need to be a real fan of his to patiently wade through this book, but you will certainly learn a lot about a very special man.

  12. 5 out of 5

    JD' D'Souza

    Teddy Roosevelt died 97 years ago and spoke of his father as, "the best man I ever knew." Reading his autobiography, the president upon reaching the White House, "never took any serious step or made any vital decision for his country, without thinking first what position his father would have taken." Theodore's father taught Sunday School, contributed in founding charities for homeless orphans and newsboys. Proverbs 23:24 "He who fathers a wise son will be glad in him." Teddy Roosevelt died 97 years ago and spoke of his father as, "the best man I ever knew." Reading his autobiography, the president upon reaching the White House, "never took any serious step or made any vital decision for his country, without thinking first what position his father would have taken." Theodore's father taught Sunday School, contributed in founding charities for homeless orphans and newsboys. Proverbs 23:24 "He who fathers a wise son will be glad in him."

  13. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Byron

    One of my favorite people, not because he was President, we had many of them ; but because what he did with the office he held.In this book it explains his feelings on all types of issues and lets us see for ourselves how he was before his time. In this book it is also written how he respected nature and it is a great read so enjoy...

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy

    More of a memoir than an autobiography. While Roosevelt was a genius and a work horse it seems he couldn't get past the self aggrandizing in his writing. The book is quite inspiring and well worth the read. More of a memoir than an autobiography. While Roosevelt was a genius and a work horse it seems he couldn't get past the self aggrandizing in his writing. The book is quite inspiring and well worth the read.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lori

    I'm about halfway through this amazing book. So far it is an amazing tale. I can't wait until I can sit down and finish it. I'm about halfway through this amazing book. So far it is an amazing tale. I can't wait until I can sit down and finish it.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Selina

    This should be required reading for college students studying American history or politics.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Michael Percy

    This autobiography is a mini-tome. Reading it from the perspective of a foreigner means I comment disinterestedly on the work of one of the US Presidents who was immortalised in Mount Rushmore. I have read Roosevelt's The Strenuous Life, and while I enjoyed reading it, I was surprised by the rather cumbersome writing style of a man who allegedly read tens of thousands of books. Maybe speed-reading (for which Roosevelt was apparently famous) doesn't help with writing? There was so much of the man This autobiography is a mini-tome. Reading it from the perspective of a foreigner means I comment disinterestedly on the work of one of the US Presidents who was immortalised in Mount Rushmore. I have read Roosevelt's The Strenuous Life, and while I enjoyed reading it, I was surprised by the rather cumbersome writing style of a man who allegedly read tens of thousands of books. Maybe speed-reading (for which Roosevelt was apparently famous) doesn't help with writing? There was so much of the man, speaking plainly and as one might expect a politician to write one's memoirs, but I felt the endless ebb and flow of agreement and disagreement, while the numerous letters included as annexes to the chapters read something like following President Trump's Twitter feed. Justifications and defences and sharing text of his earlier and others' letters - all the things one might expect a president to do. While reading this book, I completed a humanitarian training course that enabled me to use some of my long underutilised military skills. During the course, I found myself using these skills but with the opposite purpose. Indeed, if I did the exact opposite of my military training, it would invariably be the right decision in the humanitarian sphere. This had me thinking about Aristotle's "golden mean" of virtue, at the precise time I was reading about Theodore Roosevelt's idea of courage. Roosevelt, for example, stayed away from bars and other trouble spots, preferring to respond decisively to unexpected challenges to one's safety or dignity only as a last resort, rather than go looking for trouble. He wore glasses, and as a "cowboy", he had to work doubly hard to earn the respect of the men he worked with. All of this follows closely the idea of the golden mean. Brave, but not cowardly or reckless. (Roosevelt was awarded the Medal of Honor for his efforts in leading "Roosevelt's Rough Riders" during the Spanish American War; dealing with the police corruption, corporate and political corruption, not to mention the Philippines, the Panama Canal, Russia and Japan and so on.) Yet Roosevelt appears to have ever been in the right place at the right time, especially in being awarded the Medal of Honor (he was only four months away at war); to become President (he became President in the first instance after William McKinley was assassinated); and to be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. Yet his achievements were remarkable. I did not know the extent he had played in bringing about modern corporations and competition laws. The Sherman Antitrust Act came into being in 1890 but by Roosevelt's time it was hardly having the desired impact. All sorts of modern checks and balances we now take for granted in liberal democracies were simply not happening. It would seem that Roosevelt's leadership in creating a governance culture made liberal democracy, in the American sense, to function at least somewhat fairly. The United States had been a wealthy, functioning democracy for at least four decades (from the time of the Civil War until Roosevelt's presidency). Yet we assume much poorer, less well governed, less educated countries can become functioning democracies in the space of a few years when the oldest liberal democracy in the early 1900s suffered from all of the corruption we see in poorer nations today. Yet Roosevelt had the idealism of the times, a form of neo-conservatism tempered by a strong sense of moral purpose. He was tough with the corporations and the unions, but equally interested in prosperous businesses looking after workers - a form of "fair trade" that was unique for the times. I also found the references to Australia interesting, around the time of the "Great White Fleet" and its circumnavigation of the globe, visiting numerous ports throughout the world (including Sydney) over a sixteen month period. I didn't have the "Team America" theme song playing in my head while I read this, but rather the thoughts and actions of a sober, intelligent man influencing my own thoughts and actions as I discovered, in the practical sense, the idea of the golden mean of virtue. My trepidation with reading Roosevelt is that many modern fans of his work talk up his manliness and courage. But having read the man's memoirs, I discovered a sensitive man (which appears obvious in his letters - I think Woodrow Wilson cut him a little too deeply) who was far from fake and far from superhuman, yet strong and of moral righteousness all the same. The book ends along with the end of his presidency, almost as if he was hoping to write more after he was re-elected. (Roosevelt was encouraged to stay on after his second term, as he had not been elected to the first term, nor had served two full terms, but he refused on principle.) And so the book ends with a few letters. No uplifting moral lesson, no standing ovation. And that was how he lived. If I am to take the Stoic's view, he lived a good life. Not the Disney-fied life we have come to expect from the popular media, but a real man doing real things for good. How times have changed.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Anthony

    - One can only achieve peace by having a strong army. There is no way for a country to hold a doctrine of pacifism - A good life is a life lived in service for great ideals. Those who are not ready to die for their values are feeble creatures, not worthy of respect - Meritocracy is the basis of a good government. Only able men should be in charge. Nepotism, favoritism of any sort, in the end negatively reflects on the well-being of citizens - Easy life of luxury, with no struggles and triumphs is u - One can only achieve peace by having a strong army. There is no way for a country to hold a doctrine of pacifism - A good life is a life lived in service for great ideals. Those who are not ready to die for their values are feeble creatures, not worthy of respect - Meritocracy is the basis of a good government. Only able men should be in charge. Nepotism, favoritism of any sort, in the end negatively reflects on the well-being of citizens - Easy life of luxury, with no struggles and triumphs is useless - Difference between boss and a leader, is that a leader appeals to consciousness and values of the people, and does it in service of the public, and not for his own benefit - Women are equal to men and should be treated as such in every respect. Pornography, prostitution is immoral, because it treats females in demeaning manner - Keep yourself physically fit, to be ready for demands of war or possible emergencies - If you don't work, make sure to spend your time productively, by preparing for future contributions. Spend as little as possible - Roosevelt changed profession several times, and it is fine to change course, in order to remain useful to society - Lead by example, send your best men to undertake the most dangerous and the most challenging work. Lead your troops from the front row - One of the best quality in men is steadfast determination. Do what you set out to do

  19. 5 out of 5

    Alan Kolok

    Let's face it, this book is dated. On the one hand, the style that Roosevelt wrote in is long in the tooth; long sentences, long paragraphs. His choices regarding what to include and what to leave out are interesting but a little disappointing. The book is not chronological but rather thematic, which makes it really, really difficult to get through if you are trying to follow any sort of timeline. On the other hand, Roosevelt did so much in his career that he can be forgiven those mild annoyance Let's face it, this book is dated. On the one hand, the style that Roosevelt wrote in is long in the tooth; long sentences, long paragraphs. His choices regarding what to include and what to leave out are interesting but a little disappointing. The book is not chronological but rather thematic, which makes it really, really difficult to get through if you are trying to follow any sort of timeline. On the other hand, Roosevelt did so much in his career that he can be forgiven those mild annoyances. He certainly had the right to write about whatever he wanted to though his choices of what to include and what to ignore are interesting. Furthermore, the book was written over a hundred years ago, so the lack of a current writing style can be forgiven. There are some gems in the book, and for that, I was thankful. The story of his grizzly bear hunt is worth a read as were some of his recollections from the Spanish American War. If you are a Roosevelt or history fan, and you desire to get your history straight from the horses mouth, then read this autobiography. If you are looking for a good book to read just for pleasure, you are probably best advised to look elsewhere. One other thing, Roosevelt makes little effort to put things into context, so if you don't know much about his life and times, it is difficult to catch up.

  20. 5 out of 5

    RA Ratterman

    A captivating autobiography of the youngest President in USA's history. He certainly led a full life and one directed at fighting corruption, crime, ignorance, etc. The conservation legacy of Theodore Roosevelt is found in the 230 million acres of public lands he helped establish during his presidency. Much of that land - 150 millions acres - was set aside as national forests. Roosevelt created the present-day USFS in 1905, an organization within the Department of Agriculture. The idea was to con A captivating autobiography of the youngest President in USA's history. He certainly led a full life and one directed at fighting corruption, crime, ignorance, etc. The conservation legacy of Theodore Roosevelt is found in the 230 million acres of public lands he helped establish during his presidency. Much of that land - 150 millions acres - was set aside as national forests. Roosevelt created the present-day USFS in 1905, an organization within the Department of Agriculture. The idea was to conserve forests for continued use. An adamant proponent of utilizing the country's resources, Roosevelt wanted to insure the sustainability of those resources. Also a pioneer for human rights despite heavy opposition from the rival political party and media: "The relationship of man and woman is the fundamental relationship that stands at the base of the whole social structure. Much can be done by law towards putting women on a footing of complete and entire equal rights with man--including the right to vote...." -Theodore Roosevelt A great historical overview filled with a treasure trove of details. Read for personal research. Overall, a good book for the researcher and enthusiast. “No man has had a happier life than I have led; a happier life in every way.” -Theodore Roosevelt

  21. 4 out of 5

    Luke Mohamed

    Roosevelt's passion and energy bleeds through into his writings. Beyond his passion, it was clear to me that he was a genuinely good person. Throughout the book, when faced with confrontations he holds strong on his beliefs of doing the right thing, regardless of party lines or other expectations. He summarizes this at one point with "My duty was to stand with every one while he was right, and to stand against him when he went wrong; and this I have tried to do as regards individuals and regards Roosevelt's passion and energy bleeds through into his writings. Beyond his passion, it was clear to me that he was a genuinely good person. Throughout the book, when faced with confrontations he holds strong on his beliefs of doing the right thing, regardless of party lines or other expectations. He summarizes this at one point with "My duty was to stand with every one while he was right, and to stand against him when he went wrong; and this I have tried to do as regards individuals and regards groups of individuals. When a business man or labor leader, politician or reformer, is right, I support him; when he goes wrong, I leave him." Particularly touching is his thoughtful response to a letter sent by a woman who suggests that her husband has intellectually outgrown her, because her life was spent almost solely bearing children and caring for them. Roosevelt records their full correspondence and summarizes after with "...let me remark that whenever a man thinks he has outgrown his mate, he will do well carefully to consider whether his growth has not been downward instead of upward, whether the facts are not merely that he has fallen away from his wife's standard of refinement and duty."

  22. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

    Theodore Roosevelt paints himself in the most accurate way he can in this book. He lays out all of his opinions and his beliefs and even mentions some of his flaws and biggest regrets and turns it into quite possibly the best autobiography I have ever read. Being a polisci major in college I have always found it interesting studying why politicians do the things they do or why people follow movements. What drives people is fascinating and in this autobiography Teddy takes you into his mind and y Theodore Roosevelt paints himself in the most accurate way he can in this book. He lays out all of his opinions and his beliefs and even mentions some of his flaws and biggest regrets and turns it into quite possibly the best autobiography I have ever read. Being a polisci major in college I have always found it interesting studying why politicians do the things they do or why people follow movements. What drives people is fascinating and in this autobiography Teddy takes you into his mind and you can understand his exact emotions as you read along with him, you can feel his pain as he witnessed death during war, you can feel his pride being elected to represent the United States and you can feel his love for his country. This book is what an autobiography should be. He is completely honest on every page and he isn't afraid to expose himself to criticism. His book describes his character from his life. So, for any fan of Theodore Roosevelt or for any history buff this book is a must read.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Adam

    I'll be completely honest, I only read certain chapters of this book. For better or worse I just couldn't get into some of the chapters as they felt like a slog, therefore I skipped over them. To be clear, none of the information here was new to me; being a self-professed Roosevelt nerd, I've read many of the definitive books on the man's life already. It was refreshing, however, to hear the stories and get a sense for the great man through his own words. I particularly enjoyed the chapters on R I'll be completely honest, I only read certain chapters of this book. For better or worse I just couldn't get into some of the chapters as they felt like a slog, therefore I skipped over them. To be clear, none of the information here was new to me; being a self-professed Roosevelt nerd, I've read many of the definitive books on the man's life already. It was refreshing, however, to hear the stories and get a sense for the great man through his own words. I particularly enjoyed the chapters on Roosevelt's time in the Dakotas and his adventures on the police commission, these chapters alone are highly entertaining and worth a read. Edmund Morris documents the struggle Roosevelt had in writing this autobiography in "Colonel Roosevelt". Roosevelt felt constricted in the tone he felt he could use in the book. He didn't want to come across as self-congratulatory or too academic and in the end, you can feel this conflicting tone from chapter to chapter. Worth a read....mostly!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Rupak Banerjee

    An amazing book. I listened to the audiobook from https://librivox.org/ It was well read. But now I do want to go back and read it from a book, take notes, highlight stuff. It has too many great quotes to miss out on. Loved listening to it. The book starts off with Roosevelt's early life experiences and references the American Civil War. I had never before read a book that talks about those experiences directly and of horse-drawn carriages. So it was an eye-opener right away. It goes through his An amazing book. I listened to the audiobook from https://librivox.org/ It was well read. But now I do want to go back and read it from a book, take notes, highlight stuff. It has too many great quotes to miss out on. Loved listening to it. The book starts off with Roosevelt's early life experiences and references the American Civil War. I had never before read a book that talks about those experiences directly and of horse-drawn carriages. So it was an eye-opener right away. It goes through his life experiences and all the positions he held (public service and private). Fascinating. A must-read for those who consider themselves progressive. Also, a must-read for Republicans to get an idea of what the party stood for at the turn of last century. Basic background rights that we have forgotten about, were framed during his time. A great read. Recommended for everyone who enjoys reading.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Moss 慈映夢図

    I'm personally curious about the character of men that end up democratically elected as the leader of the free world, and although this is only the second autobiography of a US President I've read so far, it did not disappoint at all. Teddy Roosevelt was a fucking unit, showing immense conscientiousness during times of national strife and most interestingly of all (to me) navigating through the various minefields his political opponents often put him through while maintaining an air of respect, I'm personally curious about the character of men that end up democratically elected as the leader of the free world, and although this is only the second autobiography of a US President I've read so far, it did not disappoint at all. Teddy Roosevelt was a fucking unit, showing immense conscientiousness during times of national strife and most interestingly of all (to me) navigating through the various minefields his political opponents often put him through while maintaining an air of respect, that he both gave to and received from those who would disagree with him. It's a far cry from the modern political climate of straight up straw-manning any political dissent (and invoking the tired hyperbole we are all unfortunately so over-exposed to). I miss the days where the game was played with respect for the rules. Also he wrestled bears. 5 stars.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jacob Rex

    Roosevelt lead the strenuous life. From big game hunting and boxing to politics and police beats. He was a man of action and justice. I enjoyed his retelling of his life, seeing him though his eyes. He appreciated his friends and loved ones, fought justly his opponents, guided and guarded his country and livelihood, and fought for conservation, industrial justice, and dignity for all. He approved of women's suffrage, and men's healthy development. He hated corruption and picking sides and was tr Roosevelt lead the strenuous life. From big game hunting and boxing to politics and police beats. He was a man of action and justice. I enjoyed his retelling of his life, seeing him though his eyes. He appreciated his friends and loved ones, fought justly his opponents, guided and guarded his country and livelihood, and fought for conservation, industrial justice, and dignity for all. He approved of women's suffrage, and men's healthy development. He hated corruption and picking sides and was truly an authentic leader shaped by his past experiences. Teddy was a real champ of a guy and his own words surprise me in their subtle tenderness yet tough expression. I couldn't put this down.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    I have highlighted and saved more sections in this book than any previously. Theodore Roosevelt held high ideals, and he writes very persuasively about them. His ideals - about honest, fairness, justice, America's place as a great power, military might, globalism, environmentalism - are timely with our modern struggles and problems. Just as the industrial revolution and the technological advances of the beginning of the 20th century upended all aspects of society, such disarray can be found in t I have highlighted and saved more sections in this book than any previously. Theodore Roosevelt held high ideals, and he writes very persuasively about them. His ideals - about honest, fairness, justice, America's place as a great power, military might, globalism, environmentalism - are timely with our modern struggles and problems. Just as the industrial revolution and the technological advances of the beginning of the 20th century upended all aspects of society, such disarray can be found in the disruption modern technology has had now. Roosevelt balanced extremes and sought to do right by all, his so called "square deal", and that is a platform desperately needed in our polarized times.

  28. 4 out of 5

    David Birse

    A man of the people because he was one of the people. This is an excellent book and should be read by all politicians, government workers (local and national), prime ministers and presidents, regardless of where they live in planet Earth. If they did they would find an account of a man who filled his days trying to be virtuous and be a leader of the best possible example. I've always said that no leader should instigate war unless they have previously fought in one. Theodore Roosevelt fought in t A man of the people because he was one of the people. This is an excellent book and should be read by all politicians, government workers (local and national), prime ministers and presidents, regardless of where they live in planet Earth. If they did they would find an account of a man who filled his days trying to be virtuous and be a leader of the best possible example. I've always said that no leader should instigate war unless they have previously fought in one. Theodore Roosevelt fought in the Spanish war with honour. This account is now over one hundred years old, however the majority of this book is as relevant in building character today. Read it.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ross

    I did not like this book and would only recommend it to someone who either wants to know why President Roosevelt made specific decisions or someone studying early 20th century American politics. That said, TR is one of my favorite characters in American history. Parts of this book were fascinating: his early life, his time on a ranch in Nebraska, his love of nature, and his contributions during the Spanish American War. The rest of the book is a long winded memoir where TR justifies his policy d I did not like this book and would only recommend it to someone who either wants to know why President Roosevelt made specific decisions or someone studying early 20th century American politics. That said, TR is one of my favorite characters in American history. Parts of this book were fascinating: his early life, his time on a ranch in Nebraska, his love of nature, and his contributions during the Spanish American War. The rest of the book is a long winded memoir where TR justifies his policy decisions to future readers.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Lindberg

    Theodore Roosevelt, in my opinion, was one of the best Presidents the United States has ever had. In his autobiography, he takes great care to detail key moments of his upbringing, which he believes molded him into a proper man, and suggests the importance of each event as valued knowledge to the American. Roosevelt believed it was his duty to treat the common man the same he would any captain of industry. Each page of his autobiography seems relevant today and will remain a timeless read as eac Theodore Roosevelt, in my opinion, was one of the best Presidents the United States has ever had. In his autobiography, he takes great care to detail key moments of his upbringing, which he believes molded him into a proper man, and suggests the importance of each event as valued knowledge to the American. Roosevelt believed it was his duty to treat the common man the same he would any captain of industry. Each page of his autobiography seems relevant today and will remain a timeless read as each of its themes are universal to the benefits man.

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