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Uncle Dan's Report Card: From Toddlers to Teenagers, Helping Our Children Build Strength of Character wit h Healthy Habits and Values Every Day

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A Unique Approach to Teaching Children Timeless Values The worth of the child cannot be measured in terms of "Per Cent" alone. The home life of the child is an important part of the whole life. The teacher's judgment will be a much better one if the home will kindly co-operate. Parents are asked to carefully consider and mark "Home Report" as indicated. -M. E. Pearson, S A Unique Approach to Teaching Children Timeless Values The worth of the child cannot be measured in terms of "Per Cent" alone. The home life of the child is an important part of the whole life. The teacher's judgment will be a much better one if the home will kindly co-operate. Parents are asked to carefully consider and mark "Home Report" as indicated. -M. E. Pearson, Superintendent, Kansas City, Kansas, Public Schools, 1914 With the discovery of their Uncle Dan's school report card from 1914, in which a "Home Report" section of the card was to be completed by parents, Barbara and Robert Unell were inspired to explore the behaviors and values upon which students were "graded" in addition to the standard academic subjects. They realized that these surprising entries, ranging from acts of kindness and truthfulness to personal habits and reading for pleasure, were as timeless and relevant today as they were almost a century ago. Uncle Dan's Report Card gives every parent and caregiver not only a reminder of the worth of these values and behaviors but also a practical means to encourage children to recognize and practice good habits. This book provides the positive, proven tools they can use with toddlers to teens to help them be successful and happy in their everyday lives, personally and academically.


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A Unique Approach to Teaching Children Timeless Values The worth of the child cannot be measured in terms of "Per Cent" alone. The home life of the child is an important part of the whole life. The teacher's judgment will be a much better one if the home will kindly co-operate. Parents are asked to carefully consider and mark "Home Report" as indicated. -M. E. Pearson, S A Unique Approach to Teaching Children Timeless Values The worth of the child cannot be measured in terms of "Per Cent" alone. The home life of the child is an important part of the whole life. The teacher's judgment will be a much better one if the home will kindly co-operate. Parents are asked to carefully consider and mark "Home Report" as indicated. -M. E. Pearson, Superintendent, Kansas City, Kansas, Public Schools, 1914 With the discovery of their Uncle Dan's school report card from 1914, in which a "Home Report" section of the card was to be completed by parents, Barbara and Robert Unell were inspired to explore the behaviors and values upon which students were "graded" in addition to the standard academic subjects. They realized that these surprising entries, ranging from acts of kindness and truthfulness to personal habits and reading for pleasure, were as timeless and relevant today as they were almost a century ago. Uncle Dan's Report Card gives every parent and caregiver not only a reminder of the worth of these values and behaviors but also a practical means to encourage children to recognize and practice good habits. This book provides the positive, proven tools they can use with toddlers to teens to help them be successful and happy in their everyday lives, personally and academically.

25 review for Uncle Dan's Report Card: From Toddlers to Teenagers, Helping Our Children Build Strength of Character wit h Healthy Habits and Values Every Day

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lenore Webb

    In learning life lessons we make decisions on how we are going to take them in. And how we learn them is so different than when I was a youngster. Do you remember that report card you brought home. You know back in 3rd grade. You slid it out of the envelope with a big smile on your face. As you unfolded the report card you made sure to hold up that one side. You know where it had all the S's on it. Not the reading, writing and arithmetic. But where it had your citizenship grades. There where we In learning life lessons we make decisions on how we are going to take them in. And how we learn them is so different than when I was a youngster. Do you remember that report card you brought home. You know back in 3rd grade. You slid it out of the envelope with a big smile on your face. As you unfolded the report card you made sure to hold up that one side. You know where it had all the S's on it. Not the reading, writing and arithmetic. But where it had your citizenship grades. There where we were graded on how well we worked with others, showed respect to others and their belongings, showed healthy practices and was productive in a timely manner. I do not see that anymore. Who is teaching these lessons to our kiddos? Are they being taught these lessons? 'Uncle Dan's Report Card' does just that. Gives you a guide on how to help your children (or grandchildren) to learn just those life lessons. I love that it focuses on how to behave and conduct yourself. That there is a focus on handling money they earned. Where they note lessons in hygiene are being cared for. And that one should be truthful, honest and kind. Have you thought are you taking the time to really teach your children their citizenship? What grade would they have right now? Can it be improved and how? Maybe you need a chance to read just what lil lessons can be incorporated into their daily routine.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Christopher

    I feel like this book epitomizes the phrase "Get a job hippie!" Relying on incorrect and offensive stereotypes and generalizations this book canonizes education from 1900-1915. Fun fact about the early 1900's, just for example, the child mortality rate for ages 5-14 in as late as 1935 was 210 per 100,000 in 2007 it's 21 per 100,000 (http://www.hrsa.gov/healthit/images/m...). Perhaps it was all the work related tasks they were doing for their report card. See what I did there was provide a fact, I feel like this book epitomizes the phrase "Get a job hippie!" Relying on incorrect and offensive stereotypes and generalizations this book canonizes education from 1900-1915. Fun fact about the early 1900's, just for example, the child mortality rate for ages 5-14 in as late as 1935 was 210 per 100,000 in 2007 it's 21 per 100,000 (http://www.hrsa.gov/healthit/images/m...). Perhaps it was all the work related tasks they were doing for their report card. See what I did there was provide a fact, with citation and not just use a broad, incorrect generalization about "kids these days." Jokes aside, the true sadness here is that a discussion of values and how to instill them is always important and helpful. Just maybe not values from over 100 years ago.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Allison

    Most if it was pretty good, but there is a pervading fear of technology throughout the book. I'm all for limiting technology time, but I felt it to be a bit excessive. Other than that, it was about teaching good, old-fashioned values to kids with explanations of why they were important and a few descriptions of how to do it. Most if it was pretty good, but there is a pervading fear of technology throughout the book. I'm all for limiting technology time, but I felt it to be a bit excessive. Other than that, it was about teaching good, old-fashioned values to kids with explanations of why they were important and a few descriptions of how to do it.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Gretchen Farr

    Great, practical advice for parents, teachers and kids

  5. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

  6. 4 out of 5

    Terri

  7. 5 out of 5

    Leslie

  8. 5 out of 5

    Deborah

  9. 4 out of 5

    Richard E

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lea

  11. 5 out of 5

    Becky

  12. 5 out of 5

    Brad Gruber

  13. 4 out of 5

    Josh McDevitt-Spall

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jess

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jani

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kara

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sandra Archer

  19. 5 out of 5

    Julia

  20. 5 out of 5

    Trish

  21. 5 out of 5

    justbeingarlyn

  22. 4 out of 5

    Heather

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ahmed

  24. 4 out of 5

    Matt

  25. 5 out of 5

    Matt V.

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