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Public Parts: How Sharing in the Digital Age is Revolutionizing Life, Business, and Society

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A visionary and optimistic thinker examines the tension between privacy and publicness that is transforming how we form communities, create identities, do business, and live our lives.Thanks to the internet, we now live--more and more--in public. More than 750 million people (and half of all Americans) use Facebook, where we share a billion times a day. The collective voic A visionary and optimistic thinker examines the tension between privacy and publicness that is transforming how we form communities, create identities, do business, and live our lives.Thanks to the internet, we now live--more and more--in public. More than 750 million people (and half of all Americans) use Facebook, where we share a billion times a day. The collective voice of Twitter echoes instantly 100 million times daily, from Tahrir Square to the Mall of America, on subjects that range from democratic reform to unfolding natural disasters to celebrity gossip. New tools let us share our photos, videos, purchases, knowledge, friendships, locations, and lives.Yet change brings fear, and many people--nostalgic for a more homogeneous mass culture and provoked by well-meaning advocates for privacy--despair that the internet and how we share there is making us dumber, crasser, distracted, and vulnerable to threats of all kinds. But not Jeff Jarvis.In this shibboleth-destroying book, "Public Parts "argues persuasively and personally that the internet and our new sense of publicness are, in fact, doing the opposite. Jarvis travels back in time to show the amazing parallels of fear and resistance that met the advent of other innovations such as the camera and the printing press. The internet, he argues, will change business, society, and life as profoundly as Gutenberg's invention, shifting power from old institutions to us all.Based on extensive interviews, "Public Parts "introduces us to the men and women building a new industry based on sharing. Some of them have become household names--Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg, Google's Eric Schmidt, and Twitter's Evan Williams. Others may soon be recognized as the industrialists, philosophers, and designers of our future. Jarvis explores the promising ways in which the internet and publicness allow us to collaborate, think, ways--how we manufacture and market, buy and sell, organize and govern, teach and learn. He also examines the necessity as well as the limits of privacy in an effort to understand and thus protect it. This new and open era has already profoundly disrupted economies, industries, laws, ethics, childhood, and many other facets of our daily lives. But the change has just begun. The shape of the future is not assured. The amazing new tools of publicness can be used to good ends and bad. The choices--and the responsibilities--lie with us. Jarvis makes an urgent case that the future of the internet--what one technologist calls "the eighth continent"--requires as much protection as the physical space we share, the air we breathe, and the rights we afford one another. It is a space of the public, for the public, and by the public. It needs protection and respect from all of us. As Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said in the wake of the uprisings in the Middle East, "If people around the world are going to come together every day online and have a safe and productive experience, we need a shared vision to guide us." Jeff Jarvis has that vision and will be that guide.


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A visionary and optimistic thinker examines the tension between privacy and publicness that is transforming how we form communities, create identities, do business, and live our lives.Thanks to the internet, we now live--more and more--in public. More than 750 million people (and half of all Americans) use Facebook, where we share a billion times a day. The collective voic A visionary and optimistic thinker examines the tension between privacy and publicness that is transforming how we form communities, create identities, do business, and live our lives.Thanks to the internet, we now live--more and more--in public. More than 750 million people (and half of all Americans) use Facebook, where we share a billion times a day. The collective voice of Twitter echoes instantly 100 million times daily, from Tahrir Square to the Mall of America, on subjects that range from democratic reform to unfolding natural disasters to celebrity gossip. New tools let us share our photos, videos, purchases, knowledge, friendships, locations, and lives.Yet change brings fear, and many people--nostalgic for a more homogeneous mass culture and provoked by well-meaning advocates for privacy--despair that the internet and how we share there is making us dumber, crasser, distracted, and vulnerable to threats of all kinds. But not Jeff Jarvis.In this shibboleth-destroying book, "Public Parts "argues persuasively and personally that the internet and our new sense of publicness are, in fact, doing the opposite. Jarvis travels back in time to show the amazing parallels of fear and resistance that met the advent of other innovations such as the camera and the printing press. The internet, he argues, will change business, society, and life as profoundly as Gutenberg's invention, shifting power from old institutions to us all.Based on extensive interviews, "Public Parts "introduces us to the men and women building a new industry based on sharing. Some of them have become household names--Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg, Google's Eric Schmidt, and Twitter's Evan Williams. Others may soon be recognized as the industrialists, philosophers, and designers of our future. Jarvis explores the promising ways in which the internet and publicness allow us to collaborate, think, ways--how we manufacture and market, buy and sell, organize and govern, teach and learn. He also examines the necessity as well as the limits of privacy in an effort to understand and thus protect it. This new and open era has already profoundly disrupted economies, industries, laws, ethics, childhood, and many other facets of our daily lives. But the change has just begun. The shape of the future is not assured. The amazing new tools of publicness can be used to good ends and bad. The choices--and the responsibilities--lie with us. Jarvis makes an urgent case that the future of the internet--what one technologist calls "the eighth continent"--requires as much protection as the physical space we share, the air we breathe, and the rights we afford one another. It is a space of the public, for the public, and by the public. It needs protection and respect from all of us. As Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said in the wake of the uprisings in the Middle East, "If people around the world are going to come together every day online and have a safe and productive experience, we need a shared vision to guide us." Jeff Jarvis has that vision and will be that guide.

30 review for Public Parts: How Sharing in the Digital Age is Revolutionizing Life, Business, and Society

  1. 4 out of 5

    André Spiegel

    I had been looking forward to this book for months. When it came out, I was glad I didn't have to camp in front of a bookstore to get my copy — it was delivered wirelessly to my e-reader a few seconds after publication. And yet, having read it, I cannot deny a mild sense of disappointment. I feel a bit like a choir being preached to. I'm on Twitter, on Facebook, on Google+, and a host of other online services. I publish my precise physical location online, and I've got my own blog. I haven't yet I had been looking forward to this book for months. When it came out, I was glad I didn't have to camp in front of a bookstore to get my copy — it was delivered wirelessly to my e-reader a few seconds after publication. And yet, having read it, I cannot deny a mild sense of disappointment. I feel a bit like a choir being preached to. I'm on Twitter, on Facebook, on Google+, and a host of other online services. I publish my precise physical location online, and I've got my own blog. I haven't yet written about my penis online, but would feel little restraint doing so, if the occasion arose. Oh, and perhaps I should mention I'm German and am quite comfortable sitting naked in the sauna. Whenever a new service comes out that suggests to make further parts of my life public, my initial feeling is not so much one of anxiety, but rather of curiousity. I'm eager to try things out. So maybe I'm not quite the intended audience of the book, which might be those who are still tip-toeing into the new kind of public sphere that is developing, or those who are critical of it. Alas, I don't think this works. In my experience, irrespective of age, social background, or even culture, people fall squarely into two camps: those who are curious about publicness, and try things out, and those who are not. If someone belongs to the second camp, I have found that no reasoning whatsoever, no carefully compiled list of advantages, and no enthusiasm could persuade them to venture into publicness beyond a half-hearted first attempt that quickly fades. »It is futile to try and explain a thought to someone for whom a hint is not enough«, said Nicolás Gómez Dávila. And one of my German Twitter acquaintances quipped: »The digital divide is not between us and those who don't get it, it is between us and those who couldn't care less.« I would, therefore, consider it still very much up in the air whether the desire to share, which Jarvis so enthusiastically celebrates in his book, is really a fundamental human instinct that is only inhibited because we did not grow up in an environment that enabled it, or whether it is just a trait of a rather limited group of people. For those like me who are in the publicness camp, the book is what Germans might call a »Konsensschmöker« — a tome of consent. It is exciting to read, not least because it kindles one's sense of being part of all sorts of fascinating developments, the outcome of which we probably cannot even begin to imagine. »We ain't seen nothing yet«, as Jarvis exclaims. And he quotes Leah Marcus with what became one of my favorite passages: »Renaissances happen by infrequently enough that they should be enjoyed in the process. I, for one, await the Cyberspace Renaissance with great interest, and hope to live to see its zenith.« This nicely sums up the spirit of the book. Unfortunately, beyond this enthusiasm, it offered little additional food for thought to me.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Luke Burrage

    I listened to this one instead of reading it. Jeff Jarvis is a good narrator of his own material. The content is very interesting, though only a few parts are brand new if you are a regular listener to the This Week in Google podcast. What it does do is set out all the concepts and thoughts very clearly in a slightly more scholarly way, and not as a conversation as on the TWiG show. As for the topic of Publicness complimenting Privacy, this is something I've been aware of since I first got online I listened to this one instead of reading it. Jeff Jarvis is a good narrator of his own material. The content is very interesting, though only a few parts are brand new if you are a regular listener to the This Week in Google podcast. What it does do is set out all the concepts and thoughts very clearly in a slightly more scholarly way, and not as a conversation as on the TWiG show. As for the topic of Publicness complimenting Privacy, this is something I've been aware of since I first got online in 1996. I've always been very public, to the point where some of my friends say "You are the most open person I know... you share everything!" I don't share everything, of course, but I have many stories just like those in Public Parts. Over and over again, I find great benefits in sharing what I am doing and where I am going. I'm a professional juggler today because I tried to be as public as possible. I put my stuff out online, for free, and became an internationally known juggler. Not because I was a "good" juggler, but because I was a public juggler. On the flip side, I'm very private about many things. Since about 2000, every time I've signed up for a web service or created an account, I've done it under my own name. And I've always presumed that ANYTHING I share online will be visible to anyone in the future. I don't expect everyone to see everything, but I expect anyone to be able to see anything. And so if something is private, it doesn't leave my head. Or if it's on my laptop, it doesn't make it to anywhere online. Which is a good policy, I think. Also, I live in Berlin, so I directly "benefit" from Germany's privacy regulations of Google Street View. Right?

  3. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    In this book, Jeff Jarvis writes as an advocate for the public culture the Internet has fostered. While at times I would call him overly optimistic, he highlights ways that the Internet’s culture of publicness has positively affected our lives. He discusses the meaning of public versus private, what the terms meant in the past, and what they mean now. While I do not agree with everything he writes (I tend to err on the side of caution and, yes, privacy), I can see that many of his points are val In this book, Jeff Jarvis writes as an advocate for the public culture the Internet has fostered. While at times I would call him overly optimistic, he highlights ways that the Internet’s culture of publicness has positively affected our lives. He discusses the meaning of public versus private, what the terms meant in the past, and what they mean now. While I do not agree with everything he writes (I tend to err on the side of caution and, yes, privacy), I can see that many of his points are valid. He takes care to acknowledge the negative aspects of the Internet, but he gives plenty of examples illustrating how publicness has helped improve our relationships, has changed the way businesses run, and has enabled and empowered people all over the world. I’ll admit, some of the examples he gives are pretty impressive and persuasive. And some of his points weren’t lost on me. Reading his book has inspired me to try more of this publicness thing. I’m making more of an effort to be public on the Internet. I appreciate the way he writes. He promotes an honest and open publicness and I can tell he believes it, because his writing is frank, blunt, and very honest. He goes further than the Internet in many instances, questioning the moral mores of society and how that affects how we react. He talks about the history of the public vs. private debate and he discusses the ethics of publicness. All in all, I feel that this book is a good, optimistic read that will make you more willing to see the public Internet culture in a positive light. I didn’t agree with everything he had to say, but I agree that this book is a rewarding and thought-provoking read.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Simon Howard

    In Public Parts, Jeff Jarvis counterbalances arguments about the sinister effects of erosion of privacy in the modern world. He argues that openness and sharing, on balance, improve the world. He coins the word 'publicness' to describe open sharing, and argues convincingly that 'publicness' is not the polar opposite of 'privacy'. This is a book which stimulates thought. I particularly appreciated Jeff's elucidation of the argument that regulation should focus on the use of information that has be In Public Parts, Jeff Jarvis counterbalances arguments about the sinister effects of erosion of privacy in the modern world. He argues that openness and sharing, on balance, improve the world. He coins the word 'publicness' to describe open sharing, and argues convincingly that 'publicness' is not the polar opposite of 'privacy'. This is a book which stimulates thought. I particularly appreciated Jeff's elucidation of the argument that regulation should focus on the use of information that has been shared, rather than the sharing of information itself. I had never considered the concept in this way before, despite it being a common one. I am a doctor: people tell me all sorts of things in confidence because they have a clear understanding that to do so is the best way to allow me to understand their condition, and diagnose and treat them. Occasionally, much of what a patient discloses – which is often deeply private – turns out to be irrelevant. But the code of ethics, not to mention the law, around these interactions means that they can share without fear. While the patient freely discloses the information, the way in which the information is used remains within their power. They are free to allow me to share it with colleagues if they believe that this might help them (referring them on), or equally free to restrict me from doing so. Even if something deeply embarrassing turns out to be irrelevant, the patient is left no worse off for having disclosed it – and the possibility of benefit was probably worth the disclosure. This is a single example of the effect Jeff's book has on many of the concepts around privacy and 'publicness'. He helps the reader to assume a different viewpoint on issues. The viewpoint is often one grounded in experiences that the reader already has, or can conceive of, but which they have perhaps not understood from the viewpoint described. This is a powerful technique. Public Parts also discusses the trickier aspects of online life. It discusses cases where people share things that they perhaps should not have, and where this lack of privacy has caused harm. But he makes a convincing point that we all need to become more 'media competent', and that making the debate about 'publicness' more mainstream will serve to educate and inform, as well as helping to craft social norms in a more considered way. The style of writing in the book is certainly fast-paced, and I know that others have been critical of this. Few things irritate me more than incomplete, superficial arguments, and so I was a little reluctant to read this book on the basis of those reviews commenting on the fast-paced nature, which I thought would be indicative of superficiality. On the contrary, I found the book well-paced. It discusses issues concisely, not ad infinitum, which I found refreshing. It leaves the reader to do some of the work around thinking through the issues surrounding the arguments. The author does not lead the reader step-by-step through every possible permutation and combination of situations and ideas, as other authors are wont to do. I particularly enjoyed the discussions around the historical aspects of privacy and 'publicness'. Consideration of these issues is, in my opinion, far too often framed as part of the discussion around modern technology. In reality, there is little that is new about the issues themselves, merely new situations in which they need to be applied. The discussion was illuminated by description of how these debates progressed around the new technologies of the past – from Gutenberg's printing press to Kodak's camera. Similarly, the interviews with leaders in social media (and similar fields) helped to give some real-world perspective on the theories being discussed. It seems a shame to me that this book has received so little attention in the UK. I get the impression that it hasn't been particularly widely read, which is a shame given that its discussion is relevant to us all. It strikes me that it is a book that could catch on among the political classes, and become widely read via that route. At least, I hope it might. This book packs an awful lot in to 250 or so pages. It's a genuinely enjoyable read that provides a large amount of food for thought. I highly recommend it.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

    Interesting plea for publicness, which I agree with, for the most part, and it made me think about the choices I make and why I make them - and re-affirmed my opinions and choices. Here's what I want to remember: The 1999 quote from Douglas Adams: "I suppose earlier generations had to sit through all this huffing and puffing with the invention of television, the phone, cinema, radio, the car, the bicycle, printing, the wheel and so on, but you would think we would learn the way these things work, w Interesting plea for publicness, which I agree with, for the most part, and it made me think about the choices I make and why I make them - and re-affirmed my opinions and choices. Here's what I want to remember: The 1999 quote from Douglas Adams: "I suppose earlier generations had to sit through all this huffing and puffing with the invention of television, the phone, cinema, radio, the car, the bicycle, printing, the wheel and so on, but you would think we would learn the way these things work, which is this: 1. everything that's already in the world when you're born is just normal; 2. anything that gets invented between then and before you turn thirty is incredibly exciting and creative and with any luck you can make a career out of it; 3. anything that gets invented after you're thirty is against the natural order of things and the beginning of the end of civilization as we know it until it's been around for about ten years when it gradually turns out to be alright really. Other things of note: - publicness + connections = progress - think "media competence" rather than "media literacy" - remember the tattoo rule, the front page rule, the social bankruptcy rule, the don't-feed-the-trolls rule, the Cabernet rule (friends don't let friends post, tweet, pose for photos to upload, make YouTube videos when drunk), the honesty rule (own up to mistakes), the Golden rule, and the don't-be-a-fool rule. - it is an annotated world - Declaration of the Electronic Frontier Foundation (1996), by John Perry Barlow: "Governments of the Industrial World, you weary giants of flesh and steel, I come from Cyberspace, the new home of the Mind. On behalf of the future, I ask you of the past to leave us alone. You are not welcome among us. You have no sovereignty where we gather...Governments derive their just powers from the consent of the governed. You have neither solicited nor received ours." Principles of Publicness: - we have the right to connect - we have the right to speak - we have the right to assemble and to act - privacy is an ethic of knowing - publicness is an ethic of sharing - our institutions' information should be public by default, secret by necessity - what is public is a public good - all bits are created equal - the internet must stay open and distributed

  6. 4 out of 5

    Joel Cigan

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I’m not sure what to say after finishing this book about the Internet, or the “eighth continent,” as the author states. Many of us live their individual lives connected to their smartphones where they scrub Facebook, try to find their own voices on Twitter or post photos depicting their individual lifestyles or personal brand on Instagram even going so far as “lifecasting” themselves on YouTube showing the world many facets of their daily existence. The author states that our digital footprint a I’m not sure what to say after finishing this book about the Internet, or the “eighth continent,” as the author states. Many of us live their individual lives connected to their smartphones where they scrub Facebook, try to find their own voices on Twitter or post photos depicting their individual lifestyles or personal brand on Instagram even going so far as “lifecasting” themselves on YouTube showing the world many facets of their daily existence. The author states that our digital footprint as it is tracked by browser “cookies,” makes us safer and that Internet access is now an individual right. I’m not sure what to make of this but for the most part, from my own personal experiences, I can’t say that I have established any meaningful relationships online with anyone or had a give-and-take conversation on the likes of Instagram, messaging people about their posted photos. Even FaceBook is saturated with advertisements linked to our browsing histories and who knows what algorithm located on a remote server is analyzing us. This seems to be some sort of Naziism or oppressive regime to me in all honesty and the data that I create that is uploaded to the cloud might not even be mine in an era where “Big Data” is a currency that trumps everything. Nothing is what it seems. Maybe the only way to be “free” is, as the author did, through exposure of our private parts.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ilib4kids

    302.30285 JAR CD 302.30285 JAR My review: The hymn of publicness. the whole author's view of publicness is conversation, the relationship. Too exaggeration of benefit of public, not emphasis people need time to solitude, meditation. In the age of information deluge, how do we hold ourselves as deep-thinking individual? There are a lot of things we take for granted. e.g the meaning of public and private is kind of fixed in the certain kind of culture. We do not even notice the meaning of those keep 302.30285 JAR CD 302.30285 JAR My review: The hymn of publicness. the whole author's view of publicness is conversation, the relationship. Too exaggeration of benefit of public, not emphasis people need time to solitude, meditation. In the age of information deluge, how do we hold ourselves as deep-thinking individual? There are a lot of things we take for granted. e.g the meaning of public and private is kind of fixed in the certain kind of culture. We do not even notice the meaning of those keep changing, especially when culture clash for immigrant people. Vocabulary: Publicness: sharing information. Publicity: public relationship. Private: Safe, protective, closed, solitary, anonymous Public: open, collaborative, collective, vulnerable. Which things do you want to share and which things do you not? My words: there is certainly not a small benefits to get your life public, talk about it publicly so you get advice, suggestion, if not, at least other people offer you a different angle of perspective. But you have decide what part to share. re-examine our assumption and norms about privacy and publicness. Chap The Benefits of publicness 1. Publicness builds relationships 2. Publicness disarms strangers 3. Publicness enables collaboration 4. Publicness unleashes the wisdom and generosity of the crowd 5. Publicness defuses the myth of perfection 6. Publicness neutralizes stigmas 7. Publicness grants immorality or at least credit 8. Publicness organizes us 9. Publicness Protects us Chap A history of the Private and the Public p69 Only men of official stature were public. This construct explains why, to American's confusion, what in the United States are called private schools for the privileged are in English called public schools, as they were operated for the children of public mean. It is also why in the army, Jürgen Habermas says, the "common soldier" - the ordinary man without rank" is a private. Children's Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA), law put strict controls for children under 13. So on the Internet, every child is 14. p110 The privacy is an ethic of knowing. Publicness is an ethic of sharing. -- my word: I agree with author Ethic of private: 1. Don't steal information 2. Be transparent about what you will do with information 3. Protect information 4. Give credit 5. Give people access to their own information 6. Don't use information against people (unless they deserve it) 7. Context matters 8. Motive matters 9. Add value Ethic of publicness Benefit of publicness - be transparent, be open, be collaborative, give respect, give value 1. Be generous 2. Share for reason 3. Use common standards 4. Protect what's public Number one rule of internet interactivity: Don't feed trolls. p131 Inner real selves vs outer/show selves or identity(myself) vs. reputation (how we look to other) reflect in sincerity, authenticity, honesty. The root of fear of privacy. p131 Media Competence or media literary (how to use web) 1. The tattoo rule: it is permanent 2. The front-page rule 3. The social-bankruptcy rule (too many links no time tor reply) 4. The don't feed the trolls rule 5. The cabernet rule 6. The honesty rule 7. The Golden rule 8. The don't be a fool rule p215 Principle of publicness I. We have the right to connect II. We have the right to speak II. We have the right to assemble and to act. IV. Privacy is an ethic of knowing V. Publicness is an ethic of sharing VI. Our institution's information should be public by default, secret by necessity VII. What is public is a public good VIII. All bits are created equal IX. The Internet must stay open and distributed. Websites https://delicious.com/ (bookmarking service) LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/ http://www.wolframalpha.com/ (computational knowledge engine) TripAdvisor (travel) Yel (restaurants) Rotten Tomatoes (movies) PatientsLikeMe SeeClickFix Quora (question-and-answer websites) Ushahidi (non-profit software company) Some Internet tools: Google Latitude, Loopt TripAdvisor seeClickFix FourSqaure Final Cut (software, Video editing) OpenStreetMap Final Cut (software, Video editing) Bit.ly Gowalla (Like Foursquare) Last.fm (music) Scribd (Document) SlideShare (Powerpoint presentation) Meetup Blippy (credit card shopping sharing,no longer exist) Peer to Patent project Creative Commons Kickstarter (public investment support for-profit endeavors) Co-creation platform MESH01 (shoe and clothing design) Quirky open government movement OpenCongress.org Maplight.org (reveals and tracks the influence of money in politics) OpenSecrets.org FollowMoney.org Cookie usage: 1) Ghostery (Cookie monitor) 2) Privacy setting (forbid cookie or erase them) 3) Incognito Window on Google Chrome Facebook: 1. News Feed (compiled friend's updated sent as news feed) 2. Facebook Beacon (share user's purchase with friend), as Blippy 3. Facebook Places Books 1. Understanding Privacy by Daniel J. Solove 2. The Naked Society by Vance Packard (1964) 3. The Googlization of Everything: by Siva Vaidhyanathan 4. The Fall of Public Man by Richard Sennett 5. The Cluetrain Manifesto by Rick Levine

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sheng

    Public Parts is a book exploring the lesser-mentioned benefits and gains from publicness in the digital age. In a time where privacy remains a hot issue, it is rare to see anyone speak out for the side of publicness and how we could potentially reap more benefits by being more public and willing to share whatever information we possess. Hence, when I first started reading this book, it provided a refreshing viewpoint which contrasted with the ubiquitous laments of losses of privacy that you'll s Public Parts is a book exploring the lesser-mentioned benefits and gains from publicness in the digital age. In a time where privacy remains a hot issue, it is rare to see anyone speak out for the side of publicness and how we could potentially reap more benefits by being more public and willing to share whatever information we possess. Hence, when I first started reading this book, it provided a refreshing viewpoint which contrasted with the ubiquitous laments of losses of privacy that you'll see in media nowadays and that really piqued my interest. Jeff Jarvis goes on to explore 'publicness', a term he coined to define the opposite of privacy, at various levels from personal in the form of Facebook to government in terms of public policy. The scope of discussion was wide and Jarvis displayed an interesting perspective and his depth of knowledge as well. A particularly interesting chapter of the book was where Jarvis used examples throughout history such as the invention of the Kodak camera or film to show that privacy has always been an issue and that despite initial outrage or objection, our tolerance always seems to adjust to the trend of decreasing privacy over the years. Jarvis' look at a more two-way relationship between consumers and businesses during the process of designing and producing the final product for sale provided food for thought as well in how businesses could and should operate. Jarvis does try to take into account the views of others when discussing publicness, however he tends to display strong bias to his stance and at times he provides arguments that are too one-sided. He plays down the views of privacy advocates though at times, those views are well substantiated and do highlight some areas of concern that should be taken seriously. Jarvis' attacks on his opponents were at first slightly amusing but as the book went on, they started to feel a bit too vehement. He possesses a somewhat idealistic view on sharing most or all of your personal knowledge and information and how that would lead to a community that is more willing to open up and share their personal experiences in a mutually beneficial experience but in reality these oversharers could possibly be shunned or discriminated against in some cases. The book was dry at some parts too and it took me a few readings to digest and finally complete this book. Overall, Public Parts was informative and refreshing though it could be more balanced at times. It is a good read for anyone interested in the hot button issue that is privacy in the age of the Internet and how less may in fact mean more in terms of benefits for everyone. 3.5/5

  9. 4 out of 5

    Josh

    i will admit right off the bat - i read this because i wanted to read an opposing view to the one i hold. the author presents a good argument for openness - but i think it's a bit too optimistic and overlooks the fact that people are basically self-serving. fortunately, he does point out that what he's asking in his idealized world is contrary to the interests of govt's & businesses - hedging bets that his optimal plan will likely go unrealized (in the foreseeable future, anyhow). additionally - i will admit right off the bat - i read this because i wanted to read an opposing view to the one i hold. the author presents a good argument for openness - but i think it's a bit too optimistic and overlooks the fact that people are basically self-serving. fortunately, he does point out that what he's asking in his idealized world is contrary to the interests of govt's & businesses - hedging bets that his optimal plan will likely go unrealized (in the foreseeable future, anyhow). additionally - a large percentage of this openness / crowdsoucring / social marketplace relies on large numbers of REPRESENTATIVE populations sharing. based on what i've seen over the past decade and a half online, that's not always the case. the most vocal are passionate hobbyists or those who have a stake in the topic. myself, i have no desire or drive to spend my time writing reviews on appliances so that others can benefit from what i've learned (one of his many examples) because it does nothing to benefit me, i have no stake in improving the product, i lack any specialized skills in that area... basically - my opinion of the product means nothing and i gain nothing at all from taking time (unpaid) to work with the company to make their products better. this example serves pretty well as representing the problem as a whole - some people will share b/c they think that notoriety, recognition, fame or the slim possibility of a payout is worth it - but for most people - that's not sufficient reason to tap into their limited time resources to do something with no immediate benefit for themselves. even more importantly - we all have a very finite amount of time: we simply cannot immerse ourselves in all of these activities and virtual communities that focus on each of our various interests.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kelsey

    Public Parts by Jeff Jarvis is a really easy, yet interesting read. Jarvis uses personal and cultural examples to illustrate the importance of public sharing, and also highlights the challenges in separating public and private life. Jarvis's arguments in regards to businesses being more open in sharing ideas and interacting with their customers is especially strong. While I personally do not agree with publicness online to the extent that Jarvis does, I found that his logic for the most part mad Public Parts by Jeff Jarvis is a really easy, yet interesting read. Jarvis uses personal and cultural examples to illustrate the importance of public sharing, and also highlights the challenges in separating public and private life. Jarvis's arguments in regards to businesses being more open in sharing ideas and interacting with their customers is especially strong. While I personally do not agree with publicness online to the extent that Jarvis does, I found that his logic for the most part made a whole lot of sense! Jarvis really does make this an entertaining and easy read. He discusses the history of publicness and highlights the benefits of being public online. He addresses the concept and definition of privacy, and how that relates to the business world. Towards the end of his book he discusses the need to protect publicness and in a sense calls for support in this cause. I think one of the strong arguments Jarvis makes is our need to make connections online. He writes, "The people we want to meet are a connection away.” While I have reservations about needing to be completely public online with our personal lives, his argument for the needs companies have to make connections online made sense. The online presence a company has now has a large affect on it's brand, and is something companies need to acknowledge. Whether or not you agree with the argument Jarvis makes, it is good to be aware of it. The digital age truly is changing the way we live our lives, and we need to be aware and informed on the issue of privacy. The digital world has expanded to the point where it can no longer be ignored.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

    I ended up really enjoying this book that looks into the concept of privacy and the Internet. I have to admit that I went into the read already agreeing with the concept that there is a certain paranoia about privacy with regard to how we use the Internet and social media sites specifically. I think that Jarvis does a great job of looking and trying to define the terms privacy and publicness to identify whether we really are in danger (as long as we act responsibly) on the Internet. He also touch I ended up really enjoying this book that looks into the concept of privacy and the Internet. I have to admit that I went into the read already agreeing with the concept that there is a certain paranoia about privacy with regard to how we use the Internet and social media sites specifically. I think that Jarvis does a great job of looking and trying to define the terms privacy and publicness to identify whether we really are in danger (as long as we act responsibly) on the Internet. He also touches on the history of communication and how, since the time of the Gutenberg Bible, people have thought that great leaps in communication technology have meant the downfall of mankind and danger for individuals. Jarvis points out that it is possible to overshare with your friends, but highlights that is usually an annoyance rather than endangering. He uses great examples from his own experiences online, both personally and professionally as a researcher and reporter. The book is extremely well research with data, quotes and statistics from resources to help support his argument. I really love the concept of social media being safe because everyone is open and willing to share, thus cancelling out the danger. This is definitely not a book for everyone, but I was glad that I read it.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Velanche

    I've listened to this title as an audio book, shortly after its release. I have just listened to This Week is Google (TWIG), where Jeff Jarvis, the author, is a co-host. He's made some pretty compelling arguments on the show that privacy and the Internet can have unintended consequences, especially when companies create products (mainly software and services) that could ultimately very useful, even if a company may use data I volunteer it for other purposes. Google is a good example; though it c I've listened to this title as an audio book, shortly after its release. I have just listened to This Week is Google (TWIG), where Jeff Jarvis, the author, is a co-host. He's made some pretty compelling arguments on the show that privacy and the Internet can have unintended consequences, especially when companies create products (mainly software and services) that could ultimately very useful, even if a company may use data I volunteer it for other purposes. Google is a good example; though it claims to collect the world's information, I'm not naive to know that it also uses whatever data I give it to try and sell me things. Ultimately, though, Google's services, to me, are so useful, that my giving it information (albeit, selectively) is actually more beneficial than not. What i got out of that is that sometimes, a company, no matter how large or small, is full of people; people who want to change the world, provide services that could be useful to society, and generally push the bounds of technology that could ultimately be beneficial. Jarvis argues that sometimes, policymakers and some privacy advocates tend to leap before they look, potentially stifling innovation for society. Do give it a read, if you can, and do so with an open mind. You may agree, or you may not, but Jarvis does a good job of making his case.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Aaron Bollinger

    Jeff does a very good job laying out the argument for being more public. He also reaches the same conclusion I've been thinking for several years now - that it is getting harder and harder to separate private and public lives and what will ultimately give is society's strict standards. I believe someday everything from drinking pictures to religious and political declarations will be shared on Facebook without a thought of "I could be fired" or "these people might hate me". Ultimately, we're all Jeff does a very good job laying out the argument for being more public. He also reaches the same conclusion I've been thinking for several years now - that it is getting harder and harder to separate private and public lives and what will ultimately give is society's strict standards. I believe someday everything from drinking pictures to religious and political declarations will be shared on Facebook without a thought of "I could be fired" or "these people might hate me". Ultimately, we're all on a track to except a much larger diversity of thought and behavior - even from our closest friends. Jeff also makes a strong case for companies to become more public by sharing the good and the bad back-and-forth with customers and collectively designing and improving products and services. Quotes & Notes: - Just as privacy needs it's advocates, so does publicness. - One day we will be forced to accept more of each other's personal embarrassing moments because our own will also be exposed. We will be protected by "Mutually Assured Humiliation". - The co-creationist movement is starting to take off. This is where companies and customers work together from product vision through quality assurance. - With some adjustments to US investment law, a Kickstarter for businesses could someday be an alternative to the current venture capital system.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Adam

    I've been reading Jarvis for more than a decade, I think, on his blog and then twitter, and I've quoted him to journalism classes. So I knew what to expect here, but the explanation of the ideas -- many of which I think I've just internalized -- was still interesting. A few notes I made: Hadn't heard his idea of us being atoms in society that reform our molecules. "What's public is owned by us, the public" even if we do it as individuals Finan Times said "the streets belong to everyone and that m I've been reading Jarvis for more than a decade, I think, on his blog and then twitter, and I've quoted him to journalism classes. So I knew what to expect here, but the explanation of the ideas -- many of which I think I've just internalized -- was still interesting. A few notes I made: Hadn't heard his idea of us being atoms in society that reform our molecules. "What's public is owned by us, the public" even if we do it as individuals Finan Times said "the streets belong to everyone and that means Google too" "fame can be good" if earned. It's credit and recognition An interesting take on how tech always has detractors: There were people who thought the printing press bad for authors. Compared a copy of verses in a cabinet to a sought-after virgin and a printed book a commie whore Very interesting stuff that historically privacy didn't exist or was considered a bad thing. Now we supposedly strive for it. Another interesting idea: futile to regulate gathering of info. More about regulating use. (As an analogy, someone at an interview can discern your gender/age but still is not allowed to discriminate) Huffington says journalists have ADHD but folks online have OCD Another interesting Idea that best buy sells ads -- space in circulars, placement in stores etc.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Rodrigo Gómez Morales

    I've been into social media since I first heard about it, and, honestly, I've enjoyed the most amazing benefits from it. Generally, I'm a very public person: I share my thoughts on Twitter, I Instagram my best pictures, I announce my location on Swarm, and I review my books on Goodreads. I've made the most wonderful friends through Twitter and I generally check if any acquaintances are near my location, sometimes just to say hi. I've never had any privacy issues, and I consider myself a lucky pe I've been into social media since I first heard about it, and, honestly, I've enjoyed the most amazing benefits from it. Generally, I'm a very public person: I share my thoughts on Twitter, I Instagram my best pictures, I announce my location on Swarm, and I review my books on Goodreads. I've made the most wonderful friends through Twitter and I generally check if any acquaintances are near my location, sometimes just to say hi. I've never had any privacy issues, and I consider myself a lucky person. I've trusted my followers and they've all done a good job at keeping my privacy safe. That's the reason I have never understood what kind of issues some people have while sharing things over the Internet. I have very close friends that are obsessed with their privacy. What I loved about this book is that it exemplifies the normal use of social media and states that we should all be careful about what we post, not about the mere fact of posting. The author has had a great experience using social media and is knowledgeable about its origins and phenomena. At some points, I felt it biased, but it keeps true to the core principle of publicness. At times, it already feels outdated, so a refresh would be desirable, but generally, I liked it.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Robert Chapman

    This is the second book I have read which was written by Jeff Jarvis, the first was What Would Google Do (WWGD). I loved WWGD so I pre-ordered Public Parts at the very first opportunity. The book came at an opportune time for me as I had just recently turned from a social network hater into a serious user and the notion of publicness was very relevant. The book discusses publicness in relation to the technologies and ideas which are pervasive today. It starts by looking at the impact to our perso This is the second book I have read which was written by Jeff Jarvis, the first was What Would Google Do (WWGD). I loved WWGD so I pre-ordered Public Parts at the very first opportunity. The book came at an opportune time for me as I had just recently turned from a social network hater into a serious user and the notion of publicness was very relevant. The book discusses publicness in relation to the technologies and ideas which are pervasive today. It starts by looking at the impact to our personal lives, then progresses to how companies can benefit from publicness, and then finally how governments could better and more efficiently serve the people. The world is changing around us, openness, responsiveness, and transparency are the new expectations. This book captures the essence of publicness today and why it should be important to all of us. To be honest I found it hard to write a quick review of this book, you just need to read it and take it all in, you will not be disappointed.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Gary Beauregard Bottomley

    Enjoyable and highly listenable book on how our perceptions are changing regarding privacy and how in general it is very beneficial for us. While listening, I kept harping back to some other books I've recently listened to and for which I thought the similar topics in this book were covered much better. The books are 1) Too Big to Know, The smartest person in the room is the room meaning the internet we have at our fingertips empowers us like never before 2) Tipping Point, networking and crowd so Enjoyable and highly listenable book on how our perceptions are changing regarding privacy and how in general it is very beneficial for us. While listening, I kept harping back to some other books I've recently listened to and for which I thought the similar topics in this book were covered much better. The books are 1) Too Big to Know, The smartest person in the room is the room meaning the internet we have at our fingertips empowers us like never before 2) Tipping Point, networking and crowd sourcing multiples who we are, 3) In the Plex, a real history of Google that demonstrates that Google is much more than a search company and 4) Master Switch, how the gateway to the net (be it ATT telephone network or Google) gives the master switch owner unparallelled powers. He does cover each of those themes in the above listed books and I loved the overall theme of his book, but I just think the other books covered the topics much better. Also, I think his book is weakest when he talks about what should be and he implicitly assumes a utopian world that probably wont ever exist.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Craig Dube

    This book had its moments but just not enough of them. This book is about publicness and the open sharing of information for both businesses and professionals. It talks about topics such as public vs. private; the benefits and pitfalls of being open, honest and transparent; what the past has shown us and what he believes the future holds. I found both the beginning and end section to be a bit dull and long winded. The end also gets a bit preachy as he maps out what he believes society needs to d This book had its moments but just not enough of them. This book is about publicness and the open sharing of information for both businesses and professionals. It talks about topics such as public vs. private; the benefits and pitfalls of being open, honest and transparent; what the past has shown us and what he believes the future holds. I found both the beginning and end section to be a bit dull and long winded. The end also gets a bit preachy as he maps out what he believes society needs to do in order to keep the internet free, open and promoting publicness. For me the best parts were in the middle when he talked about how businesses can share information and be more transparent when dealing with consumers, partners and even competitors. I think there's a number of good ideas there and ones that I hope more companies will be taking on. Unfortunately there's just not enough talk on this subject and too much talk on the others to give this a rating beyond ok.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Terry

    Jeff Jarvis has written a rhetorically tight, logically sound, and presentably quotable speech on the importance of publicness in modernity. I say speech specifically as the presentation is more persuasive than scholarly and argument is more woven than partitioned. The debate style was very continental, constantly invoking previous scholars work but without the analytically rigorous support that I would have liked. Large numbers are presented as facts provided by Internet notables rather than as Jeff Jarvis has written a rhetorically tight, logically sound, and presentably quotable speech on the importance of publicness in modernity. I say speech specifically as the presentation is more persuasive than scholarly and argument is more woven than partitioned. The debate style was very continental, constantly invoking previous scholars work but without the analytically rigorous support that I would have liked. Large numbers are presented as facts provided by Internet notables rather than as the result of studies and I would have trouble trying to use the content here for more than just dinner party conversation. Finally, the content is very now-focused. This book is neither timeless nor kind to those who've not paid attention to recent news. A better title may have been "Privacy in the Second Decade of the 21st Century".

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mark Dodson

    In a bigger sense, this book is more about current economic and cultural shifts than privacy and sharing, altho both of those factor into it. I’m familiar with Jeff’s work from the TWIG (This Week in Google) podcast where he covers similar ground. That said, the book goes a bit deeper with some historical background that relates to the present, and some examples of how the “privacy” can be interpreted differently in other parts of the world. A chapter covers how radical and disturbing the concept In a bigger sense, this book is more about current economic and cultural shifts than privacy and sharing, altho both of those factor into it. I’m familiar with Jeff’s work from the TWIG (This Week in Google) podcast where he covers similar ground. That said, the book goes a bit deeper with some historical background that relates to the present, and some examples of how the “privacy” can be interpreted differently in other parts of the world. A chapter covers how radical and disturbing the concept of printing on paper and publishing books were to some back in the time of the early printing press. Also there are many examples of current day businesses trying more open and public solutionsto improve service and reach their customers. This is a good read as a primer for how the culture and economy are shifting in a big way as the world becomes increasingly transparent.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Brian Kirby

    This book is written on a higher level than what I am used to reading. That isn't a bad thing but it did not help my understanding of Mr. Jarvis' points. I also read this book in small parts over a long period of time and that did not help me either. I also did not enjoy how it felt like Mr. Jarvis was preaching at me or talking down at me. The content of the book was good and he had some excellent points. felt as though he was "beating a dead horse" towards the end of each chapter with the amou This book is written on a higher level than what I am used to reading. That isn't a bad thing but it did not help my understanding of Mr. Jarvis' points. I also read this book in small parts over a long period of time and that did not help me either. I also did not enjoy how it felt like Mr. Jarvis was preaching at me or talking down at me. The content of the book was good and he had some excellent points. felt as though he was "beating a dead horse" towards the end of each chapter with the amount of time spent on each point. The book was sourced excellently but I would expect no less from a journalism professor. Overall, I can't quite recommend this book. I might have enjoyed it better had I read it it larger sections or over a shorter time period. I just couldn't quite get over the talking-down tone.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Pete D'angelo

    as a semi-regular listener to this week in google, there wasn't much new here, but a decent summary of mr. jarvis' ideas on publicness and openness. while i agree with most of his ideas, i do find him almost naively optimistic at times. some things will always remain private. google will NEVER open-source its search algorithm, for example, for obvious reasons. it's their core asset and a major barrier of entry to would-be competitors. medical records are another example of something i think maki as a semi-regular listener to this week in google, there wasn't much new here, but a decent summary of mr. jarvis' ideas on publicness and openness. while i agree with most of his ideas, i do find him almost naively optimistic at times. some things will always remain private. google will NEVER open-source its search algorithm, for example, for obvious reasons. it's their core asset and a major barrier of entry to would-be competitors. medical records are another example of something i think making fully public would result in unintended negative consequences and discriminations. on the other hand, i do like the ideas and examples of crowd-sourced design and feedback loops. overall, author is a bit long-winded and academic at times, but some good narratives of companies and individuals creating interesting new ways to share and collaborate using open data sources.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kent Winward

    I do like to read the technological optimists. My main critique of the book is not that it didn't flood me with ideas and inspire me to explore the digital sharing realm more -- it did that. No, the problem was the book felt organized around those same sharing principles. I would have liked more organizational structure imposed by the author -- isn't that the point of the book or whatever it is we call the authorial voice compiled in one digital file? In the end, the book felt like lots of great I do like to read the technological optimists. My main critique of the book is not that it didn't flood me with ideas and inspire me to explore the digital sharing realm more -- it did that. No, the problem was the book felt organized around those same sharing principles. I would have liked more organizational structure imposed by the author -- isn't that the point of the book or whatever it is we call the authorial voice compiled in one digital file? In the end, the book felt like lots of great ideas, lots of excitement over new technology, lots of avenues to explore (and I completely enjoyed doing all that), but when I was finished, I was left with a familiar feeling. I felt the same as after 3 hours of reading news on line -- that was fun, great, entertaining -- and what was that again?

  24. 5 out of 5

    David “Skip” Everling

    Jarvis says so much of what I want to convey to people about privacy, both on the internet and as a basic concept. Thank goodness he and others like Clay Shirky are willing to put in the time and effort to break the issues down and make a reasoned case for publicness explicitly; this argument roils up worst-case fears and is not easily won. Whether you're more intrigued or concerned by the rapid shifts in privacy that are accompanying the digital age, Public Parts is worth a read for supporters Jarvis says so much of what I want to convey to people about privacy, both on the internet and as a basic concept. Thank goodness he and others like Clay Shirky are willing to put in the time and effort to break the issues down and make a reasoned case for publicness explicitly; this argument roils up worst-case fears and is not easily won. Whether you're more intrigued or concerned by the rapid shifts in privacy that are accompanying the digital age, Public Parts is worth a read for supporters and skeptics alike.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Muhammad Khan

    Jeff Jarvis, like he did with his previous book, "What would Google Do", has latched onto something big here:presenting the challenges of Public V Private, Open V Closed. The implications go way beyond the mass social network phenomenon, fast becoming relevant to the way companies and corporations are perceived, the power and value that open collaborative, participative relationships bring to the workplace and positive impact on society and communities. Jeff presents some interesting arguments f Jeff Jarvis, like he did with his previous book, "What would Google Do", has latched onto something big here:presenting the challenges of Public V Private, Open V Closed. The implications go way beyond the mass social network phenomenon, fast becoming relevant to the way companies and corporations are perceived, the power and value that open collaborative, participative relationships bring to the workplace and positive impact on society and communities. Jeff presents some interesting arguments for and against publicness, his research goes deep and material presented in a smooth coherent fashion making the book less of an academic text. IMHO the world has anyways to go yet before opening up to Jeff's ideas, I'm already taken by most of them! Book is highly recommended.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Netz

    extract out of a blog-discussion on which i was taking part,,, ,,,the book is quite good, not quite a page turner, but then you wouldn't expect that from this kind of book. I'm just over half way through. There are quite a few eye openers, bits of food for thought pop up every now and again, but mostly this is +Jeff Jarvis giving his opinion air, which is - in it's own right quite weighty and refreshing, but you shouldn't expect science here. Actually I'm hearing this book, via Audible, Jeff reads extract out of a blog-discussion on which i was taking part,,, ,,,the book is quite good, not quite a page turner, but then you wouldn't expect that from this kind of book. I'm just over half way through. There are quite a few eye openers, bits of food for thought pop up every now and again, but mostly this is +Jeff Jarvis giving his opinion air, which is - in it's own right quite weighty and refreshing, but you shouldn't expect science here. Actually I'm hearing this book, via Audible, Jeff reads it himself - so that's quite nice because I recognise him immediately from some podcasts that I regularly listen to.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Chris Wood

    Public parts is an excellent counter-argument to the strong privacy advocates surrounding the internet, social networks, facial recognition, and other challenges within today's society. Jarvis presents his points of view in well written, non-emotional (often found in privacy articles) and factual manors, both challenging as well as complementing privacy concerns. He takes the perspectives from many cultures, looking at their history & diving into why different countries are pro or against variou Public parts is an excellent counter-argument to the strong privacy advocates surrounding the internet, social networks, facial recognition, and other challenges within today's society. Jarvis presents his points of view in well written, non-emotional (often found in privacy articles) and factual manors, both challenging as well as complementing privacy concerns. He takes the perspectives from many cultures, looking at their history & diving into why different countries are pro or against various elements of the digital age. As we're constantly bombarded with the negatives of these technologies, Javris' Public Parts is a recommended read to help broaden our understandings & talking points.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Karen Mardahl

    Thought it was a bit superficial and too buddy-buddy with Facebook and Google at first. Then he starts getting at the heart of the matter about how we share our data. He raised valid questions and proposed good definitions of privacy and publicness. Still learning to take notes in audiobooks and finding I prefer paper books for non-fiction. Not sure marking in Kindle is good enough for my way of marking up a book. :)This is definitely a book to rerun to again and to share and to discuss. I like Thought it was a bit superficial and too buddy-buddy with Facebook and Google at first. Then he starts getting at the heart of the matter about how we share our data. He raised valid questions and proposed good definitions of privacy and publicness. Still learning to take notes in audiobooks and finding I prefer paper books for non-fiction. Not sure marking in Kindle is good enough for my way of marking up a book. :)This is definitely a book to rerun to again and to share and to discuss. I like that he has a website that shares all links from the book and encourages follow-up debates on the content.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    One of those books I saw an ad for in FastCompany or something, so it is about the tech industry and who, what, where, when, how should we keep stuff private? What are the limitations? How have things changed as technology has changed and what does it mean for us now? Thankfully, I quick read. Too much history for me. I like stuff that takes place in "the now" rather then a history lesson. But the author had to frame everything up. Also, the author threw in way too much personal stuff, but then, One of those books I saw an ad for in FastCompany or something, so it is about the tech industry and who, what, where, when, how should we keep stuff private? What are the limitations? How have things changed as technology has changed and what does it mean for us now? Thankfully, I quick read. Too much history for me. I like stuff that takes place in "the now" rather then a history lesson. But the author had to frame everything up. Also, the author threw in way too much personal stuff, but then, isn't that the point of this book? Kind of interesting how that all comes around, but all in all, I have read better tech books. This one hardly touched on it. Not exactly what I was expecting.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Nazary

    A very important book about a very important topic written rather poorly. Jeff Jarvis makes some excellent points in this book about the roles of publicness in our lives, what it means to be public, and the positive benefits of being public. His style wasn't for me however - it was like a series of random blog posts stapled together relying on random anecdotes then a cohesive whole. That being said moments of profound truth do poke out and this is clearly a topic he cares about and wants people A very important book about a very important topic written rather poorly. Jeff Jarvis makes some excellent points in this book about the roles of publicness in our lives, what it means to be public, and the positive benefits of being public. His style wasn't for me however - it was like a series of random blog posts stapled together relying on random anecdotes then a cohesive whole. That being said moments of profound truth do poke out and this is clearly a topic he cares about and wants people to know about. It's an unpolished book but one that should be read by anyone interested in Social Media and the future of the web.

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