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Eat Right 4 Your Type: The Individualized Diet Solution to Staying Healthy, Living Longer & Achieving Your Ideal Weight

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Dr. D'Adamo has spent the past fifteen years researching the connections among blood type, food, and disease, and his research is built on thirty years of work done by his father. Now Dr. D'Adamo offers a total resource for health, an individualized plan that's right for your blood type. In "Eat Right 4 Your Type" he shows which foods, spices, teas, and condiments help som Dr. D'Adamo has spent the past fifteen years researching the connections among blood type, food, and disease, and his research is built on thirty years of work done by his father. Now Dr. D'Adamo offers a total resource for health, an individualized plan that's right for your blood type. In "Eat Right 4 Your Type" he shows which foods, spices, teas, and condiments help someone of your blood type maintain optimal health and ideal weight; which vitamins and supplements to emphasize or avoid; which medications function best in your system; whether your stress goes to your muscles or your nervous system; whether your stress is relieved better through aerobics or meditation; whether you should walk, swim or play tennis or golf as your mode of exercise; how knowing your blood type can help you avoid many common viruses and infections; how knowing your blood type can help you fight back against life-threatening diseases; and how to slow down the aging process by avoiding factors specific to your blood type that cause rapid cell deterioration.


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Dr. D'Adamo has spent the past fifteen years researching the connections among blood type, food, and disease, and his research is built on thirty years of work done by his father. Now Dr. D'Adamo offers a total resource for health, an individualized plan that's right for your blood type. In "Eat Right 4 Your Type" he shows which foods, spices, teas, and condiments help som Dr. D'Adamo has spent the past fifteen years researching the connections among blood type, food, and disease, and his research is built on thirty years of work done by his father. Now Dr. D'Adamo offers a total resource for health, an individualized plan that's right for your blood type. In "Eat Right 4 Your Type" he shows which foods, spices, teas, and condiments help someone of your blood type maintain optimal health and ideal weight; which vitamins and supplements to emphasize or avoid; which medications function best in your system; whether your stress goes to your muscles or your nervous system; whether your stress is relieved better through aerobics or meditation; whether you should walk, swim or play tennis or golf as your mode of exercise; how knowing your blood type can help you avoid many common viruses and infections; how knowing your blood type can help you fight back against life-threatening diseases; and how to slow down the aging process by avoiding factors specific to your blood type that cause rapid cell deterioration.

30 review for Eat Right 4 Your Type: The Individualized Diet Solution to Staying Healthy, Living Longer & Achieving Your Ideal Weight

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jaline

    November 11, 1997 This was a review that had to be subjective because the book must be experienced rather than intellectualized. This review also goes back 20 years but in light of books and information coming out about the harmful effects of lectins on one’s body and immune system, I think it fits in well. So, back in time to 1997: At the time that this book came to me for reviewing, there were several major stresses occurring in my life simultaneously, and I was unnerved by how wearing they we November 11, 1997 This was a review that had to be subjective because the book must be experienced rather than intellectualized. This review also goes back 20 years but in light of books and information coming out about the harmful effects of lectins on one’s body and immune system, I think it fits in well. So, back in time to 1997: At the time that this book came to me for reviewing, there were several major stresses occurring in my life simultaneously, and I was unnerved by how wearing they were for me physically. Stress is a part of everyone's life, and I had always been able to transmute stress into an energy that I could utilize. Suddenly it wasn't working and my thoughts were running along the lines of, "Maybe I've got chronic fatigue syndrome" and similar scary places. Happily, I've been able to discard all of those notions ... along with 8 grocery bags full of food from my cupboards, 3 from my freezer, and 3 from my fridge! I gave all the groceries away and I hope that whoever has them belongs in a different food "type" than I do! Just through staying away from my "Avoid" list and eating foods on my "Highly Beneficial" and "Neutral" lists, my energy levels dramatically increased within two days of changing the foods I was eating: I was sleeping more hours at night for about a week and then that stabilized and reversed to where I now require less sleep than before I began; my energy levels not only increased, but stabilized -- no energy 'surges', but rather a strong, steady source of energy all day long. There have been many other changes, too, and perhaps more yet to come, but that shift in energy level, and the ability to move through the stresses in my life in a way that felt steady, clear, and connected was the most important change to me. So what is this "type" I'm talking about? The whole premise of this book really supports something I've always wondered about. I avoided various "nutrition programs" in the past because it seemed that for every person who raved about a new program, more others decried it. Dr. Peter D'Adamo's father, a naturopathic doctor (as is his son), noticed the very same thing many years ago and set out to discover why. It obviously wasn't a simple matter of preference -- some people literally did very poorly following a dietary regimen that was so ideal for other people. Dr. James D'Adamo discovered that there was a correlation between one's blood type and the kinds of foods that supported wellbeing and/or fostered dis-ease. He published his book, "One Man's Food" in 1980, inspired by the phrase "One man's food is another man's poison". Dr. Peter D'Adamo wanted to see if there was any scientific basis for this correlation and approached it from a different perspective. He felt that by finding connections between blood types and a predilection for certain diseases, it would supply the other side of the equation required for complete understanding of these inter-relationships. His own years of research paid off, and as a result, this book brings the two approaches together. The book talks about one's blood type being "a powerful genetic fingerprint that identifies you as surely as your DNA". It lists over two hundred foods for each type by "food family" in 3 categories: "Highly Beneficial" (the equivalent of medicine for your type), "Neutral" (functions as food for your type), and "Avoid" (the equivalent of a poison for your type). There are also several recipes given for each blood type. When one considers how few foods we tend to habitually gravitate toward, these food lists are both comprehensive and more than most of us would venture into! Dr. D'Adamo also talks about how one's blood type is "a more reliable measure of your identity than race, culture, or geography." For those who are interested in the anthropological aspects of blood type, he shows how the various blood types evolved through millennia with Type O being the oldest, type A evolving with agrarian society, type B coming into being with migration northward into colder, harsher territories, and type AB a relatively modern mixing and blending of different peoples. The book also gives several case studies of people who have received relief and remission from some serious medical conditions, as well as people who have found ease through more natural processes such as menopause, and milder medical conditions such as digestive disturbances and menstrual upsets. The toughest part for most people is just the thought of "giving up" foods that may be conditioned responses due to race or ethnic background, or just plain habit. The beauty of it is that it is so very easy to do so once you're past the thought ... at least, this is what I found and this has also been substantiated by several other people I know who are also following their foods-by-type regimen. Everything in me rebelled at the thought that my type actually requires nearly the opposite of what I've been eating for many years. At the same time, under the circumstances, I was willing to try anything if it would make a difference to my physical energy. So I promised myself to try it for a week (not really very generous) and see how I felt. The rest is, as they say, "herstory". I'm so impressed that I'm planning on giving this book as a gift to all of my family and friends who don't already have it. I don't ever remember being so quickly or easily 'converted' into anything in my life, but the difference in how I felt (and feel) was a pretty strong incentive. After finally receiving the book, it was interesting to then read the background on everything, including why foods end up on one's "Avoid" list ... that is, certain foods produce lectins that slow down the metabolism, others interfere with insulin production, others cause hypoglycemia, and so on ... but specifically according to one's type. A food that might adversely affect my thyroid could actually speed up your metabolism or vice versa! The most fascinating aspect to me is that, just as Dr. James D'Adamo discovered and Dr. Peter D'Adamo verified, "One man's food is another man's poison". Perhaps if everyone began eating right for their type, there would even be a major shift in how food is produced and consumed, with plenty of good nourishment to go around for everyone!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jonny Cox

    The bible never mentions apples. The Book of Genesis only refers to the fruit from the tree of knowledge and I believe that Eve caused the fall of man with a tomato; it is the Devil's fruit. All my life I felt like an oddity because I so detest the gooey red mess until I read this book. D'Adamo explains in the intro that type A blood groups can't digest the Devil's fruit because of insufficient stomach acid. This made sense so I read the rest of the book and gave up milk. WithIn 72 hours I felt The bible never mentions apples. The Book of Genesis only refers to the fruit from the tree of knowledge and I believe that Eve caused the fall of man with a tomato; it is the Devil's fruit. All my life I felt like an oddity because I so detest the gooey red mess until I read this book. D'Adamo explains in the intro that type A blood groups can't digest the Devil's fruit because of insufficient stomach acid. This made sense so I read the rest of the book and gave up milk. WithIn 72 hours I felt much, much better. D'Adamo explains that milk is an antigen, it provokes your Immune system. I have MS, which is an immune disorder. Following the dietary regime in this book quite possibly saved my life, it certainly slowed the progression of my incurable, degenerative condition. It has cured my hay fever, the arthritis, it has also stopped the eczema that my young boys were getting. I strongly recommend this to anyone with a health condition, low energy levels, weight problems or any concerns of a health nature. It may well change your life.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kelli

    I’m not sure it’s fair for me to review this book because I only read the parts relevant to my blood type. My copy is 21 years old, so inevitably some advice, such as avoiding coconut oil because of its high fat content, is outdated. Nutrition is kind of a crapshoot anyway, as advice varies drastically from one diet to the next. I find it interesting that many naturopaths subscribe to this way of eating, especially where bio-individuality is at the forefront of nutrition, but I must say the sect I’m not sure it’s fair for me to review this book because I only read the parts relevant to my blood type. My copy is 21 years old, so inevitably some advice, such as avoiding coconut oil because of its high fat content, is outdated. Nutrition is kind of a crapshoot anyway, as advice varies drastically from one diet to the next. I find it interesting that many naturopaths subscribe to this way of eating, especially where bio-individuality is at the forefront of nutrition, but I must say the section about my blood type seemed applicable to my situation. The general advice to up vegetable intake, avoid sugar, limited inflammatory foods, manage stress & exercise are all good. I will revisit in a month or two and update how this is working out for me. 3 stars for now.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jodi

    Some of the concepts in this book are not fully scientifically supportable, but the diet may still make lots and lots of people feel a whole lot better and attain a much greater level of health! These two things are not mutually exclusive. Reasons the claims made about the scientific merit of the exact food lists provided for each blood type are unconvincing (on the whole) to me include: 1. I have read more than half a dozen detailed and methodical explanations of why the scientific concepts in th Some of the concepts in this book are not fully scientifically supportable, but the diet may still make lots and lots of people feel a whole lot better and attain a much greater level of health! These two things are not mutually exclusive. Reasons the claims made about the scientific merit of the exact food lists provided for each blood type are unconvincing (on the whole) to me include: 1. I have read more than half a dozen detailed and methodical explanations of why the scientific concepts in the 'Blood Type' books are based on sketchy and incomplete science. While some of the theory makes sense, they found holes in the theory and the way the food lists have been compiled big enough to drive buses through. These were not in books which deny the validity of anything that is not 'mainstream' - quite the opposite in fact. These were by some of the best health and nutrition authors around. Their arguments were very compelling (although I don't have the time to go into them here). There are also numerous articles online that contain this information which you can find by Googling. The general consensus is that the author has part of his theory right, but the way it is being presented as a complete theory with all questions answered is not correct. 2. Even if it's true that our blood type has an enormous amount to do with what we should eat, the concept of biochemical individuality would still mean that there would be just as many differences between what people with the same blood type would eat, as similarities. People are remarkably individual on a biochemical level as the book Biochemical Individuality explains. 3. Family members with the same blood type often do well on very different diets. This illustrates the above principle, and also the concept that different diets suit you at different times of your life in response to all sorts of bodily changes, disease processes and so on. 3. The topic of this diet comes up now and then in chat groups and I have only very rarely heard it discussed favourably - perhaps by a single person? Most say very clearly that it didn't help them and was a waste of time and effort. The book The Body Ecology Diet: Recovering Your Health and Rebuilding Your Immunity explains that the blood type diet books provide valuable clues about which foods may suit us best, but that it should be considered a theory still in development. The author points out that: - The research has not been adapted for those with Candida issues, acidic conditions or other serious immune disorders. - The blood type diet does not emphasise the importance of eating cultured foods. For example, type Os are advised to cut out brassica vegetables such as cabbage entirely as they affect thyroid function. This may make the diet needlessly limited. But all that is needed is for these foods to be cultured, and they pose no problem! (That is a MASSIVE MASSIVE oversight for those of us with already very limited diets!) - No protein guide is given for vegetarian type Os and Bs. - Food combining is ignored. - All blood types are advised to avoid apple cider vinegar, which is highly medicinal, aids digestion and is alkalising. - Food preparation methods are not discussed which can make some foods well tolerated. (Soaked almonds and cabbage made into sauerkraut are very different to raw or roasted almonds and plain cabbage, for example.) - Lots of foods that feed yeast are recommended on the diet. - Unfermented soy is recommended, despite the fact this is difficult to digest and unhealthy. - Dairy is given undue importance and over recommended. - Wheat may cause problems for all blood types yet it is recommended on this diet for some blood types. - The blood type diet advises avoiding coconut oil, and supports many of the myths surrounding this excellent food as explained in Know Your Fats : The Complete Primer for Understanding the Nutrition of Fats, Oils and Cholesterol. - No distinction is made between refined and unrefined oils. - Many of the fruits and vegetables on the allowed lists and the avoid lists for each blood type do not seem to tally with the author's experience with patients and for the most part, all the blood types do well eating the same fruits and vegetables (with the exception of tomatoes). But this blood type diet book can still improve your health possibly, because: 1. It advises cutting out junk food. 2. It advises choosing higher quality *organic* vegetables, fruit and meats and eggs. 3. It advises upping your vegetable intake. 4. It advises lots of people to cut out foods such as dairy, grains and legumes - which are some of the most common food allergens, which most people have no idea they are allergic to. The lectins in grains and legumes also cause a lot of problems for many people. 5. It advises lots of people to cut out foods such as grains and legumes - which are very high carbohydrate. This will lead to easy weight loss for lots of people. Considering these 5 factors alone, almost anyone would benefit from going on this diet. These are 5 pieces of simply excellent advice! But you would also get many of the same benefits from following any healthy whole food eating plan or at least any which avoided recommending grain and legume consumption, as all the Paleo diet books do. If you do have allergies or a problem dealing with carbohydrates, or a need for lots of fat and protein in your diet, you better hope you are a type O though. The basics of the type 0 program happen to fit me well by chance (though it doesn't at all fit family members of mine that have the same blood type) but I bet lots of others that aren't Os do poorly eating such a high carb diet so high in grains and legumes! (This must be why the author has revised down the amount of grains it is okay for non-Os to eat, in more recent books.) The author's belief in the blood type diet concept seems to have escalated to faith, as one reviewer said. It cannot hurt to try this diet for a short time, probably. But there are far easier ways to go about getting healthy and losing weight that are nowhere near as enormously complicated, or as needlessly restrictive, potentially. You might start with a simple book on nutrition and eating real food such as Real Food: What to Eat and Why or, if you desire to lose weight as well as improve your health, Eat Fat, Lose Fat: The Healthy Alternative to Trans Fats. If you suspect that you may have an issue with grains and legumes (and/or want to lose weight while getting healthier), then you might want to read some of the books on the Paleo diet and try this diet for a while. There are lots of good books on this topic including The Primal Blueprint: Reprogram your genes for effortless weight loss, vibrant health, and boundless energy (Primal Blueprint Series) as well as lots of free information online. If you suspect you have food allergies you may want to have ELISA testing done, do some pulse testing, go on an elimination diet and then a 4 day rotation diet. You may also want to look into issues surrounding having a 'leaky gut' which is one of the main causes of food allergies. Suspect leaky gut if you have been a heavy user of NSAIDs, aspirin, ibuprofen etc. Books such as No More Heartburn: Stop the Pain in 30 Days--Naturally! : The Safe, Effective Way to Prevent and Heal Chronic Gastrointestinal Disorders can be helpful in treating this condition. To read about the fats we all need you may want to read Know Your Fats : The Complete Primer for Understanding the Nutrition of Fats, Oils and Cholesterol and Deep Nutrition: Why Your Genes Need Traditional Food. All of these books have a solid scientific basis. Eat real food, consider that you may have hidden food allergies and try to find the diet that suits YOU as an individual, I say! At best this book promotes a very incomplete and flawed theory that only explains one small part of the science of what we should each be eating and why, rather than the whole answer. Unfortunately the issue relies on many other factors in addition to blood type and is far more complicated. I quite enjoyed finding out what blood type I was finally! I'm an O negative blood type. It always felt weird that I didn't know this. The three stars in this rating are for the 5 excellent diet tips included in this book, as listed above. Jodi Bassett, The Hummingbirds' Foundation for Myalgic Encephalomyelitis Quote: "The "blood type" diet is more hype than substance. I am a blood type "A" eating a blood type "O" diet and doing fabulously. The "Eat Right for Your Blood Type" thing is just bad science, in a nutshell." Nora Gedgaudas, author of Primal Body, Primal Mind

  5. 5 out of 5

    Nick Fagerlund

    This book came up in a conversation with Kathleen before she went east — a relative of hers had gotten significant benefit from following some or another nugget of counterintuitive advice from it, which sort of thing is perfect grist for our style of shit-shooting. Anyway, I thought the premise sounded too weird to ignore, so I checked it out from the library. Basically, D’Adamo says that your blood type determines (or is at least the primary influence on) your metabolism and your ability to dige This book came up in a conversation with Kathleen before she went east — a relative of hers had gotten significant benefit from following some or another nugget of counterintuitive advice from it, which sort of thing is perfect grist for our style of shit-shooting. Anyway, I thought the premise sounded too weird to ignore, so I checked it out from the library. Basically, D’Adamo says that your blood type determines (or is at least the primary influence on) your metabolism and your ability to digest specific foods, and follows with a rather detailed rundown on how you should be eating. He backs this edifice up with his personal clinical experience (presented as a series of anecdotes dispersed throughout the text) and some extremely dodgy anthropology that reminds me of nothing so much as the Jakeskin from Templar, AZ. In terms of references to peer-reviewed studies demonstrating the mechanisms he postulates, well, not so much. (And he lets slip once or twice that he advocates homeopathy. Red flag!) So I was skeptical. But honestly? I found myself wanting to believe what he was saying. Mostly because of this feeling that ABO blood types have to be good for something besides transfusion complications and manga character taxonomy. Really, why shouldn’t the, you know, very makeup of your humours affect your digestion? And this, friends, is probably why the book managed to become such a big hit. Anyway, like I said, I checked it out. Apparently, as a Type O (The mighty hunter(/gatherer)! Roaming the African Plains in search of MEAT! Never mind that most of the protein in the appropriator diet seems to have come from bugs), I should be eating approximately the diet that my Type A (The vegetarian farmer! GRAAAAIIIIINNNZZZZ!) sister eats, while she in turn ought to be craving the pseudo-vegetarian diet that comes naturally to me. Reductionism and uninstinctiveness aside, I still couldn’t, at the end, see any reason to be eating the diet he advocates — it’s all just his word, with nothing concrete to back it up, and the outlook gets even worse when you google “blood type diet” to find out what holes the critics have been poking in D’Adamo’s research/lack-thereof. The plural of “anecdote” is still not “data.” Unsettlingly, there was a whole bunch of what seemed like genuine insight interspersed with the arrant nonsense—Type Os are supposed to have a particular affinity with broccoli and kales, and boy howdy do I ever—but I ultimately have to write it off as a cognitive artifact. The brain wants patterns, and it will damn well have them, whether or not they’re there at the start. No, I didn’t actually try the diet. For all I know, it may really be the key to a happy and healthy life. I’m still calling this book a loss. On the other other other hand, it did provide some inspiration to try giving up wheat for a few weeks, which seems to have caused me to get noticeably thinner with no further effort. So there is that. (Wait, do you still have an other hand free? In the tiny blood type fortune-telling section at the end of each division of the book, he refers to some historical personage as “the penultimate gambler.” Mister, I am pretty sure that does not mean what you think it does. Just saying.)

  6. 4 out of 5

    Agnė

    Well... I finally finished reading this book only because my library wouldn't let me keep it any longer. I started reading it because I heard a lot of different opinions about Blood Type Diet and wanted to know more about it. While reading this book, I actually tried to avoid foods which are harmful for my blood type. Since I felt pretty healthy before this diet anyways, I did not experience any significant benefits. This January, a new study came out, which found no scientific evidence for the B Well... I finally finished reading this book only because my library wouldn't let me keep it any longer. I started reading it because I heard a lot of different opinions about Blood Type Diet and wanted to know more about it. While reading this book, I actually tried to avoid foods which are harmful for my blood type. Since I felt pretty healthy before this diet anyways, I did not experience any significant benefits. This January, a new study came out, which found no scientific evidence for the Blood Type Diet whatsoever, except the fact that diets recommended for different blood types are pretty healthy in general and would benefit a person of any blood type. Anyways, now I am back at eating my regular diet and enjoying tomatoes, avocados, chicken, peanuts, some wheat etc. (all the forbidden pleasures!) in a moderation. Generally, I liked the idea of the Blood Type Diet and some points made by the author seemed very reasonable. However, in my opinion, the book is quite out dated and lacks hard proof as most of the conclusions are drawn from the observational studies (which are quite subjective) and generalizations (something like having a theory and trying to fit it everywhere) rather than objective scientific evidence. Since I have some scientific background, the book seems a little bit repetitive and some explanations are over simplified, but it might be good for someone who has no scientific background. All in all, I think the Blood Type Diet theory is not a complete nonsense but I do not agree with the author that EVERYTHING about us is determined by our blood type, and living, eating, and exercising by our blood type is the only way to go.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I borrowed this book from my Mom years ago. I set it aside thinking it would be too bio-scientific for my taste. I was wrong about that. It was definitely written so the average person could easily comprehend. This book was a very interesting read. It walked through the evolution of blood types and how they formed the premise of human diets today. I concentrated on the O types since that's what I am. My success with this nutrition plan was achieved in the opposite way of most. In my quest to live I borrowed this book from my Mom years ago. I set it aside thinking it would be too bio-scientific for my taste. I was wrong about that. It was definitely written so the average person could easily comprehend. This book was a very interesting read. It walked through the evolution of blood types and how they formed the premise of human diets today. I concentrated on the O types since that's what I am. My success with this nutrition plan was achieved in the opposite way of most. In my quest to live a healthier life, I toyed with my diet over the past couple years. Through trial and error, I migrated towards the "Type O diet" but did so before I read this book. I'm not entirely convinced that this would work for anyone; however, my success through trial and error certainly has supported the book's theories. Interestingly, many of the characteristics held true for close family members, as well. What I also find interesting when looking at the comments by other "readers" (and I use that term loosely) who gave it a * or ** rating is that I cannot conclude whether any of them actually tried the nutrition plan and failed (or even read the book!). Those that did comment simply dismissed this as "theory" that at best makes interesting reading. I'm flabbergasted how people are so willing to put unnatural, synthetic drugs into their system because someone with an MD next to their name says so (and that MD has likely never actually studied the drug) over someone who has studied a field for years, has "tested" his theory on actual humans and has found that theory to work. Oh, and one other small item: he's suggesting foods that the human body has been known to tolerate for thousands of years! I guess, like everything else, people want the quick fix and not the best one. Like I said, I'm not convinced this will work for everyone. But I am convinced that, since it's natural, the worst case is you waste a few dollars and some time/energy.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ebookwormy1

    The idea of this work, that your blood type determines what you should eat and how you should exercise, is compelling, so I borrowed it from a friend. Of course, I started by skimming my own blood type, and I found it to be much like reading a horoscope in a Sunday paper. Sure, there were some things that seemed to fit, but there were also some things that were the exact opposite of my experience. I laughed out loud when I read that certain Types are subject to heart disease and cancer! Oh reall The idea of this work, that your blood type determines what you should eat and how you should exercise, is compelling, so I borrowed it from a friend. Of course, I started by skimming my own blood type, and I found it to be much like reading a horoscope in a Sunday paper. Sure, there were some things that seemed to fit, but there were also some things that were the exact opposite of my experience. I laughed out loud when I read that certain Types are subject to heart disease and cancer! Oh really, those are only the top two killers in the US, thanks so much for letting me know! :) The lack of actual research/ study citations becomes glaring in light of so many 'scientific' assertions, althought anticdotal case studies abound, further facilitating the feeling that this book is more about the author (and his desire to break new ground and/or recruit followers) than the book's actual content. And yet I could not back away from the appeal of the idea. Wanting to take my investigation a step further, I called my mom, the resident medical expert of our family. We discussed our family history and how it fit within the rubric of D'Adamo's theories, and our conclusions were pretty much the same as mine previous. The categories of blood type, as presented, simply failed to provide insight into our family health history. Finally, I read a few goodreads reviews, and looked the idea up on the web by googling, "Blood Type Diet". It seems that others had the same problems with Dr. D'Adamo's theories as I did. There is simply no research to support his ideas, and in the end, the types he sketches out are so general that those willing to believe will quickly see themselves in his writing and disregard all that doesn't fit. Not recommended at all. Well, I guess if you are studying mass hysteria, development of cult followings, or something similar, D'Adamo's book might interest you.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Latiffany

    I don't think it is fair for me to write that I read this book because in actuality, I skimmed it. A coworker suggested this book about two years ago. I immediately purchased it and went to the doctor to confirm my blood type. Shortly after, the same coworker said that her doctor informed her that the book is junk science. I never told my doctor why I needed to know my blood type, so I can't 100% concur. I will agree that there is no way that I am limiting myself to foods outlined in this book fo I don't think it is fair for me to write that I read this book because in actuality, I skimmed it. A coworker suggested this book about two years ago. I immediately purchased it and went to the doctor to confirm my blood type. Shortly after, the same coworker said that her doctor informed her that the book is junk science. I never told my doctor why I needed to know my blood type, so I can't 100% concur. I will agree that there is no way that I am limiting myself to foods outlined in this book for people with my blood type. However, I will say that some of the foods that were suggested for people with my blood type, I already eat and crave. Science or coincidence? I don't know. The lovely thing about this book is that unless you are just drawn to the subject and history of blood types, you can simply read up on yours and put the book away. That's what I did, which is why I won't say that I read it in its entirety. I read the portions that pertained to me. Overall, I did not find it beneficial. I found it to be painfully boring.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    After reading this book I can't tell you how dangerous I think it is. If there was a negative rating I would have chosen it. The idea behind this book is that certain blood types should only eat certain foods and completely omit other foods from their diets. I can see a whole hatfull of problems with that theory and that's what this is really. Theory. Tell me when and where in the history of life that there is any proof or evidence to support this? I've heard of some close friends that have subjec After reading this book I can't tell you how dangerous I think it is. If there was a negative rating I would have chosen it. The idea behind this book is that certain blood types should only eat certain foods and completely omit other foods from their diets. I can see a whole hatfull of problems with that theory and that's what this is really. Theory. Tell me when and where in the history of life that there is any proof or evidence to support this? I've heard of some close friends that have subjected their children to this type of hooey diet, so I called my children's pediatrician and asked his opinion. He has agreed that this book is a bunch of nonsense and actually dangerous to try out on children as well as adults. Don't waste your time. I'm not sure if the person writing this book got his degree from a Cracker Jack box or what.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Finbar

    An interesting approach to diet and lifestyle, but a bit too generalized to be effective. I thought this would be a helpful tool to tweak my eating habits, but it reads more like a "fad diet" book. There are a few effective arguments and good advise to be found in here, but it just has too much pseudo-jargon to be useful. This book just didn't resonate with me. An interesting approach to diet and lifestyle, but a bit too generalized to be effective. I thought this would be a helpful tool to tweak my eating habits, but it reads more like a "fad diet" book. There are a few effective arguments and good advise to be found in here, but it just has too much pseudo-jargon to be useful. This book just didn't resonate with me.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Maarten Koller

    The author tells stories instead of backing up his ideas with science. No references at all in this book. Unless research confirms the ideas of the author, that is all they are, ideas and not facts. Also consider the fact that he published his book/ideas in 1997, if it hasn't been confirmed by now, will it ever? The author tells stories instead of backing up his ideas with science. No references at all in this book. Unless research confirms the ideas of the author, that is all they are, ideas and not facts. Also consider the fact that he published his book/ideas in 1997, if it hasn't been confirmed by now, will it ever?

  13. 4 out of 5

    Monica Willyard Moen

    This is an interesting book with an interesting approach to good health and losing weight. I don’t agree with everything I’ve read or except all of it as valid, but I do think the author has some valid points. I believe our world was created by God, so I don’t except his theory of evolutionary biology as valid. However, I do believe that different body types, different blood types, could mean that we process foods differently. I have seen some people thrive on a high-protein, low-carb diet. I ha This is an interesting book with an interesting approach to good health and losing weight. I don’t agree with everything I’ve read or except all of it as valid, but I do think the author has some valid points. I believe our world was created by God, so I don’t except his theory of evolutionary biology as valid. However, I do believe that different body types, different blood types, could mean that we process foods differently. I have seen some people thrive on a high-protein, low-carb diet. I have seen others who seem miserable doing a low-carb diet but who flourish on a high fiber vegetarian diet. Al I believe that our bodies with our personal chemistry are quite unique, so it makes sense to me that we would need different types of food depending on our bodies’ ability to process foods. I don’t think we have to agree on evolution as the basis for these unique differences. I respect his opinion, and I do see why he looks at things from that viewpoint. As for the eating plans themselves, they are definitely different from anything I have tried in the past. I am going to give my blood type’s plan a good 30 day trial to see what happens. The eating plans seem balanced enough that this doesn’t look like a crazy fad diet. There is a cookbook available that acts as a companion, modifying recipes for each blood type. The author also has a separate cookbook with additional recipes and meal ideas for each of the blood types. The recipes sound tasty, and I’m looking forward to this as an adventure.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne

    I was reading this for a challenge, vs. as a seeker of a diet, which probably didn't help, but I really had to push through this time. First off, while I do not buy into (nor can I disprove) the link between blood type and dietary needs, I think any of the diets advocated in this book are healthy, and people could be successful choosing/following one. I just have a hard time buying lots of the claims. There are a lot of scientific terms thrown about, and it is mostly just stated that they are true I was reading this for a challenge, vs. as a seeker of a diet, which probably didn't help, but I really had to push through this time. First off, while I do not buy into (nor can I disprove) the link between blood type and dietary needs, I think any of the diets advocated in this book are healthy, and people could be successful choosing/following one. I just have a hard time buying lots of the claims. There are a lot of scientific terms thrown about, and it is mostly just stated that they are true. Maybe it is the mathematician in me, but I like proof, not claims. However, since I haven't tried it, I certainly can't say for sure it doesn't work :) It just disagrees with quite a few of the things that have worked for me with diet and exercise. My rating is solely about my personal enjoyment/opinion. But again, if you need some healthy dietary guidelines, this could work well for you.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Chad Simons

    This was definitely a very interesting read. Well put together. Convincing. Also, somewhat over-the-top. Dr. D'Adamo presents a believable case. Backs it up with stated research. I am not doubting him by any means, but I am doubting my ability to follow this diet. Of course all of my favorite foods are the bad ones for my blood type. I wish I could say I will give this diet a try and get back to you, but I won't. I know me. Sad but true. This book lays it all out for you though. It makes it easy This was definitely a very interesting read. Well put together. Convincing. Also, somewhat over-the-top. Dr. D'Adamo presents a believable case. Backs it up with stated research. I am not doubting him by any means, but I am doubting my ability to follow this diet. Of course all of my favorite foods are the bad ones for my blood type. I wish I could say I will give this diet a try and get back to you, but I won't. I know me. Sad but true. This book lays it all out for you though. It makes it easy to get started and follow if you have the desire and ambition. For me, the change would be huge, and I am not wholly convinced in the argument that my blood type has to eat a certain way. If I was, I might be more successful at following such a strict regimen. Anyway, I don't know that this is another diet fad, but if you are looking for something to try after trying everything else, this may be for you.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    I listened to the audiobook and the abridged version...free from the library. It was a quick 3+ hour listen. The actual book that I attempted years ago is actually pretty robust with a lot of scientific information. This was a good review for what one can use immediately in the way of diet changes to follow his/her blood type diet. I do follow it for mine and it’s very beneficial. More than other diets I’ve tried.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Pamela(AllHoney)

    This book deals with the idea that your blood type determines what foods you should eat to maintain a healthy lifestyle. It actually made a lot of sense to me. We may be made equally but we are also made differently. Really no two people are exactly alike. I was sad to learn, since I am a type A, I should be eating a mostly vegetarian diet. My husband and my mom are type O. I have good intentions of trying to follow the guidelines of this book but I fear my love of meat may be my downfall. Especi This book deals with the idea that your blood type determines what foods you should eat to maintain a healthy lifestyle. It actually made a lot of sense to me. We may be made equally but we are also made differently. Really no two people are exactly alike. I was sad to learn, since I am a type A, I should be eating a mostly vegetarian diet. My husband and my mom are type O. I have good intentions of trying to follow the guidelines of this book but I fear my love of meat may be my downfall. Especially since I have so many type Os around me. The good news is I love fish so maybe I'll do okay.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kerry Shoji

    When I look back on the foods I am drawn to and what foods make me feel better, Dr. D'Adamo's explanations made sense to me. When I look back on the foods I am drawn to and what foods make me feel better, Dr. D'Adamo's explanations made sense to me.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    Interesting concept, but am I ever going to give up wheat or avocados? Not a chance.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lauren Petruzzi

    Awesome book. My family and I read his original 1997 book which stood the test of time and proved to be worth its weight in gold. (Especially after I tested the concept by ignoring type O recommendations for several years in my 20's and trying to be vegan... talk about contrast. Live and learn!) Anyhow, the revised and updated edition is even better and definitely worth buying. I was very happy to see the food lists expanded to include items that weren't mainstream or available in the late 90's, Awesome book. My family and I read his original 1997 book which stood the test of time and proved to be worth its weight in gold. (Especially after I tested the concept by ignoring type O recommendations for several years in my 20's and trying to be vegan... talk about contrast. Live and learn!) Anyhow, the revised and updated edition is even better and definitely worth buying. I was very happy to see the food lists expanded to include items that weren't mainstream or available in the late 90's, as well as new symbols to indicate foods that support the microbiome. The narrative is also expanded to include new topics that are relevant in our society now. Highly recommended.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Rose

    I'm sorry to see so many giving in to doctor's claims of quakery and not using some common sense. This idea of blood types and how foods affect people based on that has come at a time in my food evolution where it makes absolute sense. I've studied and experienced so many theories of food-styles--the most recent being the raw food diet. Within them is always the catch of how some foods work better or worse for different people. So why is that? This seems to be a poosible answer. I find that many I'm sorry to see so many giving in to doctor's claims of quakery and not using some common sense. This idea of blood types and how foods affect people based on that has come at a time in my food evolution where it makes absolute sense. I've studied and experienced so many theories of food-styles--the most recent being the raw food diet. Within them is always the catch of how some foods work better or worse for different people. So why is that? This seems to be a poosible answer. I find that many of the foods that benefit me are ones that I naturally came to enjoy, perhaps because they make me feel good, and the reverse can be said of most of the foods I should avoid. An example, I gave up dairy for a time and lost a bunch of weight. Turns out that that's what happens with my blood type. I don't think we put two and two together to realize that foods can make us sick, but over time, if we're not operating at our optimum, the body gives in, or reacts. If we're tuned into how food effects us, we're probably close to eating right. Someone commented about the exercises and other recommendations. I think they are just that, recommendations. You can do other things, but, generally speaking, this fits, too. My type, for instance recommends more gentle exercise. I love bicycling and working up a good sweat, but admittedly I can't do it every day. I can do yoga every day, though. So, it makes sense. It's the same with food. Do the beneficials most of the time. Eating outside of that periodically will not, probably, cause problems. But if done regularly, then the odds are greater, either way. Finally, I find that when I stay with benficial foods as described in the book, I do feel brighter and more alert. When I don't, that's when the brain fog settles in....If the brain is foggy, the blood is also foggy and affecting all the other organs as well; we just don't feel it the same way, or immediately, perhaps. I highly recommend this, with an open mind. The best way to comment is to experiment on yourselfand see/feel how it works. You can get a list of foods from the author's website. And an easy way to find your blood type is to donate to the American Red Cross. It's free and helps others in the process!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Indi Martin

    I hate "diet books." I am not really big on self-help books either. The detoxification retreat I went to recommended this book very highly - in fact, it is the only nutrition plan they recommend. Thus, I read the book while there, and wrote down the pointers for my blood type (Type 0) in my notebook. I also read about a thousand reviews of the diet, from physicians to proponents, skeptics to housewives who have been following it. Interesting. The theory sounds like a load of crap. Blood type, as ma I hate "diet books." I am not really big on self-help books either. The detoxification retreat I went to recommended this book very highly - in fact, it is the only nutrition plan they recommend. Thus, I read the book while there, and wrote down the pointers for my blood type (Type 0) in my notebook. I also read about a thousand reviews of the diet, from physicians to proponents, skeptics to housewives who have been following it. Interesting. The theory sounds like a load of crap. Blood type, as many of the outraged physicians ("this wasn't even peer-reviewed!" they gasp), has nothing to do with diet. But there are a few physicians who tried it on their harder cases, and saw results. Okay. I'll say 1 to 2 out of 5 physicians recommend this diet. Even the very skeptical generally agreed that it wasn't a harmful diet, so there's that. The reviews from "normal people" were much more interesting. Hundreds swore by it. Listening to them, it helped them lose a great deal of weight, and cured all manner of ailments, from asthma to arthritis to cancer to zits. I will say that last night's "experiment" has made me a bit more of a believer, questionable scientific basis or not. I've eaten according to the "diet" (it's not a "diet," per se, it's lists of food that you should or should not try to include in your daily intakes for the rest of your life) for the last week or so (since my fast). Last night, we splurged on pizza. OMG. It tasted great! Type O's are not supposed to have gluten, or dairy, except in small doses. This was not a small dose. For the first time since I quit smoking, I woke up feeling awful. Sluggish and fuzzy. Totally unclear. Couldn't concentrate. Lungs full of mucus as though I'd smoked a pack of cigarettes instead of simply eaten something delicious. In other words, all of the side effects that Type O's apparently suffer from.. *drumroll* gluten (wheat and white flour) and dairy. Hm. I wouldn't say I'm a believer quite yet, but we'll see how it goes. I'm definitely going to say that my body, blood type connection or not, does do better without large amounts of gluten and dairy!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Virginia Jacobs

    Okay, first, some clarification: I did not read this entire book. I read through my blood type, O, and I perused my husband's blood type, A. This book started out a little scientific-y, basically arguing the premise that if your blood fuels your body, then what you eat should fuel your blood. And, as we know there are different blood types, so it stands to reason that they could be fueled differently. I picked up this book for a variety of reasons, including that I'm trying to lose a little weigh Okay, first, some clarification: I did not read this entire book. I read through my blood type, O, and I perused my husband's blood type, A. This book started out a little scientific-y, basically arguing the premise that if your blood fuels your body, then what you eat should fuel your blood. And, as we know there are different blood types, so it stands to reason that they could be fueled differently. I picked up this book for a variety of reasons, including that I'm trying to lose a little weight, and that by living with a vegetarian I discovered that she could eat foods and feel full and energetic, and I'd eat the same thing and be STARVING ten minutes later. So, I thought, it stands to reason that certain diets are more favorable to certain people. But then the book got ridiculous and complicated. First, it's not easy to keep track of what you can and can't eat. For example, I'm allowed tomatoes and salt but not ketsup. Then it has all of these particular things you can do, and I feel like, yes, but I have a real job, I don't have time to go to the store and track down the whole list of things I can eat. I've never heave heard of hake, white perch, essene bread, kohlrabi, and a whole list of other things. And any diet I go on has to be compatable with my husband. So the big picture is that I get to eat lots of meat, fruits, and veggies, and very little to no dairy products and grains. My husband gets to eat meat, except red meat, fruits, and veggies, and a little more dairy and grains than I do. Um, is this a surprising diet at all? I didn't think so. And it just doesn't sound like very much fun.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    I know some people find this book to be great, but I find it to be hooey quackery. Lots of contradictions and "maybes" and "possiblies" and "not everyones". Apparently, I'm supposed to eat tofu, soy cheese (which is not food, in my opinion), walk, and do yoga. If that's my existence, I might as well just keel over and die. I'd dig the hole first, but I'm not supposed to do any strenuous activities :) I am supposed to eat peanut butter and pineapple, though. YUM!!!! I must be one of the "exception I know some people find this book to be great, but I find it to be hooey quackery. Lots of contradictions and "maybes" and "possiblies" and "not everyones". Apparently, I'm supposed to eat tofu, soy cheese (which is not food, in my opinion), walk, and do yoga. If that's my existence, I might as well just keel over and die. I'd dig the hole first, but I'm not supposed to do any strenuous activities :) I am supposed to eat peanut butter and pineapple, though. YUM!!!! I must be one of the "exceptions to the rule" he talks about so often in the book. This one is not working for me, and is going back to the library!!!! As far as diet plans go, the plans are reasonable and sensible, for the most part. So, that part I can understand. But the whole blood type thing and you should eat this and must avoid that, not so much. Eat real food, mostly plants, not too much. I do believe that's the best diet out there!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Maria

    I've dipped in and out of this book for a long time, but never read it cover to cover. Definitely very interesting, makes you think a lot about the food you are eating and in my experience seems to work quite well (at least for me). However I did find the explanation for importance of blood type a bit lacking (the first few chapters) and I still feel it is not quite as simple as there being 4 blood types and 4 ways of eating. Within each type is further complexity based on your own genetic make I've dipped in and out of this book for a long time, but never read it cover to cover. Definitely very interesting, makes you think a lot about the food you are eating and in my experience seems to work quite well (at least for me). However I did find the explanation for importance of blood type a bit lacking (the first few chapters) and I still feel it is not quite as simple as there being 4 blood types and 4 ways of eating. Within each type is further complexity based on your own genetic make up so whilst the book is a useful starting point and can probably get you on the right track, I think it requires further experimentation and probably working with a naturopathic doctor to really discover what is right for you. That being said it's a very interesting idea, the basis of which I'm quite keen to explore further.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Tortla

    I mostly just read the introduction and the chapter on my blood type. But from what I did read, I got a pretty strong impression of the type of advice that was being dispensed. Basically, it's like vaguely-racist astrology. The ideas behind the advice were mostly sound. (Including suggestions to eat more of certain fruits and vegetables, and to avoid others, with reference to pseudo-scientific reasoning for how these foods affect the bodies of certain blood types and thereby affect the way they f I mostly just read the introduction and the chapter on my blood type. But from what I did read, I got a pretty strong impression of the type of advice that was being dispensed. Basically, it's like vaguely-racist astrology. The ideas behind the advice were mostly sound. (Including suggestions to eat more of certain fruits and vegetables, and to avoid others, with reference to pseudo-scientific reasoning for how these foods affect the bodies of certain blood types and thereby affect the way they feel. Even if people don't follow the advice, getting these recommendations surely helps get them thinking more about their food choices and how those choices make them feel.) But if it "works" for you, it's probably because it was generically good advice, not because it tapped into some magical science behind the random accidents of how you were born.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Christa

    I picked this book up out of curiosity. I have seen many different varieties of diet, and most of them just have not ever grabbed me like this did. As I was reading over the eating plan for my blood type, I found that things that are recommended to avoid are many of the things I just do not like - and I never knew why. Things that I crave are on the beneficial list. It resonated with me. I am making changes and hope that it helps. I hate to take this out of my "currently reading" portion...as it I picked this book up out of curiosity. I have seen many different varieties of diet, and most of them just have not ever grabbed me like this did. As I was reading over the eating plan for my blood type, I found that things that are recommended to avoid are many of the things I just do not like - and I never knew why. Things that I crave are on the beneficial list. It resonated with me. I am making changes and hope that it helps. I hate to take this out of my "currently reading" portion...as it is a resource for me, but I am not actively reading this book right now. My limit is about 3. :)

  28. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    Fascinating theory that blood types determine body chemistry and therefore what types of foods agree with our systems and those that essentially act like poisons to us. Problem: may require lifestyle changes if the foods you love to eat are on the "Avoid" list. A friend reports miraculous results including 30 pound weight loss and improvements in other ailments such as digestion, skin and hair issues. Why aren't we taught these things? Why don't doctors pay attention to these things? Perhaps we Fascinating theory that blood types determine body chemistry and therefore what types of foods agree with our systems and those that essentially act like poisons to us. Problem: may require lifestyle changes if the foods you love to eat are on the "Avoid" list. A friend reports miraculous results including 30 pound weight loss and improvements in other ailments such as digestion, skin and hair issues. Why aren't we taught these things? Why don't doctors pay attention to these things? Perhaps we could be healthier by following these guidelines instead of taking a pill for every ailment. I'm going to give it a try.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Josh Mccoy

    Some helpful information but its actually much like a horiscope - general enough to apply to nearly anyone. I was actually really excited by the book and its premise but after doing some research I found out that Dr. D'Adamo is passing on information as truth when its actually scientifically false. And it's not just small facts in his work, it is a lot including his historical information about the blood types and how nutrients are absorbed into the body from our food. I was really disheartened Some helpful information but its actually much like a horiscope - general enough to apply to nearly anyone. I was actually really excited by the book and its premise but after doing some research I found out that Dr. D'Adamo is passing on information as truth when its actually scientifically false. And it's not just small facts in his work, it is a lot including his historical information about the blood types and how nutrients are absorbed into the body from our food. I was really disheartened to find this out.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Hilal

    I admire Dr Peter D'adamo's work, his books introduced me to a world of possibilities that is both scientific and practical. I'm a blood type O that grow up among siblings and Parents of an A blood type and eventually got Married to a B blood type. I understand now why I always have trouble with cheese and milk but not necessarily Yogurt and Laban, and why I crave some of the bad foods for my blood type, and why some people are basically resistant to this more individualized new (Not one size fi I admire Dr Peter D'adamo's work, his books introduced me to a world of possibilities that is both scientific and practical. I'm a blood type O that grow up among siblings and Parents of an A blood type and eventually got Married to a B blood type. I understand now why I always have trouble with cheese and milk but not necessarily Yogurt and Laban, and why I crave some of the bad foods for my blood type, and why some people are basically resistant to this more individualized new (Not one size fits all remedy) diet guide lines and exercise regiment. Thank you Dr D'adamo for everything.

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