website statistics Digitally Enabled Social Change: Activism in the Internet Age - PDF Books Online
Hot Best Seller

Digitally Enabled Social Change: Activism in the Internet Age

Availability: Ready to download

An investigation into how specific Web technologies can change the dynamics of organizing and participating in political and social protest. Much attention has been paid in recent years to the emergence of "Internet activism," but scholars and pundits disagree about whether online political activity is different in kind from more traditional forms of activism. Does the glob An investigation into how specific Web technologies can change the dynamics of organizing and participating in political and social protest. Much attention has been paid in recent years to the emergence of "Internet activism," but scholars and pundits disagree about whether online political activity is different in kind from more traditional forms of activism. Does the global reach and blazing speed of the Internet affect the essential character or dynamics of online political protest? In Digitally Enabled Social Change, Jennifer Earl and Katrina Kimport examine key characteristics of web activism and investigate their impacts on organizing and participation. Earl and Kimport argue that the web offers two key affordances relevant to activism: sharply reduced costs for creating, organizing, and participating in protest; and the decreased need for activists to be physically together in order to act together. Drawing on evidence from samples of online petitions, boycotts, and letter-writing and e-mailing campaigns, Earl and Kimport show that the more these affordances are leveraged, the more transformative the changes to organizing and participating in protest.


Compare

An investigation into how specific Web technologies can change the dynamics of organizing and participating in political and social protest. Much attention has been paid in recent years to the emergence of "Internet activism," but scholars and pundits disagree about whether online political activity is different in kind from more traditional forms of activism. Does the glob An investigation into how specific Web technologies can change the dynamics of organizing and participating in political and social protest. Much attention has been paid in recent years to the emergence of "Internet activism," but scholars and pundits disagree about whether online political activity is different in kind from more traditional forms of activism. Does the global reach and blazing speed of the Internet affect the essential character or dynamics of online political protest? In Digitally Enabled Social Change, Jennifer Earl and Katrina Kimport examine key characteristics of web activism and investigate their impacts on organizing and participation. Earl and Kimport argue that the web offers two key affordances relevant to activism: sharply reduced costs for creating, organizing, and participating in protest; and the decreased need for activists to be physically together in order to act together. Drawing on evidence from samples of online petitions, boycotts, and letter-writing and e-mailing campaigns, Earl and Kimport show that the more these affordances are leveraged, the more transformative the changes to organizing and participating in protest.

30 review for Digitally Enabled Social Change: Activism in the Internet Age

  1. 5 out of 5

    Niloufar Salehi

    The book builds up the discussion very well in the intro. Throughout the book Jennifer Earl and Katrina Kimport do a good job of portraying what social movement organizations (SMOs) look like online. However, I feel like there is a shortage on the kinds of social movements that the book studies. The authors limit themselves to movements, such as petition signing, were coordination is not really needed. What challenges would online SMOs face if they did need to coordinate, make decisions, and act The book builds up the discussion very well in the intro. Throughout the book Jennifer Earl and Katrina Kimport do a good job of portraying what social movement organizations (SMOs) look like online. However, I feel like there is a shortage on the kinds of social movements that the book studies. The authors limit themselves to movements, such as petition signing, were coordination is not really needed. What challenges would online SMOs face if they did need to coordinate, make decisions, and act collectively?

  2. 4 out of 5

    Opensource.com

    You've already heard both sides in the tired debate over the role web technologies play in contemporary social and political movements. "The web alters everything!" some say. "Organizing and mobilizing for social change will never be the same again! We need to rethink everything we know about studying activism today!" And others retort: "Politics have changed very little in recent decades! New technologies simply extend and amplify older tendencies! We needn't modify our research programs one bi You've already heard both sides in the tired debate over the role web technologies play in contemporary social and political movements. "The web alters everything!" some say. "Organizing and mobilizing for social change will never be the same again! We need to rethink everything we know about studying activism today!" And others retort: "Politics have changed very little in recent decades! New technologies simply extend and amplify older tendencies! We needn't modify our research programs one bit!" Read the full review at Opensource.com Digitally Enabled Social Change: Activism in the Internet Age by Jennifer Earl and Katrina Kimportis one of the books on the Opensource.com 2014 Annual Reading List. Visit our site for details on how you can win a free copy of the book.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Danna

    The book on activism in the digital communication age by Jennifer Earl and Katrina Kimport is mentioned in an article about "clicktivism" via Facebook (of course, ha-ha), and I was compelled to add it to the to-read list. The book on activism in the digital communication age by Jennifer Earl and Katrina Kimport is mentioned in an article about "clicktivism" via Facebook (of course, ha-ha), and I was compelled to add it to the to-read list.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany

  5. 5 out of 5

    Marcus Antônio

  6. 5 out of 5

    Keith Heggart

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ioanna

  8. 5 out of 5

    TEELOCK Mithilesh

  9. 4 out of 5

    Alina Itkin

  10. 4 out of 5

    Chip Berlet

  11. 4 out of 5

    John

  12. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jared

  14. 4 out of 5

    Peyv&

  15. 4 out of 5

    Joseph Carter

  16. 4 out of 5

    Chris

  17. 5 out of 5

    Aleks

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jackie

  19. 5 out of 5

    Nick

  20. 5 out of 5

    Louis

  21. 5 out of 5

    Vladlena Mitskaniouk

  22. 5 out of 5

    Q

  23. 5 out of 5

    Oded Marom

  24. 5 out of 5

    Trevor

  25. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Kehrberg

  26. 4 out of 5

    Phil

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kara Poe Alexander

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kara Hall

  29. 4 out of 5

    Edwin

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ruth

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.