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The Distribution of Wealth: A Theory of Wages, Interest and Profits

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This is an EXACT reproduction of a book published before 1923. This IS NOT an OCR'd book with strange characters, introduced typographical errors, and jumbled words. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We be This is an EXACT reproduction of a book published before 1923. This IS NOT an OCR'd book with strange characters, introduced typographical errors, and jumbled words. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.


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This is an EXACT reproduction of a book published before 1923. This IS NOT an OCR'd book with strange characters, introduced typographical errors, and jumbled words. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We be This is an EXACT reproduction of a book published before 1923. This IS NOT an OCR'd book with strange characters, introduced typographical errors, and jumbled words. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.

34 review for The Distribution of Wealth: A Theory of Wages, Interest and Profits

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Carson

    The theory of "marginal productivity" is inherently circular, and in practice simply hides actual power relations behind a curtain of allegedly "neutral" laws. The marginal productivity of any input is what it adds to final price. In other words, the "marginal productivity" of land, capital and intellectual property amounts to whatever rent the holder of such artificial property rights is able to extract for allowing their use; and the "marginal productivity" of labor depends upon the balance of The theory of "marginal productivity" is inherently circular, and in practice simply hides actual power relations behind a curtain of allegedly "neutral" laws. The marginal productivity of any input is what it adds to final price. In other words, the "marginal productivity" of land, capital and intellectual property amounts to whatever rent the holder of such artificial property rights is able to extract for allowing their use; and the "marginal productivity" of labor depends upon the balance of power between labor and capital, and how little employers can get away with paying. The marginal productivity of everything depends entirely on relative bargaining power, and on the prior definition of property rules.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Josh Kraushaar

    Here Clark claims that the prevailing trend in the economy is for Labor to get paid according to what it produces (the marginal productivity of labor), and that assuming labor is interchangeable all men's wages are regulated by the marginal productivity of the last man who can be hired. My question is what regulates this man's wages? In this book Clark uses a farm as a model. The last man hired is employed because the amount he produces is equal to what it costs the farmer to hire him. In this wa Here Clark claims that the prevailing trend in the economy is for Labor to get paid according to what it produces (the marginal productivity of labor), and that assuming labor is interchangeable all men's wages are regulated by the marginal productivity of the last man who can be hired. My question is what regulates this man's wages? In this book Clark uses a farm as a model. The last man hired is employed because the amount he produces is equal to what it costs the farmer to hire him. In this way he effectively sets his own wages. But while it is easy to demonstrate how this works on a farm where the man is paid in wheat, it gets more complicated when money is actually used. Clark's theory seems to suggest some baseline where wages can't get lower, otherwise marginal productivity could continue to fall as long as wages fell on pace with them. So the marginal productivity of the final man hired is ultimately determined by what wage he is willing to pay? This seems incomplete, and also seems like it was skirting the larger question behind the question Clark was originally purporting to answer about whether or not laborers receive value equivalent to what their labor produces. I partially answered my own question. This is all clearly working under the assumption that firms are price takers (which is something which seems more or less inherent in the theory of rent). Under these conditions there reaches a point where, regardless of the laborer's concerns, it no longer pays to produce additional units even if it would cost you nothing to do so, since you would make less. Another issue is that the 'heroic' assumptions Clark uses to describe the static market, he bases his theory on a model that can really never happen. This alone isn't a deadly sin, but by assuming that the market is always trending towards giving laborers the full value of their marginal produce clark ignores the fact that entrepeneurs do exist and are here to stay. Overall his model has its benefits but is incomplete. This book is well written and interesting but I think it effectively obfuscates some very important issues. I do think his extension of the theory of rent and how he describes the price of goods/capital are fascinating though.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jim

  4. 5 out of 5

    Paul Vittay

  5. 5 out of 5

    Matt M Perez

  6. 4 out of 5

    Darío Sánchez Vendramini

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jerry

  8. 5 out of 5

    Azaghedi

  9. 4 out of 5

    Cosimo Books

  10. 5 out of 5

    Whitman

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mukul Parashar

  12. 5 out of 5

    North Loop Capital Management

  13. 5 out of 5

    David

  14. 5 out of 5

    1916Rev

  15. 4 out of 5

    Nate

  16. 4 out of 5

    Steven Chang

  17. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Bernier

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jacob Ellis

  19. 5 out of 5

    Erik

  20. 4 out of 5

    Derek Jordan

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ana Mir

  22. 4 out of 5

    Tom Rooney

  23. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

  24. 4 out of 5

    Richard Strum

  25. 4 out of 5

    Khari

  26. 4 out of 5

    Publius

  27. 4 out of 5

    Justin Bacon

  28. 4 out of 5

    Steve Hager

  29. 4 out of 5

    Wednesday

  30. 5 out of 5

    Eréndira Díaz

  31. 5 out of 5

    Nils Brandsma

  32. 4 out of 5

    Gustavo Souza

  33. 5 out of 5

    Ray

  34. 4 out of 5

    Dmitry Fedorov

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