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KNIGHT OF RECKONING The Emperor’s ruthless Order 66 has all but exterminated the Jedi. The few remaining who still wield the Force for good have been driven into exile or hiding. But not Jax Pavan, who’s been steadily striking blows against the Empire—as a lone guerrilla fighter and a valued partner of Whiplash, a secret Coruscant-based resistance group. Now he’s taking on KNIGHT OF RECKONING The Emperor’s ruthless Order 66 has all but exterminated the Jedi. The few remaining who still wield the Force for good have been driven into exile or hiding. But not Jax Pavan, who’s been steadily striking blows against the Empire—as a lone guerrilla fighter and a valued partner of Whiplash, a secret Coruscant-based resistance group. Now he’s taking on his most critical mission: transporting a valued Whiplash leader, targeted for assassination, from Coruscant to safety on a distant world. It’s a risky move under any circumstances, but Jax and his trusted crew aboard the Far Ranger, including the irrepressible droid I-Five, are prepared to pit their combat skills and their vessel’s firepower against all Imperial threats—except the one Jax fears most. Reports have raced across the galaxy that the dark lord of the Sith has fallen in a duel to the death with a Rebel freedom fighter. But Jax discovers the chilling truth when he reaches out with the Force . . . only to touch the dark, unmistakable, and malignantly alive presence that is Darth Vader. And Jax knows that Vader will stop at nothing until the last Jedi has fallen.


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KNIGHT OF RECKONING The Emperor’s ruthless Order 66 has all but exterminated the Jedi. The few remaining who still wield the Force for good have been driven into exile or hiding. But not Jax Pavan, who’s been steadily striking blows against the Empire—as a lone guerrilla fighter and a valued partner of Whiplash, a secret Coruscant-based resistance group. Now he’s taking on KNIGHT OF RECKONING The Emperor’s ruthless Order 66 has all but exterminated the Jedi. The few remaining who still wield the Force for good have been driven into exile or hiding. But not Jax Pavan, who’s been steadily striking blows against the Empire—as a lone guerrilla fighter and a valued partner of Whiplash, a secret Coruscant-based resistance group. Now he’s taking on his most critical mission: transporting a valued Whiplash leader, targeted for assassination, from Coruscant to safety on a distant world. It’s a risky move under any circumstances, but Jax and his trusted crew aboard the Far Ranger, including the irrepressible droid I-Five, are prepared to pit their combat skills and their vessel’s firepower against all Imperial threats—except the one Jax fears most. Reports have raced across the galaxy that the dark lord of the Sith has fallen in a duel to the death with a Rebel freedom fighter. But Jax discovers the chilling truth when he reaches out with the Force . . . only to touch the dark, unmistakable, and malignantly alive presence that is Darth Vader. And Jax knows that Vader will stop at nothing until the last Jedi has fallen.

30 review for The Last Jedi

  1. 5 out of 5

    Maya Bohnhoff

    Well, I loved writing it. And working with Michael was, as always, fantastic. And I loooove the cover. :)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jerry

    There already was a Last Jedi story before the recent sequels? Man, did Disney really mess up Star Wars! I'll be honest: I didn't care for the recent film with the same title; it was a definite shark jumping moment for one of my favorite franchises. So, when I first saw this at a garage sale recently, I thought: NO WAY! However, when I read the summary on the inside front flap, I realized that this wasn't based on that travesty of a film; it was an original story set in the Expanded Universe, w There already was a Last Jedi story before the recent sequels? Man, did Disney really mess up Star Wars! I'll be honest: I didn't care for the recent film with the same title; it was a definite shark jumping moment for one of my favorite franchises. So, when I first saw this at a garage sale recently, I thought: NO WAY! However, when I read the summary on the inside front flap, I realized that this wasn't based on that travesty of a film; it was an original story set in the Expanded Universe, which the House of Mouse has sadly reduced to "legends" status. Figuring anything could be better than that Episode VIII dreck, I decided to give it a read...and I was glad I did! Intensity, drama, a great plot...this is what I've come to expect from Lucas' space opera! I still say Disney or Lucasfilm should reboot the films and give us a celluloid adaptation of the Thrawn trilogy; who agrees?

  3. 5 out of 5

    Scott Rhee

    Michael Reaves, whose input in the Star Wars Expanded Universe has been notable (at current count, he's written nine books in the Star Wars book franchise), brings back his character Jax Pavan in "The Last Jedi", this time with co-author Maya Kaathryn Bohnhoff. While I enjoyed "The Last Jedi", it did not have the same spark and appeal that the first three Pavan books (The Coruscant Nights trilogy) had for me. Not that "The Last Jedi" wasn't exciting and entertaining. It was. The Reaves/Bohnhoff w Michael Reaves, whose input in the Star Wars Expanded Universe has been notable (at current count, he's written nine books in the Star Wars book franchise), brings back his character Jax Pavan in "The Last Jedi", this time with co-author Maya Kaathryn Bohnhoff. While I enjoyed "The Last Jedi", it did not have the same spark and appeal that the first three Pavan books (The Coruscant Nights trilogy) had for me. Not that "The Last Jedi" wasn't exciting and entertaining. It was. The Reaves/Bohnhoff writing team continues all the excellent character development and storytelling that Reaves started in the Coruscant Nights trilogy. My complaint has nothing to do with the technical aspects of the writing. My first complaint, which is petty and not even really a complaint, is that "The Last Jedi" breaks from the formula of the first three books by transplanting Pavan off the planet Coruscant and having him gallivanting around the galaxy. I realize that this opens the door for a wide variety of more fun and excitement, but I was growing used to the idea of Pavan working within the heart of the Empire. I also liked the loosely-noir structure of the series, in which Pavan is a former Jedi Knight turned private eye/gun for hire. The wise-cracking sidekicks, the femme fatales, the shadowy Imperial agents hounding him around every corner: this is "The Maltese Falcon" within the Star Wars universe. I suppose it was inevitable that Pavan would have to, at some point, leave Coruscant. It makes sense, and the noir structure of the Coruscant Nights trilogy was a limiting factor in the ultimate development of Pavan's character, a character that is quickly becoming a fan favorite. He does, after all, embody the beginnings of the Rebel Alliance. (His character, and some of the others in the series, are also, I'm guessing, the inspiration for the new TV show "Star Wars Rebels" on Disney XD, a show mainly targeted for tweens and teenagers but is actually compelling enough for adults to enjoy.) Another complaint I have with "The Last Jedi" is that it is almost too ambitious. There is a lot of stuff, plot-wise, going on in the book. In my opinion, Reaves/Bohnhoff could have easily turned this one book into another trilogy, taking the time to expand on some of the story lines within it, especially the Whiplash attempt to assassinate Emperor Palpatine, the capture of Thi Xon Yimmon, and Pavan's possession of Drath Ramage's mysterious holocron---all of which are fascinating story lines that Reaves/Bohnhoff could have devoted whole novels to. While adding to the extremely fast pacing of the novel, this overambitious plotting ultimately makes the book seem rushed, and I felt like I may have been missing a few details along the way. Overall, though, "The Last Jedi" is another good read in the Star Wars Expanded Universe, and I hope it is not the last we see of Jax Pavan.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Iset

    Better than the Coruscant Nights trilogy in some ways, but still carrying a lot of plotholes. I initially had a positive reception to this. With the main cast pared down to only the characters we actually care about, this book was able to gain momentum in a way that Patterns of Force just didn’t. And, early on, the book doesn’t hold its punches by (view spoiler)[killing off Laranth. (hide spoiler)] I was impressed. Yes, it’s sad for a character that I liked, but so often a great story is told by Better than the Coruscant Nights trilogy in some ways, but still carrying a lot of plotholes. I initially had a positive reception to this. With the main cast pared down to only the characters we actually care about, this book was able to gain momentum in a way that Patterns of Force just didn’t. And, early on, the book doesn’t hold its punches by (view spoiler)[killing off Laranth. (hide spoiler)] I was impressed. Yes, it’s sad for a character that I liked, but so often a great story is told by pulling the rug from under its protagonists, by identifying what twist would cause the most problems and then doing it and writing about the fallout. The addition of Maya Bohnhoff to the writing team here seemed to give Jax Pavan’s story the kick it really needed. We’re off gallivanting all over the galaxy here, and this feels much more like a conventional Star Wars story from that point of view. That’s a good thing and a bad thing. It’s a bad thing because now it’s a conventional Star Wars story about a Jedi planet-hopping and duelling bad guys, when Jax Pavan’s story was supposed to be the premise of a Jedi-turned-private-investigator on Coruscant. It’s a good thing because, well, the Coruscant Nights trilogy may have been promoted as such, but it really failed to achieve what it set out to do – it failed as a detective noir, in my opinion – and so dragging it out of its niche and into the big wide galaxy sets the stage for drama spanning the stars, exciting things happening on different planets, and, well, scope. Unfortunately, there are still problems and plotholes you could fly a Jedi starfighter through. I have no idea why, with two authors fact-checking this, but the stated timeline is still way off. We’re still being told that the Clone Wars and the battle of Drongar was twenty years ago – or thirteen, depending on what page you’re on – when it was actually just three years ago. Darth Ramage’s holocron includes research about bota, a miracle drug from Drongar which was why the Clone Wars came to that world in the first place (but it mutates and becomes useless in that story). Now, if the discovery of this miraculous wonder drug was what brought the Clone Wars to Drongar, riddle me this: why does a Sith Lord from goodness knows how long ago, could be centuries or millennia, even mention bota? The thing is, these lapses in lore are facepalm moments, but the story doesn’t hinge on them and they’re forgivable. What isn’t so easily swept under the rug are the major failures in the story. Let’s talk about I-Five first. Oh my goodness, it’s obvious that Reaves must love this character to bring him back so much, but I have found him annoying in every appearance past Shadow Hunter. And it’s not just that he intrudes on Jax’s grief so offensively. It’s that the droid begins to become a Mary Sue. A droid who has not only achieved sapience, going past all expectations of his programming and becoming more than a machine; a person… but he’s Force sensitive. Somehow. Even though Jax and I-Five discuss how this should be impossible without the biological process of midichlorians. I feel like that conversation was specifically thrown in to nod to fans who hate midichlorians because they felt that the Force never really needed a scientific explanation because Star Wars is much more space fantasy than it is science fiction. And yes, I am one of those fans and I don’t care for midichlorians. But… come on… a droid who can wield the Force? The problem is this breaks the established rules of this universe. And I would be okay with that, if you want to write a story about upturning the status quo, I think exploring the personhood of droids is a great topic for a sci fi, even giving them Force powers… but that is a BIG story. You are literally overturning one of the biggest and most fundamental rules about that universe… so why does no one later, in the time of the original trilogy and afterwards, ever mention this? It’s a poor fit. You can’t put a story into this moment in the chronology of the series with a major storyline like that and have it work, because everyone in subsequent, already written books never mentions it again. Maybe the writers could pull it off if their book was slated for much further ahead in the chronology, or even hundreds or thousands of years ago where you could suppose the knowledge had time to get forgotten or lost. But putting it where it is, just after the end of the Clone Wars and a couple of decades before the original trilogy, with something that should upturn the entire galaxy, and having nothing ever happen or come of it… it feels like bad placement. It feels like a waste of a storyline. Other things that didn’t feel right included a couple of instances of deus ex machina (yes, I know, the Force, but what I mean is the solution came out of nowhere and it came just too easily), and the trip to Dathomir. It was almost like the authors wanted readers to get excited about visiting an alien world that we all recognise, without considering whether or not it made sense to do so. When we first explore Dathomir in The Courtship of Princess Leia we're led to believe that no one has visited this world in a very long time, and certainly the inhabitants act like it, as if they’ve never heard of a Jedi Knight or a man wielding the Force. Yet, according to this book and the Quinlan Vos graphic novels, Jedi were dropping in every other day of the week. Hmmm. After he absorbs the lessons from the Sith holocron, Jax becomes powerful enough to manipulate time – I feel like I should say that in a grandiose voice, but anyway this is what I meant by deus ex machina – and at one point he reflects that he might be powerful enough to take on and defeat Darth Vader. I had flashbacks at that point to Garen Malek and The Force Unleashed. You know, Darth Vader’s secret apprentice who despite being only 18 years old defeats multiple Jedi Masters with ease, can move Star Destroyers with the Force, defeated both Darth Vader and the Emperor, oh, and set up the Rebel Alliance. You ever heard of him in any other books about the Rebel Alliance? Yup, me neither. We’re told in the first book of the Coruscant Nights series that Jax Pavan has a pretty average Force connection and he only graduated to Knighthood like, two months before Order 66. And… now we’re told he thinks he might be Darth Vader’s equal? All he needed was to fly over to Dathomir, spend about two days unlocking a Sith holocron, and now it’s no biggie? With all due apologies to the writers, I just don’t buy into this. The Whiplash resistance comes across as if it just exists to tie Jax in to the nascent Rebellion; but it’s weird when it has never been mentioned as part of the Rebel Alliance’s origins anywhere else, and I question whether Whiplash is actually needed in a series that was supposed to be a smaller-scale detective noir and especially set literally just after the rise of the Empire when perhaps we need it to be a time of overwhelming darkness in the wider story. I suppose a mitigating point might be that this book was clearly intended to have further continuations to its story which might have elucidated or corrected niggles and wrapped things up in a rather more satisfying way, but this book was published in 2013 and then, well, the big wipeout came in 2014, so it exists as a loose strand. The story has its own conclusion which wraps up quite a lot, such as the fate of Whiplash on Coruscant and its leader, and our protagonists’ survival from here on out. But it also leaves a fair few questions up in the air. I get the impression that the ongoing rivalry between Jax and Vader would definitely be back, and that the authors would return to the big issue of I-Five, the Force sensitive droid – but never got a chance to. Overall, I’d say this book does some good and interesting things – it raises the stakes, doesn’t pull its punches, abandons a flailing genre and setting in favour of a better one – but it’s brought down by some serious plotholes including not fitting very well with existing lore and stretching plausibility too thin. Ultimately, I recognise that it made a solid effort to improve, but for me it wasn’t enough for me to think of it as a good book. 4 out of 10

  5. 4 out of 5

    Michael O'Brien

    At times this book wanders about a good deal, and for a while I wondered if it was going to be as aimless and inexact as some of the Clone Trooper series books turned out to be. However, this book turned out to be a worthy addition to the Star Wars books with a climactic ending that really kept me at the edge of my seat, eagerly reading each page. Since the main character, Jax Pavan, is not in Episode IV: A New Hope, this sets the reader up for believing, throughout this book, in his demise; how At times this book wanders about a good deal, and for a while I wondered if it was going to be as aimless and inexact as some of the Clone Trooper series books turned out to be. However, this book turned out to be a worthy addition to the Star Wars books with a climactic ending that really kept me at the edge of my seat, eagerly reading each page. Since the main character, Jax Pavan, is not in Episode IV: A New Hope, this sets the reader up for believing, throughout this book, in his demise; however, the ending of this book, in my opinion, leaves "The Last Jedi" wide open for a sequel!

  6. 4 out of 5

    DiscoSpacePanther

    Really enjoyed this - a well thought out and executed novel in the Legends continuity. Jax was appropriately heroic in the titular role, and Vader was a suitably threatening figure throughout. The only thing that diminishes its score from a full five stars is the lack of humour - it was a little dour, and could have used a bit more of Den to lighten the tone a bit. Reading this, I was struck by how much Jax and Laranth resemble Kanan and Hera from Rebels. I might have to go back and read the Corusc Really enjoyed this - a well thought out and executed novel in the Legends continuity. Jax was appropriately heroic in the titular role, and Vader was a suitably threatening figure throughout. The only thing that diminishes its score from a full five stars is the lack of humour - it was a little dour, and could have used a bit more of Den to lighten the tone a bit. Reading this, I was struck by how much Jax and Laranth resemble Kanan and Hera from Rebels. I might have to go back and read the Coruscant Nights trilogy to see if I get the same vibe from those novels as well.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Keith

    Stars: 2 Recommend: Only if you really like the Coruscant Nights trilogy. Re-read? No. This book was a little more entertaining than the trilogy by Reaves that preceded it, but it is still incredibly flawed. I think Reaves is a very lazy and sloppy author, and you don't have to be a huge Star Wars freak to recognize it. He still doesn't understand where in the timeline his stories fit, since he is regularly off by a decade or two. It would be like if I were writing a novel set during WWII, and I re Stars: 2 Recommend: Only if you really like the Coruscant Nights trilogy. Re-read? No. This book was a little more entertaining than the trilogy by Reaves that preceded it, but it is still incredibly flawed. I think Reaves is a very lazy and sloppy author, and you don't have to be a huge Star Wars freak to recognize it. He still doesn't understand where in the timeline his stories fit, since he is regularly off by a decade or two. It would be like if I were writing a novel set during WWII, and I regularly said things like, "The year was 1922, and the world was in the midst of the second world war." You would be forgiven for thinking the author was a complete moron for not looking up what year WWII began. This has been a problem through many of Reaves' books. Perhaps more unforgivable, he isn't even consistent in what happens in books he wrote himself. The absolute worst part of Reaves' writing is how much he relies on plot convenience. If a character needs something, someone will give it to them for no reason. If they are in a tough spot, they'll find some substance that just so happens to either be exactly what they need, or it is so powerful that it is the most useful substance in the galaxy. (view spoiler)[Bota, established in previous books, is a wonder plant that can do anything. Back in Coruscant Nights, Jax was given the pyronium in a flashback by Anakin Skywalker himself. Why did Anakin have it? Who knows? Why would he give it to Jax, who he barely knew? Also who knows? It doesn't matter. Jax needed it for the plot, so Reaves came up with the laziest way possible to get it to him. The holocron stolen from Vader a few books back is also critical to the plot. This was stolen by the spineless underling of Vader, which in and of itself was incredibly out of character for such a cowardly person. Anyway, he just so happens to steal the holocron that is exactly what Jax would later need. Inexplicably, it details how to use the Bota, even though that doesn't even fit with what Reaves himself told us about the bota. He got away with adding the bota to the Star Wars universe by saying it evolves and mutates so quickly, it only recently became so powerful and almost overnight became useless. Somehow, this holocron that is at least hundreds but most likely thousands of years old details how a force user should use the bota along with...the pyronium. It also happens to teach Jax, in a bout a day, a ton of force tricks that can wow Vader. It's a good thing Vader didn't bother trying to open the insanely powerful holocron that had been in his possession. But Jax accidentally scratches his hand and it responds. I can buy a certain amount of the Force manipulating things, but at this point Reaves may as well have had whatever Jax needed materialize in front of him. (hide spoiler)] Like a number of Reaves' previous books (Coruscant Nights in particular), way too much of the plot is tied up in plans that go nowhere. (view spoiler)[Unlike other reviews I saw, I enjoyed the portion where Whiplash attempts to assassinate Palpatine. The big mistake was not showing us any of it. It would've been awesome to get a pov from some of the would-be assassin's and witness the power of the Emperor and Darth Vader as they destroy them. That could've been awesome. Instead, we get a ton of build-up (almost exclusively from secondary characters) that ends with someone flying over seeing them get arrested. There is also far too much time wasted with ruminations on time travel that don't end up being very relevant. (hide spoiler)] Pretty much every main character became less interesting in the book to me. (view spoiler)[I've never liked Jax, but there is even less to like here. He is also a minor god now. He can expertly hide his presence, create astral projections that are so insanely powerful he can change the appearance of his ship, and I guess time travel to an extent. Again, these secrets were all inside a holocron that Vader had from the beginning and just left in storage with so little security, that the person who was basically his accountant was able to steal it with ease. I-5 is also a god at this point. He is virtually indestructible and can be put into different bodies with ease. He is also pretty much the best in the galaxy at everything he attempts. He's also now even more dominant as a fighter. If the resistance just built a couple more of him, they'd taken down the Empire with ease. Laranth is barely in it because she had to be killed off so the reader felt something, except her death felt stupid because it seemed out of character and pointless (unless you knew what had to happen next). Den doesn't seem like himself at all. Reaves also couldn't figure out how to have his characters get out of bad situations without relying on Vader being stupid. As Laranth is about to die, Vader easily defeats Jax and nearly destroys I-5. They've captured the Cerean, and for not reason whatsoever, Vader decides to leave and let gravity kill his foes that he's been hunting for four books. He has them in a place they cannot retreat from, and he can easily defeat them, but he does something idiotic like laughs and then leave them be. Jax has time to say goodbye to Laranth and gather some things before getting in the escape pod. Apparently, Vader didn't even have somebody stick around to see if they managed to get out in the escape pod. A good rule of thumb is, if you have to rely on your villains being dumb as a rock for your plot to move forward, you probably haven't written a good plot. (hide spoiler)] I thought we would finally get a really good moment from Reaves when (view spoiler)[just for an instant, he teases that Jax will murder or at least harm the Dathomiri witch for her blood so he could open the holocron. It even would've been good character development since we saw little hints of Jax flirting with the Dark Side. Unfortunately, Reaves goes back to being boring, predictable, and stupid. Apparently, this Sith Lord who was insanely powerful didn't consider that maybe multiple light side force users would give up a little of their blood to open the holocron. Reaves even has a line something like, "He never would've considered that multiple people would voluntarily give up some of their blood." YES he would. Anyone older than 10 could figure out that little problem. (hide spoiler)] . Other problems: - I've watched/read most things that are Star Wars, and I can't think of anywhere else that made a holocron seem like a rubic cube that a random person can use to access information like Reaves claims. It's always been required to have the force to use a holocron. - (view spoiler)[It's incredibly stupid that this high level Imperial prison has a civilian side and gets supplied by Black Sun. This is only here because Reaves didn't know how to get Jax and his gang into the facility without the civilian/Black Sun access. It isn't story breaking laziness, but it is the kind of thing that is just so stupid, it takes you out of the story. What could Black Sun provide that the Empire couldn't acquire itself? Why would they have to deliver to the incredibly secret facility holding the highest value prisoners and put the security of the entire facility at risk instead of dropping the supplies off anywhere else and let the Empire make the final delivery? There is no good reason. It is just that Reaves is too lazy to come up with a more realistic scenario. (hide spoiler)] Stupid lines like this: (view spoiler)[Speaking of Yimmon after he'd been captured: Jax "He'd die first." Sal: "I hope you're right." Jax stood as if the padded seat had shocked him. "Yimmon is your friend!" Followed by paragraphs of explaining what would be abundantly clear to anyone who has spent years in a resistance movement. (hide spoiler)] Another case of Reaves not even remembering what he wrote in previous books. In the first book on Coruscant Nights, (view spoiler)[Xizor introduces Kaird to an early version of Guri. He explains how his people have been working on this and have advanced it more than in the last 12 centures. In this book, this is described as being part of a mega corporation that went out of business instead. (hide spoiler)] .

  8. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Kukwa

    It's definitely not a book to come into unless you're familiar with the Lucasverse, and with much of what happens in the Legends novels in general...but armed with that, you can slip into the story pretty easily. That said, there's almost too much story here -- too many characters and plots fighting for attention. The one that deserves the most attention -- last Jedi Jax and his conflict with Darth Vader -- really merited a novel entirely on his own, without distraction...and there are many dist It's definitely not a book to come into unless you're familiar with the Lucasverse, and with much of what happens in the Legends novels in general...but armed with that, you can slip into the story pretty easily. That said, there's almost too much story here -- too many characters and plots fighting for attention. The one that deserves the most attention -- last Jedi Jax and his conflict with Darth Vader -- really merited a novel entirely on his own, without distraction...and there are many distractions here. There's also a bit too much moping that takes up more pages than I felt were necessary. In spit of all that, when the novel does focus on Jax and Vader, it's gripping, exciting and fantastic. I just wish I could have read a more stripped-down version of this novel.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jade

    This was easily the most boring, pointless Star Wars book I've ever read. What a waste of time. This was easily the most boring, pointless Star Wars book I've ever read. What a waste of time.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Anthony Hillman

    Not a novelisation of the movie, but a continuation of the not-very-good Coruscant Nights series that was released just prior to Disney acquiring Lucasfilm. This is a surprisingly fun read. I feel that if Reaves knew this was going to be his last Star Wars novel before the continuity got wiped, he may have given the more definitive ending that he seemed to be building to before seeming to change his mind at the last minute. It's not the perfect Star Wars book by any stretch, but it is definitely Not a novelisation of the movie, but a continuation of the not-very-good Coruscant Nights series that was released just prior to Disney acquiring Lucasfilm. This is a surprisingly fun read. I feel that if Reaves knew this was going to be his last Star Wars novel before the continuity got wiped, he may have given the more definitive ending that he seemed to be building to before seeming to change his mind at the last minute. It's not the perfect Star Wars book by any stretch, but it is definitely much better than I was expecting.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Adam

    A mixed bag, as usual. I don't know if it's Bohnhoff's contributions (which weren't so helpful in Shadow Games) or Reaves' progression as an author or just the point in the story we've reached, but Last Jedi finally feels like Jax Pavan's story is hitting its stride. It begins to deliver on some of the promise of the Dark Times setting, as Jax is hit with stress and suspicion, tragedy and guilt, and is forced to make some difficult choices that compromise his friendships and his integrity. The s A mixed bag, as usual. I don't know if it's Bohnhoff's contributions (which weren't so helpful in Shadow Games) or Reaves' progression as an author or just the point in the story we've reached, but Last Jedi finally feels like Jax Pavan's story is hitting its stride. It begins to deliver on some of the promise of the Dark Times setting, as Jax is hit with stress and suspicion, tragedy and guilt, and is forced to make some difficult choices that compromise his friendships and his integrity. The storyline of the Whiplash also brings up some interesting difficulties inherent in the formation of a Rebel Alliance founded on varying motives and philosophies, the problems of communication and decision making that plague decentralized and compartmentalized undergrounds. But while the character arcs are just finally getting in gear, the rest of the story is starting to feel a bit over used. It's filled with Reaves' pet characters and objects, and they sort of get old. This is especially true of Jax's power totems, the miisai tree, the pyronium, and the Sith Holocron, which are the routes to temptation Jax indulges in order to win the story. Xizor and Black Sun offer the other dangerous temptation. Did anyone else find it odd that Xizor spent this whole story standing behind a curtain in a bar on Mandalore? The Sith Holocron especially is far too easy. Once Jax figures out how to open it, it pours knowledge into his head that grants him all of these skills immediately. Then the Nightsisters go into his brain and remove all the bad stuff once he doesn’t need the powers any more. There's never a moment when we get the impression Jax might actually indulge the Holocron and turn to the Dark Side; he's quite capable of using the knowledge as a tool without falling. This really doesn't make sense considering the Jedi don't open these things to investigate them in peacetime in the balanced, low-stakes confines of the Jedi Temple. Jax is, due to the Dark Times setting, far more emotionally compromised, and it should be a pretty serious struggle for him to be able to use this Holocron without becoming an evil monster. The way Reaves writes the Force in general gets under my skin. It's like a spiritual radar system: people have Force signatures, which they can conceal with “cloaking devices” and focused beams called “tunneling” and by hiding behind a bonsai tree (sorry, miisai). Jax creates Force projected illusions, which I guess I'm fine with, but he describes them as programmed animations that occur on a timer, etc. And what's the deal with that time-shifting nonsense? Jax's relationship with Vader was a pretty thin construct to begin with (they seem to have sparred once and Vader inexplicably gave Jax the pyronium) and it's stretched too far here. The Inquisitors are meant to be the alternate villains, but they're still as boring as ever. They act as Vader's minions, and Jax trips them up as easily as he would Stormtroopers or any other mook. (view spoiler)[I approve of Reaves' decision to kill off Laranth early on in the story, since it gives Jax a wake-up call and sets his serious character development in motion. But without Yimmon and Laranth, and with Kaj, Rhinann, and Dejah out of the picture, our core party is pretty small. I understand that Jax is moody and doesn't want to talk to anyone, but it'd still be nice to have some dialogue here outside of Den and I-5 snipping stressed-out banter back and forth while they worry about Jax. There are a couple of decent new characters, but Sacha Swiftbird (inexplicably human podracer) only comes into play in the last section and Aren Folee doesn't get much screentime either. Pol Haus comes into his own here, finally, but only as a foil for Tuden Sal's self-destruction narrative. (hide spoiler)] The settings reference Clone Wars a bit much for my taste—Mandalore and Dathomir are major planets—but I suppose none of that was too bad. What really made me role my eyes was when Reaves finally bit the bullet and elevated I5 from sentient body-changing infallible droid soldier friend to full on force-sensitive. Jax is a bit of a Gary Stu, but I5 is the one Reaves really loves.

  12. 5 out of 5

    L

    The spectacular conclusion of all that was past, now taking you into a new era for the STAR WARS revolution & the changed world!! Having followed the journey from the very beginning when one looked at the world through the eyes of Anakin Skywalker and his master Obi Wan Kenobi, and learning the ways of the Jedi, this is now a turning point within the STAR WARS history. All that you have encountered so far in this remarkable, original series is soon to be changed as a great catalyst erupts thus s The spectacular conclusion of all that was past, now taking you into a new era for the STAR WARS revolution & the changed world!! Having followed the journey from the very beginning when one looked at the world through the eyes of Anakin Skywalker and his master Obi Wan Kenobi, and learning the ways of the Jedi, this is now a turning point within the STAR WARS history. All that you have encountered so far in this remarkable, original series is soon to be changed as a great catalyst erupts thus shaping all that once was as the last Jedi finally falls to Darth Vader’s wrath. We continue the saga where the Emperor’s ruthless order Route 66 has all but destroyed the remaining Jedi and those few who still remain & who can wield the FORCE for good have been now driven into exile or hiding. Fearing for their lives there is nothing left for the Jedi and even the FORCE cannot help them now, as even Yoda knows the power of the Emperor and Darth Vader who are such an almighty force that has hatred running through their veins; nothing can stop them. But, Jax Pavan has been steadily striking blows against the empire as a lone guerrilla fighter and valued partner of Whiplash (a secret Coruscant-based resistance group) The Coruscant is known as the new Republic or Galactic Empire. Now Jax takes on his most critical mission; to transport a valued Whiplash leader, targeted for assassination, from Coruscant to safety on a distant world. It’s a risky move under any circumstances, but Jax and his trusted crew aboard the Far Ranger, including the irrepressible droid I-Five, are prepared to pit their combat skills and their vessel’s firepower against all Imperial threats—except the one Jax fears most. Reports have raced across the galaxy that the dark lord of the Sith has fallen in a duel to the death with a Rebel freedom fighter. But Jax discovers the chilling truth when he reaches out with the FORCE . . . only to touch the dark, unmistakable, and malignantly alive presence that is Darth Vader. And Jax knows that Vader will stop at nothing until the last Jedi has fallen, which includes him!!! The Last Jedi: Knight of Reckoning is so dramatic, full of electric tension and suspense that will have you glued to the pages for hours. This spectacular, classic and legendary series that is STAR WARS has taken over our own world and which is as relevant & as much loved today as it was many years ago. I grew up with the books from a child when I first began to read, and always on my Christmas list was a light saber (I know, I am such a tomboy!), but STAR WARS really did open my imagination to the wonders of the science-fiction genre and how inspired it could be that brings ones dreams to life. I cannot describe in words how spectacular the series is due to the inspired and totally remarkable plot, which underpins each book as you continue the story following your favorite characters as they battle throughout different galaxies. The distinctive, individualistic and memorable characters pull the story along and are some of the well-recognized figures in literature and fiction. From Chewbacca, R2 and R4 to Obi Wan Kenobi to the Emperor, Darth Vader, Yoda, Anakin and Luke Skywalker, Jabba the Hutt ect. I could continue but I don’t want to go into too much detail about those books connected to the Old Republic. A fantastic, gripping read that would delight all fans of this genre & who love Star Wars as it embodies all that one delights in within Sci-fi fiction such as epic battle scenes, spaceships and dark forces; it really is a real treat! Out of all the series this book has to be the most poignant and significant, for it marks the end of an era and the beginning of a new dawn as a new power rises. It is just incredible and I would highly recommend it as it is so powerfully moving, dramatic and which sends shivers down your spine!!

  13. 5 out of 5

    RumBelle

    This book had some interesting moments, but basically, in my opinion, it was one long, drawn out, dull rescue mission. Jax was transporting the leader of his Rebel group to a safe place, when Vader ambushes his ship. Fight ensues, things happen (don't want to give away too much) and Vader makes off with the leader. Jax then spent the next 400 or so pages trying to get him back. The next 400 slow, tedious, unnecessary, repetitive pages, where everyone else in the Rebel group spends all their time This book had some interesting moments, but basically, in my opinion, it was one long, drawn out, dull rescue mission. Jax was transporting the leader of his Rebel group to a safe place, when Vader ambushes his ship. Fight ensues, things happen (don't want to give away too much) and Vader makes off with the leader. Jax then spent the next 400 or so pages trying to get him back. The next 400 slow, tedious, unnecessary, repetitive pages, where everyone else in the Rebel group spends all their time telling Jax not to rescue their leader. This book had a few interesting moments, like the detour to Dathomir, but mostly it was dull waiting. It would have been better as a shorter more fast paced story.

  14. 4 out of 5

    C

    I hate giving this book only two stars because I love Reaves as a Star Wars author, but there were some major problems with continuity errors that really bugged me. Your mileage may vary as to whether that lessens your interest in this one. Another cause for the low stars is that the narrative feels a bit "lost" for lack of a better term. Lots of wild goose chases and plots that go nowhere (either in terms of carrying the story forward *or* character development). Still, it is an enjoyable read - I hate giving this book only two stars because I love Reaves as a Star Wars author, but there were some major problems with continuity errors that really bugged me. Your mileage may vary as to whether that lessens your interest in this one. Another cause for the low stars is that the narrative feels a bit "lost" for lack of a better term. Lots of wild goose chases and plots that go nowhere (either in terms of carrying the story forward *or* character development). Still, it is an enjoyable read - especially if you are a fan of the characters from earlier Reaves novels.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jason Fryer

    The book started out relatively slowly, or possibly only seemed to due to the amount of time since I finished the previous book in the series. However, it picked up and was an enjoyable read. I look forward to the next one, if there is one.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    No.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jared

    Star Wars Legends Project #195 Background: The Last Jedi was written by Michael Reaves and Maya Kaathryn Bohnhoff. It was published in February 2013. Reaves has written or co-written several Star Wars novels, including the Coruscant Nights trilogy (this is a sequel to those). Bohnhoff has co-written three novels with Reaves. This is the second. Apparently she co-wrote the last Coruscant Nights book with him, but went uncredited. The Last Jedi is set some months after Patterns of Force, about a Star Wars Legends Project #195 Background: The Last Jedi was written by Michael Reaves and Maya Kaathryn Bohnhoff. It was published in February 2013. Reaves has written or co-written several Star Wars novels, including the Coruscant Nights trilogy (this is a sequel to those). Bohnhoff has co-written three novels with Reaves. This is the second. Apparently she co-wrote the last Coruscant Nights book with him, but went uncredited. The Last Jedi is set some months after Patterns of Force, about a year after Order 66 (17 years before the battle of Yavin). The main characters are Jax Pavan, I-5, and Den Dhur. Darth Vader plays a significant role, as do several surviving characters from the Coruscant Nights trilogy. The novel takes place on Coruscant, Toprawa, Mandalore, Dathomir, and various points in outer space. Summary: Things have gotten too hot on Coruscant for Thi Xon Yimmon, the leader of the Whiplash resistance movement, so sort-of-ex-Jedi Jax Pavan and the rest of his rebel cell are tasked with moving him to a new base on Dantooine. But when the mission ends in catastrophe, Jax and the others are left reeling, with the nascent rebellion on the brink of extinction. Every choice feels like the wrong choice, and the only alternative that's worse is no choice at all. Review: I have no insight into the division of labor between Reaves and Bohnhoff, and I wasn't even aware that she cowrote Patterns of Force until just now, so I wasn't thinking about that as I read it. If I had to guess at Bohnhoff's influence, I'd say she improves the style over Reaves writing alone (fewer contemporary references dressed up in Star-Wars-ese), but the narrative lacks drive. There was a lot of pointless wheel-spinning in Patterns of Force compared to the first 2 novels in the trilogy, and that effect is even more apparent here since this novel is over 100 pages longer than the longest of the Coruscant Nights books. It's definitely longer than it needs to be, though not to the extent you might expect. There is a lot going on in this story, and now that the characters are finally allowed to be somewhere other than Coruscant there's a lot more for them to do. It's also one of the few novels from this era that incorporates significant tie-ins with The Clone Wars animated series, particularly in its depictions of Mandalore and Dathomir. Some of this is good stuff, some less so, but I don't want to get too deep into spoiler territory. I find that I have surprisingly little to say about this overall, actually. It begins by significantly raising the stakes from where they were in the trilogy, and it's a much more satisfying conclusion to the storyline of these characters than the last book was. I liked it better than any of the Coruscant Nights books. On the other hand, it was still a bit of a chore to get through, and while it introduced some interesting new characters, I didn't feel like I got to know them as well as I should have, almost like they were being held at arm's length. This was particularly true of Sacha Swiftbird. I-5's storyline in this was also weird, almost a transplant from a Star Trek story. And I'm not sure I bought the tension between Jax and the others. At the very least it wasn't well-explained. In the end, although there's plenty to like here, it's spread too thin across too high of a page count, and I'm definitely more than ready to move on from here. It feels like Star Wars writers in this era don't know what kinds of stories to tell, particularly when they involve Jedi. That feels like a crucial mistake when dealing with the Dark Times (outside of, obviously, the excellent Dark Times series of comics). Writers keep wanting to tell stories of a nascent rebellion, but we know from the opening crawl of Star Wars that any real victory of a rebellion movement is literally almost two decades away. They're missing huge opportunities to tell stories that aren't just Jedi vs. Sith or Rebellion vs. Empire. I want to see stories about morally grey anti-heroes who operate in the underworld as the Empire tightens its grip on power. I want to see stories about ordinary people (as in non-Force users) dealing with day-to-day survival after this massive shift in galactic government. Most of all, I don't want stories whose endings I already know because they're about rebellions that are destined to fail and missions that can't possibly succeed. Your heroes want to assassinate the Emperor or try to take out Darth Vader? I already know how that ends! We all do! Find a better plot! Surprise me! B-

  18. 4 out of 5

    Malcolm Cox

    First up, this is not the novelisation of that terrible Disney film that came out that mistakenly put ‘Star Wars’ on the title and stole the title of this book. Interestingly, Disney Luke’s Force projection in the film is a direct rip-off of the Force projection in this book. This is an actual Star Wars book based in the actual Star Wars universe. Now that’s out of the way, on to the review… This is a follow-up book to the Coruscant Nights trilogy of books that follow Jedi Jax Pavan and the senti First up, this is not the novelisation of that terrible Disney film that came out that mistakenly put ‘Star Wars’ on the title and stole the title of this book. Interestingly, Disney Luke’s Force projection in the film is a direct rip-off of the Force projection in this book. This is an actual Star Wars book based in the actual Star Wars universe. Now that’s out of the way, on to the review… This is a follow-up book to the Coruscant Nights trilogy of books that follow Jedi Jax Pavan and the sentient droid I-Five that originally belonged to his father in Darth Maul: Shadow Hunter. In this one, the Coruscant-based resistance known as Whiplash is feeling the pressure and it is decided to evacuate their leader off-world to a safer location. Unfortunately, Darth Vader is waiting and kidnaps the leader leaving Jax and his friends for dead. Now Jax must do what he can to mount a rescue. I do very much enjoy the character of I-Five and this is his sixth appearance in the books. Jax is a lot more unbalanced in this one, dealing with loss and exploring a Sith holocron, which made him a much more interesting character. There was one scene in particular when he discovers that sentient blood is required to open it and a new acquaintance of his suddenly turns up and I really thought he might do something drastic. The story itself is okay, if a little meandering. For all the urgency in mounting the rescue, there’s an awful lot of preamble and ‘side missions’ that must be done first. Interspersed amongst all this is the ongoing operations of Whiplash without their leader which, though compelling, ultimately don’t really amount to much. There is no great battle or encounter but the rescue attempt at the end is pretty good. The story does get a little lost with the time manipulation sub-sub plot which felt a bit unnecessary. Infinitely better than the ‘film’ of the same name.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Milo

    Read the Full Review: http://thefoundingfields.com/2013/03/.... A/N: This was initially intended to be part of a dual review with fellow reviewer Shadowhawk, which explains the slightly different (no introduction between the quote and the blurb) format. “Another strong collaboration between Bonhoff and Reaves, but ultimately, The Last Jedi doesn’t quite get everything right.“ ~Bane of Kings, The Founding Fields "The Emperor’s ruthless Order 66 has all but exterminated the Jedi. The few remaining Read the Full Review: http://thefoundingfields.com/2013/03/.... A/N: This was initially intended to be part of a dual review with fellow reviewer Shadowhawk, which explains the slightly different (no introduction between the quote and the blurb) format. “Another strong collaboration between Bonhoff and Reaves, but ultimately, The Last Jedi doesn’t quite get everything right.“ ~Bane of Kings, The Founding Fields "The Emperor’s ruthless Order 66 has all but exterminated the Jedi. The few remaining who still wield the Force for good have been driven into exile or hiding. But not Jax Pavan, who’s been steadily striking blows against the Empire—as a lone guerrilla fighter and a valued partner of Whiplash, a secret Coruscant-based resistance group. Now he’s taking on his most critical mission: transporting a valued Whiplash leader, targeted for assassination, from Coruscant to safety on a distant world. It’s a risky move under any circumstances, but Jax and his trusted crew aboard the Far Ranger, including the irrepressible droid I-Five, are prepared to pit their combat skills and their vessel’s firepower against all Imperial threats—except the one Jax fears most. Reports have raced across the galaxy that the dark lord of the Sith has fallen in a duel to the death with a Rebel freedom fighter. But Jax discovers the chilling truth when he reaches out with the Force . . . only to touch the dark, unmistakable, and malignantly alive presence that is Darth Vader. And Jax knows that Vader will stop at nothing until the last Jedi has fallen." I don’t normally talk about cover arts when writing a review, but holy crap - The Last Jedi has a great one. It’s got an awesome cover of the main protagonist, Jax – standing in front of a menacing Darth Vader, who is one of my favourite villains ever. The moment that I saw that cover, I knew I had to request this book from NetGalley and my choice of requesting was further reinforced by my enjoyment of the other collaboration by Michael Reaves and Maya Kaathryn Bonhoff - Shadow Games. As the last Star Wars book that I read was Darth Plageuis, I wanted to read something from the Jedi’s perspective and Reaves and Bonhoff did not disappoint, creating an enthralling tale set in the aftermath of Order 66, the betrayal of the Clones and the revelation of Palpatine as Darth Sidious in a move that changed the very foundations of the Republic to its core. Apparently, The Last Jedi is the fourth book in the Coruscant Nights series, all written by Michael Reaves – but I had no problem reading this book as a standalone which is what it is billed as – for on the cover and blurb there is no references to the fact that this book is a tie in to that particular series. So if you’re looking for another Star Wars tale which puts the underdogs against an Evil Empire then look no further than The Last Jedi. Bonhoff and Reaves have experience of writing in the Universe and it’s a real joy to read their writing – whilst this is no Shakespeare, it doesn’t pretend to be. And neither does it need to be. If you want a fun, fast-paced, high-stakes read then look no further - The Last Jedi is your book. But it does suffer from a few key problems. First of all, as is the case with Star Wars books featuring main characters such as Darth Vader, you know the character is not going to be killed off and therefore the book is rendered predictable. But what will happen to Jax? How close will he get? It’s almost like watching Valkyrie, the Tom Cruise film featuring an attempt on the life of Hitler by renegade German Army Officials, because you know they’re not going to succeed Whilst the threat to the good guys is there and the villain doesn’t have to be established, this is a flaw in the book and I really wish Reaves and Bonhoff had played with a different concept instead and created a more unpredictable outcome. But The Last Jedi, whilst its title may be misleading (we know that Obi-Wan is lurking in Tatooine around the time of this book), should not be dismissed because of its predictability. Another thing that I didn’t really enjoy that much in The Last Jedi was the fact that Jax seemed a bit too similar to a Mary-Sue for my liking, although I would probably think less of this if I had read Coruscant Nights. Because he seems to make the connection between Anakin Skywalker and Darth Vader a little too easily for my liking, even with the backstory that he was friends with Anakin at one point in their career as a Jedi. You’d thought that this would have been mentioned in the films if Jax was an important character in Anakin’s life like The Last Jedi makes him out to be, but Reaves and Bonhoff have created an addition to character’s story in an attempt to make the betrayal seem even more personal. It just didn’t work for me, but apart from that I found Jax’s character bearable as a whole even if he isn’t the most memorable one in the Star Wars Universe. The rest of the characters are even less memorable than Jax, I-Five being the only other that I can remember – as I feel that the book spends too much time taking the reader on a tour of different planets in a book that is clearly plot driven, to explore the characters more. But this review is probably making me sound like I disliked the book. In fact, I actually enjoyed it – it was a Star Wars novel and I’ve never read a bad one yet (although my read count is few), and whenever I read a book set in this Universe I always feel like I’m having fun. The Last Jedi has some great action scenes, an awesome cover art and some very nice lightsaber battles indeed, and I believe that Reaves and Bonhoff have produced a strong, but flawed book here – hence why I am going to give it a balanced verdict of three stars. VERDICT: 3/5 Action packed, well written, fun and page-turning, The Last Jedi is let down by its plot-driven storyline and a Mary-Sue lead character. The Last Jedi also boasts an awesome cover.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Natalie K

    This book wasn't terrible, per se—it was interesting enough, but some of the characters just fell flat to me. Granted, I know many of them were introduced in the Coruscant Nights series, which I have not read—but in my defense, this book is supposed to be a standalone anyway! The protagonist is Jax Pavan, a Jedi who survived Order 66. He's gone head-to-head with Darth Vader before and lived to tell the tale, which tells you he's impressive, lucky, or some combination of the two. In this book, Dar This book wasn't terrible, per se—it was interesting enough, but some of the characters just fell flat to me. Granted, I know many of them were introduced in the Coruscant Nights series, which I have not read—but in my defense, this book is supposed to be a standalone anyway! The protagonist is Jax Pavan, a Jedi who survived Order 66. He's gone head-to-head with Darth Vader before and lived to tell the tale, which tells you he's impressive, lucky, or some combination of the two. In this book, Darth Vader boards his ship and kidnaps a Resistance leader. Jax spends the rest of the book trying to rescue his friend. If that sounds like a bit of a thin plot for a full-length novel—well, it kind of is. There are subplots and such with the other characters, but like I said, many of these characters fell flat to me. One thing's for sure: Michael Reaves is a decent writer, but he's no Timothy Zahn. No one can write Star Wars like Zahn can.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Dante

    First Star Wars book I’ve ever dumped. This book is over 450 pages long. No big deal, except this book could have been much shorter. The plots were boring and bland and I didn’t care about any of the characters. I didn’t really like the other books in the series but at least I could get through them without being bored to tears. The plot of trying to kill the emperor was used in the last book and was renewed for this one. Why I ask would you reuse that plot? Hard to care when you know the empero First Star Wars book I’ve ever dumped. This book is over 450 pages long. No big deal, except this book could have been much shorter. The plots were boring and bland and I didn’t care about any of the characters. I didn’t really like the other books in the series but at least I could get through them without being bored to tears. The plot of trying to kill the emperor was used in the last book and was renewed for this one. Why I ask would you reuse that plot? Hard to care when you know the emperor survives. And the other major plot point was to find the Cerean Whiplash leader who Darth Vader captured. Even Darth couldn’t make me enjoy this book. Glad I dumped it after 300 pages. I wish I would have done so sooner. Skip this book and the entire Coruscant Nights Series. There is a reason why it is one of the lesser known EU books.

  22. 5 out of 5

    João Batista

    Jax Pavan, a hidden Jedi, from the beginning of the story, running from Vader's (supposed) threat... and deep in Pavan's heart, he suspects he is not the last Jedi (?). After some losses, a rebel group he is part of, Whiplash, is found in dissension. Only after 280 pages do we see some Jedi fight... And, by the end of the book, Jax learns something that could actually help him recover what he lost to Vader. I wish there were more lightsaber fights... but the mere presence of the Dark Lord is wort Jax Pavan, a hidden Jedi, from the beginning of the story, running from Vader's (supposed) threat... and deep in Pavan's heart, he suspects he is not the last Jedi (?). After some losses, a rebel group he is part of, Whiplash, is found in dissension. Only after 280 pages do we see some Jedi fight... And, by the end of the book, Jax learns something that could actually help him recover what he lost to Vader. I wish there were more lightsaber fights... but the mere presence of the Dark Lord is worth it.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jake

    This book had a lot going for it. Some good plot developments, interesting characters, etc. Unfortunately, what holds this book back the most is that it followed three under-climactic filler stories. I think it stands to reason that if you're writing book four of a trilogy, you've made a mistake in your pacing. By the time we get to Last Jedi, we're already bored with a lot of the characters and their personal drama. Suspending this, you've got a good story here, but one that is far too dependan This book had a lot going for it. Some good plot developments, interesting characters, etc. Unfortunately, what holds this book back the most is that it followed three under-climactic filler stories. I think it stands to reason that if you're writing book four of a trilogy, you've made a mistake in your pacing. By the time we get to Last Jedi, we're already bored with a lot of the characters and their personal drama. Suspending this, you've got a good story here, but one that is far too dependant on its weak forerunners.

  24. 5 out of 5

    C.T. Phipps

    Star Wars: The Last Jedi feels like a Star Wars MMORPG novel. This is a curious statement because we have had lots of Star Wars MMORPG novels and none of them felt like this. The Old Republic tie-in fiction is more or less identical to regular Star Wars fiction with the caveat it is rare that it's allowed to finish its story. The Ruins of Dantooine, made for the Galaxies MMORPG, is widely considered to be one of the worst Star Wars novels of all time. The Last Jedi, by contrast, is a very fun n Star Wars: The Last Jedi feels like a Star Wars MMORPG novel. This is a curious statement because we have had lots of Star Wars MMORPG novels and none of them felt like this. The Old Republic tie-in fiction is more or less identical to regular Star Wars fiction with the caveat it is rare that it's allowed to finish its story. The Ruins of Dantooine, made for the Galaxies MMORPG, is widely considered to be one of the worst Star Wars novels of all time. The Last Jedi, by contrast, is a very fun novel but it feels more like Galaxies and The Old Republic than any of the other novels ever did. Indeed, I'd argue it's not necessarily an online role-playing game that The Last Jedi feels like. Instead, it feels like a roleplaying-game period. I played literally hundreds of hours of Star Wars: The Roleplaying Game as well as its sequel, Star Wars SAGA without the benefit of computers. A more or less typical party of characters would consist of a guy wanting to be a Jedi, smugglers, droids, and the obligatory Twilek love-interest. Our heroes would tool around the galaxy, conduct various raids against the Empire on behalf of the Rebel Alliance, and do their very best to avoid the attentions of Lord Vader. Because Darth Vader couldn't be killed due to the movies, or so fanboy logic went, he was depicted as an invincible juggernaut of destruction. You could thwart his schemes and plans but not actually stop the villain himself. When you wanted your Jedi Knight to face a Dark Jedi, you sent them up against the Imperial Inquisition. The Imperial Inquisitors, created by West End Games, were Darth Vader-lite types who were omnipresent Dark Siders after your heroes. In a weird way, The Last Jedi is also a throwback to the Pre-Prequels Star Wars universe. There's no hints of the emotionally unstable Anakin beneath Darth Vader's mask. Instead, he's treated as an unstoppable force of nature akin to his handling in A New Hope and The Empire Strikes Back. The Empire is all-pervasive and tyrannical with freedom-loving people across the galaxy desiring to overthrow it. The Rebel Alliance doesn't exist yet but our heroes work with miniature versions of it on numerous worlds. The Star Wars RPG universe had ample room for other heroes than Luke, Han, and Leia with dozens of low-level or wannabe Jedi Knights tooling around. Jax Pavan isn't really a threat to the supremacy of the Dark Lord like, say, Starkiller because despite being a fully trained Jedi--he's ridiculously outclassed by Vader. Were Luke Skywalker and Jax to ever meet up, it's likely untrained Luke would be more powerful than him. That's how the RPG worked too, with Rebellion-Era Luke possessing ridiculously high Force stats despite his untrained nature. This "classic" of the Star Wars universe is important to bring up because I suspect whether you like RPGs or not will determine what you think of this novel. It feels very much like someone novelizing a campaign. There's a bunch of Maguffins, exotic locations, rescue missions, guest-stars, and temptations for Player Characters to hang themselves with (also known as the "Deck of Many Things" ploy). Jax Pavan goes to Topwara, Dathomir, Coruscant, Mandalore, and Darth Vader's secret fortress. He meets with Prince Xizor, Lord Vader, and members of the Singing Mountain clan. Even the mission, rescue an important Rebel General, is the kind of thing West End Games used to put in their adventure modules. Overall, I really enjoyed The Last Jedi but I have complaints. One of them is the death of Laranth. There's a phenomenon in comics known as "Women in Refrigerators" and this is an example of that. Basically, Laranth's death exists solely so Jax Pavan can have some character development by having him react to her death. Given Laranth was an interesting character in her own right, being a Jedi Gunslinger, this only makes it more troublesome. Her death also comes off as somewhat perfunctory as if she didn't warrant something suitably epic. I also think the rescue of Whiplash's leader is too low-stakes for a 400+ page novel. Whiplash is a Rebel Cell, not the Rebel Alliance and I would have preferred something more epic like Jax Pavan wanting to blow up a Star Destroyer or the Inquisition's base. Some members do want to achieve something huge but well, we know what happens with this plan the moment someone describes what the objective is. Curiously, despite its old school feel, the book ties together the "modern" EU with The Clone Wars Animated series in a way which feels seamless. Mandalore is under the control of Death Watch and selling its citizens as slaves, the Dathomir have large number of Zabrak-Human hybrids even in the Singing Mountain clan, and there's no sign of any real continuity hiccups. It makes me want Michael Reaves to have Jax hook up with the Mareks on Kashyyyk or jump ahead to the point Starkiller can hang out with Pavan. In conclusion, I really liked The Last Jedi but it's crunchy genre fiction at its crunchiest. You won't miss out on anything by not reading this book but it's enjoyable enough if you want something Star Warsy for your diet. I hope they make another couple of books in the series as I have no objections to the character or his continuing adventures. 8/10

  25. 5 out of 5

    Hazel

    Not my favorite in the series though technically this book stands outside the Coruscant nights series for some reason. Perhaps because so little of it happens on Coruscant. As a book it's fine there's some cool stuff going on, it wasn't ever really boring, but I never found it very exciting either. Just kind of mid range. Not my favorite in the series though technically this book stands outside the Coruscant nights series for some reason. Perhaps because so little of it happens on Coruscant. As a book it's fine there's some cool stuff going on, it wasn't ever really boring, but I never found it very exciting either. Just kind of mid range.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Christian Smith

    Overall: 6/10 Pro: learning Ramage’s abilities and all the new force powers was extremely cool and well integrated into the story. Con: I could use more Den. He’s a cool character and I barely knew he existed in this story.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sean Watson

    So grateful that we got one more book in this great series!!!!! This one was my favorite of the four books. Could not let this one go, so much fun!!!!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Trevor Anderson

    Great novelization that clears up TLJ pretty well. There's nothing exceptional really, but it got the job done. Great novelization that clears up TLJ pretty well. There's nothing exceptional really, but it got the job done.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Will

    Good series, disappointed it was not continued, as the story is left hanging... Could see this working as a TV mini movie series or at the theater.

  30. 4 out of 5

    David Barney

    I really enjoyed this story. The story gave hope that the Jedi would continue on.

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