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In a Dark, Dark Room and Other Scary Stories

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Creak... Crash... BOO! Shivering skeletons, ghostly pirates, chattering corpses, and haunted graveyards...all to chill your bones! Share these seven spine-tingling stories in a dark, dark room.


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Creak... Crash... BOO! Shivering skeletons, ghostly pirates, chattering corpses, and haunted graveyards...all to chill your bones! Share these seven spine-tingling stories in a dark, dark room.

30 review for In a Dark, Dark Room and Other Scary Stories

  1. 5 out of 5

    Caroline

    i liked the story of the girl whose head falls off so much that i got a baby doll when i was 3, named her Jenny, and tied a green ribbon around her neck, and then i'd untie it and i'd make her head fall off. when my parents figured out what it was supposed to be, they knew i would be weird forever. i liked the story of the girl whose head falls off so much that i got a baby doll when i was 3, named her Jenny, and tied a green ribbon around her neck, and then i'd untie it and i'd make her head fall off. when my parents figured out what it was supposed to be, they knew i would be weird forever.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Tim

    My daughter finds it quite intolerable that I "read scary stories all the time" but that she's not allowed to. Mind you, most of the stories I read to her are cheery books with unicorns, talking animals and more than a dash of the color pink. She's also a child who has hid some of my books before because the cover was "too scary and I wanted to make sure it didn't bother anyone." I honestly figured anything remotely scary would not go over well… then I remembered a book I enjoyed as a kid. The s My daughter finds it quite intolerable that I "read scary stories all the time" but that she's not allowed to. Mind you, most of the stories I read to her are cheery books with unicorns, talking animals and more than a dash of the color pink. She's also a child who has hid some of my books before because the cover was "too scary and I wanted to make sure it didn't bother anyone." I honestly figured anything remotely scary would not go over well… then I remembered a book I enjoyed as a kid. The stories weren't particularly scary and the illustrations looked very similar to Halloween decorations I remember from my childhood. I went online, ordered it and figured it would be fun to read. This is what I remembered: This is what we got: So yeah, the illustrations were revised in recent years and instead of making them less scary (like that horrible revision of Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark which I will not allow in my house because if anyone is reading it they will be as traumatized as I was a kid damn it all) it was made significantly creepier. While I personally love the artwork, I would call it significantly scarier. I read through the stories and was delighted to remember them, but the accompanying illustrations, were certainly a bit more than I thought my daughter could take based on her personality and decided perhaps it was better if I hid it for a bit. … So, story time hits that night and my daughter tells me "I want the story about the girl whose head falls off." I look at her blankly, wondering what the hell she's talking about and if she's somehow figured out the iPad's code and has been pulling up things on Youtube that she really shouldn't when she runs over to my bookcase and pulls this out. Apparently she had seen me put it away earlier in the day, pulled it out, looked through all the pictures, and returned it to the bookcase. Well, bravo child, my hands are tied, time for some scary stories. Overall she enjoyed the book and I was pleasantly surprised to not be woken up with screams about ghost pirates or anything throughout the night. While it worked out well for me and my daughter, I highly advise parents to look through this one prior to buying… that said, who knows? Maybe the child is braver than you think. 4/5 stars. Side note: after reading through it and losing the nostalgia filter, I do think the illustrations in this version make for a better book.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    This book is hands down one of my favorite children's books. My kindergarten teacher read this to us Halloween (1989) and I fell in love with it. The story of the little girl named Jenny with the ribbon around her neck really stuck with me. In middle school and high school I started asking people if they ever read a book with that story in it, or heard of it. No one did. As an adult I was determined to find it but I didn't remember what it looked like. Every Halloween season I would look in book This book is hands down one of my favorite children's books. My kindergarten teacher read this to us Halloween (1989) and I fell in love with it. The story of the little girl named Jenny with the ribbon around her neck really stuck with me. In middle school and high school I started asking people if they ever read a book with that story in it, or heard of it. No one did. As an adult I was determined to find it but I didn't remember what it looked like. Every Halloween season I would look in bookstores and ask booksellers if they ever heard that story. I was beginning to think that I made it up. I started working at Borders Books & Music (R.I.P.) fall of 2005 and started working in the children's section doing inventory and merchandising. This book was on a cart that I was re-shelving in the I Can Read Book spinners and I happened to flip through it. Oh my god I was so excited. I bought it that day and then I had the author and the title and was able to order some in hard cover. Now when I wander through Barnes and Noble I sometimes see the hardcover in the bargain books section during Halloween time. I make sure to pick up a copy and I give them to my nieces and children of my friends. I just bought a new one to use when I work with young children so I can keep my copy nice.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Josiah

    Alvin Schwartz is one of the best tellers of scary stories for kids, and in this book he has adapted that ability for a younger audience than ever: the early reader. The best thing about Alvin Schwartz's scary stories is that the best ones really do make chills run up and down one's spine, and cause a bit of paranoid fear about what could be lurking around the corner in one's own house. The stories that comprise In a Dark, Dark Room are very short, but effective. Kids won't soon forget the eerie Alvin Schwartz is one of the best tellers of scary stories for kids, and in this book he has adapted that ability for a younger audience than ever: the early reader. The best thing about Alvin Schwartz's scary stories is that the best ones really do make chills run up and down one's spine, and cause a bit of paranoid fear about what could be lurking around the corner in one's own house. The stories that comprise In a Dark, Dark Room are very short, but effective. Kids won't soon forget the eerie endings, solidly embedded in the American tradition of horror and folklore storytelling. To me, the best story of In a Dark, Dark Room is about the girl who always wears a green ribbon tied around her neck for no obvious reason. She resists telling a boy she knows (and ends up marrying) the purpose of the ribbon until her dying day, and then... I like this book. It's a brief read, but completely worth it. I rate In a Dark, Dark Room two and a half stars, and am tempted to round to three. Alvin Schwartz's most famous illustrating partner is the incredible Stephen Gammell, but Dirk Zimmer pairs wonderfully with him as well.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Abigail

    Folklorist and children's author Alvin Schwartz presents seven spooky selections in this early-reader collection. From the opening tale about The Teeth, in which a boy runs from a series of men, each with teeth longer than the last, to the closing children's song about The Ghost of John, the contents here is sure to give young beginning readers the shivers. In the Graveyard sees a fat woman speaking to three thin corpses in a graveyard, while The Green Ribbon follows the tale of a young girl who Folklorist and children's author Alvin Schwartz presents seven spooky selections in this early-reader collection. From the opening tale about The Teeth, in which a boy runs from a series of men, each with teeth longer than the last, to the closing children's song about The Ghost of John, the contents here is sure to give young beginning readers the shivers. In the Graveyard sees a fat woman speaking to three thin corpses in a graveyard, while The Green Ribbon follows the tale of a young girl who always wears a ribbon of green around her neck. The titular In a Dark, Dark Room uses repetition to build suspense, and scare the reader, while The Night it Rained and The Pirate both chronicle a ghostly encounter. Although I have vivid memories of reading Schwartz's Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark as a girl - a collection that was intended for older, middle-grade readers - I never happened to pick up In a Dark, Dark Room and Other Scary Stories, which first saw print in 1984. I'm glad I've finally remedied that situation, as I think this collection makes an admirable spooky read for younger children who are just becoming independent readers. I appreciated the author's foreword, in which he talks about the appeal of being scared, and I also appreciated the afterword, in which he briefly discusses the folkloric sources for each selection. With the exception of The Teeth, which comes from Suriname, it would seem that these tales and songs are mostly British and/or Euro-American. The accompanying artwork by Dirk Zimmer accentuates the scares to be found in each tale, and ably complements the text. Recommended to beginning readers looking for ghost stories.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    Oh, the memories! I remember my first grade teacher reading this book to me. VERY VERY scary. There were some scary stories which I somehow forgotten over my childhood/teenhood, but the one story I ALWAYS remembered and would randomly replay in my head is the story of THE GREEN RIBBON. THE GREEN RIBBON............so it's about this girl named Jenny who always wore a green scarf/ribbon around her neck. Jenny marries a boy and the boy always asks Jenny why she has the scarf on. Jenny simply just sa Oh, the memories! I remember my first grade teacher reading this book to me. VERY VERY scary. There were some scary stories which I somehow forgotten over my childhood/teenhood, but the one story I ALWAYS remembered and would randomly replay in my head is the story of THE GREEN RIBBON. THE GREEN RIBBON............so it's about this girl named Jenny who always wore a green scarf/ribbon around her neck. Jenny marries a boy and the boy always asks Jenny why she has the scarf on. Jenny simply just says she'll tell him someday. So one day, **SPOILER ALERT SPOILER ALERT SPOILER ALERT ALERT ALERT** when Jenny is dying and at her deathbed, Jenny tells the boy to undo the ribbon around her neck. When the boy does, Jenny's head falls off. *GASP*** As a little kid, the story scared the HELL OUT OF ME. (That is the reason why I still remember THE GREEN RIBBON story to this day.) So yeah, I'm sure this is a total horror book especially if only one simple story freaked me out. Regardless, this book has amazing suspense, mystery, and horror. It's the perfect book to scare the crap out of someone....especially on Halloween. :)

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tova

    I read this years ago, and The Green Ribbon was something.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Bilgewater

    This is one of my favorite books of all time and one of the first books I ever read. The illustrations are spectacular and very creepy, and the stories are wonderfully told twists on classics. Perfect for kids and new readers, as well as anyone who wants a gentle but spooky read.

  9. 4 out of 5

    La Coccinelle

    This is a short collection of very short stories aimed at beginning readers. Though most are based on older folktales, I felt the stories were kind of watered down, to the point that they'll probably only be entertaining to the age group they're aimed at. Kids might get a sense of accomplishment from reading these little morsels of fright, but older readers are likely to be left unsatisfied. That said, the illustrations are great. The edition I read features new illustrations from 2017, which bre This is a short collection of very short stories aimed at beginning readers. Though most are based on older folktales, I felt the stories were kind of watered down, to the point that they'll probably only be entertaining to the age group they're aimed at. Kids might get a sense of accomplishment from reading these little morsels of fright, but older readers are likely to be left unsatisfied. That said, the illustrations are great. The edition I read features new illustrations from 2017, which breathe some new life into this 1984 collection. Here are my thoughts on the individual stories: "The Teeth" - Creepy more than scary--and without much of a plot--this is basically just the story of a boy who encounters a series of men with progressively larger teeth. The fright factor is highly dependent on the illustrations. 3* "In the Graveyard" - I can't quite tell if this one features fat-shaming or not (but if I'm questioning it, it could probably be construed that way). An overweight woman sitting in a graveyard meets some corpses. She asks them if she will be like them when she is dead. They say yes. The illustrations show a vision of her future self as a skinny corpse that looks awfully happy. Make of that what you will. 2* "The Green Ribbon" - I think I've seen a version of this story somewhere before. It's probably the most comical and macabre of the bunch. It concerns a young girl named Jenny who wears a green ribbon around her neck. She won't tell anyone what it's for until the day she's on her deathbed... when everyone finds out in a startling way. (The illustrations make the girl look disconcertingly like Anne Shirley... so the finale becomes even more disturbing!) 3.5* "In a Dark, Dark Room" - The title of this story is probably the spookiest part of it. It relies on word repetition to build up suspense. Unfortunately, the payoff is kind of... meh. This is another story in this collection that relies heavily on the illustrations; the ending is next to worthless without them. 2* "The Night it Rained" - If you're over the age of ten, you'll probably have encountered a variation on this story. A man sees a little boy standing next to a cemetery. It's raining, so he offers the kid a lift and the use of his sweater, with a promise to return the next day to pick up said garment. For kids who haven't read something like this or seen the twist, it will probably be more engaging. 3* "The Pirate" - Here's yet another story that looks like it stars Anne Shirley (this time with bosom friend, Diana Barry). Diana Ruth is spending her vacation with her cousin Anne Susan. Susan tells Ruth about how the guestroom is supposedly haunted by the ghost of a pirate. So Ruth checks the room thoroughly before going to bed, only to hear a big voice! The illustrations are essential to this story, too; readers won't fully appreciate the final climactic scene without them. 2.5* "The Ghost of John" - This is apparently a poem written by an 8-year-old girl (who would now be 48, according to the note at the end). It's surprisingly good, considering the age of the poet; I've read rhyming poems by adults that are a lot worse. 2.5* I might recommend this to young children who are starting to read on their own. The actual writing is pretty decent, and the illustrations are deliciously creepy (while still maintaining a sense of humour). For older readers who want a story collection that's actually satisfying on a plot level, though, I'd suggest looking elsewhere.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ronyell

    4.5 stars Now, I have been introduced to Alvin Schwartz’s works before through his famous and controversial “Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark” series and after I found out that Alvin Schwartz had written another pair of horror stories for children called “In a Dark, Dark Room and Other Scary Stories,” of course I had to give this series a whirl! This is a collection of horror stories for children and there is a total of seven stories being told in this book. The stories featured in this colle 4.5 stars Now, I have been introduced to Alvin Schwartz’s works before through his famous and controversial “Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark” series and after I found out that Alvin Schwartz had written another pair of horror stories for children called “In a Dark, Dark Room and Other Scary Stories,” of course I had to give this series a whirl! This is a collection of horror stories for children and there is a total of seven stories being told in this book. The stories featured in this collection are: 1. The Teeth 2. In the Graveyard 3. The Green Ribbon 4. In a Dark, Dark Room 5. The Night it Rained 6. The Pirate 7. The Ghost of John Wow! Alvin Schwartz really knows how to create stories that are both scary and tame for any child and all of these horror stories contain a mixture of humor and horror that made me both smile and cringe at the same time. I loved the fact that Alvin Schwartz did some research on these stories and allows the readers to understand where these stories came from as he mentions it in the “Where the Stories Come From” section at the end of the book as I wanted to know where these stories came from. I also enjoyed many of the stories in this book with my favorites being “The Green Ribbon” and “In a Dark, Dark Room” as I believe that those are the creepiest stories in this collection, especially “The Green Ribbon!” Dirk Zimmer’s artwork conveys both horror and comedy in this book as the characters have exaggerated features which includes some of the characters have large noses and wide eyes and I also loved the way that the characters look so pale and frightened in most of the images as it shows what kind of horrors the readers will be introduced to when they start reading this book! The reason why I took off a half point from the star rating was because I felt that there were too many abrupt endings in each story and I wanted to see some closure in these stories, although given the short length of this book, that was to be expected. Also, even though I have enjoyed Alvin Schwartz’s work on “Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark,” I felt that this collection of horror stories was not as scary as “Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark.” Maybe it is because the artwork was not as scary as Stephen Gammell’s artwork in “Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark” and that took away the creepiness of the stories, although stories like “The Green Ribbon” still remained creepy no matter how the illustrations looked like. Overall, “In a Dark, Dark Room and Other Scary Stories” is a great collection of horror stories that children will gladly enjoy during Halloween time! I would recommend this book to children ages six and up since there are some scary stories in this book that might creep out younger readers. Review is also on: Rabbit Ears Book Blog

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jodi

    Saw someone dressed as Jenny from "The Green Ribbon" for Halloween and viscerally recalled the fear of reading this book as a kid. It spooked me then and I love how fun and creepy it is now! I love the genre of horror within readers for kids who want something scary but aren't ready for Goosebumps yet. Nightmarish AND developmentally appropriate! Saw someone dressed as Jenny from "The Green Ribbon" for Halloween and viscerally recalled the fear of reading this book as a kid. It spooked me then and I love how fun and creepy it is now! I love the genre of horror within readers for kids who want something scary but aren't ready for Goosebumps yet. Nightmarish AND developmentally appropriate!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mr. Cody

    Don’t untie the green ribbon....ahhhhh!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

    From the author of middle school favorite and frequently challenged Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark, Alvin Schwartz’ In A Dark, Dark Room is a collection of seven stories written with a younger elementary school audience in mind. The Foreword sets the stage in describing why scary stories are liked and sets up the premise for the book “when there is no real danger, feeling scared is fun.” And it is fun. The Zimmer’s illustrations incorporate the important spooky elements of the stories to demon From the author of middle school favorite and frequently challenged Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark, Alvin Schwartz’ In A Dark, Dark Room is a collection of seven stories written with a younger elementary school audience in mind. The Foreword sets the stage in describing why scary stories are liked and sets up the premise for the book “when there is no real danger, feeling scared is fun.” And it is fun. The Zimmer’s illustrations incorporate the important spooky elements of the stories to demonstrate the plot, but are also quite funny. The people have exaggerated features and the scare-factor is more of a surprise twist that can lead to a smile. Repetition of text is used, and text is spaced for anticipation and buildup to find out what happens next when the page is turned. An ALA Notable Children’s Book as well as winner of several state recognition awards, In A Dark, Dark Room incorporates both traditional folklore as well as song in these stories. “Where The Stories Come From” at the end of the book describes the basis for the adaptation and retelling of the stories and song included in this collection for children. This is definitely a book beginning readers will pick up, enjoy, and remember.

  14. 5 out of 5

    James

    Obviously for young kids. I remember reading this back in the '80s, and picking it up and taking the few minutes to read all of the stories and take in the artwork was a lot of fun. Just spooky enough for toddlers and elementary school kids before they dare enter the creepy world of the original "Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark" books, and just fun enough for adults looking for a quick shot of nostalgia during the Halloween season! Obviously for young kids. I remember reading this back in the '80s, and picking it up and taking the few minutes to read all of the stories and take in the artwork was a lot of fun. Just spooky enough for toddlers and elementary school kids before they dare enter the creepy world of the original "Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark" books, and just fun enough for adults looking for a quick shot of nostalgia during the Halloween season!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Penelope (Penelope’s Picks)

    I will always remember The Green Ribbon.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Cam

    These are level 2 reason with help short scary stories. Very cute but they are to short and the stories feel open ended.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jack Stark

    3.776659 stars Well, that was a fun little read. I came across this on bibliobeth’s blog review. As it is coming up to Halloween I like to sit in the garden with my nieces and do a bit of a Halloween/Samhain campfire where we roast marshmallows and tell scary stories. HEATHENS! You can be sure that this book will be making an appearance on that night! Although these stories are very much intended for use with children, it did make me laugh that they reminded me of many of the short 'horror' storie 3.776659 stars Well, that was a fun little read. I came across this on bibliobeth’s blog review. As it is coming up to Halloween I like to sit in the garden with my nieces and do a bit of a Halloween/Samhain campfire where we roast marshmallows and tell scary stories. HEATHENS! You can be sure that this book will be making an appearance on that night! Although these stories are very much intended for use with children, it did make me laugh that they reminded me of many of the short 'horror' stories that one may find on the reddit dot com. You know, the ones where the twist at the end is always 'and it turns out they were dead all along!' Anyway, I'm off to tie a green ribbon round my neck. Peace and Love.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Goge (BARRONS) le Moning Maniac,

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I was scared. This book scared me. I read it more than ten years ago.. I was scared.. creeped out, horrified and fascinated. This was one of my earliest horror stories I read as a kid. There was one story that thinking about gave me scared the willies out of me and that was the story of the girl with a ribbon around her neck... *shivers* Still scares me today.. 'Everyone asked her what the ribbon was for but she never told them. Time went by and she go herself a boyfriend who became her husband. I was scared. This book scared me. I read it more than ten years ago.. I was scared.. creeped out, horrified and fascinated. This was one of my earliest horror stories I read as a kid. There was one story that thinking about gave me scared the willies out of me and that was the story of the girl with a ribbon around her neck... *shivers* Still scares me today.. 'Everyone asked her what the ribbon was for but she never told them. Time went by and she go herself a boyfriend who became her husband. He asked her what the ribbon was for but she never told him; just kept telling him, "not yet". Finally, as they(or just her?) lay dying in bed, I believe, she said, "now, now untie the ribbon." He does and her head falls off. -The thought that at any time her head could have fallen off scares me. The mystery of how her head got like that scares me. "Headless", this book spooked me so much I gained a fear of headless things ect.And.. I was always so scared that my neck was going to pop off.. barbies scared me because their heads could pop off *shudders*. I used to randomly touch my neck to see if I could feel a thin line that shows my head would come off. I completely believed when I was older that was how I would die, my head popping off.. Yep, this book scared me. And I remembered this compulsion to touch my neck to assure myself it wouldn't fall off because thinking about this book I unintentionally touched my neck, my hand's cold right now and that scared me. Made me remember what I used to do. This book is extremely nostalgic. I used to have troubles sleeping with this book.. A Major goosebumps, shivers, shudders, and ice-cold feeling type of book. I don't remember the teeth story but thinking about it gave me a small shudder.. I think my subconcous was scared of it when I was younger too..

  19. 5 out of 5

    Josiah

    Alvin Schwartz is one of the best tellers of scary stories for kids, and in this book he has adapted that ability for a younger audience than ever: the early reader. The best thing about Alvin Schwartz's scary stories is that the best ones really do make chills run up and down one's spine, and cause a bit of paranoid fear about what could be lurking around the corner in one's own house. The stories that comprise In a Dark, Dark Room are very short but effective. Kids won't soon forget the eerie Alvin Schwartz is one of the best tellers of scary stories for kids, and in this book he has adapted that ability for a younger audience than ever: the early reader. The best thing about Alvin Schwartz's scary stories is that the best ones really do make chills run up and down one's spine, and cause a bit of paranoid fear about what could be lurking around the corner in one's own house. The stories that comprise In a Dark, Dark Room are very short but effective. Kids won't soon forget the eerie endings, solidly embedded in the American tradition of horror and folklore storytelling. To me, the best story of In a Dark, Dark Room is about the girl who always wears a green ribbon tied around her neck for no obvious reason. She resists telling a boy she knows (and ends up marrying) the purpose of the ribbon until her dying day, and then... I like this book. It's a brief read, but completely worth it. I rate In a Dark, Dark Room two and a half stars, and am tempted to round to three. Alvin Schwartz's most famous illustrating partner is the incredible Stephen Gammell, but Dirk Zimmer pairs wonderfully with him as well.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mary Ann

    New illustrations by Victor Rivas reinvigorate this classic easy reader with cartoonish, creepy kids, ghosts and ghouls. Schwartz begins his book writing, "Most of us like scary stories because we like feeling scared. When there is no real danger, feeling scared is fun." He uses repetition, suspense and sudden revelations to great effect. Rivas' illustrations amp up the fright with creepy cartoon characters in the style of Tim Burton and Edward Gorey. New illustrations by Victor Rivas reinvigorate this classic easy reader with cartoonish, creepy kids, ghosts and ghouls. Schwartz begins his book writing, "Most of us like scary stories because we like feeling scared. When there is no real danger, feeling scared is fun." He uses repetition, suspense and sudden revelations to great effect. Rivas' illustrations amp up the fright with creepy cartoon characters in the style of Tim Burton and Edward Gorey.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Cherlynn (cherreading)

    I wished I had read this as a kid because then I would have definitely enjoyed it more. The only story I truly liked was Jenny and her Green Ribbon, though who doesn't? What a classic. And not forgetting the cool illustrations in the book. I wished I had read this as a kid because then I would have definitely enjoyed it more. The only story I truly liked was Jenny and her Green Ribbon, though who doesn't? What a classic. And not forgetting the cool illustrations in the book.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Elaine

    The first few stories aren't at all spooky, but the stories become progressively scarier as you read further in. The first few stories aren't at all spooky, but the stories become progressively scarier as you read further in.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sayeeda

    her head fell off!!!!!!!!!!!!! 😵

  24. 4 out of 5

    Earl

    Scary stories geared for an even younger audience. Includes a foreword on how to best tell a good ghost story. I love that he immediately sets the mood that these are meant to be enjoyed and that being scared can be fun! He also cites where the stories come from.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Colleen

    We were talking about The Green Ribbon this past book club, so I had to order the book I remembered from my childhood, and was not disappointed (except that it's a reprint). It has 6 stories and a short poem in it, and most are enjoyable. It ultimately is the illustrations that make each story creepy. I really did like how at the end the author gives the origin of each tale. That might not matter to a kid, but to an adult that loved these as a kid, it's fun to do some research. The Teeth - a sma We were talking about The Green Ribbon this past book club, so I had to order the book I remembered from my childhood, and was not disappointed (except that it's a reprint). It has 6 stories and a short poem in it, and most are enjoyable. It ultimately is the illustrations that make each story creepy. I really did like how at the end the author gives the origin of each tale. That might not matter to a kid, but to an adult that loved these as a kid, it's fun to do some research. The Teeth - a small boy keeps seeing a succession of men on the street, each with longer teeth than the previous one. In the Graveyard - a short and fat woman sitting on a bench in the graveyard sees 3 long and thin corpses come in and asks if she will be like them when she dies. They say yes, sit up in their coffins, and she yells. I didn't really get this one. (I get the short/fat thing dying, and becoming thin and skeleton like, I'm not stupid. I just didn't get her yelling at the end after already having a conversation with the corpses.) The Green Ribbon - obviously the best story. Jenny and Alfred meet in school, end up married. Will never tell him why she has a green ribbon on her neck. She gets old, and when she is about to die she lets Alfred take it off. Plop, there goes her head. In a Dark, Dark, Room - one of the two I didn't like. Not creepy. Dark wood, dark house, dark room, dark shelf, dark box, GHOST. dumb. The Night it Rained - my second favorite. Classic story - driver picks up kid in the rain, gives him a sweater. Goes to get it next day, mom says son died a year ago. He finds it on the boys grave. The Pirate - the other dumb one. A girl is visiting her cousin, told her room is haunted. She looks everywhere, can't find a ghost. He yells. The Ghost of John - a little poem written by an 8 year old. Fun.

  26. 5 out of 5

    David

    In a Dark, Dark Room and Other Scary Stories by Alvin Schwartz, illustrated by Dirk Zimmer is a classic easy reader & short Halloween compilation. Schwartz brings scary stories plus a song & poem to level one readers in an effective mix sure to please. Dirk Zimmer's appropriately creepy illustrations have enough humor to entertain the younger audience for these stories. The introduction & info on where the stories originated are helpful and set the tone well. The Green Ribbon, The Teeth, The Nig In a Dark, Dark Room and Other Scary Stories by Alvin Schwartz, illustrated by Dirk Zimmer is a classic easy reader & short Halloween compilation. Schwartz brings scary stories plus a song & poem to level one readers in an effective mix sure to please. Dirk Zimmer's appropriately creepy illustrations have enough humor to entertain the younger audience for these stories. The introduction & info on where the stories originated are helpful and set the tone well. The Green Ribbon, The Teeth, The Night it Rained, and The Pirate are among the most efffective stories. Besides using the stories to read aloud, I have used parts of this book in a variety of ways. The Teeth I adapted to tell using monster masks, including in a darkened room. I have told In a Dark Dark Room using a box with a ghost inside & substituted one year & used a witch instead. I have also told these aloud, and suggested the book to kids wanting to tell a scary story to others. Ghosts!: Ghostly Tales from Folklore (I Can Read Book Series: Level 2) is another Schwartz collection. In a Dark, Dark Room and Other Scary Stories is a memmorable, useful, and annual Halloween favorite. For grades 1 - 2 and older for telling out loud.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    This was a book I remember from my childhood. A book I picked out of the school library constantly and then eventually on a used book sale at my school this book was for sale and I finally owned the exact copy. Although it is somewhere in my boxes in the basement now, I will always remember this book as kinda spooky to me as a kid and nostalgic to me now :)

  28. 4 out of 5

    Di

    I had such nostalgic feelings reading this for what feels like the millionth time. The Green Ribbon was always my favorite story in this book, but I am surprised I remembered so many of the stories after all this time! It has been a couple decades since I read this last, and I'm happy to say that it remains a favorite to this day. I had such nostalgic feelings reading this for what feels like the millionth time. The Green Ribbon was always my favorite story in this book, but I am surprised I remembered so many of the stories after all this time! It has been a couple decades since I read this last, and I'm happy to say that it remains a favorite to this day.

  29. 4 out of 5

    [Name Redacted]

    First Read: 1991-ish? Second Read: 9/26/2015 Third Read: 7/17/2018

  30. 5 out of 5

    J

    It has been a while since I read this but reading it now certainly puts a damper on it. Unfortunately since it has been so long I cannot remember whether the stories had scared me when I was younger (I am sure they didn't) or whether there was more to the telling of the stories then what I have found in this particular book. Anyway the only reason that I truly gave this a 3-stars instead of 2 is since the story of Jenny more or less stuck with me throughout all time. Although this particular ta It has been a while since I read this but reading it now certainly puts a damper on it. Unfortunately since it has been so long I cannot remember whether the stories had scared me when I was younger (I am sure they didn't) or whether there was more to the telling of the stories then what I have found in this particular book. Anyway the only reason that I truly gave this a 3-stars instead of 2 is since the story of Jenny more or less stuck with me throughout all time. Although this particular tale has more details in its brief telling than other similar stories there is no true difference when you are reading other choker/thread-necklace stories, which are quite common tales in the horror/folklore/urban tale genres. Otherwise the writing is easy and quite simple to understand so children who are able to read should have no problems with the telling. Unfortunately to me the stories seemed really brief and like they were missing parts, which again I cannot remember if there was more in the earlier version that wasn't part of the "I Can Read" series. What really impressed me with this book and still does is that it was one of the first books to actually teach me that the illustrations can have as much an influence on the reader as the story. The notorious black cat appears at least once in most of the tales while the darkish centered colors lends to the eerie atmosphere of the stories themselves although occasionally you will find something funnily but indirectly related like the poster of the toothbrush. All in all it is a decent starter to urban legends and spooky tales for children who may be interested but in the long run it just won't be truly satisfying for a adult horror fan or one who has grown out of such easy retellings.

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