website statistics One Salt Sea - PDF Books Online
Hot Best Seller

One Salt Sea

Availability: Ready to download

October "Toby" Daye is finally doing all right—and that inevitably means it's time for things to take a turn for the worse. Someone has kidnapped the sons of the Duchess Dianda Lorden, regent of the Undersea Duchy of Saltmist. To prevent a war between land and sea, Toby must not only find the missing boys, but also prove that the Queen of the Mists was not behind their abd October "Toby" Daye is finally doing all right—and that inevitably means it's time for things to take a turn for the worse. Someone has kidnapped the sons of the Duchess Dianda Lorden, regent of the Undersea Duchy of Saltmist. To prevent a war between land and sea, Toby must not only find the missing boys, but also prove that the Queen of the Mists was not behind their abduction. She'll need all her tricks and the help of her allies if she wants to make it through this in one piece. Toby's search will take her from the streets of San Francisco to the lands beneath the waves. But someone is determined to stop her—and whoever it is isn't playing by Oberon's Laws. As the battle grows more and more personal, one thing is chillingly clear. When Faerie goes to war, not everyone will walk away.


Compare

October "Toby" Daye is finally doing all right—and that inevitably means it's time for things to take a turn for the worse. Someone has kidnapped the sons of the Duchess Dianda Lorden, regent of the Undersea Duchy of Saltmist. To prevent a war between land and sea, Toby must not only find the missing boys, but also prove that the Queen of the Mists was not behind their abd October "Toby" Daye is finally doing all right—and that inevitably means it's time for things to take a turn for the worse. Someone has kidnapped the sons of the Duchess Dianda Lorden, regent of the Undersea Duchy of Saltmist. To prevent a war between land and sea, Toby must not only find the missing boys, but also prove that the Queen of the Mists was not behind their abduction. She'll need all her tricks and the help of her allies if she wants to make it through this in one piece. Toby's search will take her from the streets of San Francisco to the lands beneath the waves. But someone is determined to stop her—and whoever it is isn't playing by Oberon's Laws. As the battle grows more and more personal, one thing is chillingly clear. When Faerie goes to war, not everyone will walk away.

30 review for One Salt Sea

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    One Salt Sea (October Daye #5), Seanan McGuire October "Toby" Daye is finally doing all right—and that inevitably means it's time for things to take a turn for the worse. Someone has kidnapped the sons of the Duchess Dianda Lorden, regent of the Undersea Duchy of Saltmist. To prevent a war between land and sea, Toby must not only find the missing boys, but also prove that the Queen of the Mists was not behind their abduction. She'll need all her tricks and the help of her allies if she wants to m One Salt Sea (October Daye #5), Seanan McGuire October "Toby" Daye is finally doing all right—and that inevitably means it's time for things to take a turn for the worse. Someone has kidnapped the sons of the Duchess Dianda Lorden, regent of the Undersea Duchy of Saltmist. To prevent a war between land and sea, Toby must not only find the missing boys, but also prove that the Queen of the Mists was not behind their abduction. She'll need all her tricks and the help of her allies if she wants to make it through this in one piece. Toby's search will take her from the streets of San Francisco to the lands beneath the waves. But someone is determined to stop her—and whoever it is isn't playing by Oberon's Laws. As the battle grows more and more personal, one thing is chillingly clear. When Faerie goes to war, not everyone will walk away. تاریخ نخستین خوانش روز هشتم ماه مارس سال 2017 میلادی عنوان: دریای نمکی: کتاب پنجم از سری اکتبر دای؛ نویسنده: سینان (شانین) مک گوایر (مکگیر)؛ اکتبر (توبی) دِای، سرانجام به درستی عمل میکند - و این به ناچار به معنای آن است که زمان آن رسیده است که اوضاع بدتر شود؛ شخصی فرزندان دوشس دیاندا لردن، را ربوده است؛ برای جلوگیری از جنگ بین خشکی و دریا، «توبی» نه تنها باید پسران ربوده شده را پیدا کند، بلکه باید ثابت کند که «ملکه میست» نیز، در پشت ربایش آنها نبوده است؛ او به همه ی ترفندها و یاری متحدینش نیاز خواهد داشت؛ و...؛ ا. شربیانی

  2. 5 out of 5

    Denisa

    5.5 The feels! The other books deserve 5 stars too but this one!!! OMG! When everyone told me the series only gets better I admit, I was a bit doubtful. I mean, I already loved it, what more could I get?! Oh, how wrong I was! Yes, boys and girls, this series is really as good as they say. I haven't cried so much at a book in a long time and I admit, I love it! I fell in love with all the characters, even the bad ones, and I hate to see some of them go. But that is life, I guess. Anyway, it's the kind 5.5 The feels! The other books deserve 5 stars too but this one!!! OMG! When everyone told me the series only gets better I admit, I was a bit doubtful. I mean, I already loved it, what more could I get?! Oh, how wrong I was! Yes, boys and girls, this series is really as good as they say. I haven't cried so much at a book in a long time and I admit, I love it! I fell in love with all the characters, even the bad ones, and I hate to see some of them go. But that is life, I guess. Anyway, it's the kind of series that is a must-read for anyone who even remotely likes UF. Even if you don't really like the first book, it's worth sticking to it!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Cece ❀Rants, Raves &Reviews❀

    Wow.. this was sad ( ಡ ﹏ ಡ) October, Toby, Daye is back with her sharp wit and sassy personality. Honestly this girl is seriously bulking her resume, bitch is just doing everything getting it all done just what what I really kinda struggled to write this review. Looking back, I had saved all these great quotes reflecting the fun characters, worldbuilding and great writing that first made me start this series. But I remember how I felt while reading this. Disappointed. This book... is fucking sad Wow.. this was sad ( ಡ ﹏ ಡ) October, Toby, Daye is back with her sharp wit and sassy personality. Honestly this girl is seriously bulking her resume, bitch is just doing everything getting it all done just what what I really kinda struggled to write this review. Looking back, I had saved all these great quotes reflecting the fun characters, worldbuilding and great writing that first made me start this series. But I remember how I felt while reading this. Disappointed. This book... is fucking sad. Toby still gets into the most ridiculous situations that are pretty funny “Pull me out. Don’t make a scene, and don’t drop me.” “Oh, see, now you’re hurtin’ my feelings. Why would I drop—Titania’s tiny titties, girl, you’re a fucking fish!” I hit the water hard.” But the stress of her surroundings weigh heavily in her POV and as a reader, I then felt sad while reading it. which is the exact fucking opposite feeling of what I wanted. She wasn't as light hearted as usual, but still had some funny lines “You eat like a six year old,” said Connor, grinning at me as he put his bowl in the sink. “A caffeinated six year old,” I corrected.” There continues to be a weird pull to Tybalt despite her dating Connor. This psydo-love triangle isn't a main feature but just evident enough that made me sigh and turn the page. “There are side benefits to dating a Selkie.” “You mean I’m getting something out of this besides the sex? Awesome.” Something I'v always really loved about Toby is that she doesn’t take any shit from anyone “Bucer’s voice was immediately in my ear, announcing, “I cost two hundred an hour, cash on the barrel, and I don’t do anything that might get violent.” “Hello to you, too, Bucer,” I said. “How about I give you fifty dollars for answering some questions, and I don’t get violent?” The secondary characters kept me reading even when Toby's morbid feeling and losses were overwhelming And don’t worry the Linberg is back with her bullshit “Normally, I’d charge for something like this, but since you’re doing it for me—and it amuses the shit out of me—we’ll call this a freebie.” But jesus fucking christ that ending made me fucking bawl like a goddamn baby (view spoiler)[“And none of it did a thrice-cursed thing. Connor was still dead. Faerie could endure until the end of time. I could burn out enough of my mortality to watch the sun die. And Connor would still be dead.” (hide spoiler)] I really struggled to read this book and it took me twice as long as the others did because it was lowkey painful and depressing. I wanted to be excited, I wanted tension. This was kinda dark. Like sure I get that the author is trying to convey the dark seriousness of the situation.... but bitch its dEpReSsInG Onto the next book, and here's hoping it picks up again because Toby deserves better, this world deserves better, WE deserve better.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Suz

    Wow. Just...wow. I can't discuss this without giving too much away. But I really like the way Seanan McGuire has introduced new elements that will be pertinent to the long arc, and will keep us engaged in the story from one book to the next, without needing to resort to some low-rent, wanna-be cliff-hanger tactic. Seriously, this is the way to keep someone musing about what's to come. And yeah, I have to say it - I adore Tybalt. Does anyone not adore Tybalt? Wow. Just...wow. I can't discuss this without giving too much away. But I really like the way Seanan McGuire has introduced new elements that will be pertinent to the long arc, and will keep us engaged in the story from one book to the next, without needing to resort to some low-rent, wanna-be cliff-hanger tactic. Seriously, this is the way to keep someone musing about what's to come. And yeah, I have to say it - I adore Tybalt. Does anyone not adore Tybalt?

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jessica ❁ ➳ Silverbow ➳ ❁

    Reviewed by: Rabid Reads These books . . . GAH. Escalation is a hard thing to maintain in a series. Every new installment (hopefully) raises the bar higher, every foundation laid that comes to fruition, every sign of affection between love interests, etc. An exceptional author maintains the slow burn of the myriad elements in such a way that her readers are captivated. Seanan McGuire is one such author, and OCTOBER DAYE is one such series. The setting: I've always loved the idea of an entirely separat Reviewed by: Rabid Reads These books . . . GAH. Escalation is a hard thing to maintain in a series. Every new installment (hopefully) raises the bar higher, every foundation laid that comes to fruition, every sign of affection between love interests, etc. An exceptional author maintains the slow burn of the myriad elements in such a way that her readers are captivated. Seanan McGuire is one such author, and OCTOBER DAYE is one such series. The setting: I've always loved the idea of an entirely separate world living on top of our own, if we only had the eyes to see it, and that's exactly the kind of world October lives in. Before ONE SALT SEA, these places existed on land: the beach entrance to the Court of the Mists, Sylvester's Shadowed Hills duchy in Paso Nogal Park in Pleasant Hill with its glass rose garden, Goldengreen at the San Francisco Art Museum that somehow thinks it belongs to the bogeys and pixies, etc. This time we go deeper . . . *hums Under the Sea* But faeness isn't limited to the fantastical backdrop in which it lives. No, it's full to bursting with equally strange and amazing creatures: They ranged from the expected Merrow and Sirens to stranger things, women with the lower bodies of octopi instead of the standard Merrow’s tail, men with slick, blue-black skin and the smooth fluidity of eels. So there's that. *continues to hum Under the Sea* The characters: I've told you plenty about October in previous reviews, so this time I'm sticking to a few of my favorite secondaries. May: May pretty much freaked us all the hell out when she showed up wearing Toby's face and announced she was her very own death omen, but fae are tricksy creatures and masters at finding loopholes . . . Which explains why she's still around three books later, while October remains very much alive. And we love her, despite our inauspicious beginning, b/c she's freaking hilarious. Like when she shows up with Quentin to observe October's sword practice with Sylvester: “Let’s see some carnage!” hollered May, pumping her fist in the air. *giggle snorts* PS - any questions you may (HA!) have had in regards to the origin of fetches are answered in this installment. FYI. Tybalt: The King of the Cait Sidhe is more than just a ridiculously sexy face who seems to have a growing affection for our heroine, he's also very, very wise. On the topic of war: ". . . most of the ones who come when the call goes out won’t have ever fought a war before. They’ll come because they think it’s honorable, or because they want to be called heroes. They’ll show up in their pretty armor, and they’ll litter the battlefield like leaves.” So also, he's maybe a poet. *swoons* The Luidaeg: The instant I met the Luidaeg (Lou-sha-k, Lou-sha-k, Lou-sha-k . . . ), I knew I liked her, but that like has grown into LOVE. She's probably my favorite character, period. It's all that dark and twistiness, I think. On the topic of warmongering amongst the fae: The Luidaeg once said, in a moment of particularly black humor, that nature made us territorial and temperamental because otherwise we’d have overrun the world within five generations. But in ONE SALT SEA a piece of her puzzle is revealed that is absolutely heartbreaking: (view spoiler)[ “One of my sisters betrayed me. She put knives in the hands of humans and told them to kill my children, because it would make them immortal." (hide spoiler)] *weeps* *WAILS* *gnashes teeth* The only thing I can say about that is, please, please, don't let the sister who betrayed her be Amandine . . . The plot: So many Important Things happen in ONE SALT SEA that I'm loathe to give any of the surprises away, but I can say that this installment clearly identifies several future hurdles for our heroine AND what might ultimately be the End Game. The few I can discuss without spoilers are: 1. As frustrating as it is, the purebloods appear to have a good reason for frowning on interspecies marriages: "Mixed blood can be unstable, depending on how distant the mix is. If two of Daddy’s descendants hook up, it doesn’t really matter what bloodline they’re from. If one of them decides to get it on with one of Mom’s descendants, well. There’s the potential for a lot of crazy.” “Like changeling madness?” “Exactly like changeling madness." Which creates issues not only for Toby and Tybalt and/or Connor, but for Toby and ANYONE. So that sucks. 2. Creepy clairvoyant Roane is C R E E P Y: The Roane woman gave his arm another reassuring pat. “There, there, my lovely one. She’ll steer you sure enough. Just never let her near the silver. Line of thieves, hers is, and they’d rob even royalty blind.” She turned a mad, serene smile on me. “I know you’ve not stolen half a heartbeat from a stolen child as yet, but you will, given time. You will.” I've no idea what that (or any of the similarly incomprehensible things she said) means, but I suspect it's not good. There are numerous other points of interest as well--I want to see the Cloud Kingdom, and I want to see it NOW--but it all boils down to this: OCTOBER DAYE rocks my socks off, and if you love urban fantasy and haven't already read it, you're doing yourself a major disservice. ONE SALT SEA joins the ranks of Best UF Installments Ever along with stellar books like Magic Bites and Bitten . Highly recommended. My other reviews for this series: Rosemary and Rue (October Daye, #1) A Local Habitation (October Daye, #2) An Artificial Night (October Daye, #3) Late Eclipses (October Daye, #4) Ashes of Honor (October Daye, #6) Chimes at Midnight (October Daye, #7) The Winter Long (October Daye, #8) A Red-Rose Chain (October Daye, #9) Once Broken Faith (October Daye, #10)

  6. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    Toby and her motley crew save the day again. I like October. She keeps on truckin' whatever is thrown at her and picks up loyal followers as she goes. There is Danny the troll, May the fetch, Tybalt and Connor, Quinn and Raj and the Luidaeg. Her new home of GoldenGreen is typically Toby- there are bogeys and pixies colonising the place and they are allowed to stay. Toby's powers have improved since her blood has been changed. All good stuff. Without spoilers, I'll just say that I'm now hoping th Toby and her motley crew save the day again. I like October. She keeps on truckin' whatever is thrown at her and picks up loyal followers as she goes. There is Danny the troll, May the fetch, Tybalt and Connor, Quinn and Raj and the Luidaeg. Her new home of GoldenGreen is typically Toby- there are bogeys and pixies colonising the place and they are allowed to stay. Toby's powers have improved since her blood has been changed. All good stuff. Without spoilers, I'll just say that I'm now hoping the path may have been cleared for Tybalt and Toby. Interesting in this instalment to hear about the fae living beneath the waves and the different mer creatures. It was well done. This is a quality urban fantasy series where the characters grow and develop, the world building deepens and the plot builds on all that has gone before.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Heidi

    One Salt Sea is, without surprise, the strongest installment of the October Daye series to date. Toby is drawn into a desperate effort to stop an impending war from taking place between land and sea when the children of the Duchess of Saltmist go missing and the Mists appear to be of blame. Her debts to the Luidaeg have been called in, and it doesn’t take long to realize that if the battle occurs, the land will be at the greatest loss. As a new Countess, Toby must work to protect her own subject One Salt Sea is, without surprise, the strongest installment of the October Daye series to date. Toby is drawn into a desperate effort to stop an impending war from taking place between land and sea when the children of the Duchess of Saltmist go missing and the Mists appear to be of blame. Her debts to the Luidaeg have been called in, and it doesn’t take long to realize that if the battle occurs, the land will be at the greatest loss. As a new Countess, Toby must work to protect her own subjects along with those of her liege, while tracking down a kidnapper with the desperate hope that the children are alive. As war looms, Toby’s mission becomes increasingly personal, lending One Salt Sea the highest stakes yet. “I’m just a changeling,” I cautioned. “I’m not in her league.” “I’ve heard the stories–Connor alone tells enough to give your skills away, and you invoke the Luidaeg when you give your references. Even my wife likes you, as much as she likes anyone.” He smiles slightly. “You’re a lot of things, but ‘just a changeling’ isn’t one of them.” What McGuire has managed to do in the fifth installment of her October Daye series can only be described as awesome. We are given a protagonist who is struggling to find her footing after immense bodily changes, a conflict that is deeply personal in addition to encompassing every character we have come to know and love, along with new rich and fascinating settings and species to observe. Remember when I read Late Eclipses and got a tad bit annoyed with all the crazies? Turns out there’s a reason for that. Within the first chapters of One Salt Sea it is revealed that changelings aren’t the only fae subject to changeling madness–it is a situation that can also occur through mixings of different pure blood lineages, with particularly potent mixtures causing particularly vulnerable minds. Certainly explains a bit about Rayseline, no? My other complaint to this regard is that the fae in this series don’t seem quite like the classic fae we are used to, which is why I have to say the Luidaeg has become my absolute favorite character. She of any character we see regularly is most what fae are supposed to be. She is by choice a being of comfort or of nightmares, she makes bargains but requires much in return, she is very rarely what she appears to be, but also plays by a strict set of rules. I would love to read a story from the Luidaeg’s perspective. I like that she isn’t our protagonist, she’s too powerful, but at the same time I’d love to see what she does when Toby’s not around (I’m totally going to rock out In Sea Salt Tears when I’m depressed that the next new Toby is too far off). I have very much enjoyed watching Toby’s attempts to become accustomed to her new limits of power and body since Late Eclipses. She’s gained so much confidence since Rosemary and Rue, yet now we have to see her uncertain about her own abilities with no one around to teach her. She tests herself throughout One Salt Sea, and hints at what we will see in the future from a Dóchas Sidhe, which is equal parts frightening and fascinating. This installment also brings more on the romance front than we have seen thus far. Both Tybalt and Connor play incredibly important roles in Toby’s lives, but also provide very different methods of support. Connor is so sweet, attentive, and loving, but it is also clear that he is unable to stand beside Toby in the same ways that Tybalt is. I really appreciate that even though there is a love triangle dynamic here, there is an obvious respect between Tybalt and Connor. They respect each other’s feelings for Toby, and do not fight over her, but let her decide who she will have in her romantic life–neither of them will leave her regardless (but let’s face it, she’s totally in love with Tybalt whether she’s ready to admit it or not). Underneath all of this character development lies a driving plot and a captivating new world. For the first time we are able to glimpse the sea fae and learn about the extremely different world of Salt Mist. A world that is as new to Toby as it is to us brings about new species, magics, and arrangements that are counter intuitive to what we know of the land. One Salt Sea is by far the most political installment of the series, which also ensures a complex and fast paced plot. There are by necessity layers of complications, delicate balances that need to be upheld or torn through as we encounter them. It is by far the most complex and involved story yet; personal to Toby and readers, but with massive implications, One Salt Sea marks a crescendo that will be hard to outdo in future books. Original review posted at Bunbury in the Stacks.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Felicia

    So I reviewed the first in this series and enjoyed it pretty much, even though there were some uneven parts. For some reason I didn't feel compelled to pick up the second in the series immediately and just forgot about it, but people kept recommending it to me so I went and ordered the second on kindle, or so I thought. I actually accidentally purchased this one, #5, and I have to say I regret not keeping up with the series, it was QUITE enjoyable! It's done well and the Faerie world is very int So I reviewed the first in this series and enjoyed it pretty much, even though there were some uneven parts. For some reason I didn't feel compelled to pick up the second in the series immediately and just forgot about it, but people kept recommending it to me so I went and ordered the second on kindle, or so I thought. I actually accidentally purchased this one, #5, and I have to say I regret not keeping up with the series, it was QUITE enjoyable! It's done well and the Faerie world is very interesting, and some REALLY dramatic things happen in this book (that mean I have to go back and read 2-4!) I really like Toby as a main character because she's not just a cliched badass, and I definitely was sucked in to the dramatic twists in this book. Now I want the next one nooooow!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Angela James

    So far my least favorite of the series. I think this is due, in part, to the larger role of Connor, a character I have never cared for. I think he's a weak character, and I've always felt that October's infatuation with him makes her seem like a weaker character. It doesn't feel like adult feelings, so much as lingering feelings from another lifetime, when she was a different person, while he, meanwhile, has been always weak. After the events of this book, I do look forward to the next installme So far my least favorite of the series. I think this is due, in part, to the larger role of Connor, a character I have never cared for. I think he's a weak character, and I've always felt that October's infatuation with him makes her seem like a weaker character. It doesn't feel like adult feelings, so much as lingering feelings from another lifetime, when she was a different person, while he, meanwhile, has been always weak. After the events of this book, I do look forward to the next installment (and I hope it doesn't seem heartless of me to say I was happy with the ending, lol!)

  10. 4 out of 5

    h o l l i s

    What I find interesting about this installment is that while I was still mostly bored in the lead-up to the climax, I wasn't annoyed about as many things as I usually am. Either I'm being innoculated to this world or it really wasn't as frustrating as the books that came before or a bit of a break did a world of good. Also, what I was warned would annoy me.. didn't. At least not much. Mostly because I was resigned to it but, also, all the spouting off of randomness and foreshadowing.. well, fore What I find interesting about this installment is that while I was still mostly bored in the lead-up to the climax, I wasn't annoyed about as many things as I usually am. Either I'm being innoculated to this world or it really wasn't as frustrating as the books that came before or a bit of a break did a world of good. Also, what I was warned would annoy me.. didn't. At least not much. Mostly because I was resigned to it but, also, all the spouting off of randomness and foreshadowing.. well, foreshadowed the end. How's that for vague? It's going to be harder and harder to review these books the further I go into this series, this being five of a current thirteen (twenty, fifty, who knows how many in the end). So, suffice it to say I wasn't delighted by the romance because it wasn't what I know to be endgame and therefore wasn't my preference. However, that said, my choice of pairing is going to have a lot of explaining to do as there's been some build-up that implies certain things and I have questions. But it seems I'm the only one who does because once again with all this new information and hinting floating around, October makes a token effort to look confused, complain about the vaguery, like one time, then move on. Also, again, I have to wonder at the attitudes of so many of the characters in this world. Pretty much everyone outside of the main circle sucks and even those within sometimes just.. choose poorly? Expect so much? It's constantly confusing and annoying and exhausting. All that to say it's the same stuff I've been bitching about the entire time I've been reading these books. I think I'm definitely getting a little fae'd out, this world is very one note, however that did get a bit of a mixup in this installment as we visited a different kind of fae scenery. But still. There's definitely something to be said for a not-just-one-kind-of-paranormal in an urban fantasy series; particularly one of this length. I have a little more enthusiasm going into book six, doubly so as I've been told I might get me some feels, though overall I wouldn't say I'm excited, but I do still have a bit of hope that I'll come out the other side of all this loving these books. Maybe it's just one hell of a slow burn. Maybe I'm just a stubborn delusional idiot. Only time will tell. --- This review can also be found at A Take From Two Cities.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Wanda

    Another fabulous fae book from Seanan McGuire. I was finishing it up in the lunch room at the museum where I work and was dismayed to find myself weeping uncontrollably. The military guys already have their misgivings about me and I really didn’t need to get all emotional over black squiggles on a slice of dead tree to prove to them that I’m a little different than they are. Fortunately, I had chosen an odd time to go for lunch and I got to cry surreptitiously. I went home and re-read the last f Another fabulous fae book from Seanan McGuire. I was finishing it up in the lunch room at the museum where I work and was dismayed to find myself weeping uncontrollably. The military guys already have their misgivings about me and I really didn’t need to get all emotional over black squiggles on a slice of dead tree to prove to them that I’m a little different than they are. Fortunately, I had chosen an odd time to go for lunch and I got to cry surreptitiously. I went home and re-read the last few chapters and allowed myself to have a really good, ugly cry. Normally, crying wouldn’t be a reason that I would recommend a book, but I find myself very emotionally invested in this series and I was relieved when I checked and confirmed that I am only half way through the series. Plenty of Toby Daye adventures are still in my future! So what were the good points of this book? Toby gets herself a squire, none other than young Quentin. We learn more about the sea witch, the Luidaeg, and I couldn’t help but appreciate her more! Plus the undersea Fae were both interesting and inventive. Anyone who has been in the presence of an Orca whale will likely be willing to think of them as mysterious representatives of the undersea world! The sad points? Well, you can’t make an omelette without breaking eggs. There are a lot of people unhappy by book’s end—kidnapping victims injured, dear ones dead, irreversible bargains made. As Toby is reminded, everything has a cost and it seems that all the main characters have to pay a bit in this one. As do we all. So there was sadness, but the decks are clear now for more adventures and more happiness in the next book Ashes of Honor.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Marzie

    Everything changes... And this was a transitional book in the Toby series. A book about love and loss, honor and infamy, motherhood (from at least four different perspectives), letting go when you have to and saving what you can. (Note to Author: I see what you did there, making me love The Luidaeg and Tybalt and Toby and May even more. It makes me patient enough to wait a whole year for the next Toby book while trembling slightly at the thought of just what '*Ashes* of Honor' might entail.) Sean Everything changes... And this was a transitional book in the Toby series. A book about love and loss, honor and infamy, motherhood (from at least four different perspectives), letting go when you have to and saving what you can. (Note to Author: I see what you did there, making me love The Luidaeg and Tybalt and Toby and May even more. It makes me patient enough to wait a whole year for the next Toby book while trembling slightly at the thought of just what '*Ashes* of Honor' might entail.) Seanan McGuire continues to give us a strong female lead, men who love her by letting her be herself, friends who support her in ways she needs to be supported and an interesting examination of the surprisingly unlimited boundaries friendship, motherhood, madness, hatred and love in her Fae world. Readers should consider reading 'Through This House' in the Anthology Home Improvement: Undead Edition to enrich their sense of where Toby is at the start of 'One Salt Sea', although it's not necessary to the main theme of this book.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Neeta

    Sigh. I keep waiting for these books to get better and they really don't. The whole series has so much potential but it just never develops. In theory, a changeling knight with a hero complex who spent 14 years as a fish would be an awesome main character. Instead, it takes us ages to learn what's so awesome about Toby (the first changeling knight ever! You'd think the whole thing was part of her identity or something) and how she changed from delinquent changeling to knight in shining armor. Oh Sigh. I keep waiting for these books to get better and they really don't. The whole series has so much potential but it just never develops. In theory, a changeling knight with a hero complex who spent 14 years as a fish would be an awesome main character. Instead, it takes us ages to learn what's so awesome about Toby (the first changeling knight ever! You'd think the whole thing was part of her identity or something) and how she changed from delinquent changeling to knight in shining armor. Oh, wait. We never really learn about the second part. It's like Ms. McGuire drops these hints to keep things interesting but they're not actually part of Toby's identity. In theory, a knight sent off to prevent a war between a crazy queen and a mermaid with missing children would be rife with challenge and adventure. And it is. The mystery is actually pretty good this time, like the last book. Unlike books 1 and 2. In theory, the knight's love interest... would actually be interesting. Which, I'm sorry to say, Connor is not. Also, can I repeat again how much I hate love triangles? Can't the woman just pick one and be done with it? But nope, it's got something to do with how interesting they're supposed to be. On the other hand, crazy cat king who's got cat spies working everywhere and can travel through the Shadows? Hello interesting. In fact, I'd say Tybalt is the only character done properly in this whole series, and a lot of that might have to do with the fact that we don't see him often. I love the idea of the fae world and all it's hidden crazyness. After 5 books, I've even got most of the various races straight (yea right, up until they add a bunch of new merfolk ones in this book). The biggest problem I have with this series is the lack of feeling. Case and point: Gilly. Toby is supposed to love her daughter, I assume, but she doesn't do any of the things I'd assume a mother who's been barred from her daughter's life to do. She doesn't drive by her daughter's house or school every now and then, trying to catch a glimpse of her. She doesn't keep tabs on her emails/text messages like a PI mother would (ok, maybe Tobes is too technically challenged for this, but you get the idea). But we're supposed to believe she cares? Where's the demonstration of feeling?

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lana *Lifeinwordsandlyricscom*

    It's the weirdest thing, I was all for some of the things that happened and then I somehow got sad while they happened. Go figure 🤷 Oh, and there are honest to God mermaids. My eight year old self was doing cartwheels throughout the whole thing 🧜🤯 Over and out It's the weirdest thing, I was all for some of the things that happened and then I somehow got sad while they happened. Go figure 🤷 Oh, and there are honest to God mermaids. My eight year old self was doing cartwheels throughout the whole thing 🧜🤯 Over and out

  15. 4 out of 5

    Steven

    And I thought the last book was rough! *wipes tears*

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Just when Toby finally feels like she has her life pretty figured out someone kidnaps the sons of Duchess Lorden from Saltmist, an undersea duchy that happens to be the court of Mists closest neighbour. Duchess Lorden believes that the queen of mists is behind the kidnapping and she has promised all out war between the land and sea if her sons are not returned to her safely. Toby doesn't just need to find the boys, she also needs to prove her queen's innocence or they will all be forced into a w Just when Toby finally feels like she has her life pretty figured out someone kidnaps the sons of Duchess Lorden from Saltmist, an undersea duchy that happens to be the court of Mists closest neighbour. Duchess Lorden believes that the queen of mists is behind the kidnapping and she has promised all out war between the land and sea if her sons are not returned to her safely. Toby doesn't just need to find the boys, she also needs to prove her queen's innocence or they will all be forced into a war that they stand absolutely no chance of winning. I am so totally addicted to this series now and in One Salt Sea the stakes are higher than ever. Poor Toby just never gets a break and she faces some incredibly difficult decisions in this instalment. It was actually quite heartbreaking to see what she goes through and the choices she makes just go to prove how strong she is as a woman and how much she cares about others to put their needs above her own desires. One of the things I loved most about this book was getting the chance to visit Saltmist, I really hope we'll see more of the undersea duchy in the future because there were so many interesting different fae creatures down there. It was like visiting a whole new world and I'm sure there is plenty more to explore, especially now we're starting to learn more about the Luidaeg's history and her connection to the selkies. Another thing I love about this series is the characters, it isn't just Toby that I've come to love but also all of her friends and the family she has made for herself. The bond between her and Sylvester, the brotherly affection she has for Quentin and now Raj (those two are becoming quite the double act!), the way she has accepted May like a sister and especially the chemistry she has with Tybalt and the way he always has her back. I hate to say it but I was a bit disappointed with the budding romance between Toby and Connor, I don't dislike him as a character but he's a bit of a bumbling idiot most of the time and they have absolutely zero chemistry compared to her and Tybalt. Let's face it though, Toby has terrible taste in men so I'm hoping she's just working through a few frogs before she captures the king of cats. There is just so much to love about this world and all of the different characters that it's hard to choose favourites. There was one particular moment towards the end that I think should have had a bigger impact on me than it actually did but I think that was partly because I didn't love the character involved and partly because it got lost amidst another event that really did upset me. It was hard to see how much certain things hurt Toby though, she's been through so much that you can't help root for her to finally find some happiness. Other than that I really enjoyed this story though, the mystery was great and even though they have a pretty good idea who kidnapped the missing children fairly early on there's a big difference between knowing something and being able to prove it, or mount a rescue mission for that matter. Toby once again has to pay a high price for saving the world but I'm holding out hope that she'll receive her deserved rewards eventually. Source: Received from DAW Books in exchange for an honest review.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. 5 'It's about doing the right thing' Stars. Toby faces her biggest challenge yet and she will do anything she can. She has to prevent a war, find two missing children and save her daughter at the same time, although her daughter is seen as collateral in the fae world. For saving the realm she is about to pay a very steep price. Toby has also acquired a squire, Quentin is going to be interesting and an official squire, the Prince of Cats, Raj. She has her fetch who is no longer her fetch and her A 5 'It's about doing the right thing' Stars. Toby faces her biggest challenge yet and she will do anything she can. She has to prevent a war, find two missing children and save her daughter at the same time, although her daughter is seen as collateral in the fae world. For saving the realm she is about to pay a very steep price. Toby has also acquired a squire, Quentin is going to be interesting and an official squire, the Prince of Cats, Raj. She has her fetch who is no longer her fetch and her Aunt the Sea Witch. Her family is getting bigger and her sense of conscience and obligation even more. The Land Fae and the Fae of the Underseas are about to go to war. The Court of Mists with the borderline insane Queen won't back down, Lady Dianda of Saltmist is more affable but not by much. It's a race against time and she has to go against Rayseline, her Liege's daughter. This puts Toby with her love interest Connor, the Selkie between a rock and a hard place. You see I didn't want these two to be together because Toby and Tybalt are a better fit. But I didn't want that to happen to Connor either. It gutted me so much. The author does an amazing job that I am floored with how much I love this series. We get to see more and more of the Fae World and how entitled they think they are and that the Changelings are actually bettter off than the Purebloods.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lynsey (A Bookish Life)

    The fifth book in October Daye series, One Salt Sea, picks up one month after the events of book four, Late Eclipses. Someone has kidnapped the children of the Duchess of the undersea courts of Saltmist. Toby only has three days to find the kids, and in doing so, clear her Queen’s name and stave off a war between the land and sea Fae. One of the things I love about this series is the incredibly detailed worldbuilding. I've read many series involving the Fae but this one seems particularly vivid a The fifth book in October Daye series, One Salt Sea, picks up one month after the events of book four, Late Eclipses. Someone has kidnapped the children of the Duchess of the undersea courts of Saltmist. Toby only has three days to find the kids, and in doing so, clear her Queen’s name and stave off a war between the land and sea Fae. One of the things I love about this series is the incredibly detailed worldbuilding. I've read many series involving the Fae but this one seems particularly vivid and vibrant to me. Perhaps because in this one they are the only focus- we are not distracted by having to learn of other races- vamps, werewolves, etc. And incredibly, the worldbuilding in One Salt Sea is even more expansive than in most of the previous novels, largely due to the introduction of a new realm: the Saltmist, home of the undersea Fae. I'll be honest, I was slightly dubious about this upon reading the summary. I've seen many books featuring mer-people and other sea-dwelling folk and always thought "hmm, how does that work then?", and never bothered with them. Since this is the continuation of one of my now favourite series, not reading this particular undersea adventure wasn't even a possibility. And how wrong I had been to dismiss books based on my own preconceptions. McGuire made me feel like I, too, was diving into the big deep blue for the first time. It was fascinating. Although I'm glad it wasn't this setting for the majority of the book, as I would have severely missed my landlubbers had I been denied access to them for too long. Speaking of which, the full gang was out in force in this one, with equal time dedicated to all of my favourite characters. Obviously, if it were up to me I would have Tybalt on every page, but being slightly more realistic for a second, I can concede that he was probably in it just the right amount, considering what's going on in Toby's personal life currently. This is the first book in this series to reduce me to tears. McGuire is some sort of evil genius, to be sure. Just when I was starting to appreciate certain characters and find a level of grudging acceptance where they were concerned, she goes and rips the rug out from under me. Before this book, this turn of events might have made me happy, but now?...now I'm just a blubbering mess, that's what. And do you know what else makes me sad? That I now have to wait twelve stinking, agonising months until the next book, Ashes of Honor, comes out in September 2012. *big dramatic sigh* On the plus side though, after such a long time I'd simply have to do a re-read prior to it coming out, wouldn't I? *evil grin* Well, as you'll no doubt have guessed by this point, I am in love with this series. It's right up there with my other UF favourites: Kate Daniels, Horngate witches, Cassie Palmer, Mercy Thompson, etc., and I recommend it to ALL. Do yourself a favour and read them in order: Rosemary and Rue, A local Habitation, An artificial Night, Late Eclipses.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    It’s been a month since the defeat of Oleander de Merelands, since the Duke’s mad daughter Rayseline went on the lam, and since October Daye was brought back from the brink of death and restored to the power level she should have had all along. This is a lot to deal with, and now there’s a new problem in Faerie. The two sons of a mermaid Duchess have been kidnapped. Unless they can be found, the sea fae will declare war upon those of the land, with disastrous casualties for both sides. If anyone It’s been a month since the defeat of Oleander de Merelands, since the Duke’s mad daughter Rayseline went on the lam, and since October Daye was brought back from the brink of death and restored to the power level she should have had all along. This is a lot to deal with, and now there’s a new problem in Faerie. The two sons of a mermaid Duchess have been kidnapped. Unless they can be found, the sea fae will declare war upon those of the land, with disastrous casualties for both sides. If anyone can find the boys before it’s too late, it’s Toby, though it’ll mean facing her fear of the water. In a reversal of the fairy tale “The Little Mermaid,” Toby goes to the sea witch (a.k.a. the Luideag) for a spell that will enable her to survive underwater. She investigates both land and sea in her search for the boys… and then the case takes a turn for the very, very personal. In One Salt Sea, Seanan McGuire deepens her exploration of most of the major characters. In one of the book’s most haunting scenes, she shows us just how broken Rayseline really is, making me pity her as much as I hated her. Another character, whom I’d found boring, won a bittersweet sort of admiration from me here. We learn more about Toby’s Fetch, May: why she attached herself to Toby in the first place, and why she’s still in existence. We see Toby’s human ex and daughter again. We get tantalizing moments of Tybalt goodness. And Toby herself is compelling as always — maybe even more so than usual, since this case strikes so close to home — and as an added bonus, she’s on the ball this time and there aren’t any moments of wondering why she’s missing the obvious. One Salt Sea is the best October Daye book to date; everything that’s great about the series comes together in one book. The plot is strong, the characterization is terrific, the tragedies hurt, a few things that were confusing are explained here, and McGuire’s usual beautiful writing and dark humor are present and accounted for. This has become one of my favorite urban fantasy series, and I can’t wait to find out what happens next. FanLit's Seanan McGuire/Mira Grant page

  20. 5 out of 5

    Renay

    This book is like rolling your emotions in peanut butter, coating them in fire ants, jamming them in your pants, and then charging a hungry grizzly bear so it consumes you whole. All in all, pretty great. Reading the next one immediately. More thoughts: http://ladybusiness.dreamwidth.org/20... This book is like rolling your emotions in peanut butter, coating them in fire ants, jamming them in your pants, and then charging a hungry grizzly bear so it consumes you whole. All in all, pretty great. Reading the next one immediately. More thoughts: http://ladybusiness.dreamwidth.org/20...

  21. 4 out of 5

    Robin (Bridge Four)

    Another week another October Skye book with my UF friends at at Buddies Books & Baubles 4.75 Salty Tear Stars Color me invested in this series, I’m pretty sure that is some sort of pink color reminiscent of a sunrise and it smells a little like a blend of pennyroyal and copper Just so we are clear I AM IN….I think the last book was the one that pretty well sold me on the October Daye series but THIS is the book the put the last nail in that coffin and now I will ride this out until the very end Another week another October Skye book with my UF friends at at Buddies Books & Baubles 4.75 Salty Tear Stars Color me invested in this series, I’m pretty sure that is some sort of pink color reminiscent of a sunrise and it smells a little like a blend of pennyroyal and copper Just so we are clear I AM IN….I think the last book was the one that pretty well sold me on the October Daye series but THIS is the book the put the last nail in that coffin and now I will ride this out until the very end. ஓ What was awesome in this ஓ ① - Toby takes on my favorite teenager as a squire. I have some very specific theories about who his parents are so I love that Toby is going to have a role in shaping the person he is. Also she has gotten him into a lot of trouble without being his official trainer so just imagine how much more they can get into now. “I can't. I'm not a good influence on him. I keep getting him shot. I swear too much, I don't brush my teeth every time I go to bed, and I never remember to eat a balanced breakfast. You want someone with culture. Poise. A lack of gunfire. ② - THE DEATH HAUNTS – Not only do we see them again but we get some insight into what they really are and how they are connected to another character in the series. WOAH is all I’m going to say. “The night-haunts never lie. They could, if they wanted to, but they don’t really see the point. The truth is so much more dangerous than a lie.” ③ - Underwater Fae and their world *squee* - This is something that you don’t really get in many books so I found it so original. I loved that we get to expand this world into the Oceans and see what kind of Fae are living there. "Merrow are to the sea as Daoine Sidhe are to the land, only without the blood magic, and with a tendency to summon storms when annoyed. Oh, and fins, although they can have legs when they want to. Little Mermaid, eat your heart out ④ - The Luidaeg calls in Toby’s debt marker. Not only is she given an almost impossible task to accomplish, Toby (and the reader) also get more insight into the Luidaeg. Her story is both captivating and so tragic. Why is the sea witch not living in the sea??? Well we find out and I’m going to say that it is so sad. But she is the Luidaeg so there are plenty of other cantankerous moments where she is hilarious throughout as well. Also I learned never give the Luidaeg your hand as you are bound to be bleeding right after. “I squared my shoulders, trying to ignore the fact that I was standing in the apartment of the sea witch, wearing a fairy-tale prom gown, waiting for the attack of the mermaids.” ⑤ - The TnT situation. I’m firmly on the SS Tybalt and I’m totally waiting for that ship to sail. Okay so we go on a little detour in this *bark*I don’t want to talk about it *bark* but there is still plenty of sexual tension between Toby and Tybalt. I love his cat like ways and it does appear that like the cat man he is he enjoys toying with his potential plaything/sextoy/whatever they will eventually become. He always steals the page for me so I love that we seem to get more and more of the King Of Cats as the series continues. No matter what though I’m sure of this….Tybalt will always have Toby’s back. ⑥ - Gillian arc gets a little page time. So to say that Toby’s relationship with her ¼ blood daughter is complicated is an understatement. That is what happens when you end up a fish for 14 years and your daughter just thinks you ran out on her. But Toby will still do whatever it takes to protect the little girl she had to give up. This was a super emotional part of the story and you couldn’t help but feel the emotions that Toby had to go through to save the little girl she left behind so long ago. “If something happened to Gillian, I'd rip the world down to save her, even if she spat in my face when I did. That's what parenthood means.” ⑦ - MORE QUESTIONS – I think that is bound to happen when you are hanging out with the Luidaeg. She is old, like around the time of Jesus and maybe before that old. So there is a ton of history she knows about and even more secrets that she is keeping. We get a little glimpse at a few that might play into the bigger overall arcs of this series. The big new question for me is……what the heck is going on with that tree. ⑧ - Toby - I am pretty attached to that chick and she kind of had a hard go of it again in this book. Things are never easy and she seems to lose the people that she cares about all the time. She had to make some really hard decisions in this and I really do applaud that she has this really strong moral code that won’t let her treat others unfairly. Still she keeps her satirical wit about her and so I’m enjoying the journey since she rarely pouts and says why me…but when she does it is funny. “I was getting tired of being in an endless succession of things called "the fight of a lifetime." Just once, I'd like to have the fight of a Tuesday afternoon.” ⑨ - The Ending….was….gah…… I am really invested in a lot of the characters now and so a few things in One Salt Sea just hit so hard. Sometimes you wonder if it is worth it to be fae and live so long if you have to live by the rules they have going on. I felt that way for the Luidaeg especially. She has a lot of power but she also has so many rules and you can tell that some of the costs for the bargains she makes are prices that she isn’t happy to exact. But her tie to the selkies in particular and what it could end up costing them….*rubs heart* because it really hurts. "“Everything has a cost, October; remember that. It may be a long time before the bill comes due, but everything has a cost.” And finally ⑩ - EVERYTHING ELSE!!! May, the worldbuilding, Sylvester, the bad guys, the good guys, the blood (not as creepy as it sounds) and freaking almost everything else. ஓ What I didn’t like ஓ Um……hmmm….there really isn’t much. I wasn’t entirely happy about the romantic detour because I was certain that wasn’t going to last and I am totally #teamtybalt. Look Conner isn’t a bad guy, he is actually very nice. But while I like his as a side character I never wanted him with Toby. But alas he is needed to advance the plot and so we get it. I cringed a little since I didn’t want to see then together but since this is way more UF than anything to do with romance it didn’t detract too much from my overall enjoyment. Plus Tybalt snuck in a kiss so I won’t protest just yet. ஓ Overall ஓ I’m so in and this is my favorite installment of the series so far. If things continue to trend this way it might overtake one of my other favorite UF series.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ina

    Missing children. Undersea Knowes. Fae wars. Hopefully, anyone who saw a woman riding a screaming mermaid in a wheelchair down Leavenworth at a quarter to give in the morning would just think they'd had too much to drink. Re-read: January 2019 In the fifth installment of October Daye, the shit is once again about to hit the fan. And if things go wrong this time, it won't just result in Toby's death, but in the war that could kill thousands. You can see how stakes are even higher now. This is Missing children. Undersea Knowes. Fae wars. Hopefully, anyone who saw a woman riding a screaming mermaid in a wheelchair down Leavenworth at a quarter to give in the morning would just think they'd had too much to drink. Re-read: January 2019 In the fifth installment of October Daye, the shit is once again about to hit the fan. And if things go wrong this time, it won't just result in Toby's death, but in the war that could kill thousands. You can see how stakes are even higher now. This is only the fifth book in the series and Toby has already been through so much, from family history revelations to relationship troubles to her nobility status changes. One can't even imagine what McGuire has prepared for Toby in the upcoming books when so much has happened in just the first five. To be honest, sometimes it astonishes me how well though out this series is. Everything is connected to everything and some things mentioned in book #1 come back with new significance in book #10. I really admire how much thought McGuire puts into this series. She has to keep track of so many details (such as smell of everyone’s magic, everyone’s history, etc.) and even the smallest things turn out to have a new and huge meaning in the later books. (Since this is my re-read and I already read the first ten books, it's really bugging me that I STILL don't know what the whole 'you have a year' deal with the Luidaeg and the Selkies is about'. Hopefully I will find out soon.) Just like I said in my review of Late Eclipses, these books leave me with mixed feelings. On one hand, I'm happy to see that Toby's circle of friends and allies is growing. On the other hand, it always leaves me with a melancholic feeling, because October Daye happy endings aren't really all that happy, since one way or the other, Toby always loses something in the end. And I'm sorry if you count this as a spoiler, but Toby lost a bit too much in this book, if you ask me. I have a feelings McGuire secretly hates her, because that poor girl has been through hell. Long story short, October Daye is one of those series that just keep getting better with each new installment. Original review: February 2017 Toby’s fifth adventure begins with Toby trying to finally come to terms with who she is and learning to take responsibility for what it means. Toby is now more Fae than human and to add to that, she is also Countess of Goldengreen, which means she is responsible for more lives than her own now. What’s more, Sylvester wants her to take Quentin as her squire. Luckily, Toby not only has more responsibilities, she also has more people to help her with everything. She has the Torquils, May, Quentin, Danny, Lily’s former subjects and her new-old boyfriend, Connor. Everything’s good. At least until children of prominent Undersea nobles go missing and the Fae world finds itself at the brisk of the war. And of course, Toby is right in the middle of all action. One Salt Sea was one big roller coaster ride that made me laugh, cry and shiver. Highlights of the book: - The Luidaeg calling Tybalt "brave littly kitty" "Tybalt's here because the Cait Sidhe are going to help defend Goldengreen, if things come to that." "Brave little kitty." - Raysel's new creepy background (view spoiler)[It was relly interesting (and really, really creepy) to find out that Raysel kind of suffers from Stockholm syndrome."Sometimes I miss the darkness." (hide spoiler)] - Toby's family, friends & acquaintances "You have a squire now?" asked Tybalt, sounding amused. "Danny has called twice to say that he hasn't found anything, but he wants to help. Poor guy's going to show up and start offering to get things down from high shelves if we don't give him something to do soon." May shrugged. "Interrogating a box of rocks is probably about right." - amazing new Fae world - Undersea "You may keep the dress. Consider it a souvenir." "Sort of an 'I went to the lost city of Atlantis and all I got was this lousy T-shirt' thing, right?" I asked. Dianda looked at me blankly. "Atlantis isn't lost. It's about an eight-day swim from here." - Toby’s love life - although it was present in this book (from Toby’s relationship with Connor to her kiss with Tybalt), it wasn’t the main focus of the story. And I loved it. There’s finally a woman, who doesn’t obssess about these things. Of course, she thinks about them, but she is more than aware of the fact that there are far more important issues to deal with. - the ending - there was so much action, so many emotions. (view spoiler)[I don’t know why, but I wasn’t really sad about Gillian’s departure or Connor’s death – I mean, Toby didn’t even realize he was dead at first – but the last chapter was pretty nostalgic. (hide spoiler)] I’m more than intrigued by the tragic story of the Luidaeg’s children and I can’t wait to explore it more.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mizuki

    This time, October Daye, changeling faerie knight and countess must solve a kidnapping case in order to prevent a war between land and sea. If she failed to find the kidnapped victims and called the villains out within three days, her loved ones are going be in a world of trouble and bloodshed. This fifth book of the series is still going strong, it's entertaining, eventful, has badass and interesting characters, and the story goes with an impressive ending plot twist. 4.9 stars. Review for book This time, October Daye, changeling faerie knight and countess must solve a kidnapping case in order to prevent a war between land and sea. If she failed to find the kidnapped victims and called the villains out within three days, her loved ones are going be in a world of trouble and bloodshed. This fifth book of the series is still going strong, it's entertaining, eventful, has badass and interesting characters, and the story goes with an impressive ending plot twist. 4.9 stars. Review for book 1: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... Review for book 2: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... Review for book 5: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ranting Dragon

    http://www.rantingdragon.com/one-salt... The fifth book in New York Times bestselling author Seanan McGuire’s October Daye series, One Salt Sea picks up one month after the events of book four, Late Eclipses. A changeling (part fae, part human) knight turned Countess, October “Toby” Daye’s life is finally beginning to take on some semblance of “normal”—she’s becoming more comfortable with her role as nobility, actually dating again, and her life is starting to look up. That is, until war is threa http://www.rantingdragon.com/one-salt... The fifth book in New York Times bestselling author Seanan McGuire’s October Daye series, One Salt Sea picks up one month after the events of book four, Late Eclipses. A changeling (part fae, part human) knight turned Countess, October “Toby” Daye’s life is finally beginning to take on some semblance of “normal”—she’s becoming more comfortable with her role as nobility, actually dating again, and her life is starting to look up. That is, until war is threatened when someone kidnaps the children of the Duchess of the undersea courts of Saltmist. Toby only has three days to find the kids, clear her Queen’s name, and stave off a war, a feat made even more difficult by the fact that someone is determined stop her—someone who isn’t afraid to break the rules. And the stakes are much higher than usual—as the back cover blurb states, “When Faerie goes to war, not everyone will walk away.” Hitting her stride In previous novels, the storyline has seemed rushed, like McGuire simply couldn’t take the time needed to fully express the story. While Toby is almost always working against a deadline, the sense of rushing seemed almost too much and took away from the overall impact of the story. This was one of my major critiques of McGuire’s writing and the stories she crafted in the earlier installments. However, in book four, McGuire seemed to find a good pacing for the narrative, and I’m happy to say that she settles into that pacing in One Salt Sea. The suspense of working on a deadline is there, but the plot and story do not seem rushed. It’s a relatively steady pace which works phenomenally well for Toby’s story, and I am very pleased with the results, as One Salt Sea quickly became my favorite of Toby’s (mis)adventures. Worldbuilder extraordinaire One of the things I love about this series is the sheer amount of worldbuilding done within each novel. In a lot of instances, McGuire pulls directly from mythologies, and her research is evident. At the beginning of each book, a pronunciation guide is also provided, and before each read, I will just spend ten minutes going through the list and saying words out loud. Yes, I’m a total geek. At any rate, the worldbuilding in One Salt Sea is more expansive than in most of the previous novels, largely due to the new realm Toby encounters—the Saltmist, home of the undersea Fae. McGuire’s research shines through again, and she brings a feeling of correctness to this world that is so different from anything we’ve seen in Toby’s story thus far. Character connections One of the things that struck me the most about One Salt Sea, as opposed to the rest of the novels, was the degree to which I connected with the secondary characters. While the secondary characters have been developed in previous books, I hadn’t felt as much of a connection with them as I did in One Salt Sea. This is partly due to becoming more and more familiar with the characters, but can also be attributed to the writing style and content of the novel. As such, there was one character in particular whom I began to warm up to I hadn’t really care for before. Yet even then, I still had my biases against them—I simply began to accept them and the direction McGuire was writing them. And once I finally began to accept that, what happened? Like any good author, McGuire killed them off. (Seanan, I both loved and hated you in that moment.) Apart from the secondary character developments, we get a number of more introspective moments from the protagonist herself. These moments serve to develop some absolutely delicious internal conflicts as well as external character tensions. I am personally looking forward to where they will go, and how they will affect Toby in the future. Why should you read this book? Read this book for the action. Read this book for the worldbuilding. But most of all, read this book for the characters and the story. McGuire truly hits her stride in this novel, and it shows, both in pacing as well as her character work. If you’re a newcomer to the series, this book can stand on its own quite nicely. However, as with any series, I recommend starting at the beginning, Rosemary and Rue, with the understanding that as with most series, this one takes a few books to get up to speed.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Glennis

    Got an ARC of this and man was it good. I got to read this in one sitting and man was it great. I liked that the way the storyline can either be read in the sequence or as a stand alone with enough info sprinkled in so you are not totally lost. Toby deals with finding out more about herself and the changes her mother did to her in the last book. She also has 3 days to stop a war between land fey and the sea fey. Due to story constraints you don't get enough sea fey but it is certainly a rich enou Got an ARC of this and man was it good. I got to read this in one sitting and man was it great. I liked that the way the storyline can either be read in the sequence or as a stand alone with enough info sprinkled in so you are not totally lost. Toby deals with finding out more about herself and the changes her mother did to her in the last book. She also has 3 days to stop a war between land fey and the sea fey. Due to story constraints you don't get enough sea fey but it is certainly a rich enough idea kingdom that a short story has to come out of it someday. In the end Toby saves the day and closes a chapter on her past as well. Can't wait to see what will happen to her next time.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Rylee Richard

    Sigh. Such a somber end. It feels like the theme is sacrifice, with a pinch of The Little Mermaid. Connor is a much bigger character, and I feel like this was his biggest role to date. Kinda thought it’d be like that since “sea” is mentioned in the title, so that’s not misleading. Tybalt is there more than I thought, given that Connor’s progression feels like a more important focus. More questions are answered — what happened to Rayseline after the last book, what Luidaeg was up to during the la Sigh. Such a somber end. It feels like the theme is sacrifice, with a pinch of The Little Mermaid. Connor is a much bigger character, and I feel like this was his biggest role to date. Kinda thought it’d be like that since “sea” is mentioned in the title, so that’s not misleading. Tybalt is there more than I thought, given that Connor’s progression feels like a more important focus. More questions are answered — what happened to Rayseline after the last book, what Luidaeg was up to during the last book (at least the subject of her focus, anyway), and some background on May. I feel like Tybalt will be more central in the next one — at least, I hope he will be. This one left me needing a pick-me-up.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ali

    In one of her relatively recent blog posts, Seanan McGuire mentioned that One Salt Sea was the book that would have to keep people interested enough in Toby's story to come back to it after an entire year, as opposed to the about-six months we've had been each of the first five installments. Dear Seanan: I do not think you have to worry. o_O In one of her relatively recent blog posts, Seanan McGuire mentioned that One Salt Sea was the book that would have to keep people interested enough in Toby's story to come back to it after an entire year, as opposed to the about-six months we've had been each of the first five installments. Dear Seanan: I do not think you have to worry. o_O

  28. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    You can also read this review at Reflections on Reading Romance If you haven’t read any of the October Daye series, you are seriously missing out, as Toby Daye is my all-time favorite Urban Fantasy heroine! I don’t say that lightly, as I like a lot of Urban Fantasy. But McGuire’s books set in San Francisco and the world of Faerie stand out among the UF crowd because of her taut writing, fascinating characters, and complex plots. Toby is one of the most compelling heroines I’ve read, mainly becaus You can also read this review at Reflections on Reading Romance If you haven’t read any of the October Daye series, you are seriously missing out, as Toby Daye is my all-time favorite Urban Fantasy heroine! I don’t say that lightly, as I like a lot of Urban Fantasy. But McGuire’s books set in San Francisco and the world of Faerie stand out among the UF crowd because of her taut writing, fascinating characters, and complex plots. Toby is one of the most compelling heroines I’ve read, mainly because she’s an intriguing mix of vulnerability and toughness. Toby is a changeling, and despite getting the stuffing beat out of her on a regular basis in previous books, she always manages to rise to the challenge set before her. If you’re looking for a Happy Ever After, you won’t find one in these books, as the fae are a dangerous lot, but the changeling private detective copes with the intricacies of the two worlds remarkably well, allowing for a Happy For Now. One Salt Sea begins with everything right in Toby’s world, so you know that something truly horrible has to be on its way. As the novel begins, Toby’s sparring with Sylvester, the Duke of Shadowed Hills and her liege. He convinces her to take on a teenaged squire, Quentin, whom we’ve met in previous books. She’s also dating Connor, her childhood sweetheart who’s a selkie. Unfortunately for Toby’s peace of mind, someone has kidnapped the children of the Duchess of Saltmist, an undersea duchy, and unless Toby can find the two boys within three days, Saltmist will begin an all out war on the Queen of Mist’s territories, threatening everyone and everything Toby cares for. To add to the tension, the search for the kidnapped boys becomes frighteningly personal for Toby when her own daughter is taken. One of the reasons I love this series is that the books are always intense, because no one character is truly safe. Even though the fae want to believe that they are immortal, they can be killed, and despite Toby’s best efforts, sometimes the innocent suffer unintended consequences of her actions. This particular book is all the more poignant, because we witness Toby’s pain over her damaged relationship with her daughter. Since there are no guarantees that any character is safe, the tension remains high throughout the book, especially when Toby’s daughter is kidnapped. We’ve learned in previous books that even if Toby can save her daughter, there’s a good chance that Gillian will be changed forever. While you can read this book as a stand alone novel, I think you would be better off beginning the series from the beginning, as you need some background information in order to understand Toby’s circumstances. Her relationship with her daughter is complicated because of events explained in the first book that are not elaborated on here. Reading the scene when Toby discovers her daughter’s been taken and visits Gillin’s father is difficult because of its intensity, and I had to put the book down and come back to it, because it’s so powerful. We haven’t seen Gillian since the first book in the series, Rosemary and Rue, and her reappearance in One Salt Sea reminds us of Toby’s heartbreaking situation with her daughter, made all the more painful because Toby’s existence as a changeling prevents her from explaining to her mostly human daughter the truth about her disappearance more than fourteen years before. Once again Toby finds herself forced to make difficult decisions about the daughter she loves, and you feel her despair at her helplessness when faced with what she must do. The book is a heart pounding adventure, as McGuire skillfully maintains the tension throughout the novel with non-stop action. In previous novels Toby has finally accepted her role as a hero, and here we see that she has definitely grown more skilled in dealing with the world of Faerie, although she never feels as competent as her friends and enemies believe her to be. McGuire’s deft plotting will keep you turning the pages, wondering what could possibly happen next and how Toby will deal with it. Also, what I’ve always loved about these books is that the mythology is both complex and consistent. You never see characters suddenly displaying powers that appear out of nowhere, and the chaotic world of Faerie, while as confusing at times to Toby as it is to us, is gradually revealed as the plot unfolds. Even though there are many types of creatures within this world, you’ll never find yourself confused about names or powers, which is impressive. I don’t know that I would call the October Daye books romances, although they have strong romantic elements. I’ll confess that I was disappointed to see that Connor was the boyfriend referenced in the blurb on the back of the book, because I’ve always been a big fan of Tybalt, the king of the Cait Sidhe. Connor’s always struck me as eager and uncomplicated despite his messy marriage to Rayseline Torquill, while Tybalt is more of a bad boy type – Rawr! Despite Toby’s relationship with Connor, Tybalt figures heavily in the book, and there are definitely sparks with Toby, suggesting that we’ll see more of him. We also see an easy friendship developing between Toby and Tybalt, which in the past has been a more contentious relationship than it is here. I can’t wait to see future books in the series to see how the tension between them is resolved. This book made my weekend! It was such a pleasure to read, as are all the books in the series, and I am thrilled that it more than exceeded my high expectations. I definitely recommend this one as a must read!

  29. 4 out of 5

    The Flooze

    Ah, Toby. Your world wasn’t difficult to get into, but I’ve still traveled a hard road to get where we are today. You used to frustrate the hell out of me, yet we’ve come to an understanding. So much so that I’ve even chosen to remove you from my Glutton For Punishment shelf. Kudos! I hope you stay off it. One Salt Sea finds Toby a tad more adept at researching clues - if only because she’s now willing to call in people with real expertise. That mitigates her fumbling, round-about methods. She’s Ah, Toby. Your world wasn’t difficult to get into, but I’ve still traveled a hard road to get where we are today. You used to frustrate the hell out of me, yet we’ve come to an understanding. So much so that I’ve even chosen to remove you from my Glutton For Punishment shelf. Kudos! I hope you stay off it. One Salt Sea finds Toby a tad more adept at researching clues - if only because she’s now willing to call in people with real expertise. That mitigates her fumbling, round-about methods. She’s a hero, not a Holmesian thinker, so I’m terribly pleased that she’s delegating tasks. The case - the kidnapping of two children - has larger implications. If the children are not found alive and well, Faerie war is inevitable. Leave it to Toby to land face-first in the most complicated and dire of situations. But she’s got people! Friends, even! to help her sort it all out. The investigation is pretty standard for the series. As usual, it’s the exploration of Faerie and the varied characters within it that provide the most allure: a trip to the mind-bogglingly colorful and topsy-turvy Undersea; interesting tidbits about the grumpy and mysterious Luideag; prophetic statements from a loopy visitor; factual statements from some misplaced rocks (yes, rocks); and, of course, scenes with the most alluring King of Cats. Oh, that Tybalt. I just can’t get enough of him. Predatory, protective, and tender, with sly amusement in his eyes and an attitude that radiates well-earned confidence. He’s a keeper. There are comical scenes and emotional ones. McGuire’s humor leans towards sarcasm and slapstick, prompting guffaws during otherwise tense moments. (view spoiler)[Who wouldn’t laugh at the idea of Toby hurtling down a hill in a wheelchair, curled up in the lap of a queen? That’s cartoon-comedy gold and I can envision it perfectly. (hide spoiler)] The emotional scenes varied in success; I didn‘t personally feel the weight of Toby‘s turmoil until the closing chapters. Much of it hinged on me being concerned about a character we’ve had limited knowledge of. I can’t just muster up fear because I’m told to. I need to be invested. The final moments of One Salt Sea did make me teary-eyed though. That emotion, along with the hints at deeper mysteries and the promise of more more more Tybalt ensure that I’ll picking up book six in the series. Seems I’m just a glutton for fantastic fae and hot men…as if we didn’t know that already.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    When a kidnapping threatens to spark a war between the land fae and their dangerous cousins from the sea, everyone that October Daye cares about is in the line of fire. We get to explore a new area of faerie this time, one that Toby doesn’t know much about. A couple of the established characters have connections to the Undersea, though, which brings up some interesting complications. There are plenty of twists that involve purely land-based drama as well, including several major shocks to both To When a kidnapping threatens to spark a war between the land fae and their dangerous cousins from the sea, everyone that October Daye cares about is in the line of fire. We get to explore a new area of faerie this time, one that Toby doesn’t know much about. A couple of the established characters have connections to the Undersea, though, which brings up some interesting complications. There are plenty of twists that involve purely land-based drama as well, including several major shocks to both Toby’s surroundings and her personal life. Toby’s had a lot of roles over the course of these books, and we see her move through most of them here. She often seems to feel out of her depth, but she compensates for that by really putting thought into how to act like the mentor or the countess or the friend that the people around her deserve. It’s nice to see a heroine making that level of effort towards caring for other characters, because sometimes novels get so caught up in saving everyone that the actual relationships fall through the cracks. I read too many books where I’m told how the characters feel about each other without really getting it on a gut level. But in this book, it’s easy to understand why Sylvester would be concerned about Toby even while he’s sick with worry over his daughter. It’s easy to understand why Tybalt is willing to stand up for her. I’m pretty sure I’ve said this before, but it bears repeating: this is the best urban fantasy series going. The mix of episodic action and ongoing story is spot on, and best of all, the longer-term arcs are really starting to pay off. It’s rare for me to find books that match my ideal pace so consistently. The stakes keep getting raised for Toby, but it happens in a smooth, natural way that doesn’t feel like the author’s just shaking things up without purpose. This book has some really great emotional moments. It answers some questions and closes the door on a few chapters in October’s life. And like my very favorite series books, it leaves me immediately wanting more. A slightly longer version of this review was originally posted on my Urban Fantasy blog.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.