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The Eyes of the Dragon

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A kingdom is in turmoil as the old king dies, murdered by a strange and horrible poison. While the land of Delain mourns, the evil wizard Flagg, hatches an unscrupulous plot, which sees the King's eldest son Peter imprisoned for his father's murder, and the youngest son inherit the throne. Only Peter knows the truth about his own innocence and the evil that is Flagg. Only A kingdom is in turmoil as the old king dies, murdered by a strange and horrible poison. While the land of Delain mourns, the evil wizard Flagg, hatches an unscrupulous plot, which sees the King's eldest son Peter imprisoned for his father's murder, and the youngest son inherit the throne. Only Peter knows the truth about his own innocence and the evil that is Flagg. Only Peter can save Delain from the horror that Flagg has in store. But first, he must escape from the high tower.


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A kingdom is in turmoil as the old king dies, murdered by a strange and horrible poison. While the land of Delain mourns, the evil wizard Flagg, hatches an unscrupulous plot, which sees the King's eldest son Peter imprisoned for his father's murder, and the youngest son inherit the throne. Only Peter knows the truth about his own innocence and the evil that is Flagg. Only A kingdom is in turmoil as the old king dies, murdered by a strange and horrible poison. While the land of Delain mourns, the evil wizard Flagg, hatches an unscrupulous plot, which sees the King's eldest son Peter imprisoned for his father's murder, and the youngest son inherit the throne. Only Peter knows the truth about his own innocence and the evil that is Flagg. Only Peter can save Delain from the horror that Flagg has in store. But first, he must escape from the high tower.

30 review for The Eyes of the Dragon

  1. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    4.5 stars! Hands down, this is my FAVORITE Stephen King book. I'm not saying this is his best piece of work, but (personal preferences 'n all) this is just what I happen to enjoy the most. So. Erica has a stellar review that explains why this book should be revered above all other King books. And also touches another review that is total crap, written by a man who can normally be counted on to give good book recommendations. Even though he tends to ramble, and add musical lyrics to all his reviews. A 4.5 stars! Hands down, this is my FAVORITE Stephen King book. I'm not saying this is his best piece of work, but (personal preferences 'n all) this is just what I happen to enjoy the most. So. Erica has a stellar review that explains why this book should be revered above all other King books. And also touches another review that is total crap, written by a man who can normally be counted on to give good book recommendations. Even though he tends to ramble, and add musical lyrics to all his reviews. And doesn't actually talk about the book half of the time. Or, let's face it, make sense. Because he's old. And weird. Probably even smelly...but I have no proof of that one. Still. He's our friend. Most days. Anyhoo. This one is actually a fairly simple fantasyish tale. The Fearsome Dragon... The Wise and Beautiful Queen... The Evil Sorcerer... The Decent but Stupid King... The overlooked, sad, spiteful, kinda stupid, (Baby-Brother) Prince... Prince... actual size may vary Oops! Wait. The Good and Decent Hero Prince... The thing that I love about this story is that it has that classic good over evil vibe to it. There are twists, but nothing mind-blowing. It reminds me of the kind of fairytale/fantasy stuff my mom would read to me before bedtime. Well. Ok. She never read me anything with adult content in it, but that's not what I'm talking about. This is just... Good wins and Evil takes a beat-down. Sometimes it's nice to pretend that you're a kid, and you still believe that you know? Be noble, be kind, do the right thing...and everything will work out. Remember that? sigh So, that's why I love this one. The End. Re-read 2020 I just finished listening to the audiobook and it was amazing. Bronson Pinchot did a fabulous job, and I can't recommend this one enough. Bronson Pinchot - Narrator Publisher: Blackstone Audio, Inc. Edition: Unabridged Awards: Bram Stoker Award for Lifetime Achievement Grand Master Award

  2. 5 out of 5

    James Tivendale

    When the majority of individuals think about Stephen King's credentials; it is generally about his amazing work-rate at producing memorable and top quality horror stories. With that in mind; in addition to The Dark Tower saga, this novel is one of Mr. King's lesser known creations that is definitely more Tolkien than Tommyknockers. It is an easy story to get into and I was intrigued from the first page. My grandfather gave me this book when I was a wide-eyed, eleven-year-old lover of Goosebumps When the majority of individuals think about Stephen King's credentials; it is generally about his amazing work-rate at producing memorable and top quality horror stories. With that in mind; in addition to The Dark Tower saga, this novel is one of Mr. King's lesser known creations that is definitely more Tolkien than Tommyknockers. It is an easy story to get into and I was intrigued from the first page. My grandfather gave me this book when I was a wide-eyed, eleven-year-old lover of Goosebumps books as I possessed pretty good reading skills for that age and I loved every second of this tale back then. Memories of the book from 19 years ago are of course hazy so I am glad I picked it up again - half for the nostalgia but also to delve back into the mythical land of Delain which lurks somewhere within Mid-World. The book is presented by an omnipresent narrator who may very well be Stephen King himself. This story was written and dedicated to his daughter Naomi after all. The storyteller keeps us updated with his opinions, lets us know the personae's thoughts and motives throughout the plot and reverts back to us as a reader to find out how we are getting on. It is a nice touch for a pleasant story. It follows the royal family of Delain. King Roland the Good is an average monarch. He loves his alcohol, hunting and is just generally an okay guy. He reminded me of Robert Baratheon from Game of Thrones. His defining feat was killing the last known dragon - the head of which remains in his drawing room as a trophy. In his later years when his subjects are worried at a lack of an heir - he is introduced to a witty, charming, younger lady called Sasha and thanks to a couple of magic potions to aid sexual prowess two children are born. Peter and Thomas. All seems nice and happy so far. Peter grows to be a strapping, proud and honourable young gentleman who everyone agrees will make a great next king. Well, all except one person... I forgot to mention The Eyes of the Dragon includes one of the most infamous, notorious villains in fiction - a gentleman (or demon perhaps) called Flagg happens to be the King's aide and black magician. Flagg goes by many names in Stephen King's novels - The Man In Black, The Walkin' Dude, Randall Flagg etc... If you are familiar with King's books you probably know this dude from Dark Tower and The Stand amongst others. To summarise: He is one evil muthaphuckka. On a grim day in Delain - The King is poisoned with a vile substance called Dragon Sand which burns victims from the inside out and next in line to the throne Peter is incorrectly judged to have committed the said regicide, therefore, is placed on the top floor of The Needle for eternal imprisonment 300 feet above the ground. In lieu of this, Roland's younger, weaker, more impressionable son becomes King - and guess who is whispering in his ear about how to rule the land? Following this, we are dealt a slightly predictable but still utterly entrancing narrative that composes a state of mind to the readers where hope, belief, friendship and desire are the real magic in a story that is polluted by Flagg's plotting, deceit and all sort of macabre magical nastiness. The story revolves around a dolls house, an endless supply of napkins, a mouse, a two headed parrot and a very clever wolf-dog called Frisky who is presented with charming childishly human qualities by the narrator. A lot of the supporting cast who I have not even mentioned are well created and add to the overall quality of the tale. My copy of the novel also included some amazing fantastical art including Frisky, the dragon, a lost looking rabbit, the wizard and such which was a very nice touch. I guess you need to read this so you will know what was seen when someone on the secret passage looked through the eyes of the dragon and how it impacts on this awesome story. James Tivendale.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Charlotte May

    "Of all the weapons ever used to commit regicide - the murder of a King - none has been as frequently used as poison. And no one has greater knowledge of poisons than a magician." I thoroughly enjoyed losing myself in this fantasy. This was my first Stephen King novel, I don't really like horror so I wanted something different from him and I wasn't disappointed! King Roland has been killed, presumed murder. His eldest son Peter is accused of the crime and sentenced to imprisonment in the needle "Of all the weapons ever used to commit regicide - the murder of a King - none has been as frequently used as poison. And no one has greater knowledge of poisons than a magician." I thoroughly enjoyed losing myself in this fantasy. This was my first Stephen King novel, I don't really like horror so I wanted something different from him and I wasn't disappointed! King Roland has been killed, presumed murder. His eldest son Peter is accused of the crime and sentenced to imprisonment in the needle - the tallest tower in the Kingdom. Meanwhile his younger brother Thomas now sits the throne, despite not being fit for the role, as the old King's magician and advisor Flagg whispers in Thomas' ear and stirs up trouble. There are those who are still loyal to Thomas, who suspect Flagg; after all he seems to have lived for an unrealistically long time, surely there is some evil at play here? I noticed a lot of parallels between this and Robin Hobb's Farseer trilogy, it is set in a similar world which may be why I liked it so much. A simple enough story of good vs evil, where each character has flaws of some sort. Where people have to decide how far they will go to prevent the spread of evil and to protect their royal family.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Delee

    When I was a little girl my mother and father would tuck me in at night and read me a bedtime story. At Christmas and Easter- I would have the pleasure of listening to bedtime stories made-up by my father, just for me- Delee. The Adventures of the Pink Kitty...about a very special kitten making his way to a very special child.....and his adventures along the way trying to find a home with the perfect little girl. ME!!! It wasn't a logical story...it probably wasn't the best story out there- but When I was a little girl my mother and father would tuck me in at night and read me a bedtime story. At Christmas and Easter- I would have the pleasure of listening to bedtime stories made-up by my father, just for me- Delee. The Adventures of the Pink Kitty...about a very special kitten making his way to a very special child.....and his adventures along the way trying to find a home with the perfect little girl. ME!!! It wasn't a logical story...it probably wasn't the best story out there- but to me it was magical. THE EYES OF THE DRAGON is another kind of bedtime story. A bedtime story KING style!! Noooo pink kitties here. In a fairy tale past- there is a relatively happy Kingdom of Delain- with the dragon slaying King Roland, his young wife Queen Sasha, and their sweet, perfect, little boy Peter...but there also is evil in Delain-a magician by the name of Flagg. Who is also unfortunately...Roland's adviser. Flagg's goal is to make this Kingdom...less happy- and he comes up with a plan. A plan that doesn't involve Queen Sasha...or a sweet, perfect, heir to the throne. So he schemes... ...and he schemes. Sasha dies in childbirth- and Thomas is born. A not so perfect child- who Flagg takes under his wing... ...and when the time is right- all the pieces fall into place. ...but there are a few snags in his wicked plan- Flagg is not aware of- that may or may not come back to haunt him later. This is one of my Favorite King books. It speaks to my inner child..and from time to time SHE still enjoys fairy tales and bedtime stories.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Melissa ♥ Dog/Wolf Lover ♥ Martin

    It was pretty good. I enjoyed the little graphics. Mel 🖤🐶🐺🐾

  6. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    Another King reread on my chronological King rereading adventure. I had been really looking forward to this one since I remembered loving it when I first read it over 20 years ago. Would the reread go as well? I will start by saying I loved it again. It is a great fantasy book with an interesting premise that does not get bogged down in complex world building. He originally wrote it for his daughter, Naomi, so he kept it at a YA sort of level (before YA was officially a thing). And, there is a lo Another King reread on my chronological King rereading adventure. I had been really looking forward to this one since I remembered loving it when I first read it over 20 years ago. Would the reread go as well? I will start by saying I loved it again. It is a great fantasy book with an interesting premise that does not get bogged down in complex world building. He originally wrote it for his daughter, Naomi, so he kept it at a YA sort of level (before YA was officially a thing). And, there is a lot to tie it into the Stephen King Universe - so, fans who enjoy all the intricacies of his books being connected must read this. I will follow up that by saying I liked it better the first time. I think it might the a nostalgia thing - remembering a really great book experience and then not quite feeling it the next time. It happens to me a lot with movies from the 80s as well. When I watched or read as a kid/teen I was blown away. But, when I go back to find the same magic it is not quite there. But, that is only a minor issue - as I said, I still loved it! Note on the audiobook:. I usually love Bronson Pinchot as a narrator and he does a lot of King books. But, he made a big audio narrator mistake (at least in my book). Most of the dialogue of Flagg was whispered and it drove me crazy. I had to rewind several times to figure out what he was saying. I know he was trying to create atmosphere, but this dialogue did not have to be whispered to make that happen.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Merphy Napier

    A an easy read with a really interesting narrative style. Unfortunately, the narrative style was really the only thing I liked about it. The characters weren't much for me to latch on to and they didn't have much development. I was numbingly board throughout most of it, and if I have to read one more line about napkins, their history and storage, and WHY it makes sense they'll be used to form a rope.... I might die. Apparently fan's reactions to this book is what inspired Misery. So I do feel bad A an easy read with a really interesting narrative style. Unfortunately, the narrative style was really the only thing I liked about it. The characters weren't much for me to latch on to and they didn't have much development. I was numbingly board throughout most of it, and if I have to read one more line about napkins, their history and storage, and WHY it makes sense they'll be used to form a rope.... I might die. Apparently fan's reactions to this book is what inspired Misery. So I do feel bad for King that the reaction was so intense, but I am glad such a great book came from it.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lyn

    Napkins? Napkins. And more than enough (too much) nose picking and boogers. Stephen “I dressed up like Jack Vance for Halloween” King made a noteworthy switch from straight up horror to a better than passable high fantasy in his 1987 novel The Eyes of the Dragon. The King of American horror, though, is also a better than average writer and knows a thing or two about moving some copy and though this is a little out of character (like Henry Fonda in Once Upon a Time in the West) it is also entertainin Napkins? Napkins. And more than enough (too much) nose picking and boogers. Stephen “I dressed up like Jack Vance for Halloween” King made a noteworthy switch from straight up horror to a better than passable high fantasy in his 1987 novel The Eyes of the Dragon. The King of American horror, though, is also a better than average writer and knows a thing or two about moving some copy and though this is a little out of character (like Henry Fonda in Once Upon a Time in the West) it is also entertaining and delivers a fantasy gem. Vaguely reminiscent of Neil Gaiman’s Stardust, in tone if not in theme, this change of pace, to this humble reader at least, most notably features his epic villain Randall Flagg, in this work simply Flagg, the king’s magician. King has created in Flagg a universal boogeyman, a timeless and undying human darkness that plays in a score of nefarious roles. But more than just a plug and play antihero, Flagg becomes a recurring evil in a mythos built on bad. A good fantasy.

  9. 4 out of 5

    David - proud Gleeman in Branwen's adventuring party

    "Book, you have the right to a speedy trial" review THE DEFENSE - He may have switched from horror to fantasy with this one, but Stephen King's trademark gripping prose is still in full force! - A scene-stealing villain who creates chaos and is just so much fun to watch, Flagg would fit right in at Gotham City! - Despite the fantasy setting, the emotions of the characters always feel real. - King takes some narrative risks that really pay off. (The segments told through the POV of a dog a "Book, you have the right to a speedy trial" review THE DEFENSE - He may have switched from horror to fantasy with this one, but Stephen King's trademark gripping prose is still in full force! - A scene-stealing villain who creates chaos and is just so much fun to watch, Flagg would fit right in at Gotham City! - Despite the fantasy setting, the emotions of the characters always feel real. - King takes some narrative risks that really pay off. (The segments told through the POV of a dog are particularly effective.) THE PROSECUTION - Very little action for a fantasy novel... (putting "Dragon" in the title when the dragon is only in the book for about two pages...that's downright cruel, Mr. King!) - The book's fairy-tale narrative voice may not be for everyone. (King often speaks directly to the reader, like Aesop speaking to a crowd, which some might find off-putting.) - Story drags a bit in the final act. THE VERDICT A fractured fairy tale as only Stephen King can deliver, this book is perfect for someone who wants to see an author step out of their comfort zone and try something new!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ɗẳɳ 2.☊

    When The Eyes of the Dragon was first published, back in 1984, it was somewhat of a departure for Stephen King. It wasn’t his first venture into fantasy, per se, considering the iconic Gunslinger (the first of the Dark Tower books) came out a few years prior, but I do believe The Eyes of the Dragon was his first attempt at a novel-length fairy tale. It makes perfect sense then that King would dedicate the story to his daughter, considering the cutesy feel to it. The tale is conveyed through an un When The Eyes of the Dragon was first published, back in 1984, it was somewhat of a departure for Stephen King. It wasn’t his first venture into fantasy, per se, considering the iconic Gunslinger (the first of the Dark Tower books) came out a few years prior, but I do believe The Eyes of the Dragon was his first attempt at a novel-length fairy tale. It makes perfect sense then that King would dedicate the story to his daughter, considering the cutesy feel to it. The tale is conveyed through an unknown narrator, who often pauses to interject his own thoughts directly into the narrative. Much like a father reading a bedtime story to his daughter, occasionally stopping to discuss what’s happening—similar in style to something like The Princess Bride. However, whereas The Princess Bride is a swashbuckling tale of adventure and romance set in a magical land chock-full of unforgettable characters—a story of betrayal and revenge and that oh so important TRUE LOVE—The Eyes of the Dragon, by comparison, is a rather simple tale of a fat, dimwitted, slovenly king, his two sons, and the evil magician hellbent on destroying their kingdom. It, no doubt, pales in comparison. The crux of the tale revolves around King Roland’s firstborn son, Peter. Who’s kind, generous, much loved, and, by all accounts, quite brilliant, while his younger brother, Thomas, is cut from the same cloth as their father. Fearing that the brilliant princeling might one-day muck-up all of his nefarious plans, the magician, and adviser to the king—let’s call him Flagg—devises a way to remove Peter from the line of succession, reasoning that Thomas would be far easier to manipulate. The majority of the narrative follows Peter as he attempts to wiggle free from Flagg’s web. Stupidly enough, after five long years of struggle and planning, Peter’s ultimate success or failure hinged entirely on dreams and dumb luck (or was it ka?). Sadly, much of the tension and mystery throughout the story was undercut by King’s endless desire to foreshadow upcoming events. He seemingly chopped the legs out from under his narrative at every opportunity. I don’t honestly understand his strange compulsion to spoil major plot points. Offhand, I can think of several instances of him spoiling the endings to other stories as well, and not only his own! It’s like he just can’t help himself—but I digress. Bottom line: The Eyes of the Dragon is a rather straightforward fairy tale, that lacks mystery and intrigue, but, at the same time, feels too drawn out. What little action that did occur could have easily been told in half the number of pages. And since the only Dark Tower tie-ins were a couple of familiar names, a central location, and one of the main characters, I didn’t feel like the story was really worth my time. However, it is worth noting that, following the lukewarm reception and/or outright rejection of this fairy tale by his rabid fans, King penned his famous Misery book. A story of an author kidnapped and chained to his desk, and forced into writing only the types of stories that his “Constant Readers” demand. STAY IN YOUR LANE, uncle Stevie! 2 Stars – For completionist only or a younger audience fond of simple fairy tales. Favorite quote: She had never seen a man with his drawers off before her wedding night. When, on that occasion, she observed his flaccid penis, she asked with great interest: “What’s that, Husband?” . . . “It is King’s Iron,” he said. “It doesn’t look like iron,” said Sasha, doubtfully. “It is before the forge,” he said. “Ah!” said she. “And where is the forge?” “If you will trust me,” said he, getting into bed with her, “I will show you, for you have brought it from the Western Barony with you but did not know it.”

  11. 5 out of 5

    Tom Quinn

    Did you know Stephen King wrote a fantasy novel? Well he did, and it's glorious. All his best skills are on display here: short episodic chapters that end with a "what happens next?" cliffhanger, relatable inner monologuing from ordinary folks thrown into extraordinary situations, creative worldbuilding that fills out every scene. King has a knack for good old-fashioned storytelling, and here he does a rip-roaring fantasy tale that serves up the genre's tropes and conventions with ease and an en Did you know Stephen King wrote a fantasy novel? Well he did, and it's glorious. All his best skills are on display here: short episodic chapters that end with a "what happens next?" cliffhanger, relatable inner monologuing from ordinary folks thrown into extraordinary situations, creative worldbuilding that fills out every scene. King has a knack for good old-fashioned storytelling, and here he does a rip-roaring fantasy tale that serves up the genre's tropes and conventions with ease and an enthusiasm befitting any 80s movie of the week. 4 stars. Melodrama that shows King has chops in the non-horror department, this was so much more fun than expected.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Swaps55

    i need to preface this by saying that this was the first stephen king book i ever read. he is my father's favorite author, and i grew up staring at the dozens of hardback books all in a row on the shelves of his office, all with king's name on them. i really wanted to read one, see what it was dad read, and the reason he handed me this one was the same reason king wrote it: so his kids could read something he had written. in other words, it's kid-friendly, and actually written as a children's bo i need to preface this by saying that this was the first stephen king book i ever read. he is my father's favorite author, and i grew up staring at the dozens of hardback books all in a row on the shelves of his office, all with king's name on them. i really wanted to read one, see what it was dad read, and the reason he handed me this one was the same reason king wrote it: so his kids could read something he had written. in other words, it's kid-friendly, and actually written as a children's book (don't be fooled, though. there is plenty of poisonings, death, betrayal, etc, and the villain is flagg, of the stand fame). that said, it could be that my love for this book the second time around as an adult is deeply rooted in that first reading as a kid, meaning it could be that if you read it for the first time as an adult you might not feel the way that i do about it. think reading the hobbit vs. reading lord of the rings, and that's about the comparison to it and normal king fare. the story itself could almost be considered stock fantasy, but the characters are brought to life with the amazing skill that you come to expect from stephen king. you have the kingdom of delain, ruled by king roland. roland has two sons, peter and thomas. the elder peter is the golden child, with thomas always living in his shadow. roland himself is a weak king, a virtual puppet of his adviser, flagg. with peter poised to take the throne after roland dies, flagg must see to it that somehow thomas, the weaker son who more resembles his father, is the one actually crowned king. this doesn't sound to original, does it? but i doubt you can find a story in which you feel such compassion for the spineless king roland, awe and respect for the venerable prince peter, and sympathy blended with shame for thomas. it's a quick read, engaging, and skillfully told. if you want a fantasy story that will bring you back to your childhood, this is it.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Bradley

    I first read this about a year after it was published and hadn't thought too much about it since then, but for the young kid I was, it happened to be the first fantasy novel I ever read and the second novel... period. It shaped my idea of what fantasy was, even if I've reformulated that about a million times since then, but let me be frank: I wasn't all that impressed. SF in all its shapes and forms caught my imagination more. In fact, it took something like a decade and a half before I went off I first read this about a year after it was published and hadn't thought too much about it since then, but for the young kid I was, it happened to be the first fantasy novel I ever read and the second novel... period. It shaped my idea of what fantasy was, even if I've reformulated that about a million times since then, but let me be frank: I wasn't all that impressed. SF in all its shapes and forms caught my imagination more. In fact, it took something like a decade and a half before I went off the infrequent perusal of fantasies and did huge binge-reads of the genre. The old castle, kings, queens, and princes just didn't do that much for me. On the other hand, Stephen King will not be denied. I enjoyed the characters even tho they seemed to be nearly archetypal templates with hardly any differentiation from the ideals, was amused by the whole handkerchief plot, and was immensely interested in Flagg, that bigger-than-life evil bastard that spans many of King's novels. This re-read didn't change my initial opinion all that much, but the core is still good if not purely fantastic. And this time, I got to wonder at all the kitchen-sink story elements that had been thrown into this tale, straight out of King's earlier novels. Such as the importance of storms, a-la IT, the incorporation of less than bright characters as extremely important heroes in their own rights, and elements of regret, redemption, and forgiveness for even the greatly-flawed and mostly despicable characters. I haven't seen but a handful of characters in ALL of King's works that can be described as genuinely decent and/or good, but Peter happens to be one. That's pretty wild. :) No, this isn't a King masterpiece, but it definitely has a lot of charm. Can you believe it? It's King's only pure fantasy!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    I read this about ten years ago and just read the book again about two years ago. Well, I'm delighted to say that it still has all its magic. As an aspiring writer, I was breaking down the story, trying to figure out what made it special. It's not so much the setting as there are many fairy tale legends which are similar to this one . .. nor is it the actual idea as many good princes have been unjustly imprisoned and then tried to redeem themselves later. This tale's strength is in its narrative p I read this about ten years ago and just read the book again about two years ago. Well, I'm delighted to say that it still has all its magic. As an aspiring writer, I was breaking down the story, trying to figure out what made it special. It's not so much the setting as there are many fairy tale legends which are similar to this one . .. nor is it the actual idea as many good princes have been unjustly imprisoned and then tried to redeem themselves later. This tale's strength is in its narrative prose as well as its nuances. The magical dollhouse, the napkins, the tidbits of legends, the extra push for detailing characters all explain why King is such a great storyteller. If you like King, read this. If you like fantasy, read this. If you like fairy tales, read this . .. although, be warned: this is not for children. OVERALL GRADE: A minus

  15. 5 out of 5

    Baba

    Using core 'fairy tale' features such as medieval like settings, Kings & Queens, castles with moats, peasants etc. Stephen King creates a delightful young adult fantasy of a dispossessed (of his kingdom) prince and how he set about righting the injustice; and the villain? You'll have to read it to find out who it is :) And increasing a point after each reread, this is now a 7 out of 12 in 2018 for me :) Using core 'fairy tale' features such as medieval like settings, Kings & Queens, castles with moats, peasants etc. Stephen King creates a delightful young adult fantasy of a dispossessed (of his kingdom) prince and how he set about righting the injustice; and the villain? You'll have to read it to find out who it is :) And increasing a point after each reread, this is now a 7 out of 12 in 2018 for me :)

  16. 4 out of 5

    Mike's Book Reviews

    Full Video Review Here: https://youtu.be/wG7Lhb5y-T4 It's a rare case when I pick up a Stephen King book and it is not for a re-read. After the fiasco that was my "break up" with Stephen King in 2004 when I read the last 2 Dark Tower books, I wrote off The Talisman and Eyes of the Dragon because the last thing I wanted was Stephen King doing fantasy again. Yes, I was that petty 16 years ago. Now, doing my "Into the Multiverse" series for the channel, it came time for Eyes of the Dragon, a book tha Full Video Review Here: https://youtu.be/wG7Lhb5y-T4 It's a rare case when I pick up a Stephen King book and it is not for a re-read. After the fiasco that was my "break up" with Stephen King in 2004 when I read the last 2 Dark Tower books, I wrote off The Talisman and Eyes of the Dragon because the last thing I wanted was Stephen King doing fantasy again. Yes, I was that petty 16 years ago. Now, doing my "Into the Multiverse" series for the channel, it came time for Eyes of the Dragon, a book that many a King fan puts near the bottom of their rankings. So, was it as bad as I was told? Heck no, I loved it. Going into this with the knowledge that he wrote the story for his daughter really helped me to approach it as a fairy tale rather than epic fantasy. The Eyes of the Dragon is every bit a fairy tale. A very, very charming fairy tale. What I didn't expect was so many Dark Tower references (maybe?) in this one. Any time you get more of arguable King's greatest villain ever created in Randall Flagg, well it's going to be a good time. Add to this not one, but two coming of age stories under very different circumstances and it is King at his best; even if there isn't the usual horror and bad language. I had a ton of fun with this one and I'm already planning for it to be my oldest son's gateway into Stephen King when he's ready. I think this is absolutely the perfect book for Constant Readers to pass on to their kids should they want to share a love of King with them.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Choko

    *** 3.40 *** A buddy read with my fairy tales loving friends at BB&B!!! I have never jumped on the Steven King fan band wagon, but it was never because of his writing. It usually relates to the thematics and my inability to cope with thrillers and imaginative mind, which brings all his monsters to life and I just can't deal... However, this book is not his usual fair. It is a fairytale!!! And I am a humongous fan of anything resembling a classic fairytale or Fantasy... So, this is how several BB&B *** 3.40 *** A buddy read with my fairy tales loving friends at BB&B!!! I have never jumped on the Steven King fan band wagon, but it was never because of his writing. It usually relates to the thematics and my inability to cope with thrillers and imaginative mind, which brings all his monsters to life and I just can't deal... However, this book is not his usual fair. It is a fairytale!!! And I am a humongous fan of anything resembling a classic fairytale or Fantasy... So, this is how several BB&B members found ourselves reading this book. Mr. King wrote this in order to have something he created appropriate enough to read to his children when they were very young. And he did just that - he created a fairytale good for children as young as 6 and as old as time:-) I truly enjoyed the story. I also think, that if I had read it as a youth I would have rated it with all the stars. However, I am reading it in a ripe old age and although magically written, it was a bit too straight forward and linear for my expectations of the modern Fantasy genre. This in no way diminished it's value or enjoyment factor. It just made it a bit young and predictable for what we all have gotten accustomed to. Despite everything, it read really fast and I engulfed it in one sitting. As I said, I enjoyed reading this with friends and recommend it to all those young at heart - a simple story of good verses evil!!! I hope you all have a great time reading!!!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Peter Topside

    I am not a fan of fantasy-heavy stories, but decided to give this a shot, as I was all about Stephen King after reading Desperation. It was a totally different experience, and I was very shocked by how engaged I became. The dragon sand was a really cool concept, and who knew dragons had a 9-chambered heart? I highly recommend to fans of King, as well as the likes of Tolkien.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ron

    Whoever said the second time wasn't a charm? This fine little book, written some 35 years ago during the time King was writing other stories like IT and Misery, had escaped my attention since first reading not long after IT. You can't compare The Eyes of the Dragon to the books that had come before it (many being big and scary), unless you were King's daughter at the time. I read somewhere that his son Joe had read a couple of King's books by that point, even if he was younger than his sister. B Whoever said the second time wasn't a charm? This fine little book, written some 35 years ago during the time King was writing other stories like IT and Misery, had escaped my attention since first reading not long after IT. You can't compare The Eyes of the Dragon to the books that had come before it (many being big and scary), unless you were King's daughter at the time. I read somewhere that his son Joe had read a couple of King's books by that point, even if he was younger than his sister. But Naomi hadn't (the scary stuff just wasn't for her). So her dad asked her what she most liked, and then wrote this story during the mornings (while working in tandem on Misery), with no intention to publish. King also said, or so I've heard, that when you write you can't write for another person only. You also have to write for yourself. I know that's a big reason why I like The Eyes of the Dragon. Like most good books, this reads for adults as well as the young. The idea of morality is in here. “Good vs Evil” is in here as well, like so many of Stephen King's works. Roland though, he is unlike the Roland of Gilead that I know. Weak and without will, this Roland flounders. So the good is left to his son Peter instead, until he runs into trouble. And of course that's where the evil presents itself. As they say, “Where there is good...”. Randall Flagg. He is the same in name, and almost in persona too - he always seems to change a little with each story, but that's what he does and who he is. Very glad to have reread this one. It's not something I'd actively planned to do, until I started rereading The Dark Tower Series. It doesn't advance that series, but it has a way of rounding it out with the concept of “other worlds” in ways I hadn't thought about.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Wolf

    The Eyes of the Dragon, as far as I can tell, is one of King's early departures from writing straight-up horror. It's not a horror story at all -- instead, it's fantasy set in a far-off kingdom, where an evil magician is determined to thrust the land into chaos and bloodshed in order to satisfy his own dark purposes. King Roland the Good is an okay king, kind but not particularly effective, and perhaps a little too under the sway of his advisor, the magician Flagg. Roland has two sons -- his heir The Eyes of the Dragon, as far as I can tell, is one of King's early departures from writing straight-up horror. It's not a horror story at all -- instead, it's fantasy set in a far-off kingdom, where an evil magician is determined to thrust the land into chaos and bloodshed in order to satisfy his own dark purposes. King Roland the Good is an okay king, kind but not particularly effective, and perhaps a little too under the sway of his advisor, the magician Flagg. Roland has two sons -- his heir, Peter, and a younger son, Thomas, who grows up in his older brother's shadow, always plagued by feelings of inadequacy and jealousy as he watches Peter grow into a fine, beloved young man. When Flagg's schemes end with Peter falsely imprisoned on charges of murdering his father, Thomas gains the throne, but he's guided in all things by Flagg, who uses Thomas's weakness to destabilize the country. But Peter is strong and smart, and doesn't give up so easily... Such a terrific story! I was completely enthralled by this tale of loyalty, royalty, friendship, betrayal, and the evil that threatens to undermine families and kingdoms. The characters are so well drawn, showing shades of personality and motivation, and finding hidden dimensions in characters that might otherwise seem like a stock type. The Eyes of the Dragon is an excellent adventure -- don't miss it!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Celeste

    The Eyes of the Dragon is billed as both King’s only high fantasy and his only novel that could be classified as a children’s book. I wasn’t sure how successful he’d be with either of those things, but now I really wish he would write more of both. This book so radically exceeded my expectations that, even though I’ve come to passionately love King’s work, I couldn’t help but be surprised. I loved everything about this, and it’s the first King novel I’ve ever read that I could comfortably recomm The Eyes of the Dragon is billed as both King’s only high fantasy and his only novel that could be classified as a children’s book. I wasn’t sure how successful he’d be with either of those things, but now I really wish he would write more of both. This book so radically exceeded my expectations that, even though I’ve come to passionately love King’s work, I couldn’t help but be surprised. I loved everything about this, and it’s the first King novel I’ve ever read that I could comfortably recommend to literally anyone of any age. “He knew as well as we in our own world do that the road to hell is paved with good intentions--but he also knew that, for human beings, good intentions are sometimes all there are. Angels may be safe from damnation, but human beings are less fortunate things, and for them hell is always close.” I love the change in voice King uses here. The presence of an omniscient narrator who makes his own personality known frequently throughout the telling of the story is so reminiscent of classic fairy tales, and it was a sweet, and very successful, decision. King’s storyteller in this book is pitch perfect and wonderfully balanced, and I wish I could read a dozen more stories told in this voice. “I tell tales, not tea leaves.” Character development has alway been one of King’s strengths in my opinion, and that strength was well showcased here. Peter could have easily been too perfect to be believable if King had not deftly fleshed him out well enough to come across as wholly three dimensional. Thomas could have been so easy to hate, but King managed to make him sympathetic. The supporting cast could have been cardboard cutouts just fulfilling their designated jobs, but King made sure that readers would see them as actual people. And then there’s Flagg. If you have any experience with King, you’ve probably heard the name. I won’t get too into his character and role in the book except to say that he’s absolutely terrifying. “One of the great things about tales is how fast time may pass when not much of note is happening. Real life is never that way, and it is probably a good thing.” The Eyes of the Dragon is a great example of classic high fantasy. This is a genre that produces such a multitude of works that many entries end up feeling derivative and predictable. However, I felt that in this book King actually did some things in the genre that I had actually never seen before. It was really refreshing. And considering the fact that this was written in 1987, I think the fact that it still feels so fresh speaks so highly of both the book and the author. “Did they all live happily ever after? They did not. No one ever does, in spite of what the stories may say. They had their good days, as you do, and they had their bad days, and you know about those. They had their victories, as you do, and they had their defeats, and you know about those, too. There were times when they felt ashamed of themselves, knowing that they had not done their best, and there were times when they knew they had stood where their God had meant them to stand. All I'm trying to say is that they lived as well as they could, each and every one of them; some lived longer than others, but all lived well, and bravely, and I love them all, and am not ashamed of my love.” This is a book that I would happily read to a classroom full of students. I would gift it to fantasy fans and people who don’t usually like King’s writing. I would read The Eyes of the Dragon again in a heartbeat, and would as just quickly recommend it to almost every type of reader. I loved it. You can find this review and more at Novel Notions.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Stepheny

    Two of my favorite people have vastly different opinions on this book. Delee gave this book 5 glowing stars while Jeff gave it two and used such eloquent and moving words to explain what exactly he disliked so much about it. When Delee told me I had to read it I could not tell her no! Literally she has read every single book I have ever requested she read. Literally. She’s amazing. And I knew how much this book meant to her. And Jeff insisted I skip this book; that it just was not worth my tim Two of my favorite people have vastly different opinions on this book. Delee gave this book 5 glowing stars while Jeff gave it two and used such eloquent and moving words to explain what exactly he disliked so much about it. When Delee told me I had to read it I could not tell her no! Literally she has read every single book I have ever requested she read. Literally. She’s amazing. And I knew how much this book meant to her. And Jeff insisted I skip this book; that it just was not worth my time. But on my quest to read all of King’s books I knew I had to get to this one eventually. I just wasn't sure when because of the varying opinion among King fans. In the faraway land of Delain there resides a King. His name is Roland. *drops jaw* Yes. Roland. ERMAGERD. *coughs* Anyway, he is married to his beautiful wifey, Sasha. They have Le Petit Prince a sweet little Prince named Peter. Peter is instantly everyone’s favorite baby. He grows up to be a nice young boy that the kingdom is taken with. Everyone knows Peter is going to be the Greatest King of All Time. But Roland’s “advisor” has other plans. Mayhap you’re familiar with this “advisor”? He goes by the name Flagg…Randall Flagg. *jaw drops again* Flagg pulls a few strings to make the puppets dance. He gets Roland in bed with his wife again and BAM they are having another baby! And guess what?! It’s a boy! And guess what else?! Everyone’s favorite Queen dies during childbirth. The Kingdom mourns as much as the King and Prince. Meanwhile everyone ignores poor little Princeling, Thomas. He’s basically abandon by everyone, everyone that is, except for Flagg. Flagg has some tricks up his sleeve for sweet, naive little Thomas. And when King Roland is poisoned and Peter is imprisoned it is up to Thomas to rule the Kingdom…with help from his only friend. While I could appreciate what King was going for and I did enjoy the majority of the story there was just something I could not get behind. I can’t be ok with Thomas’ character. The whole time I read this I just felt so bad for him. He was born because Flagg made it so, he was abandon and utterly ignored because of Flagg, he was despised as a ruler because of Flagg. It made me so incredibly sad that this poor boy was subjected to such hate and abandonment while his brother was praised just for breathing or taking a shit. It really bothered me. I think I just have one of those hearts that is naturally drawn to the “weak”. All through high school I was the one trying to stick up for the less fortunate; trying to prevent bullying whenever I could. I felt that Thomas was never even given a fair chance and it broke my heart. The ending was a little bittersweet. I was hoping for some evil spell to be lifted where the people of Delain would love Thomas and realize what asshats they had been. I listened to this on audio and will at some point go back and read the physical book to see if I feel any differently about it. I landed safely in the middle on this one, but I’d like to give it a second chance later on in life.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Trish

    I was told I might want to read this book to gain a slightly deeper insight into the Dark Tower series that I've started. Yes, it's entirely too easy to rope me into reading yet more books. Make no mistake, technically this is not part of the DT series. Instead, it is an early standalone fantasy novel quite unlike other King books. In fact, it is a straight up fantasy, no twists and turns, everything pretty much on the nose and following the usual formula for such books. We have a kingdom that isn I was told I might want to read this book to gain a slightly deeper insight into the Dark Tower series that I've started. Yes, it's entirely too easy to rope me into reading yet more books. Make no mistake, technically this is not part of the DT series. Instead, it is an early standalone fantasy novel quite unlike other King books. In fact, it is a straight up fantasy, no twists and turns, everything pretty much on the nose and following the usual formula for such books. We have a kingdom that isn't doing too badly. We have a king who, while not being the brightest candle on the cake, is actually quite nice (though often also awkward/clumsy). We have a queen who dies tragically while giving birth to her second son - and not by entirely natural causes. We have two little princes who end up on two very different sides of the age-old good-versus-evil equation. What we also get - and here Dark Tower (as well as a few other books) comes in - is a wizard! Randall Flagg (King fans will recognize the name), faithful adviser to the king. Or is he? *snorts* Of course not! He's a scheming little shit with a voice like Harry Potter when he speaks in Parseltongue. The wizard is also several hundreds of years old and has come and gone in several guises, always with the intent to wreak havoc on this kingdom, sow discord and bring chaos and ruin. He thrives on mischief (though personally, I think that is too mild a word for what he does). Thus, he manipulates the younger prince, frames the older (since he couldn't win that boy over) and after having the older prince imprisoned and the younger one crowned king, he then ruins the kingdom to his heart's content. Until the older prince is ready to fight back (yes, King is realistic enough even in this setting not to let everything happen within the span of a lunch). So far so good. And let me be frank here: I often enjoy such stories, no matter how simple the pattern. However, a simplistic pattern plus King's very detailed description of EVERYTHING didn't go well together, I thought. I didn't skim and it wasn't torture, but I really did want them to finally get a move on and fight it out - somehow. I liked how realistic King's timeline for the events was and that he didn't tell the story in linear form but with flashbacks, from different POVs and later revelations, but the book could have been shorter without the story suffering. What I LOVED in this book was the narrator. By which I don't mean the guy reading the audiobook (though he was good, too), but the narrator King used to tell this tale. Different and quirky and it worked for me. By the way, there is only one dragon in this book - right at the beginning for about a page, then stuffed on the king's wall. *sobs* That was just cruel! I really didn't know how to rate this book. Better than some fantasies I've read, not up to King's usual standard even in older books though, enjoyable on one side but also too long-winded until about the 60%-point. Still, I'm quite glad I read it. Just how important it really is regarding the afore-mentioned insight into a certain Man in Black's thoughts and character remains to be seen. 3.5 stars (I'll decide later if rounding down or up is more appropriate)

  24. 4 out of 5

    Danielle The Book Huntress (Back to the Books)

    To me it's pretty interesting that my favorite Stephen King book is not horror at all, but rather, fantasy. It makes sense, really. I don't enjoy reading about people being tormented and murdered. I like to read about people overcoming their fears and the villains they encounter in life. So it was nice to read a story by King in a setting I love, fairy tale land. This is a fairy tale, with all the usual trappings, and he does a great job with it. I think this story really shows what a good write To me it's pretty interesting that my favorite Stephen King book is not horror at all, but rather, fantasy. It makes sense, really. I don't enjoy reading about people being tormented and murdered. I like to read about people overcoming their fears and the villains they encounter in life. So it was nice to read a story by King in a setting I love, fairy tale land. This is a fairy tale, with all the usual trappings, and he does a great job with it. I think this story really shows what a good writer and a storyteller King is. There's no gore, shocking, horrific events. So the clarity of his ability to use words shines through. This is not a review so much as my thoughts on this book. In order to do a review justice, I'd need to reread this book. But I can say that I loved this book.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Johann (jobis89)

    "I think that real friendship always makes us feel such sweet gratitude, because the world almost always seems like a very hard desert, and the flowers that grow there seem to grow there against such high odds." A beautiful YA fantasy novel focusing on the tale of King Roland of Delain and his two sons, Peter and Thomas, with the story being told by an unknown narrator. King Roland is killed by an unusual poison, with his son Peter being accused of murder and imprisoned at the top of a high tower "I think that real friendship always makes us feel such sweet gratitude, because the world almost always seems like a very hard desert, and the flowers that grow there seem to grow there against such high odds." A beautiful YA fantasy novel focusing on the tale of King Roland of Delain and his two sons, Peter and Thomas, with the story being told by an unknown narrator. King Roland is killed by an unusual poison, with his son Peter being accused of murder and imprisoned at the top of a high tower, following the meddling of a certain Randall Flagg, the King's magician. What follows is an exciting story looking at themes including, but not limited to, friendship, loyalty, heroism and adventure. Stephen King? Young adult fantasy, you cry?! What's the Master of Horror doing in this genre? Part of the reason I found this book so sweet was that he had written it for his daughter Naomi. When she was young, he asked her what she liked reading about, and she said "Dragons", and this is what came next. He even named a minor character after her too - adorable! Initially I felt apprehensive as I'm not a huge fan of young adult, nor am I really into the fantasy genre, apart from a few exceptions (The Dark Tower series, Lord of the Rings and Game of Thrones - okay, maybe I do like fantasy!!). This is also my friend Sadie's favourite King book, and she is a huge fantasy fan too, so there was also a little pressure to enjoy it, or else she might fly over here and resort to violence. But luckily within about 10 pages, I was hooked! One of the best parts about this book was meeting Randall Flagg again. That guy really is everywhere, scheming and causing trouble. This time, he wants to see the Kingdom of Delain crumble and fall, all whilst he hides in the shadows and watches. Another highlight for me was the narrator himself, the storyteller. No-one, and I mean no-one, can fill this role like Stephen King himself. When he tells his stories to us Constant Readers, it feels like we're all sitting around a campfire, elbows on our knees, head in our hands, absorbing it all. So it was fun for him to tell this story in a more traditional storyteller prose, similar to his introductions where he speaks directly to the Constant Reader. The illustrations in my edition were incredible too, I loooove illustrations. It really helps bring the characters and locations to life. This is a nice book to direct people towards if they don't like horror, but wish to read some Stephen King. It's also a nice starting point for young readers, a stepping stone to the more macabre and adult books. I can imagine myself reading this to a young child at bedtime (perhaps leaving out more adult parts at the beginning surrounding sex!). This book is really proof that King is able to transcend across any genre he likes. So far, I have read the following from King: horror, romance, fantasy, young adult, supernatural, sci-fi... the list goes on. And he has excelled at all of these. So, enough fangirling for now... I give this fairytale 5 stars out of 5! It appears I'll be taking a short break from King, but sometimes it's good to branch out to other authors. This is me trying to convince myself. Anyway...until next time! Long days and pleasant nights.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Werner

    Although I read a good deal in the speculative genres in which King characteristically writes, he's never been a "go-to" author for me. (Originally, that was probably part of a broader pattern; I don't generally seek out the work of most other best-selling authors either, because I innately distrust the hype, and prefer to pick my own reading rather than letting other people in effect pick it for me.) But back in my days as a public librarian, I decided that since his work was so popular with th Although I read a good deal in the speculative genres in which King characteristically writes, he's never been a "go-to" author for me. (Originally, that was probably part of a broader pattern; I don't generally seek out the work of most other best-selling authors either, because I innately distrust the hype, and prefer to pick my own reading rather than letting other people in effect pick it for me.) But back in my days as a public librarian, I decided that since his work was so popular with the patrons, I should try to cultivate at least a bit of first-hand knowledge of it, just for purposes of readers advisory services. This novel was one a couple of his that I read at that time, recommended to me by a library colleague as works that I might be more apt to like than others more typical of his output. My wife Barb and I actually read it together, and both liked it moderately well. (As is sometimes the case, that puts my rating solidly in the middle of the spectrum in my friend circle, other ratings there ranging from five stars all the way down to one.) This is a capably written, entertaining conventional fantasy, utilizing a low-tech, medieval-like world mostly resembling real-world Europe, in a realm governed by hereditary kingship, and drawing a strong conflict between good and evil. Evil here is incarnated in the malevolent person of the king's wizard, Flagg (a.k.a Randy Flagg the Dark Man, a villain who appears also in several other King works such as The Stand, and who promotes the cause of darkness across various dimensions of the author's fictional multiverse). The plot involves murder, framing the innocent, and intrigue surrounding the royal succession. It's not an especially outstanding or ground-breaking work of its type, IMO, but it's well done for what it is. If it has any particular strong or distinctive point, I'd say that would be its recognition that sometimes people can be manipulated or misled for bad purposes without themselves being bad people as such (something we all tend at times to forget, sometimes at the expense of fairness). Related to this, the characterizations are commendably realistic, and (except for Flagg) believably nuanced. King apparently wrote this originally for his kids, when they were still in grade school. As a result, it doesn't have any particular bad language that I can recall, and not much in the way of sexual content, certainly none of it explicit. (There is an element of implied teenage sex at one point.) Being set in a fantasy world, it lacks the political references that King sometimes inserts into other works (to ensure that everyone has their ideological labels on perfectly straight, apparently), as well as the slurs against evangelicals that he frequently works in when he's using a real-world setting. It's also a much more normally-sized novel, compared to the ultra-thick behemoths that are more typical of his work. Nonetheless, I don't know that I'd characterize it particularly as a children's book; kids and YAs could certainly read it, but the tone, reading level and general vision are such that wouldn't necessarily fall short for adult tastes, either. (As a trigger warning, one of my friend's reviews mentions a scene of animal cruelty. though I don't actually remember that one myself --it's been nearly 30 years since I read the book.) If you're into traditional fantasy, this isn't a must-read, but I don't believe it would disappoint, either.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Erin *Proud Book Hoarder*

    3.5 “Once, in a kingdom called Delain, there was a King with two sons. Delain was a very old kingdom and it had had hundreds of Kings, perhaps even thousands; when time goes on long enough, not even historians can remember everything.” King used a unique narrative style for this fairy tale, where he flexes his writing muscle and offers something much different than his usual fare. Fans of the Dark Tower series will see some name similarities and tributes here like King Roland (much different pers 3.5 “Once, in a kingdom called Delain, there was a King with two sons. Delain was a very old kingdom and it had had hundreds of Kings, perhaps even thousands; when time goes on long enough, not even historians can remember everything.” King used a unique narrative style for this fairy tale, where he flexes his writing muscle and offers something much different than his usual fare. Fans of the Dark Tower series will see some name similarities and tributes here like King Roland (much different personality than our beloved gunslinger) and Flagg, who is as evil as always. Set in historical fantasy-land times, it's a story about two young brothers rising to become Kings while the kingdom is really being ruled by a demented magician. I loved how King tied in two childhood habits into the story later as major game changers. I enjoyed the characterization - Peter and his allies were formidable forces for good, Roland and Thomas among many who struggle between right and wrong, and then finally Flagg - pure evil badassness with his laboratory and potions. It follows fairy-tale tropes with kingdoms, towers, betrayals, and the day old struggle of brotherly love/envy and living up to a father's ideals. It's not gory, but there are disturbing scenes, such as the use of a certain dragon-influenced poison. King again indulges in weird body humor - scenes with the King farting and picking his nose. King does this often so I guess it's a humor he enjoys, although I could have done without some of the scenes. Gross! Overall it's a well written book and easy to follow, but the pacing lags after the first 1/4th. While the story is a good one, there's just not enough action and variances to justify it's length. Not ridiculously long at 380 pages, but my interest started waning.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    The single worst Stephen King novel I have ever read and this man has written his fair share of turds.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Edward Lorn

    I understand that this was many readers' first King book. I understand that this book rests in the hearts of thousands. I understand this is meant to be a fairytale, and that I am not the target audience. I understand all that and I still choose to hate this book. How'd Bobby Brown put it... "It's my prerogative." The Eyes of the Dragon was slightly more bearable this go around because Laddie from Perfect Strangers read it to me, and I highly suggest you take the same route when/if you decide to I understand that this was many readers' first King book. I understand that this book rests in the hearts of thousands. I understand this is meant to be a fairytale, and that I am not the target audience. I understand all that and I still choose to hate this book. How'd Bobby Brown put it... "It's my prerogative." The Eyes of the Dragon was slightly more bearable this go around because Laddie from Perfect Strangers read it to me, and I highly suggest you take the same route when/if you decide to tackle this lesser-known fantasy novel. Bronson Pinchot's performance is fantastic, and lends entertainment value to some of the most boring shit King has ever written. There are only three major scenes in the book, and the plot doesn't even begin until a hundred pages in. That would be fine if this book was six- or seven-hundred pages long. But no. It's 380 pages long, with artwork and big-ass font to make the book seem thicker than it actually is. This book ties in very loosely to the Dark Tower books. Delain is mentioned in several DT novels, and Thomas and Dennis's names are dropped in The Waste Lands, but overall, I feel that this one happens outside of Mid-World, in perhaps another inscape that resides off to the side, much like our own whens. In summation: Not quite Young Adult because there's no trials-of-youth theme and nowhere near the quality of King's adult fiction, The Eyes of the Dragon is pretty much impossible to categorize in the King-verse. Recommended to King completionists only.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Christy

    Well, that was different. Well written of course. It wasn't bad at all....Just not what I was expecting (or really wanted--see King's reaction to that view below--if we all would have loved this one--we would have missed out "miserably"). Perhaps I would have rated it higher if I knew what was coming....or what age group this is really written for? Or if I was extremely ill in bed slurping down chicken soup and my mom came in to read it to me (and blush at the mention of the King's "iron") Hmmmm. Well, that was different. Well written of course. It wasn't bad at all....Just not what I was expecting (or really wanted--see King's reaction to that view below--if we all would have loved this one--we would have missed out "miserably"). Perhaps I would have rated it higher if I knew what was coming....or what age group this is really written for? Or if I was extremely ill in bed slurping down chicken soup and my mom came in to read it to me (and blush at the mention of the King's "iron") Hmmmm. And...there is some to learn about the vile Flagg in this. He's very very old. The most interesting thing about this book was Stephen King's response to it's so-so-reception. He found out most readers didn't want a "fantasy" book from him. It seems he felt "chained" to his desk to write a certain type of book....namely, horror. So....he immediately wrote Misery, a book about an author being forced to write a type of book he didn't want to. And, ironically, it is one of his most horrific books..... So, I guess his fans won.....but he certainly didn't lose out either. Misery was one of his best book to film adaptations yet. (And I really hope the writing of it helped release his frustration at the ungrateful fantasy readers!) One final thing I heard....it's possible the Syfy channel is doing something with this book... could be interesting.... I'd probably give it a try.

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