website statistics Ultimate Spider-Man, Volume 1 - PDF Books Online
Hot Best Seller

Ultimate Spider-Man, Volume 1

Availability: Ready to download

High school, puberty, first dances - there are many pitfalls to being young. Compound these with intense personal tragedy and superhuman powers, and you can start to visualize the world of Peter Parker, aka Spider-Man.


Compare

High school, puberty, first dances - there are many pitfalls to being young. Compound these with intense personal tragedy and superhuman powers, and you can start to visualize the world of Peter Parker, aka Spider-Man.

30 review for Ultimate Spider-Man, Volume 1

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jesse A

    Yes it Is fresh and updated but this is ultimately a lot more faithful to normal Spiderman than a lot of the Ultimate Universe stuff.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Rory Wilding

    SPOILERS By the time when Brian Michael Bendis was hired by Marvel to write a Spider-Man comic that would not only reboot the publisher’s most iconic character for the millennial audience, but introduce the Ultimate Universe, Spidey was not selling well as the nineties were a troubling time for the industry, including Marvel, who had to sell the movie rights of their characters to make sure they’re still alive. Fortunately, it paid off as the nerdy science kid from Queens can be as relevant durin SPOILERS By the time when Brian Michael Bendis was hired by Marvel to write a Spider-Man comic that would not only reboot the publisher’s most iconic character for the millennial audience, but introduce the Ultimate Universe, Spidey was not selling well as the nineties were a troubling time for the industry, including Marvel, who had to sell the movie rights of their characters to make sure they’re still alive. Fortunately, it paid off as the nerdy science kid from Queens can be as relevant during the 21st century. Based on the original story in Amazing Fantasy #15 by Stan Lee and Steve Ditko, which was only 11 pages long, Bendis's retelling of Spider-Man's origin is expanded in the first seven issues. During a school trip to Oscorp Industries, Peter Parker gets bitten by an experimental genetically-engineered spider, which leads to him manifesting various superhuman, arachnid-like powers. As Peter comes to terms with these powers and trying to find a purpose for them, Oscorp founder Norman Osborn – the father of Peter’s friend Harry – keeps an eye on the high schooler who will become your friendly neighbourhood Spider-Man. Given that the source material was essentially a short story in which the hero learns the meaning of responsibility through a tragedy, it is surprising how Bendis can expand this over seven issues, since everyone should know Spidey’s origin by now. However, Bendis expands on who Peter is as a high schooler who is constantly being bullied by the jock Flash Thompson, whilst receiving friendly comfort from his next-door neighbour Mary Jane Watson. Although there was about forty years of history before the publication of Ultimate Spider-Man as we’ve seen the character age over the years, returning Peter to his teenage roots not only makes him relevant to younger readers, but shows how Peter has to learn his lessons, albeit through the hardest of circumstances. Obviously the murder of Uncle Ben shapes Peter in the path of “with great power comes great responsibility”, but even as Spider-Man, he is still learning as later in this volume, he faces organized crime, but his decisions as a vigilante does make him a public menace, much to the delight of The Daily Bugle’s J. Jonah Jameson. As someone who thinks Spidey has the best rogues gallery in the Marvel universe, I found some of Mark Bagley’s redesigns of these classic villains to be problematic, such as the Shocker. Although Norman Osborn is a more intimating presence as he manipulates those, including his own son, to achieve his goals, but when he goes full Goblin, he is an uninteresting Hulk-like monster, hence the constant jokes of the Hulk attacking Midtown High School. Wow, never thought I would miss Steve Ditko’s glider-riding Halloween-wearing Goblin. The only villain that came visually unscathed is the Kingpin, who functions the same as his 616 counterpart, but despite his menacing obese figure, the amount of fat jokes Spidey comes up with are just hilarious. Concluding this first year of the book is #13, which brings out the best in the Bendis/Bagley collaboration. What is essentially a conversation in which Peter comes out to Mary Jane, Bendis is spot-on in writing this friendship that could possibly lead to something more, while Mark Bagley (who has been drawing Spider-Man since the early nineties) does a good job at drawing a comic that is very dialogue-heavy as he makes his characters lively and expressive. Clearly influenced the cinematic incarnations, Ultimate Spider-Man by Brian Michael Bendis and Mark Bagley is a terrific millennial revisit to the roots of Stan Lee and Steve Ditko’s most celebrated creation.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Richard

    Marvel introduced the Ultimate Universe in an attempt to modernize their stories, reset their continuities and make them more accessible to new readers (i.e. make money and save themselves from bankruptcy). It all began with this Ultimate Spider-man series. This is a retelling of Spidey's origin with a few updates. There's not a whole lot of new ground covered here but what is here is pretty well written with dynamic art fit for the web-slinger. I also love that Brian Michael Bendis has the patie Marvel introduced the Ultimate Universe in an attempt to modernize their stories, reset their continuities and make them more accessible to new readers (i.e. make money and save themselves from bankruptcy). It all began with this Ultimate Spider-man series. This is a retelling of Spidey's origin with a few updates. There's not a whole lot of new ground covered here but what is here is pretty well written with dynamic art fit for the web-slinger. I also love that Brian Michael Bendis has the patience to really develop Peter Parker as a believable high school student and to really flesh out his origin without rushing into everything. With Spidey dealing with his newfound powers, high school, Mary Jane, his Uncle Ben, the Green Goblin, and the Kingpin, all in a more modern setting, this is a great place to start for anyone interested in reading a solid introduction to Spider-man.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Corban Ford

    After finally caving in and seeing the latest Spider-Man movie I had to re-read the universe that started it all...well the universe that started the one that Miles Morales inherited. I enjoyed this re-read of these comics I grew up with, and enjoyed the way that Electro was rewritten almost as much as I hated the way that the Green Goblin was presented here. He's not some hulking beast, he's just a dude who dresses as a goblin and likes to fly around on his goblin glider and hurl around pumpkin After finally caving in and seeing the latest Spider-Man movie I had to re-read the universe that started it all...well the universe that started the one that Miles Morales inherited. I enjoyed this re-read of these comics I grew up with, and enjoyed the way that Electro was rewritten almost as much as I hated the way that the Green Goblin was presented here. He's not some hulking beast, he's just a dude who dresses as a goblin and likes to fly around on his goblin glider and hurl around pumpkin bombs. Not a whole lot to over-analyze with that. Regardless, I forgot how well crafted these stories were, and it was a fun treat to be reminded of that while also reading through these great early storylines. It's crazy to believe how long it's been since these came out, but I am happy to report that even now, these tales still stand the test of time.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Baba

    In 2000, with a new management, Marvel undertook something they tried before, but this time with their own characters, a brand new Marvel Universe, the Ultimate Universe. This Brian Michael Bendis, Bill Jemas and Mark Bagley shut-down all the doubters with a more realist super hero universe starting with the Ultimate Spider-Man, all the pros and cons of being young... and having super spider powers! How long do we give it for a Green Goblin entry? We get an including an utterly hardcore iteratio In 2000, with a new management, Marvel undertook something they tried before, but this time with their own characters, a brand new Marvel Universe, the Ultimate Universe. This Brian Michael Bendis, Bill Jemas and Mark Bagley shut-down all the doubters with a more realist super hero universe starting with the Ultimate Spider-Man, all the pros and cons of being young... and having super spider powers! How long do we give it for a Green Goblin entry? We get an including an utterly hardcore iteration of the Green Goblin, a superb Gwen Stacy and an enchanting MJ. Collects Ultimate Spider-Man #1-13, 7 out of 12.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tricia Donley

    This was the first comic book I’ve ever read. It certainly won’t be my last. Thanks for the recommendation, Madison! :)

  7. 4 out of 5

    Judah Radd

    Ultimate Spider-Man rules. As far as reboots go, this one really does capture the spirit of Stan Lee and Steve Ditko’s original spidey origin. Peter Parker is perfect. Bendis (who pretty much always rules) does an expert job of capitalizing on the growth and development that makes Peter Parker such a compelling, relatable and iconic character. The pacing and flow of these issues is on point. It moves like a movie. Also, this is some of Mark Bagley’s best work. So many iconic frames. It’s easy to s Ultimate Spider-Man rules. As far as reboots go, this one really does capture the spirit of Stan Lee and Steve Ditko’s original spidey origin. Peter Parker is perfect. Bendis (who pretty much always rules) does an expert job of capitalizing on the growth and development that makes Peter Parker such a compelling, relatable and iconic character. The pacing and flow of these issues is on point. It moves like a movie. Also, this is some of Mark Bagley’s best work. So many iconic frames. It’s easy to see why Ultimate blew up into such a popular and vibrant universe.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kate Hawkins

    When I was a kid Ultimate Spider-Man was the first comic I got hooked on. There was no comic book store near me so I had a mail-order service through Marvel that would deliver the new issues monthly. I can still remember my excitement every time they would show up and how quickly I would devour the new episode in Peter Parker’s life. I never got a chance to read the entire series, however, so now I’m going back and doing just that. In many respects, Ultimate Spider-Man represents the classic back When I was a kid Ultimate Spider-Man was the first comic I got hooked on. There was no comic book store near me so I had a mail-order service through Marvel that would deliver the new issues monthly. I can still remember my excitement every time they would show up and how quickly I would devour the new episode in Peter Parker’s life. I never got a chance to read the entire series, however, so now I’m going back and doing just that. In many respects, Ultimate Spider-Man represents the classic backstory and tale of Peter Parker but updated for the modern-day. Everything that you could expect back when the character was first published in the 60s, and in Sam Rami’s trilogy of movies, is in this series. Harry Osborne is Peter’s best friend, Flash Thompson is his bully, Mary Jane is his crush, and he’s the smartest kid in an otherwise bad school. What is interesting, however, is that much of the rest of the series is altered from the original in this update. Many of the villains have been interpreted differently by Mr. Bendis and Mr. Bagley, most notably changing the Green Goblin into a monster and making Electro look much more modern. This update in style and interpretation of the villains is a welcome change, if you go back and look through the original rouge’s gallery for Spider-Man in the 60s you’ll most likely come to the conclusion that they would look rather dated in an update for the series. Another update in this new series is that Spider-Man becomes a much more quippy character, and the jokes that Mr. Bendis writes for him are genuinely funny, there’s a particularly hilarious set of jokes that Spider-Man lobs at Kingpin that genuinely made me laugh out loud. This humor was a big enough addition to the character that it has remained a part of Spider-Man to this day. Mr. Bendis also does a great job writing of the backstory in this first volume, not only does he do an excellent job introducing new readers to the character but also in making Peter the sympathetic character that he is. There is an additional undercurrent of conflict between Peter and his aunt and uncle that I appreciated, it’s not only well written and realistic but it also adds to the devastation when Uncle Ben is eventually killed. Across the board, the characters and relationships are much better written and realized in this update than they were in the original run of the series. I will say that the one shortfall of the series is the art, the style that Mr. Bagley illustrates in is very indicative of the period, during the 90s and early 2000s the type of art on display here was very popular. Since then the industry has largely moved in a more realistic direction which unfortunately makes Ultimate Spider-Man a book firmly set in that time period, and removes some of the timeless aspects of Peter Parker as a character. Additionally, it's very hard to see the characters as the age they’re supposed to be. Peter and his classmates are supposed to be fifteen but they’re drawn in a way that would suggest that they’re much older than that. It may seem like a minor point but it did make it difficult to connect the maturity of the characters and how they look with the age that they’re supposed to be. Overall, Ultimate Spider-Man still holds up in quality to this day, and it's not difficult to understand why this particular series did a lot to save Marvel from bankruptcy. Mr. Bendis has a vision for the character that pays homage to its roots but he also isn’t afraid to change things in a very unique way, and it has an edge that makes the character much more interesting to read. If you’re looking for a good entry into reading one of Marvel’s cornerstone characters then you can't do much better than this.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Chad Warner

    A modern retelling of Spider-Man's origin, set in the early 2000s rather than the 1960s. The artwork is pretty good; a variety of colors, well-portrayed emotions, and dynamic action scenes. Unfortunately, the script falls short; it seems written for modern teenagers, who, apparently, have a much more limited vocabulary and greater use of slang than teens did in the 1960s (surprised?). I'd guess that only Spidey fans will enjoy this one. I've been a Spider-Man fan since childhood, growing up on th A modern retelling of Spider-Man's origin, set in the early 2000s rather than the 1960s. The artwork is pretty good; a variety of colors, well-portrayed emotions, and dynamic action scenes. Unfortunately, the script falls short; it seems written for modern teenagers, who, apparently, have a much more limited vocabulary and greater use of slang than teens did in the 1960s (surprised?). I'd guess that only Spidey fans will enjoy this one. I've been a Spider-Man fan since childhood, growing up on the 1990s cartoon and toys. I may have read a few of the comics at friends' houses, but they didn't interest me much. In the early 2000s, Marvel rewrote most popular comic books to take place in the present day. Ultimate Spider-Man was one of those comics. I read a few issues in high school, because friends let me borrow them. When Marvel launched DotComics (a PC program for downloading and reading comics) in the early 2000s, I downloaded as many free comics as I could, many of them from the Ultimate line. When I saw this book on the library shelf, I recognized the Ultimate Spider-Man title from a decade ago. Since I wasn't able to get every issue from friends or online back in the day, I checked it out. I was somewhat disappointed. The trademark one-liners that Peter/Spider-Man is known for spewing during fights were mostly lame. The stories weren't particularly compelling. There's not a lot of character development for Harry Osborn or Liz Allan. Mary Jane was the worst; other than a few scenes of her studying, she's mostly represented as vapid eye candy. The story is based on the original, but there are several changes; for example, Norman Osborn has Peter followed, and he discovers that Peter obtained his spider powers from the spider bite in his lab. The Green Goblin and Kingpin are the main villains, but Electro and other minor ones appear as well. One redeeming quality of this book came at the very end: a full-color reprint of the original Spider-Man comic book: Amazing Fantasy #15 from 1962, by Marvel legends Stan Lee and Steve Ditko.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Josiah Holmes

    ULTIMATE SPIDER-MAN, VOL. 1 by BRIAN MICHAEL BENDIS | ★★★★★ My first introduction to Spider-Man was Sam Raimi's 2002 film, appropriately named Spider-Man. It was as great as a superhero film could be in the early 2000s, but it hooked me into the webslinger's story and made me a fan. But even with the movies, it never occurred to me that I could be reading the comic books. So I took it as an opportunity to catch up on old times. In this first volume, Bendis takes the classic story and revitalizes ULTIMATE SPIDER-MAN, VOL. 1 by BRIAN MICHAEL BENDIS | ★★★★★ My first introduction to Spider-Man was Sam Raimi's 2002 film, appropriately named Spider-Man. It was as great as a superhero film could be in the early 2000s, but it hooked me into the webslinger's story and made me a fan. But even with the movies, it never occurred to me that I could be reading the comic books. So I took it as an opportunity to catch up on old times. In this first volume, Bendis takes the classic story and revitalizes it, breathing fresh life into it and presenting it to an audience of a new generation. As a kid just starting out in elementary school, this would've been perfect for me. And the story doesn't disappoint. Peter Parker is still Peter Parker--somewhat nerdy but brainy, not so smooth with the ladies, the butt of a jock's jokes--and his supporting cast is almost the same, minus the subtle differences (the book takes place in the Ultimate universe, a separate continuity for the main Marvel universe...it can get complicated, but that's the basic idea), but the story, while the same at its core, feels new. It's almost as if there's more to Peter's story that we're just now learning; or better yet, the same story with new angles and twists. It's a feel-good story that's sure to win the hearts of fans across the board. Everything you know about Peter's early days as Spider-Man, from the accident, to his relationship with his aunt and uncle, to the famous words, "With great power comes great responsibility," Ultimate Spider-Man, Vol. 1 is an absolute must-read for diehard fans and newcomers alike.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Samir Jones

    Ultimate Spider-Man is a fictional comic that has been written over and over again for the last couple of decades. The story about Peter Parker, a nerd who is bitten by a scientific spider. That spider reverses his DNA and enhances his natural abilities. On top of that, he matures with his new powers as well. He lives his life by his uncle's motto: with great power comes great responsibility. Since I have read Spider Man a lot, I am already familiar with it. However, I did not like this comic i Ultimate Spider-Man is a fictional comic that has been written over and over again for the last couple of decades. The story about Peter Parker, a nerd who is bitten by a scientific spider. That spider reverses his DNA and enhances his natural abilities. On top of that, he matures with his new powers as well. He lives his life by his uncle's motto: with great power comes great responsibility. Since I have read Spider Man a lot, I am already familiar with it. However, I did not like this comic in particular. This book has details that I'm not at all familiar with. For one, it displays some characters as being totally off who they were previously portrayed as. In some aspects, this comic is not even accurate with details that happened in the comics or even in the movies. If you aren't familiar with Spider Man before, I would advise against reading this as a first comic. It will throw off your understanding off what actually happened. In addition, it was hard to follow the path of the story because at times, the characters would just stop talking. Then they would say some random thought that would throw me off at times. Because Spider Man is a classic, some things can't be changed. The things that could be changed were changed completely. Few things in this story aligned with the classics or even with the movie.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Noe

    I'd have given this 5-stars... but I am so beyond sick of hearing the Spider-Man origin story that it is impossible to enjoy anymore. It is over-examined and unnecessary. Even when I consider that the Ultimate line started in the early 2000's, before several movies and reboots, it still seems unnecessary to revisit every time. All that changed, even in an alternate universe, were minute details. After the origin though - it gets great. It is the Spider-Man everyone loves - jokes, but serious. Se I'd have given this 5-stars... but I am so beyond sick of hearing the Spider-Man origin story that it is impossible to enjoy anymore. It is over-examined and unnecessary. Even when I consider that the Ultimate line started in the early 2000's, before several movies and reboots, it still seems unnecessary to revisit every time. All that changed, even in an alternate universe, were minute details. After the origin though - it gets great. It is the Spider-Man everyone loves - jokes, but serious. Semi-strong, but ultimately outsmarts and out-clevers his opponents. I am interested to see how the MJ thing plays out - THAT is what has me craving Vol 2.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Oran

    I'm self-aware of the fact that this seems to be the only review for this. Bendis can write. This is clear from this volume and the fact that a familiar story can still affect me in such a way. The presentation of Peter's issues in school and outside seem realistic and help give some depth to the character. It's a well-trodden road but still fun to read and can build on character relationships in a way that the films could never really do. As for the art, in general it works, lots of exaggeratio I'm self-aware of the fact that this seems to be the only review for this. Bendis can write. This is clear from this volume and the fact that a familiar story can still affect me in such a way. The presentation of Peter's issues in school and outside seem realistic and help give some depth to the character. It's a well-trodden road but still fun to read and can build on character relationships in a way that the films could never really do. As for the art, in general it works, lots of exaggerations that help the action scenes more actiony. A little heavy on the inks for my taste, though. Really good stuff. Check it out if you're interested in some Spidey fun.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Scott Brillon

    Review of the entire series: I have always been a huge fan of Spiderman, having collected just about every series since I was young. This, though, is just about my favorite version. Takes all the best parts of Spiderman and whips them together in a wonderful narrative. Had me in tears at the end.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    This is a great retelling of Peter Parker's story... a great starter for book for anyone who has wanted to get into comics but has no clue where to start! This is a great retelling of Peter Parker's story... a great starter for book for anyone who has wanted to get into comics but has no clue where to start!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Brent

    =============================================== 3.5/5 stars overall. =============================================== Review for volume 1 (Ultimate Spider-Man, Volume 1: Power and Responsibility): Back in 2000, after the release of Jinx, indie author Brian Michael Bendis was chosen to write Ultimate Spider-Man, the first title in Marvel's new Ultimate imprint. Now, almost 20 years later, Bendis has only just quit writing Ultimate Spider-Man, launched two other imprints (Marvel MAX and Icon Comics), w =============================================== 3.5/5 stars overall. =============================================== Review for volume 1 (Ultimate Spider-Man, Volume 1: Power and Responsibility): Back in 2000, after the release of Jinx, indie author Brian Michael Bendis was chosen to write Ultimate Spider-Man, the first title in Marvel's new Ultimate imprint. Now, almost 20 years later, Bendis has only just quit writing Ultimate Spider-Man, launched two other imprints (Marvel MAX and Icon Comics), written most of the events of the 00's and most of the Marvel characters including the Avengers, the X-Men, Spider-Man, Moon Knight, Iron Man, the Guardians of the Galaxy,... It all started here. With... A fun read? I've already read this whole run once a couple of years ago, so I thought I might appreciate this volume more this time around, knowing everything that happened after it. But I didn't. Stan Lee managed to do Spider-Man's origin in about 10 pages, Bendis did it in 5 issues and it shows... It's definitely a good read, but it just drags after a while. This volume in particular is better read in issues each month than binged as a trade paperback in my opinion. There's still a lot to love about Power and Responsibility regardless. The dialogue is great, campy but not too campy, kinda like a teen flick. The art usually looks really good, with really vibrant colours, especially if you own a physical copy. There are some cool setups for things to come, hints at a larger universe both for Spidey as for the Ultimate universe in general. What this book really shines in, and highlights how innovative this book was, is the importance of the side characters. You get to see Peter and Uncle Ben interact, so you're bummed out when he eventually dies (spoilers for a 65 years old comic). Liz Allen, Flash Thompson, Harry Osborn, all of them are showcased so much that you just know they're going to be important later on. There's even a shameless Bendis cameo in the form of the character (King) Kong, who's clearly visually based on Bendis' chubbier days. =============================================== Review for volume 2 (Ultimate Spider-Man, Volume 2: Learning Curve): Learning Curve is proof that realism in superhero comics can have great results. Peter boldly decides to go after the crime network in his city, but as with any 15 yo boy in any aspect of life, he's way in over his head. Bendis doesn't shy away from having Peter fail, again and again. He has to wise up and learn what it takes to combat crime effectively. His powers alone won't do the trick for him. Meanwhile, we get some great panels showing the aftermath of the events of the previous volume. The students, especially Liz, are still reeling from the attack at their school, while Peter and Aunt May mourn the loss of Uncle Ben. It's a precedent for tonnes of awesome small moments that keep this run grounded and character-driven. My only gripe with this volume is that it takes a couple of issues to get anywhere. The introduction of USM's greatest meme early on is nice and all, but it's only halfway through the book that we're actually thrown in the main story. Seeing Mark Bagley's big old chungus of a Kingpin almost makes up for it, though. ===============================================

  17. 4 out of 5

    Brandt

    So at the turn of the century, Marvel engaged in an interesting idea--they decided that they were going to create a new Marvel "universe" called the Ultimate universe ostensibly so that folks who had never really been able to start from the beginning with their favorite characters. Since Spider-Man is the standard bearer of Marvel, it made some sense for Marvel to start this new universe with Ultimate Spider-Man (the other title being Ultimate X-Men, natch.) At the helm of the new book Marvel as So at the turn of the century, Marvel engaged in an interesting idea--they decided that they were going to create a new Marvel "universe" called the Ultimate universe ostensibly so that folks who had never really been able to start from the beginning with their favorite characters. Since Spider-Man is the standard bearer of Marvel, it made some sense for Marvel to start this new universe with Ultimate Spider-Man (the other title being Ultimate X-Men, natch.) At the helm of the new book Marvel assigned my fellow Cleveland native Brian Michael Bendis (actually you would be shocked at how many comic writers from Cleveland are named Brian.) This was Bendis' first work for Marvel, after he had pitched a Nick Fury story for the Marvel Knights and while twenty years later of a Geoff Johns-like existence at Marvel both good and bad (Alias good, House of M bad), this was really his first work for Marvel. This volume contains the first two Ultimate Spider-Man story arcs, the first introducing the "Ultimate" version of the classic Spider-Man villain the Green Goblin and the second doing the same for the Kingpin and Electro (as well as the more obscure Spider-Man villains the Enforcers.) These arcs are collected in their own volumes, but I tend to gravitate to omnibus editions, because who wouldn't want to read as many comics as possible? While both arcs are enjoyable, it's the first one that is the more important of the two. While it's unlikely that anyone who loves comics has not read the original Lee/Ditko Spider-Man story from Amazing Fantasy #15, the story does not age well for the palate of the contemporary comic fan. I think readers today appreciate a more complex plot. In this, I have to count the Green Goblin arc as one of Bendis' successes--he is able to adapt the original Lee/Ditko story to also include arguably Spider-Man's greatest villain, the Green Goblin (personally I think it's Doctor Octopus, but he's here too kind of) and set up a plot thread that I feel might run through the entirety of the Ultimate Spider-Man run. In addition, astute readers will recognize that some of the elements of the arc seem to be part of the plot of the first Tobey Maguire Spider-Man film, so good luck convincing me they didn't borrow heavily from Bendis here. In my estimation the Kingpin arc was a smart call by Bendis to finish the first year of the book as well. In one arc Bendis is able to set the lay of the land for the underworld Peter feels he needs to take on in the wake of Uncle Ben's death, as well as showing just how green Peter is when it comes to being Spider-Man. This may be the more refreshing of the two arcs, because as consumers we have been subjected to the Spider-Man origin a million times, but most readers at the time wouldn't be used to a "Spider-Man Year One" sort of story, since Lee never really concerned himself with the problems of being Spider-Man as much as being Peter Parker while being Spider-Man. That is a focus of Bendis as well, but he is able to strike a balance, especially when he shows how out of his element the nascent Spider-Man is here. The last story of the collection is not part of either arc, but contains a story where Peter reveals his secret to Mary Jane. It's probably the most "human" of the stories, and again, is likely setting up plot threads for later in the series. In my review of Ms. Marvel, vol. 1: No Normal , I stated that the world doesn't need any more teen white boy stories, but that doesn't mean that they aren't appreciated when they are done well. This is one that is done well, and also, eventually leads to Miles Morales, and that is something I can totally get behind (if you haven't seen Into the Spider-Verse you need to fix that right now.)

  18. 4 out of 5

    Caleb

    (Note: this review was originally published on my blog, The Fantastic and the Mundane. http://fantasticandmundane.blogspot.com/) WHAT I LIKED As far as beginnings go, Spider-Man's is pretty famous. Nerdy kid is nerdy. Kid is bitten by special spider. Spider gives kid super powers. Kid takes advantage of powers and becomes selfish. Uncle dies, and the kid learns that with great power, there must also come great responsibility. Kid gets red and blue tights and fights crime while trying to win over (Note: this review was originally published on my blog, The Fantastic and the Mundane. http://fantasticandmundane.blogspot.com/) WHAT I LIKED As far as beginnings go, Spider-Man's is pretty famous. Nerdy kid is nerdy. Kid is bitten by special spider. Spider gives kid super powers. Kid takes advantage of powers and becomes selfish. Uncle dies, and the kid learns that with great power, there must also come great responsibility. Kid gets red and blue tights and fights crime while trying to win over the girl of his dreams. What is interesting about this particular take on the origin is how little they tinker with that core story. I mean, sure, the Spider is updated from a random spider that just so happened to be exposed radioactive materials and is instead a genetically altered spider. And instead of Gwen Stacey being the first girl Peter ever had eyes for, it's Mary Jane Watson, who is here a bit more of a nerd here, and bonds with Peter a bit even pre-spider bite. And of course the most important update, Uncle Ben now has a pony tail. Besides that, though the first half of this volume is mainly concerned with fleshing out all those character beats. After Pete gets his powers, we see him slowly come to terms with his new gifts, because at first, they really freak him out. Then we witness as he abuses those powers in some pretty understandable ways. And then we see him called out on it, just before his uncle is tragically murdered, and watch him slowly piece together exactly how he needs to use these powers for the benefit of others. The other part of the "origin" arc deals with Norman Osbourn's reaction to someone getting Super Spider-Powers, especially since he realizes it was through his genetically altered spiders. While not every point of this arc is my thing, I do like the basic concept, for the most part. The next arc included in this volume features the classic Spider-Man/Daredevil villain, Kingpin. This arc is pretty well put together, and resolves in a satisfying way, with Spider-Man getting his butt kicked before realizing that he needs to learn to work smarter, not harder. It also features hands down one of the funniest Spider-Man moments ever in Spider-Man's second encounter with Kingpin. I shan't spoil it, it must be seen to be believed. And finally, I like that Pete admits to someone that he's Spider-Man so he can have a confidant. As much as I really admire the fact that Pete does what he does selflessly, it's also nice to have someone who has your back when you have to vanish out of class, or come home late to dinner. What I didn't Like. When you reinterpret stories and characters like this, you're bound to change something in a way that some people don't like. It's just how these things go, and I don't hold it against the creators too much, they went for something, and I respect that... but I just don't care for ULTIMATE! Green Goblin. Too much Hulk/raging monster. Not enough of the plotting trickster version of the character I enjoy. Simple as that. The angst and edge of the ULTIMATE! modern day update is also not my thing. Too much of it seems like they're trying to show how "real" all their high school stuff is, but it comes off more like a teen drama aired on WB Network around 2005. (Do I win most specific analogy? is that a prize?) But seriously, I just don't care for that sort of thing, and it did kinda detract from my enjoyment. Content advisory: What's this? a Parental warning? Yeah, for most movies and such, I don't really do this sort of thing for movies, since their are so many places where you can find out whether or not the film is appropriate for little Timmy. Comic books, though? Good luck, far too often have I picked up a random comic book and flipped through it too find either a barely obscured woman in some form of undress (if any dress at all), or surprisingly messy violence. The simple fact is, that while comic books do have boundaries in which to operate, these boundaries are a whole lot looser than your average PG-13 movie or TV show. So whenever I do a comic review, I'll try to let you know what to expect if you pick up a copy. As far as this first volume of Ultimate Spidey goes, things are at about the Cable Teen Drama level I just mentioned in the previous section. Light to mild swearing happens on a semi-frequent basis with harsher profanities often alluded to but replaced with various symbols. Violence is mostly the standard BIFF POW WHAM stuff of Superhero stories, with a couple of notable exceptions. The first being at the scene of an explosion, where a man is clearly impaled on a piece of metal, though the goriest bit being obscured by the position of his arms, and the second being a scene where a young teen finds the charred remains of his mother, though all we see is a burnt and deformed hand in a blase of fire. The most intense is probably when one man crushes another man's skull with his bare hands. The deed is mostly done off panel, focusing on every one's horrified reactions. But we do see the aftermath, sort of as the man was wearing a Spider-Man style mask at the time, and security footage of the event. Sexual content or Nudity is sparse in this volume, but not not absent. A couple of girls dress scantily at a party, Mary Jane is seen in both a towel and a bathrobe, and Pete himself hangs out in a T-shirt and some briefs. The most awkward moment comes at the end during a scene with Peter and Mary Jane. While nothing happens between the pair, Aunt May walks in and finds them in Peter's Bedroom after hearing a racket. She then has a frank conversation with the pair about " at least I hope you were being safe" and "no shenanigans in the house" It's mostly played for laughs, but not really a conversation you want your eight year old reading. Summary This first ULTIMATE! volume of Ultimate Spider-Man (which, again, is a special collection that contains Ultimate Spider-Man Issues 1-13 otherwise contained in Ultimate Spider-Man vol. 1 & 2) was a decent scratch to the Spider-Man itch I had. I might read further volumes, though my local library system where I borrowed this from has quite a few gaps in the series, so I'll have to figure some stuff out on my own. (I've already read ULTIMATE! Volume 3, which collects regular volumes 5 & 6, so I've had some practice) But as for this volume, it gets a rating of ULTIMATELY! just OK.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Brian James

    After spending £1500 getting back into Marvel TPBs (after decades out) i decided to see what the Ult. Spider-man fuss was all about. In short, some aspects of Bendis writing was entertaining. But the cringey villain dialogue 'Electro': I hate you!' WTF is he 5 years old?? was all too irritating for my old arse. And also, of course then came my introduction to Mark Bagley: I simply hate this man's artwork. The styling of Uncle Ben / Peter's hairstyle / Aunt Man.. sorry May / Kingpin's hands being After spending £1500 getting back into Marvel TPBs (after decades out) i decided to see what the Ult. Spider-man fuss was all about. In short, some aspects of Bendis writing was entertaining. But the cringey villain dialogue 'Electro': I hate you!' WTF is he 5 years old?? was all too irritating for my old arse. And also, of course then came my introduction to Mark Bagley: I simply hate this man's artwork. The styling of Uncle Ben / Peter's hairstyle / Aunt Man.. sorry May / Kingpin's hands being larger than people's bodies / The Green Goblin at 'monster' size / the multiple panels of facial expressions / the kooky artwork / the playdo Spiderman with often terrible anatomical positions! It's simpler to say I collected six TPB volumes leading all the way to the Sinister six stories and they have ALL been put on ebay last week!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Sanchez

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. It’s yet another origin story and did it disappoint???? HELL NO The jokes, especially when he fought Kingpin at the end where funny. The character development was awesome and Parker really did act like a teen rather then a kid who thought of himself above others in his school. He actually hung out with the jocks of his school at one point. The art is magnetic and I could never get my eyes off of that Spidey suit. I loved the unmasking of Spider-Man in the Kingpin part and how he kind of did suck a It’s yet another origin story and did it disappoint???? HELL NO The jokes, especially when he fought Kingpin at the end where funny. The character development was awesome and Parker really did act like a teen rather then a kid who thought of himself above others in his school. He actually hung out with the jocks of his school at one point. The art is magnetic and I could never get my eyes off of that Spidey suit. I loved the unmasking of Spider-Man in the Kingpin part and how he kind of did suck as a superhero. Great read. Great book, and I recommend it to any Spider-Man fan.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Robert Timmons

    This first volume of Ultimate Spider-man collects the first year in this series and tells the origin of Spider-man, Kingpin and Norman Osborn. This is an all ages story and I really enjoyed it, probably because it reminds me of my childhood watching the spider-man cartoon. Given it's set it in the Ultimate Universe, this is a continuity free story which makes it an easy place to start. 4 stars for me ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ This first volume of Ultimate Spider-man collects the first year in this series and tells the origin of Spider-man, Kingpin and Norman Osborn. This is an all ages story and I really enjoyed it, probably because it reminds me of my childhood watching the spider-man cartoon. Given it's set it in the Ultimate Universe, this is a continuity free story which makes it an easy place to start. 4 stars for me ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️

  22. 5 out of 5

    adeline

    (4 ⭐) I went to the cinema a couple days ago and watched Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse and oh man, it was so good! (Like, seriously, do yourself a favor and go watch it.) So I thought you know what maybe I should try and read the comics. And so far I like it! Maybe the art style is not my favourite thing (the characters are supposed to be 15 years old but they look like 30 years old and idk it's kinda funny) but I'm liking the story and the characters. (4 ⭐) I went to the cinema a couple days ago and watched Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse and oh man, it was so good! (Like, seriously, do yourself a favor and go watch it.) So I thought you know what maybe I should try and read the comics. And so far I like it! Maybe the art style is not my favourite thing (the characters are supposed to be 15 years old but they look like 30 years old and idk it's kinda funny) but I'm liking the story and the characters.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Francine

    This was great. I've been a big fan of the Spider-Man movies for years and have only recently started to get into the comics. This is the fourth series I've started on since January 2019 (after Spider-Man/Deadpool vol.1: Isn't It Bromantic, Spidey: School's Out and the very confusing Amazing Spider-Man vol.1: The Parker Luck) and this is by far the best way to start reading Spider-Man. Can't wait to re-read. This was great. I've been a big fan of the Spider-Man movies for years and have only recently started to get into the comics. This is the fourth series I've started on since January 2019 (after Spider-Man/Deadpool vol.1: Isn't It Bromantic, Spidey: School's Out and the very confusing Amazing Spider-Man vol.1: The Parker Luck) and this is by far the best way to start reading Spider-Man. Can't wait to re-read.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Saphirablue

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I kind of like it. It's the origin story of Spider-Man set in the early 2000s and while I like it, some of the actions of everyone (especially May, Peter and Mary Jane) are a bit 'Hmmmm' and o.O for me. I also did not like all the fat jokes/shaming. Yes, Kingpin is the bad guy but still. So unnecessary. The art was okay for me. I kind of like it. It's the origin story of Spider-Man set in the early 2000s and while I like it, some of the actions of everyone (especially May, Peter and Mary Jane) are a bit 'Hmmmm' and o.O for me. I also did not like all the fat jokes/shaming. Yes, Kingpin is the bad guy but still. So unnecessary. The art was okay for me.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Lorenzo

    After watching Spider-Man: Into the Spiderverse, I decided to go back and read some of the Ultimate universe stories, starting with Spidey. These first volume is, basically, the origin story of Spider-Man. It is well told and well drawn, but didn't blow me away. I also think I'm so tired of origin stories which is probaboy why this didn't blow me off my feet. After watching Spider-Man: Into the Spiderverse, I decided to go back and read some of the Ultimate universe stories, starting with Spidey. These first volume is, basically, the origin story of Spider-Man. It is well told and well drawn, but didn't blow me away. I also think I'm so tired of origin stories which is probaboy why this didn't blow me off my feet.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Renato Kalugdan

    Fantastic reboot with some skewed revisions. Worth the effort to attempt collecting the entire series but fair warning. All are OOP and a bit of a treasure hunt in my opinion. Bagley art is another aspect I enjoyed about the book but there are some pages where you kind of giggle lol. All in all I recommend this for any ASM fans out there

  27. 5 out of 5

    William Wygle

    Another reboot and another retelling of Spider-Man's origin story. Been there. Done that. Nevertheless, it's still entertaining, putting a timely updating spin on Spidey in the 21st Century. I want more Spider-Man and less Peter Parker in future installments. Another reboot and another retelling of Spider-Man's origin story. Been there. Done that. Nevertheless, it's still entertaining, putting a timely updating spin on Spidey in the 21st Century. I want more Spider-Man and less Peter Parker in future installments.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    Is it weird that I liked the cheesy earth 616 stuff from like, the 60s better?

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jack Herbert Christal Gattanella

    issues 7 to 12 pick up a great deal from the first six which are good and entertaining but not great

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kenneth

    Peter Parker gets his power, loses Uncle Ben & face a villain.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.