website statistics Passage to Liberty: The Story of Italian Immigration and the Rebirth of America - PDF Books Online
Hot Best Seller

Passage to Liberty: The Story of Italian Immigration and the Rebirth of America

Availability: Ready to download

Passage to Liberty recaptures the drama of the 19th and 20th century immigration to America through photos, letters, and other artifacts -- uniquely replicated in three-dimensional facsimile form. In the tradition of Lest We Forget, Chronicle's bestselling interactive tour through the African American experience, the text uses the stories of individuals and families -- fro Passage to Liberty recaptures the drama of the 19th and 20th century immigration to America through photos, letters, and other artifacts -- uniquely replicated in three-dimensional facsimile form. In the tradition of Lest We Forget, Chronicle's bestselling interactive tour through the African American experience, the text uses the stories of individuals and families -- from early explorers, through the wave of 19th century impoverished families, to contemporary figures -- to recapture the rich heritage the Italian people carried with them over the waves, and planted anew in the American soil. Among the topics covered here are: The roots of American democracy in Roman history The migration of 15 million Italians, 1880-1920 Catholicism in Italian-American culture Food, music, and other Italian cultural traditions The Mafia: myth and reality Cultural icons: DiMaggio, Sinatra, Madonna & more As vibrant and packed full of history as previous volumes in this extraordinary series, Passage to Liberty is a splendid and loving tribute to the Italian-American experience.


Compare

Passage to Liberty recaptures the drama of the 19th and 20th century immigration to America through photos, letters, and other artifacts -- uniquely replicated in three-dimensional facsimile form. In the tradition of Lest We Forget, Chronicle's bestselling interactive tour through the African American experience, the text uses the stories of individuals and families -- fro Passage to Liberty recaptures the drama of the 19th and 20th century immigration to America through photos, letters, and other artifacts -- uniquely replicated in three-dimensional facsimile form. In the tradition of Lest We Forget, Chronicle's bestselling interactive tour through the African American experience, the text uses the stories of individuals and families -- from early explorers, through the wave of 19th century impoverished families, to contemporary figures -- to recapture the rich heritage the Italian people carried with them over the waves, and planted anew in the American soil. Among the topics covered here are: The roots of American democracy in Roman history The migration of 15 million Italians, 1880-1920 Catholicism in Italian-American culture Food, music, and other Italian cultural traditions The Mafia: myth and reality Cultural icons: DiMaggio, Sinatra, Madonna & more As vibrant and packed full of history as previous volumes in this extraordinary series, Passage to Liberty is a splendid and loving tribute to the Italian-American experience.

41 review for Passage to Liberty: The Story of Italian Immigration and the Rebirth of America

  1. 5 out of 5

    firesandwords

    This book is excellent visually and for its somewhat interactive nature: its got removable italian passports, scribbled grocery lists, saints cards, a prison letter from bartolomeo vanzetti to his son, and so on. The visuals and layout are all really tightly and nicely done. My grandmother gave me this book several years ago sparking an interest in where/what my family came from considering we're so assimilated and middle-class now. Since it was a gift from my grandma, I can't trash it too much. This book is excellent visually and for its somewhat interactive nature: its got removable italian passports, scribbled grocery lists, saints cards, a prison letter from bartolomeo vanzetti to his son, and so on. The visuals and layout are all really tightly and nicely done. My grandmother gave me this book several years ago sparking an interest in where/what my family came from considering we're so assimilated and middle-class now. Since it was a gift from my grandma, I can't trash it too much. However, one critique is that it follows the typical narrative of immigration and assimilation into what is portrayed as an inherently fair and free society and nation; Which is neither accurate then nor now. The experiences of recent immigrants to this country (from people much less likely to become white as italians have) and the oppressions they experience should alarm those of us looking back to our history. instead this book follows the dominant culture in the bootstraps narrative about how we overcame. It fails to connect the marginalization, prejudice and stereotyping of italian immigrants then to what's happening today and in particular how racism and xenephobia is perpetuated by italian-americans. it fails to address how the radical italian labor & feminist movements gave america the motivation to open up the concept of whiteness a little to let us in so that we could quiet down. The violent and hateful reaction of predominantly italian-american residents and police in East Haven, CT to Latinos moving into the city largely from New Haven, where I live is a telling example that we're going to have to do a lot better at writing these histories outside of the cookie-cutter narratives and look at the costs of our assimilation and privilege. Also, in the celebration of columbus, an italian, as an early pioneer of italians in the americas somehow forgets to mention his genocidal legacy. Columbus was not the first to discover or sail to the americas. He was not the first to believe and act upon the idea that the world was round. He didn't even know where he was when he landed, but when he got there he immediately made plans for enslavement, massacre and christianization for his own profit. This is not a legacy italians need to be celebrating.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Tina Reitz

    It's my family. And I love that it has all kinds of historical replicas in it. It's my family. And I love that it has all kinds of historical replicas in it.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Nancy Byrne

    I loved every part of this book. My great grandparents came from Italy and through Ellis Island and settled in NYC. I have shared this book with two of my four children and they enjoyed all the documents that were recreated and inserted. They truly add to the authenticity of this book. This book outlined and details what was important to the Italian culture like family, faith, and food! It also clearly addresses the discrimination the Italians encountered, which mirrors the experiences my family I loved every part of this book. My great grandparents came from Italy and through Ellis Island and settled in NYC. I have shared this book with two of my four children and they enjoyed all the documents that were recreated and inserted. They truly add to the authenticity of this book. This book outlined and details what was important to the Italian culture like family, faith, and food! It also clearly addresses the discrimination the Italians encountered, which mirrors the experiences my family had endured. All experiences had a direct impact on the assimilation and hard work and impact Italians made in the US. I am so proud of my Italian heritage and love to share the stories, recipes, cooking, baking, and language with my kids and husband. I have also shared the struggles my family members had. (Sadly, most immigrants to this country have been subject to discrimination, but that's not the point of the book or this review.) All in all, wonderful book!!!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Marlene

    This book was different from any I have read about Italian immigration and Italian-Americans. It's not long, but it covers from early explorers to present, including a brief history of Italy and what led to the emigration flow. Each chapter is told like a personal story and each includes a copy of some sort of enclosure. Example: a copy of the letter Nicola Sacco wrote to his son while on death row. It's a feel-good book for Italian-Americans, but it covers a lot of history in a small space and g This book was different from any I have read about Italian immigration and Italian-Americans. It's not long, but it covers from early explorers to present, including a brief history of Italy and what led to the emigration flow. Each chapter is told like a personal story and each includes a copy of some sort of enclosure. Example: a copy of the letter Nicola Sacco wrote to his son while on death row. It's a feel-good book for Italian-Americans, but it covers a lot of history in a small space and gives a good feel as to what it was like for the early immigrants here; the hardships, the prejudices. I thought the whole book was very well done.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jimmy Bello

  6. 4 out of 5

    jennet wheatstonelllsl

  7. 4 out of 5

    Silvio

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lucille

  9. 4 out of 5

    Tegan

  10. 4 out of 5

    francesco

  11. 5 out of 5

    Anna M

  12. 5 out of 5

    Christina

  13. 5 out of 5

    Yamil Baez

  14. 5 out of 5

    Brian

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sal Bo

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lynda

  17. 4 out of 5

    Janice I

  18. 4 out of 5

    Florette Camarata

  19. 5 out of 5

    Michaela

  20. 5 out of 5

    Dizzy Icicle

  21. 5 out of 5

    Deepa

  22. 4 out of 5

    Laura

  23. 4 out of 5

    Laila

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jessie

  25. 5 out of 5

    Annette

  26. 5 out of 5

    Community District Library

  27. 5 out of 5

    Renee

  28. 4 out of 5

    Janet

  29. 4 out of 5

    Alicia

  30. 5 out of 5

    Frank Piccioli

  31. 5 out of 5

    Derek Rosaia

  32. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

  33. 4 out of 5

    Vicky Matthes

  34. 5 out of 5

    Kim Brown

  35. 5 out of 5

    Thomas A Nappo

  36. 5 out of 5

    Constantin Minov

  37. 4 out of 5

    Francesca

  38. 5 out of 5

    Christine

  39. 4 out of 5

    Leah

  40. 4 out of 5

    Maria Laura

  41. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...