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Expecting Someone Taller

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Malcolm Fisher inherits a magic ring from a dying badger and becomes the much-disputed Ruler of the World. Everyone wants the ring--despite the fearsome curse upon it. And Malcolm is about to learn that some are born to greatness, and some are, well, badgered into it.


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Malcolm Fisher inherits a magic ring from a dying badger and becomes the much-disputed Ruler of the World. Everyone wants the ring--despite the fearsome curse upon it. And Malcolm is about to learn that some are born to greatness, and some are, well, badgered into it.

30 review for Expecting Someone Taller

  1. 5 out of 5

    Brent

    I was a little put off at first, afraid that Malcolm would remain clueless throughout the plot like Arthur Dent in The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy series. Fortunately, he didn't try my patience for long and was soon addressing the challenges of his new life. The humor was not laugh-out-loud caliber (for me), but pretty consistently funny with a main character I found myself surprisingly attached to. I was a little put off at first, afraid that Malcolm would remain clueless throughout the plot like Arthur Dent in The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy series. Fortunately, he didn't try my patience for long and was soon addressing the challenges of his new life. The humor was not laugh-out-loud caliber (for me), but pretty consistently funny with a main character I found myself surprisingly attached to.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Heidi The Reader

    Full disclosure: I know The Lord of the Rings better than the mythological stories behind the Ring Cycle. Holt provides a very short synopsis of the myths for folks like me and I was grateful for it. Otherwise, I would have not understood what on earth was going on. Holt is an English fantasy-humorist and, like Pratchett's many offerings, I enjoy books like this but I never have laugh out loud moments. I don't know if the humor is lost-in-translation or what my deal is. I expect that those who ar Full disclosure: I know The Lord of the Rings better than the mythological stories behind the Ring Cycle. Holt provides a very short synopsis of the myths for folks like me and I was grateful for it. Otherwise, I would have not understood what on earth was going on. Holt is an English fantasy-humorist and, like Pratchett's many offerings, I enjoy books like this but I never have laugh out loud moments. I don't know if the humor is lost-in-translation or what my deal is. I expect that those who are familiar with the Norse myths and who are British might really love this rather silly tale of Malcolm and the ring. There were some memorable lines like: "Ingolf eased the plain gold ring off his finger and passed it to Malcolm, who accepted it rather as one might accept some delicacy made from the unspeakable parts of a rare amphibian at an embassy function." pg 7 Nice. "The next morning, Malcolm thought long and hard before waking up, for he had come to recognise over the past quarter of a century that rather less can go wrong if you are asleep." pg 15 Absolutely true in my experience too. Malcolm figuring out how the Tarnhelm (a hat that can change the wearer into anything) works: "Make me," he said aloud, "as handsome as it is possible to be."... He stood for awhile and stared... "We'll call that one Richard" (he had always wanted to be called Richard). He resumed his own shape (which came as a bitter disappointment) then said "Richard," firmly. At once, the Most Handsome Man reappeared in the mirror, which proved that the Tarnhelm had a memory, like a pocket calculator." pg 20-21 :) For my friend, Richard. The difference between smiles: "The girl looked at him and smiled. Malcolm had come to believe that he was fairly well equipped to deal with smiles, but this was a new sort; not a happy, optimistic smile but a sad, wistful smile. It didn't say, "Wouldn't it be nice if..." like the stock delivery of a Rhinemaiden, but, "It would have been nice if..." which is quite different." pg 117 Why humans are the worst pick for ring bearing: "And so you give this irregularity in your minds a name of its own. You call it Love, which is meant to make everything all right. Rather than try to sort it out or find a vaccine, you go out of your way to glorify it. I mentioned your art and your poetry just now. What are your favourite themes? Love and War."..."Now be fair," he continued, "can you honestly say that a member of a species with this ancestral fallibility should be allowed to rule the universe?" pg 160 Fair question. If you enjoyed Expecting Someone Taller, you may want to pick up The Good Fairies of New York by Martin Millar (a modern day fantasy with fairies) or Anansi Boys by Neal Gaiman.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Emma Sea

    Nostalgia rating. I think this was the book of 1988, for me.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Gerry

    My first exposure to the literary genius teetering on madness that is the mind of Tom Holt. I got this from the library way back around the late '80s, not knowing quite what to expect and was more than pleasantly surprised by it. It tells of Malcolm Fisher; just an ordinary guy trying to get home one night when he drives over a badger. So far, so ordinary. But the badger turns out to be nothing more than a Norse giant in disguise and before he realises what is happening, Malcolm becomes embroiled My first exposure to the literary genius teetering on madness that is the mind of Tom Holt. I got this from the library way back around the late '80s, not knowing quite what to expect and was more than pleasantly surprised by it. It tells of Malcolm Fisher; just an ordinary guy trying to get home one night when he drives over a badger. So far, so ordinary. But the badger turns out to be nothing more than a Norse giant in disguise and before he realises what is happening, Malcolm becomes embroiled in the ongoing struggles of the Norse pantheon. At least he'd managed to pick up some of the gods' powers, which must be helpful, right? Riiight.... If the story of Wagner's Ring Cycle interests you, but you don't want to sit through hours of big women wailing in a foreign language, then this could be the book for you. All the fun of the Niebelung without the 4-hour arias and unfortunate aryan undertones :)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lydia

    When the legendary Ring of the Niberlings becomes the possesion of a mild-mannered, rather forgetable, not very driven, almost middle-aged Englishman, the pantheon knows something must be done to stop the inevitable madness. When the world starts going through an unparalleled time of peace and prosperity, Woten and the rest know their worst fears are being realized and decide to stop at nothing to fix this horror. Humorously sarcastic view of "If the meek did inherit the earth"; reminded me stro When the legendary Ring of the Niberlings becomes the possesion of a mild-mannered, rather forgetable, not very driven, almost middle-aged Englishman, the pantheon knows something must be done to stop the inevitable madness. When the world starts going through an unparalleled time of peace and prosperity, Woten and the rest know their worst fears are being realized and decide to stop at nothing to fix this horror. Humorously sarcastic view of "If the meek did inherit the earth"; reminded me strongly of DWJ's "Eight Days of Luke", Connie Willis' "To Say Nothing of the Dog" and Douglas Adams' "Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy" in style and content. A fairly funny read, I now know much more about Wagner's Ring and characters than I knew before. Not really laugh out loud funny (no swans), but I was chuckling a good bit. Content notes: language is very british; Wodehouse style swearing, somewhat frequently. Sensuality is not present in deed, but the meaning of "Love" is explored by many different characters some wandering into the emotional and mental side, with others delving into the physical; however, it is kept pretty clean. Violence is almost no-exhistant, there is a car accident at the beginning which causes all the trouble, but everything else is nippedd in the bud before it can come to blows.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Steve Mitchell

    Expecting Someone Taller is based around Wagner’s Ring Cycle; the first thing to realise is that it is a story based upon real events and genuine characters. The hero - Malcolm Fisher - finds that he has inherited the mantel of Siegfried, that is the shape-shifting and teleporting Tarnhelm plus the riches-inducing (but ultimately cursed) Nibelung’s Ring after he runs over a badger. Can a man known affectionately by his family as ‘Only Malcolm’ come to terms with his new found position as the rul Expecting Someone Taller is based around Wagner’s Ring Cycle; the first thing to realise is that it is a story based upon real events and genuine characters. The hero - Malcolm Fisher - finds that he has inherited the mantel of Siegfried, that is the shape-shifting and teleporting Tarnhelm plus the riches-inducing (but ultimately cursed) Nibelung’s Ring after he runs over a badger. Can a man known affectionately by his family as ‘Only Malcolm’ come to terms with his new found position as the ruler of the world before Wotan and his cronies manage to dupe our hapless hero out of his mystical and mythical possessions? As a mix of comedy and fantasy this book is just about as spot on as you can hope for; if you are a fan of Douglas Adams or Terry Pratchett then there is no reason why you should not really enjoy this and Tom Holt’s other additions to the genre.

  7. 5 out of 5

    James Titterton

    'Expecting Someone Taller' is a book with a great premise that it never really lives up to. Malcolm Fisher, a pathetic young Englishman, accidentally kills the last holder of the Ring of the Nieblungs and finds himself unwillingly responsible for the well being of the entire world. A variety of supernatural beings then descend on him to try and claim the Ring for themselves. Placing the ridiculous characters from Wagner's Ring Cycle in the sleepy English countryside should be a riotously surreal 'Expecting Someone Taller' is a book with a great premise that it never really lives up to. Malcolm Fisher, a pathetic young Englishman, accidentally kills the last holder of the Ring of the Nieblungs and finds himself unwillingly responsible for the well being of the entire world. A variety of supernatural beings then descend on him to try and claim the Ring for themselves. Placing the ridiculous characters from Wagner's Ring Cycle in the sleepy English countryside should be a riotously surreal yomp akin to Monty Python at their best, but 'Expecting Someone Taller' never rises above gently amusing. The plot feels like it's meandering along, waiting for the real story to begin. One might excuse Holt for failing to make the most of his initial premise, as this was his first published novel, but on its own merits it just isn't funny or inventive enough.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Chuck

    Badgers are not always what they appear to be. If you tried reading Lord of the Rings and felt guilty because you couldn't get through it, read this hilarious retelling of the real Ring Cycle , the one Wagner made so famous a long, long time before Tolkein ever picked up pen and paper. Badgers are not always what they appear to be. If you tried reading Lord of the Rings and felt guilty because you couldn't get through it, read this hilarious retelling of the real Ring Cycle , the one Wagner made so famous a long, long time before Tolkein ever picked up pen and paper.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Quinten

    This was a fun, light read that explored Wagner's Ring Cycle in "modern" (to when the book was written in the 1980s) times. The author has a distinctive voice for parody that is similar to Terry Pratchett's, although slightly less absurdist. This was a fun, light read that explored Wagner's Ring Cycle in "modern" (to when the book was written in the 1980s) times. The author has a distinctive voice for parody that is similar to Terry Pratchett's, although slightly less absurdist.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    Maybe the funniest novel I've ever read. Maybe the funniest novel I've ever read.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Robert Kline

    Absolutely wonderful book. Comedic British fantasy at its finest. The best way to describe it is... imagine Terry Pratchett (Discworld) met Lord Of The Rings in a local pub and after a rather awkward romance they had a beautiful baby together. Three thumbs up!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mo Alsaedi

    Why did the badger cross the road? Is perhaps the only question the story leaves unanswered. In short, this book is witty, fast-paced, and a real page-turner. The concept of a world tied to the whims and moods of Malcolm Fischer of Somerset, England is enjoyable, palpable, and extremely hilarious. The story is driven by the 'alternative fact,' -wink- that Wagner's Der Ring des Nibelungen (The Ring of the Nibelun) is a loosely written true story conveyed to Wagner by a bird. Yes, you read that ri Why did the badger cross the road? Is perhaps the only question the story leaves unanswered. In short, this book is witty, fast-paced, and a real page-turner. The concept of a world tied to the whims and moods of Malcolm Fischer of Somerset, England is enjoyable, palpable, and extremely hilarious. The story is driven by the 'alternative fact,' -wink- that Wagner's Der Ring des Nibelungen (The Ring of the Nibelun) is a loosely written true story conveyed to Wagner by a bird. Yes, you read that right. Even though Rick Riordan's Percy Jackson books are often mentioned alongside Holt's, I'd like to point out a few key differences. Compared to the Percy Jackson stories, 'Expecting Someone Taller' features more conversation, deeper thoughts, and more confusion than a Horcrux hunt. It works on exposing the human mind and takes jabs at philosophical dilemmas. Despite the prevalent role of gods and mythical powers, I believe the evolution of Malcolm Fischer's mind to be the central plot. The story does stall at times but it picks right back up and moves on to a more awesome sphere. Also, if you are a fan of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, this book does bear some resemblance in the tone and humor it offers. If you find out why the badger crossed the road, please do share!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Edwina Harvey

    Our unlikely hero, Malcolm Fisher, runs over a badger, discovers he's inherited the Ring of the Tarnhelm, and the magical powers that come with being the rightful Ruler of the World, and suddenly has a whole lot of hitherto unnoticed Norse Gods and legends to contend with. This book is written as "a comic variation of Wagner's Ring Cycle" (according to Kirkus Review) which is where I felt I let the book down, rather than the other way around as I only have a cursory knowledge of The Ring Cycle, a Our unlikely hero, Malcolm Fisher, runs over a badger, discovers he's inherited the Ring of the Tarnhelm, and the magical powers that come with being the rightful Ruler of the World, and suddenly has a whole lot of hitherto unnoticed Norse Gods and legends to contend with. This book is written as "a comic variation of Wagner's Ring Cycle" (according to Kirkus Review) which is where I felt I let the book down, rather than the other way around as I only have a cursory knowledge of The Ring Cycle, and kept wondering if there were parts of the backstories and undertow that I was failing to grasp. It was grin-worthy rather than laughing out loud, but a pleasant read. And the phrase "he took to it like a duck to petrol" is one I hope I never forget!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Alex Durston

    As ever, Tom Holt writes a funny, silly and wonderful novel, merging our world with the magical fantasy world where the opera Gotterdammerung is set. Having played in the orchestra for that opera a while ago, imagine my delight when I realised this novel continues where that opera left off, with a giant hidden in the form of a badger wielding the ring which rules the world. This book is silly in all the right ways, is well written, and is exactly what we have come to expect from the fantastic aut As ever, Tom Holt writes a funny, silly and wonderful novel, merging our world with the magical fantasy world where the opera Gotterdammerung is set. Having played in the orchestra for that opera a while ago, imagine my delight when I realised this novel continues where that opera left off, with a giant hidden in the form of a badger wielding the ring which rules the world. This book is silly in all the right ways, is well written, and is exactly what we have come to expect from the fantastic author that is Tom Holt. I would recommend this book to anyone who just wants something relaxed and funny to fill their time.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Faith Jones

    Usually I review exciting new indies, not reprints of ancient texts that underpin Waterstones, but I have re-visited Expecting Someone Taller by Tom Holt because I remember it as an effortlessly entertaining and informative read, yet couldn’t quite recall what it was about the style and technicalities that left such an impression in my mind. Having done so now, re-read it with a brain that’s a few years more developed, I have noted: The writing is conversational, with a sort of fifty-fifty split Usually I review exciting new indies, not reprints of ancient texts that underpin Waterstones, but I have re-visited Expecting Someone Taller by Tom Holt because I remember it as an effortlessly entertaining and informative read, yet couldn’t quite recall what it was about the style and technicalities that left such an impression in my mind. Having done so now, re-read it with a brain that’s a few years more developed, I have noted: The writing is conversational, with a sort of fifty-fifty split of description to quotation. It has an irreverence to it, chatty and self-depreciating. It’s also a parody, where the author has taken a classic international story, many generations old, which already has a set of deeply established characters and has continued that piece of world building in the style of an anecdote he might tell to a friend in a village pub. Holt has put his stamp on this, so it is no longer “heavy” and by doing that he’s slid it along from the dusty classics section to inhabit the fresh-faced young adult shelf, yet it still conveys tons of legendary information and entertains broader bands above and below that simplistic YA demographic. The hero is a timid everyman in the shadow of his sister, who excels at nothing that we value in modern life and doesn’t even measure up as a self-assured male but, uniquely, would be exceptionally good at a specific role in a fantasy reality (i.e. ruling everything). He, Malcolm, fits the pattern that if you were that exceptionally rare kind of person that could hold absolute power without hurting anybody (ideally never using it at all), then you’d be a stunning success in comparison with just about everyone else, who would use it to apply all their petty prejudices and therefore submerge into the minus column. To be the best, you wouldn’t even need to improve anything – just play for a draw, neutralise the dangerously unlimited god/boss role and move small measures of necessary power down the ladder to those functionaries who need it, usually to fix things on a daily basis and keep them moving. Malcolm does try things out, in a minimum and apologetic kind of way, feels guilty and leaves compensation to balance his experimental actions. Meaning no harm to anyone, even subconsciously, he’s perfect in the sense of perfectly harmless. The exceptional trick that this novel pulls is in its introductory nature; to continue the plot of Wagner’s Ring Cycle operas and get the reader accidentally educated in the Teutonic myths and legendary activities of Wotan, the Valkyries, Loge, Siegfried & Brunhilde, the frost giants and the Rhinemaidens etc. It’s the Bayreuth Festival in bite-size humorous form, without the Germanic language, nasty lager and two hundred quid tickets. As Stephen Fry observed: “You can tell the Germans are a cruel nation because their operas last for four days and they have no word for fluffy.” I like opera. There, I’ve said it. Not musicals. Both forms are theatre with singing but opera has the gravitas to tremble the heart and rouse the soul. If you’ve gone a year without crying, go to an opera. Ok, so why do I like opera? That would be because of THIS BOOK. As an incidental note, I realise that I also like Icelandic poetic sagas and kennings, which were introduced to me by this same author in Who’s Afraid of Beowulf. The point I’m making is that Tom Holt has a way of insinuating great and otherwise unapproachable cultural monoliths into porous young minds in such a way that his readers spill out into the confusing blue yonder and become better and more rounded people, with a keen interest in developing their knowledge and widening their cultural ambitions – probably forgetting the original influence that set them onto their path. I read this, I wasn’t scared of awesome culture in another language and I tootled off to enjoy that confidence. Now, who says this is a silly story? Another thing I got from re-reading this book is how much Tolkien copied from Wagner who copied from legend. Does any of this sound familiar? One ring is forged in a secret fire and the power to rule them all gets decanted into it. The ring is mute but has a treacherous personality that actively wants to cause harm. The ring is passed from one ring-bearer to another by the act of murder, e.g. drowning or a spear in the back. Dark forces are searching for the ring because they are hungry for that power to rule the world. If the ring-bearer is mentally strong enough, that person can bend the ring to their will, but… the ring eventually turns them into something they don’t like. They’re changed by the experience and can’t go back to how they were before they had the adventure. In this sense, Malcolm is a hobbit, the only race strong enough to offer to give up the ring, representing all power, and hand it away by an act of free will. It’s the ability to defeat an opponent and then stop, not become as bad as your opponent by using your advantage to oppress and thus become them, everything you detested in the first place. There’s a saying that if anyone wants to wield power, that should disqualify them from ever being allowed to have it. Malcolm, the anti-protagonist, doesn’t think he is at all suitable for the job, is terrified of taking any action that might upset anyone, even the ducks on a pond, so is therefore the ideal candidate. I’d trust him with my life. I’d also trust Tom Holt to run my cultural information desk. This book should be on the curriculum because, if you see what I mean, it’s bigger than it is.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Roderick Ellem

    Funny book based on the Norse mythologies and Wagner Operas. Well worth a read!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Elaine Abrol

    Pratchetesque fantasy - although entertaining and amusing not quite in Pratchett's league. That said, I did buy another 5 Tom Holt books as I did enjoy it and am aware that this is his first. Pratchetesque fantasy - although entertaining and amusing not quite in Pratchett's league. That said, I did buy another 5 Tom Holt books as I did enjoy it and am aware that this is his first.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Olly Colluphid

    A harsh 3 Let down by the ending in which things were resolved altogether too simply after some nice build up. Still enjoyable. Very dodgy cover though. Don't think the artist read the book. A harsh 3 Let down by the ending in which things were resolved altogether too simply after some nice build up. Still enjoyable. Very dodgy cover though. Don't think the artist read the book.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Caleb

    I've said it before that Tom Holt books seem to follow a pattern, but on further consideration it's not really the plot that's predictable. It's hard to describe. I think the thing in common is the protagonist is almost painfully unremarkable. Boring and miserable guy, usually... gets thrust into mystical or magical shenanigans, granted, but it's hard to laugh at the guy because you feel sorry for him. Maybe I just empathize with these characters more than I should, or maybe it's my timing. At th I've said it before that Tom Holt books seem to follow a pattern, but on further consideration it's not really the plot that's predictable. It's hard to describe. I think the thing in common is the protagonist is almost painfully unremarkable. Boring and miserable guy, usually... gets thrust into mystical or magical shenanigans, granted, but it's hard to laugh at the guy because you feel sorry for him. Maybe I just empathize with these characters more than I should, or maybe it's my timing. At the time I read The Portable Door etc about a guy laid off and then stuck in a dead-end job, I was recently laid off and soon stuck in a dead-end job. Now, here I am again, reading about a guy who doesn't have many friends, doesn't go to parties, and is boring compared to his popular and successful sister. Come on, Tom! Go on, describe his poor eyesight and fallen arches! But seriously, I did enjoy the book. This one was based on "Der Ring des Nibelungen", the Wagner operas most famous for "Ride of the Valkyries". It's a story I've often wondered about but never really looked into much, mostly because the operas are 15 hours long and German. It's about a Ring that gets created that has the power to dominate the entire world. (No, not that one.) It was entertaining to be told this story in the form of a complaint from some of the mythical participants that were inconvenienced by the whole squabble. It was also an interesting take on "what do you do with ultimate power", by giving it the twist: the world is affected by the emotions of the ring-bearer. So this guy has to go around not getting too upset or bad things happen. I wonder if I'd do a better or worse job than he did? Clearly this Ring is not currently in good hands in 2020. So I didn't find this one as funny as most, but maybe they don't all have to be funny. Interesting story based on real opera and Norse mythology, brought forward into modern times. Still had some good musing on the whole point of life, and love and how complicated humans have made it.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Hester

    A humorous sequel to to Wagner's "Ring Cycle." I was never able to understand what happened in the Ring Cycle, and Holt did a great job of summarizing it. This is a relaxing, fun read with a strong sense of place. I now have a passing interest in passing through Taunton. Much of the action takes place in Combe Hall, outside of Coombe, outside of Taunton. There is a Sydenham Combe Hall to the west of Taunton, and a Coombe to the east of Taunton. I wonder if he had been thinking of those as inspir A humorous sequel to to Wagner's "Ring Cycle." I was never able to understand what happened in the Ring Cycle, and Holt did a great job of summarizing it. This is a relaxing, fun read with a strong sense of place. I now have a passing interest in passing through Taunton. Much of the action takes place in Combe Hall, outside of Coombe, outside of Taunton. There is a Sydenham Combe Hall to the west of Taunton, and a Coombe to the east of Taunton. I wonder if he had been thinking of those as inspiration, or if he amalgamated names that sounded like they should be in Somerset. The last third lagged, but the first two were diverting. Even with the change in pace, it was a very fast read.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Marcus

    K. J. Parker (Tom Holt's pseudonym) is one of my favorite authors, and he typically writes "speculative fiction" as opposed to straight fantasy - imaginary worlds, but non-magical. Books under Parker's name tend to have a wry sense of humor and a cynical, morally complex outlook. As Holt, he keeps the wry sense of humor, but loses the rest in favor of somewhat silly magical stories. This one's based heavily on Wagner's Ring Cycle, and it's an enjoyable, if rather lightweight, read. If you like D K. J. Parker (Tom Holt's pseudonym) is one of my favorite authors, and he typically writes "speculative fiction" as opposed to straight fantasy - imaginary worlds, but non-magical. Books under Parker's name tend to have a wry sense of humor and a cynical, morally complex outlook. As Holt, he keeps the wry sense of humor, but loses the rest in favor of somewhat silly magical stories. This one's based heavily on Wagner's Ring Cycle, and it's an enjoyable, if rather lightweight, read. If you like Discworld or Douglas Adams, you'll find something to like here. (However I would much rather direct you to Parker's work.)

  22. 5 out of 5

    Darwin Smith

    This is just a great book. I love discovering new comedic writers (although Tom Holt has been around for some time), and as a fan of Tom Sharpe, Robert Rankin and Terry Pratchett, heard from a few people with similar taste that I should read Tom Holt. Great reads! I've read Holt's Portable Door series, and wondered if his other stuff was also good, so I tried "Expecting Someone Taller". It's a standalone story that draws from Norse Mythology, so will feel familiar in style to those who are fans This is just a great book. I love discovering new comedic writers (although Tom Holt has been around for some time), and as a fan of Tom Sharpe, Robert Rankin and Terry Pratchett, heard from a few people with similar taste that I should read Tom Holt. Great reads! I've read Holt's Portable Door series, and wondered if his other stuff was also good, so I tried "Expecting Someone Taller". It's a standalone story that draws from Norse Mythology, so will feel familiar in style to those who are fans of Pratchett, especially his earlier stuff.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Surya

    People who are neither particularly driven/ambitious nor lazy and dormant are fascinating. Malcom Fisher, the protagonist of this novel is one such fascinating guy. One day due to some truly unexpected turn of events he finds himself in a very powerful position. His adventures is this humorous, mythological, satirical fantasy novel. Luckily, the wikipedia link for this novel did not have the plot, so I ended up reading the book without knowing the climax. Although many a times I just wanted to kn People who are neither particularly driven/ambitious nor lazy and dormant are fascinating. Malcom Fisher, the protagonist of this novel is one such fascinating guy. One day due to some truly unexpected turn of events he finds himself in a very powerful position. His adventures is this humorous, mythological, satirical fantasy novel. Luckily, the wikipedia link for this novel did not have the plot, so I ended up reading the book without knowing the climax. Although many a times I just wanted to know how it is going to end, I must say that I was not at all disappointed.. Why why why should the dynamics between Wotan and Valkriyes be very well written. It made me introspect on certain aspects that I DID NOT find amusing. Overall, a fun read.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jon

    This was a good read even though it was on it's way to 3 star at most review until the last 3 chapters when I realized the author had duped me and I didn't realize it. The main character together gets annoying I mean insufferably ANNOYING during the resolution, to the point I want that I found myself siding with the test of the characters as him being an absolute idiot . However, it ended well.. it's a good quick read. This was a good read even though it was on it's way to 3 star at most review until the last 3 chapters when I realized the author had duped me and I didn't realize it. The main character together gets annoying I mean insufferably ANNOYING during the resolution, to the point I want that I found myself siding with the test of the characters as him being an absolute idiot . However, it ended well.. it's a good quick read.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Logan

    The Wagnerian Ring Cycle is not something I'm familiar with (in terms of story, but the music is quickly recognizable), but this novel's humorous revisiting definitely makes me curious about the original operas and Norse and German mythologies in general. One of my favorite and in my (most likely naive) opinion surprising twists surrounds the "English Rose." A quick read that is very enjoyable overall. The Wagnerian Ring Cycle is not something I'm familiar with (in terms of story, but the music is quickly recognizable), but this novel's humorous revisiting definitely makes me curious about the original operas and Norse and German mythologies in general. One of my favorite and in my (most likely naive) opinion surprising twists surrounds the "English Rose." A quick read that is very enjoyable overall.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ann

    Wow. This was an awesome book! I loved the way the mythology and real life melded together so well. I was a bit worried if I'd get confused since I didn't know much about the myth of The Ring, but Holt did a really good job explaining it with Malcolm. I also loved the idea of Happiness and Love - how you can't have one without the other. I'm definitely going to read more of Holt's books! Wow. This was an awesome book! I loved the way the mythology and real life melded together so well. I was a bit worried if I'd get confused since I didn't know much about the myth of The Ring, but Holt did a really good job explaining it with Malcolm. I also loved the idea of Happiness and Love - how you can't have one without the other. I'm definitely going to read more of Holt's books!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ghanima

    Who knew that of all of the special powers from the Nibelungen saga, speaking the language of the birds would be the most useful? I found this book to be very engaging. The story flows very nicely, it's easy to get through and there's some decent jokes in there. If I ever come across another book by Tom Hold I'll definitely try it also. Who knew that of all of the special powers from the Nibelungen saga, speaking the language of the birds would be the most useful? I found this book to be very engaging. The story flows very nicely, it's easy to get through and there's some decent jokes in there. If I ever come across another book by Tom Hold I'll definitely try it also.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Cunningham

    Funny, sometimes clever, popcorn reading. Nothing here made me LOL, but plenty of smiles and smirks. Just what the doctor ordered after my last read and with my kids commencing phase 17 of the now sprawling operation "5000 Night of Sleep Deprivation." I suspect if I read this in a different state I might be somewhat underwhelmed else I would go for 4-stars. Funny, sometimes clever, popcorn reading. Nothing here made me LOL, but plenty of smiles and smirks. Just what the doctor ordered after my last read and with my kids commencing phase 17 of the now sprawling operation "5000 Night of Sleep Deprivation." I suspect if I read this in a different state I might be somewhat underwhelmed else I would go for 4-stars.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Stefan Bogdanski

    Malcolm Fisher is, well, just him. Until he runs over a badger by accident and ends up wearing the Nibelungenring and becoming master of the universe, which is a move frowned upon by many deities. But it turns out that shy Malcolm is only shy when being confronted with humans, and after all, someone needs to teach Wotan a lesson, right?

  30. 4 out of 5

    B

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Interesting perspective. Not sure why she can read the data better than the other scientists though. It seems like that's a cross-disciplinary skill among people who work with samples rather than an economic skill. Interesting perspective. Not sure why she can read the data better than the other scientists though. It seems like that's a cross-disciplinary skill among people who work with samples rather than an economic skill.

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