website statistics Preacher, Volume 8: All Hell's a-Coming - PDF Books Online
Hot Best Seller

Preacher, Volume 8: All Hell's a-Coming

Availability: Ready to download

Following the events of the Preacher: Salvation collection, Jesse Custer wants to renew his quest to find God and hold him accountable for all of his actions. But before he can continue down that path, he must reunite with his girlfriend Tulip. In this edition, we look back and see how Jesse and Tulip first met as well as how she became so deadly proficient with a gun. Als Following the events of the Preacher: Salvation collection, Jesse Custer wants to renew his quest to find God and hold him accountable for all of his actions. But before he can continue down that path, he must reunite with his girlfriend Tulip. In this edition, we look back and see how Jesse and Tulip first met as well as how she became so deadly proficient with a gun. Also, after making amends with his love, Jesse seeks revenge against his former friend and compatriot Cassidy for the things that the Irish vampire did to Tulip during the time that they both believed the Preacher to be dead. Collects: Preacher #51–58, Preacher Special: Tall in the Saddle


Compare

Following the events of the Preacher: Salvation collection, Jesse Custer wants to renew his quest to find God and hold him accountable for all of his actions. But before he can continue down that path, he must reunite with his girlfriend Tulip. In this edition, we look back and see how Jesse and Tulip first met as well as how she became so deadly proficient with a gun. Als Following the events of the Preacher: Salvation collection, Jesse Custer wants to renew his quest to find God and hold him accountable for all of his actions. But before he can continue down that path, he must reunite with his girlfriend Tulip. In this edition, we look back and see how Jesse and Tulip first met as well as how she became so deadly proficient with a gun. Also, after making amends with his love, Jesse seeks revenge against his former friend and compatriot Cassidy for the things that the Irish vampire did to Tulip during the time that they both believed the Preacher to be dead. Collects: Preacher #51–58, Preacher Special: Tall in the Saddle

30 review for Preacher, Volume 8: All Hell's a-Coming

  1. 4 out of 5

    Baba

    Yasssssss! This is something! Here I am at the penultimate volume and finally think I know what this book has been about all along? Will Jesse find Tulip again? What will they say to one another? Where's Cassidy. In fact... who the Hell,, what the Hell, is Cassidy? Will Arseface stay at the top? Where's Starr and co. These questions and more are answered in this volume, and by now I very much care about every single solitary character. Many claim this is Ennis' best ever work, and at this stage Yasssssss! This is something! Here I am at the penultimate volume and finally think I know what this book has been about all along? Will Jesse find Tulip again? What will they say to one another? Where's Cassidy. In fact... who the Hell,, what the Hell, is Cassidy? Will Arseface stay at the top? Where's Starr and co. These questions and more are answered in this volume, and by now I very much care about every single solitary character. Many claim this is Ennis' best ever work, and at this stage in this series, it's hard to dispute that. 9.5 out of 12.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kemper

    As I’ve previously stated, I firmly believe that anyone who hasn’t already completed the entire run of Preacher should NOT be reading any reviews or summaries of these later volumes. All I can safely say is that this is an interlude before the final volume in which nothing big seems to happen, but it’s critical for setting the stage of the ending. Also, if you ever find yourself performing oral sex in an alley in exchange for heroin, you might want to take a second look at your life choices. If y As I’ve previously stated, I firmly believe that anyone who hasn’t already completed the entire run of Preacher should NOT be reading any reviews or summaries of these later volumes. All I can safely say is that this is an interlude before the final volume in which nothing big seems to happen, but it’s critical for setting the stage of the ending. Also, if you ever find yourself performing oral sex in an alley in exchange for heroin, you might want to take a second look at your life choices. If you have read it already or just like to live dangerously: (view spoiler)[ The main thing striking me as I reread this for like the third time is how much worse Cassidy seems. What he did to Tulip in the guise of ‘helping her’ after Jesse’s apparent death just comes across as sicker and more twisted every time as does the history that Jesse finds when he goes looking into Cassidy’s past. Ennis did a masterful job of showing us almost from the beginning that despite seeming like a friend Jesse could count on that he really was a vampire in the truest sense. He charms and seems to offer loyalty when in reality he’s a monster who sucks every good thing from the lives of those he gets closest too. And what’s really interesting is that Cassidy doesn’t even think of it like that. He rationalized his treatment of Tulip as doing what was best for her and even when he’s previously confessed some sin to Jesse, it’s always been framed as some kind of boys-will-be-boys misadventure. Conversely, the more times I go through this, the less patience I have for the Arseface storyline. It was crudely hilarious the first time through with moments of poignancy, but the joke has gotten stale by now. (hide spoiler)] Next stop: The Alamo

  3. 4 out of 5

    Bradley

    Guess who has gotten back together? This one's heartwarming and and heartbreaking, and the rest of the time, we get to see the dark side of Cass. Yes, that's right, we get to know just how big a ponce that wanker really is. My ire is stoked in equal measure to how relieved I am that Jesse and Tulip are on the mends. As for Starr? Omg he's still one of the most absolutely pathetic super-villains I've ever read and pure comedic gold. Still. All the dominoes are set up and ready to fall for the last Guess who has gotten back together? This one's heartwarming and and heartbreaking, and the rest of the time, we get to see the dark side of Cass. Yes, that's right, we get to know just how big a ponce that wanker really is. My ire is stoked in equal measure to how relieved I am that Jesse and Tulip are on the mends. As for Starr? Omg he's still one of the most absolutely pathetic super-villains I've ever read and pure comedic gold. Still. All the dominoes are set up and ready to fall for the last Volume. I can't wait to see if god ever gets properly chastised. :)

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jim C

    This is the penultimate collection of a series where they really should be read in order. In this one we learn about Tulip's childhood. We also see Tulip realize that Cassidy isn't the right guy for her and how she reunites with Jesse. There is also a one off where we share a small adventure of Tulip, Amy, and Jesse that has nothing to do with the main story arc. For the most part I loved this collection. The look into Tulip's childhood was amazing. It was at the beginning of the collection and I This is the penultimate collection of a series where they really should be read in order. In this one we learn about Tulip's childhood. We also see Tulip realize that Cassidy isn't the right guy for her and how she reunites with Jesse. There is also a one off where we share a small adventure of Tulip, Amy, and Jesse that has nothing to do with the main story arc. For the most part I loved this collection. The look into Tulip's childhood was amazing. It was at the beginning of the collection and I was immediately enthralled by this collection. Her reuniting with Jesse was a touching story line and is basically set up for the finale. The mini adventure was very enjoyable and I liked the new character. I couldn't give this five stars because there was one issue I thought was terrible. It explored Jesse's journey and it was crude, unnecessary filler. I know it is ironic for me to say something is crude in this comic when this comic has been crude for its entire run. I have enjoyed the crudeness but there was a point to it. I didn't think there was a point to it in this comic and it felt like the authors did it just for the fun of it. I am looking forward to the finale and I believe it will be shocking and explosive. The pieces are set for it thanks to this collection and the authors did a commendable job with that aspect. I still applaud the authors for taking a likeable character and doing a one eighty with him. This was a very good collection of this comic as it has all the trademarks that this comic is known for. It is crude and funny while being touching at the same time.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Brittany Lee

    A lot more relevance to this one. I finally flew through one of these. I enjoyed this volume more than some of the others. I appreciated the recap that was included in the beginning, as it has been some time between reads for me. The characters' backstories all start getting revealed- really pulling the heartstrings. Definitely connected with the characters more, while other's gained tons of empathy. Loved the feminism girl power stuff. I was shocked at the twists! The best word to describe this A lot more relevance to this one. I finally flew through one of these. I enjoyed this volume more than some of the others. I appreciated the recap that was included in the beginning, as it has been some time between reads for me. The characters' backstories all start getting revealed- really pulling the heartstrings. Definitely connected with the characters more, while other's gained tons of empathy. Loved the feminism girl power stuff. I was shocked at the twists! The best word to describe this series would be a slow burn. One more to go!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Gavin

    This is another Ennis book that has been dragged on too long...the last volume, Salvation, was great...this? Not so much...back to homophobia, vampires, and the Church...oh and stupid violence. I rate this as 2 stars because Tulip has a great backstory, and because Jesse is still ok. Cassidy has always been a dick, how is this a revelation??? Thanks for the horrible reading day Garth!! This is another Ennis book that has been dragged on too long...the last volume, Salvation, was great...this? Not so much...back to homophobia, vampires, and the Church...oh and stupid violence. I rate this as 2 stars because Tulip has a great backstory, and because Jesse is still ok. Cassidy has always been a dick, how is this a revelation??? Thanks for the horrible reading day Garth!!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Devann

    This volume was okay but honestly there were just too many different things going on for it to feel like an entirely coherent narrative to me so that's the reason for the 3 star rating. I know he was trying to tie up loose ends and bring back old characters for cameos before the final volume but that's never really my favorite thing to read. It is always nice to get a bit more of Tulip's backstory though, and to a lesser extent Jesse's. It is not so nice to get more Cassidy's backstory because t This volume was okay but honestly there were just too many different things going on for it to feel like an entirely coherent narrative to me so that's the reason for the 3 star rating. I know he was trying to tie up loose ends and bring back old characters for cameos before the final volume but that's never really my favorite thing to read. It is always nice to get a bit more of Tulip's backstory though, and to a lesser extent Jesse's. It is not so nice to get more Cassidy's backstory because the more you know about Cassidy the more you hate him but ... [shrugs]. Honestly this entire series is just me being differing levels of annoying with both Jesse and Cassidy and it's giving me whiplash lol. Excited to finally finish up my reread with the last volume, especially because I have literally NO recollection of how this all ends.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    5 Insane-Stars! ☆☆☆☆☆ The beginning starts off with Tulip and her escape from Cassidy and also gives a glimpse into her childhood. And i must say, its f#%ked up to see what made Tulip the person she is today. I mean the way her father died... Just f#%k!! And then Tulip's only friend gets raped... F#%K!!! Insane sh!t happens in this book! ...like, one of the two 'sexual bounty hunters' detectives had to suck off 'fifteen guys' till they came for gas money because they were broke. -What?! Then, a ba 5 Insane-Stars! ☆☆☆☆☆ The beginning starts off with Tulip and her escape from Cassidy and also gives a glimpse into her childhood. And i must say, its f#%ked up to see what made Tulip the person she is today. I mean the way her father died... Just f#%k!! And then Tulip's only friend gets raped... F#%K!!! Insane sh!t happens in this book! ...like, one of the two 'sexual bounty hunters' detectives had to suck off 'fifteen guys' till they came for gas money because they were broke. -What?! Then, a bar owner by the name of Joe Soap gets chemically castrated by the police by accident because they got him confused with a local pedophile, with the name 'John' Soap. -How in the hell does that happen?! Cassidy gets caught sucking his dealer's d!ck for some drugs by his girlfriend! -i know...freaking insane! Some f#%king guy ate another man's arm while he was under anesthesia! He didnt know he was being eaten until he turned his head! - Holy-F#%k-Balls! The odd thing is, i thought i liked Cassidy's character, but after reading about his past, ...I started having huge second thoughts. Then after two more pages, I couldn't stand him! I cant believe I hate Cassidy. :( Hahahahahaaaa! Seeing Herr Starr screaming at the old lady to start moving made me laugh out loud! I think Herr Starr had the best comedic lines. "We're going to wipe him off my arse like a DINGLEBERRY." "My c#%k is in the b!tch's mouth. And not in a good way." -the b!tch was a DOG! His countless failed attempts to kill Eisenstein were just as hilarious! The countdown frames had me smiling from ear to ear. There was an accent or language problem though, because i couldnt understand a select few lines that were said, (ex.: "...dont let that good ol' boy act fool you, 'cause that son of a b!tch was ready to cock our goose.") -cock your goose?!?! What the f***? Or this line... "He knows i got him buffaloed." -buffaloed?! ...believe it or not but its an actual word. Why Jesse knows this random word which has dozens of contradictory meanings is beyond me. It either could mean, to intimidate or to overpower. Lol or it means, a large group if oxen. ...jesus. And i must WARN everybody, the Horse-killing scene is traumatic. Its wrong on so many levels.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Thomas

    So conflicted over this one. It's homophobic, anti-French, reactionary, ultra-conservative, sex-negative... gotta love all that Preacher right-wing weirdness, right? But then there's this whole backstory about Tulip that's kind of cheesy but I [heart:] Tulip so that's oh, just so MFing dandy. Then there's a Very Special Episode of Preacher Starring Cassidy's Drug Problem And His Manipulation of Tulip, during which I realized that in creating Spike in Buffy the Vampire Slayer and in putting toget So conflicted over this one. It's homophobic, anti-French, reactionary, ultra-conservative, sex-negative... gotta love all that Preacher right-wing weirdness, right? But then there's this whole backstory about Tulip that's kind of cheesy but I [heart:] Tulip so that's oh, just so MFing dandy. Then there's a Very Special Episode of Preacher Starring Cassidy's Drug Problem And His Manipulation of Tulip, during which I realized that in creating Spike in Buffy the Vampire Slayer and in putting together that weird storyline about Willow addicted to magic, Joss Whedon was not just cribbing from Preacher; he had watched every Preacher Afterschool Special starring Melissa Gilbert and basically appropriated its weird, glib comments on drug addiction and destructive relationships. It's all so pat it kinda hurts; even if it's satisfying, even if it feels streetwise, it's ultimately a COMIC BOOK, and it feels like a comic book treatment of drugs. Bummed me out. This... this is not why people who read "real" literature think all comic books are crap -- but if said literature people DID read comic books (rather than just sneering at them), such people would probably gesture fanatically at the half-assed glib pat treatment of drug addiction, the reactionary xenophobic politics and the ultra-simplistic, essentially anti-female version of female empowerment (via high-caliber firearms) offered and say "See! See!?!" while jumping up and down and waving their berets and bleating "Sacre Bleu!" until they puke their coq a vin all over the floor of some Marxist classroom at The University of Milktoast Pansies, San Francisco Campus. Would I agree with them? Not really, because we get to see Tulip's tits, and assloads of people get killed, which rocks. Awesome. And comic books are there to be comic books. I still love Preacher... but let's call a spade a spade.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    Here's the book where all the threads start tightening up - everything that's gone before is coming together slowly, and we get to feel some measure of resolution to face the Big Climax Of All The Things. Tulip's origin story is beautiful, poetic and absolutely appropriate to the woman we've gotten to know. Jesse's little cross-country driving trip is more than a little amusing, picking up some interesting characters along the way and hearing out their bizarro stories. Then we get into the shit f Here's the book where all the threads start tightening up - everything that's gone before is coming together slowly, and we get to feel some measure of resolution to face the Big Climax Of All The Things. Tulip's origin story is beautiful, poetic and absolutely appropriate to the woman we've gotten to know. Jesse's little cross-country driving trip is more than a little amusing, picking up some interesting characters along the way and hearing out their bizarro stories. Then we get into the shit for Starr and oul' Proinsas. Those two boys done fucked up and we're aimin' to show them how to spell comeuppance. Savouring the smell of meat cookin' folks? I know I am. How’s about we end off with a little horse-rustlin? Chalk one more up to Ennis' fascination with old west, straw-chewin cowboys. And as usual, a good meaty story built on one of the thinnest, trodden-til-paper-thin of premises.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jedi JC Daquis

    I cannot fathom how can the TV show bring in all the evil fun in this series, all the violence, blasphemies, with all the sex, drugs, impending armageddon and vampires in between. Preacher volume eight, the penultimate volume to this excellent series prepares everything towards the end. But except for Jesse and Tulip gearing up for their eventual encounter with god, things are not going fine with Herr Starr and Arseface (the literal dickhead and assface respectively). I liked how Ennis left a bla I cannot fathom how can the TV show bring in all the evil fun in this series, all the violence, blasphemies, with all the sex, drugs, impending armageddon and vampires in between. Preacher volume eight, the penultimate volume to this excellent series prepares everything towards the end. But except for Jesse and Tulip gearing up for their eventual encounter with god, things are not going fine with Herr Starr and Arseface (the literal dickhead and assface respectively). I liked how Ennis left a blatant meta on how he answers all the criticisms given to him in writing the series. All you have to do is to say those two words man, two words. Nope, I am not pumped up and hyped to read the last few issues. It is the end of a great series and somehow I don't want to end this read.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    I think, considering that this was the penultimate episode of a story that has so many characters and plot threads, this volume was as good as could be expected. There is a lot of variety in this issue -- Tulip's back-story, Jesse's cross country drive, Jesse and Tulip's reunion, a bit of color on Amy, more skeletons in Cassidy's closet, further degradation of Herr Starr, and a car-thievin', horse-rustlin', adventure from Jesse, Tulip and Amy's past. The end of that particular story is one of my I think, considering that this was the penultimate episode of a story that has so many characters and plot threads, this volume was as good as could be expected. There is a lot of variety in this issue -- Tulip's back-story, Jesse's cross country drive, Jesse and Tulip's reunion, a bit of color on Amy, more skeletons in Cassidy's closet, further degradation of Herr Starr, and a car-thievin', horse-rustlin', adventure from Jesse, Tulip and Amy's past. The end of that particular story is one of my favorite moments of the comic, where Jesse, riding his horse off into the sunset, ponders asking Tulip and Amy to have a threesome with him.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Brad

    One-and-a-half stars. During this volume, I concluded that the Preacher series is really just a testosterone-heavy romance. The (supposed) plot it introduced early on (Jesse's quest (view spoiler)[to find God and learn why God quit (hide spoiler)] ) has been given very little attention throughout the series. Instead the series has mostly consisted of off-topic detours from that plot, all while making the actual focus Jesse and Tulip's relationship. With each new episode bringing its own form of u One-and-a-half stars. During this volume, I concluded that the Preacher series is really just a testosterone-heavy romance. The (supposed) plot it introduced early on (Jesse's quest (view spoiler)[to find God and learn why God quit (hide spoiler)] ) has been given very little attention throughout the series. Instead the series has mostly consisted of off-topic detours from that plot, all while making the actual focus Jesse and Tulip's relationship. With each new episode bringing its own form of uncommunicative hand-wringing, (view spoiler)[(e.g. Tulip being mad at Jesse for abandoning for her five years previous to the start of the story, Jesse not trusting that Tulip can take care of herself in a fight, Cass confessing his love to Tulip and Tulip keeping it a secret, Tulip shacking up with Cass so quickly after Jesse's death, Jesse's will-they-won't-they tension with his deputy back in volume 7) (hide spoiler)] this is undeniably true: (1) The series is, first and foremost, a love story. (Think Mickey and Mallory, but with less charisma. There seems to be little-to-no hero in these anti-heroes.) (2) The setting is a hyperviolent, hyper vulgar contemporary Western. (Think vigilante justice, but without any internal moral compass or respect for human life.) (3) The hook is the spiritual question it poses, which the reader hopes will elevate the story above just being a sophomoric shock factory...but the author teases it out so long with very little insight. (This does not bode well for the final volume.) Now, there's nothing wrong with a love story, but it both seems out of place and is unconvincing in this hateful piece full of male chauvinism, homophobia and all-around bigoted redneck characters. (These criticisms are also true of the main characters.) The story is this: two thrill kill vigilantes in love, running around stirring up trouble by acting tough, insulting and proud; shooting first and asking questions later; and believing themselves (and their lives) to be of greater importance than anyone else they encounter. I just can't find anything to enjoy here. This type of story is dated and of a different era. I cannot fathom it receiving today the praise it received when it came out. I think it aims to bring the timelessness of Westerns together with Tarantino level violence/vulgarity, but all it comes off as is obnoxious, chauvinistic and haphazardly bigoted. (Natural Born Killers was twisted, but it was unquestionably a commentary/parody of media sensationalism. Preacher is merely sensationalistic.) In this volume, we learn that Tulip really has no other goal beyond the men in her life, be it her father (view spoiler)[(whom, after he is killed, she mourns with such strength as to give her life no direction) (hide spoiler)] or Jesse (whom, after she believes he is killed, she mourns so fiercely as to render herself catatonic). Throughout the series, the backstories of the other characters have varied in how rewarding they are, but Tulip's might be the only one that gives absolutely no motivation to her story. As a result, her only function in this story is to love the male hero. This poorly written choice is among the most insulting things in this series, even more so because it is one of the only offending things in the series that wasn't on purpose. (view spoiler)[Here's what happens in this volume: Seven months after Jesse's apparent death, Tulip finally pulls herself together, having spent the entire time drunk or drugged up, shacking up with Cass. She goes to see Amy in NYC who tells her Jesse (very much alive) is coming for her. We learn Tulip's backstory. (Her mother died in childbirth. Her father loved her, but raised her to like guns. Her love of stereotypically "boy" things resulted in her being an outcast, not "one of the guys." Her father is shot and killed during a hunting accident. She mourns him until she meets Jesse.) Reunited, Jesse and Tulip rekindle their love and bring each other up to date. Jesse learns the truth about Cass keeping Tulip drugged up and Cass's history of leeching onto people and leaving their lives in wreckage. (The latter he learns from a homeless woman who it would seem has been made immortal by Cass.) When Cass shows up, all three want him to leave. Jesse breaks his hand stopping a punch from Cass. Jesse and Tulip hit the road. Meanwhile, Herr Starr deals with Eisenstein, the man who brought him into the Grail; Eisenstein suspects foul play and, if confirmed, he'll defund the Grail, rendering Herr Starr powerless. Herr Starr unsuccessfully attempts to assassinate Eisenstein and has his privates devoured by a dog in the process. Meanwhile, Arseface's manager takes advantage of Arseface, embezzling money and creating loads of controversy for Arseface to deal with amongst crippling debt. In the next episode, we see Jesse and Tulip back when they first met, stealing cars with Amy. In doing so, they wreck $1 million worth of luxury vehicles, which causes a rift with a head honcho named Langtry. At the same time, a grizzled and retired Texas Ranger enlists their help to save the lives of a herd of horses who were stolen for horse meat by Langtry. Jesse, Tulip and Amy are the only ones who get out alive. Jesse resolves to not float the idea of a manage a trois because it isn't worth risking his relationship with Tulip. (hide spoiler)]

  14. 4 out of 5

    William

    All the hell came...

  15. 5 out of 5

    ***Dave Hill

    NOV 2011 RE-READ: Things start to pay off, with Cassidy's true colors and story coming to light, Tulip and Jesse reunited, the Grail falling apart at the hands of Starr's monomaniacal pursuit of revenge against Jesse, and everything else starting to set up for the final apocalyptic volume. For all it sounds like, it's a very human volume, with minimal supernatural business. The side characters introduced (both Amy, nicely fleshed out, and her bartender friend) are done so gently. Even Tulip's back NOV 2011 RE-READ: Things start to pay off, with Cassidy's true colors and story coming to light, Tulip and Jesse reunited, the Grail falling apart at the hands of Starr's monomaniacal pursuit of revenge against Jesse, and everything else starting to set up for the final apocalyptic volume. For all it sounds like, it's a very human volume, with minimal supernatural business. The side characters introduced (both Amy, nicely fleshed out, and her bartender friend) are done so gently. Even Tulip's backstory, with its occasional spurts of violence, feels less over the top than much of what we've seen. We also get a one-off special of Jesse, Tulip, and Amy's younger days, which shows a bit more where each of these characters is coming from (in truly Texan xenophobic style). One of the best issues collected here is Jesse's late-night drive toward New York, and the various folks he picks up hitchhiking. They're a typical band of Ennis zanies (including a few we've run into before), but it's mostly talk, not asskicking and cosmic commanding. A good, all-around book, and the relative calm before the storm. ----- JUN 2016 Pretty much hit all the notes below. Tulip's origin story is great, Cassidy's true colors are horrifying, and Jesse's cross-country drive is delightful. ----- JAN 2020 In some ways, it's very odd to wait until the penultimate volume (more or less) to delve into some of this -- Tulip's backstory, Cassidy's backstory, the Jesse/Tulip/Amy triangle -- but in other ways, it all lets it pay off in a fashion that giving it to us in more detail earlier wasn't really needed. Notes in comparison to the TV series: For the most part, none of this happens, at least not the big items. Cassidy's extremely sordid past, Tulip's background, or all the Amy stuff simply never makes it onto the screen. A deep pity, that, as they serve mostly to inform how the both series will end.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tyler Hill

    I know that one of Preacher's major appeals is its shock factor and gross-out humor. But, while I generally enjoy it for that reason too, I sometimes find myself wishing that Garth Ennis would give it a rest. I mean, we get your point already, Garth: America is filled with inbred, gun-toting racists. But, for page after page, he keeps ramming that point home. (I'm sure he'd love the usage of "ramming" in that last sentence.) The problem is that, as far as social commentary goes, it's pretty blun I know that one of Preacher's major appeals is its shock factor and gross-out humor. But, while I generally enjoy it for that reason too, I sometimes find myself wishing that Garth Ennis would give it a rest. I mean, we get your point already, Garth: America is filled with inbred, gun-toting racists. But, for page after page, he keeps ramming that point home. (I'm sure he'd love the usage of "ramming" in that last sentence.) The problem is that, as far as social commentary goes, it's pretty blunt and one-dimensional, and I feel like it tends to distract from some actually genuinely interesting situations and character developments. Tulip's flashback story with her father, Jesse and Tulip's relationship, Jesse trying to reconcile his past friendship with Cassidy with the horror stories he learns about him in this volume... these things are all handled with a subtly and maturity not found in many comic books. The problem is that you have to wade through the obligatory stories of chemical castration, sexual bounty hunters and hunters getting shot while crapping in the woods just to get to them. It probably also doesn't help that some of the humor hasn't aged particularly well, and some stuff comes off as borderline homophobic (see: ramming comment above.) That's not to say that I would remove all the gross-out humor. Far from it. For each eye-rolling forced shock, there's a great moment with the perpetual rise and fall of Herr Starr. Or, the broad commentary on fame that's been Arseface's side story. Take out all the gory and goofiness, and you'd have a neutered Preacher comic... and what fun would that be? I just wish it was more naturally executed sometimes.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Garrison Kelly

    After six months of drug-induced sex with Cassidy, Tulip O’Haire escapes the devious vampire’s clutches and reunites with the one she truly loves, Reverend Jesse Custer. The two of them clear up their misunderstandings and their relationship becomes stronger for it. Now all that’s left is for Jesse to ask around town about how dark of a past Cassidy truly has. Meanwhile, the Grail still have plans to assassinate Jesse. Plus, a certain disfigured recording artist faces backlash for his “controver After six months of drug-induced sex with Cassidy, Tulip O’Haire escapes the devious vampire’s clutches and reunites with the one she truly loves, Reverend Jesse Custer. The two of them clear up their misunderstandings and their relationship becomes stronger for it. Now all that’s left is for Jesse to ask around town about how dark of a past Cassidy truly has. Meanwhile, the Grail still have plans to assassinate Jesse. Plus, a certain disfigured recording artist faces backlash for his “controversial” messages. All of this will come to a head in the ninth and final installment of Preacher. But for now, enjoy this violent appetizer. When I first started reading this volume, I expected it to suffer from the same problems as its seventh predecessor. I thought it was going to be yet another hackneyed drama with all of the “good stuff” conveniently left out. By the time I got to the horsemeat storyline, I was proven dead wrong. In fact, the way those horses were butchered wasn’t at all “deliciously violent”. It was downright disturbing. While I never like to see animals treated in that way, I do appreciate being unsettled and uncomfortable during a series that prided itself on offensive content. The horse butchers were the villains of that storyline, so watching them get their rightful beatings was well worth the discomfort. That doesn’t mean I didn’t appreciate the dramatic aspects of this graphic novel. On the contrary, I loved seeing Jesse and Tulip back together again. Not only is their romance a healthy one, but they’re also equal when it comes to beating up the bad guys. They’re both good with guns, they’re both vicious brawlers, and they both do their fair share of rescuing each other. It makes Cassidy look even more disgusting when you realize just what kind of a person he really is. He tried to keep Tulip for himself, but Tulip saw right through the lies and put a bullet through his chest. She’s a keeper, but only for Jesse Custer. Speaking of our dear friend Cassidy, the way his acquaintances describe him to Jesse is another part of the Preacher series that could be considered disturbing. For the first few editions, he was a fun-loving friend who’d never stab his friends in the back. In this edition, he’s described as a selfish jerk who disrespects women, spends money on drugs, and has no room in his heart for love. I hated Cassidy so much after hearing this that I wanted Jesse to exact his revenge right then and there. But that’s what makes Cassidy such a convincing shades-of-gray villain: he can manipulate his way out of any dangerous situation. He’s the kind of creep you’d see on Dr. Phil’s show. Or Jerry Springer’s show, either one would be fine. All in all, this was a fun little comic book even though it didn’t have nearly as many of the screwed up moments as its predecessors. I have a feeling we’ll get more of those in the final volume. For what it’s worth, I’m looking forward to that final volume. Will Jesse finally put God in his place? Will Cassidy get the comeuppance he deserves? Will the Grail finally assassinate Jesse in a nuclear fallout showdown? What will become of Tulip if she loses her boyfriend again? I legitimately want to know the answers to these questions and this graphic novel put me in that mood. Another passing grade for you, Garth Ennis!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Michael Sorbello

    This is a review of the entire series. Preacher follows a gang of three washed-up misfits that have all been dealt cruel hands by fate. First there’s Jesse Custer, a vulgar, foul-mouthed yet all-around upstanding and gentlemanly preacher living a dull life in a small Texas town called Annville. He wears the mantle of a preacher while exuding the aura of a gritty, spaghetti western antihero. He spends more time praying to John Wayne and channeling Clint Eastwood than he ever spends seeking guidanc This is a review of the entire series. Preacher follows a gang of three washed-up misfits that have all been dealt cruel hands by fate. First there’s Jesse Custer, a vulgar, foul-mouthed yet all-around upstanding and gentlemanly preacher living a dull life in a small Texas town called Annville. He wears the mantle of a preacher while exuding the aura of a gritty, spaghetti western antihero. He spends more time praying to John Wayne and channeling Clint Eastwood than he ever spends seeking guidance from God. Things take a major turn for Jesse when he accidentally gets possessed by the spirit of a supernatural entity called Genesis, the cursed child born out of the forbidden fornication between an angel and a demon. The entity contains the essence of absolute goodness and absolute evil, fusing together with Jesse’s soul and granting him unimaginable power. Now a force to be reckoned with, Jesse makes himself quite a few dangerous enemies and he doesn’t plan to let his newfound powers go to waste. He has a bone to pick with the scum of the earth and plans to use his powers to make amends with his past trauma and regrets. Most of all, he has it out for God more than anyone else for allowing all the chaos and evil in the world to spiral out of control in the first place. He goes on a journey to find God and give him a piece of his mind. Along his journey, Jesse reunites with his ex-girlfriend Tulip and befriends an Irish, vampire junky named Cassidy. Tulip is a hotheaded gunslinger that was raised by her tough-as-nails yet affectionate, sharpshooting father who taught her how to hunt, stand on her own two feet and take no nonsense from anybody. She’s a wild tomboy with a lot of heart and has quite a bit of catching up to do with Jesse after he abandoned her for unknown reasons at the peak of their relationship. After hearing Jesse’s story about fusing with Genesis and going on a mission to find God with his newfound powers, Cassidy happily joins the preacher on his quest while Tulip works on patching things up with Jesse after learning of the dark secrets behind his sudden disappearance. Cassidy also has some demons of his own to work out as he battles with alcoholism, drug addiction and a wavering moral compass on top of never being able to walk around in broad daylight because of the curse of vampirism placed on him as a young boy. Despite their numerous imperfections, the three come together in hopes of finding God. Not in the metaphorical sense, but to kick his ass for abandoning his throne in heaven, neglecting his duties and letting humanity drown in the cesspool he created with his own hands. The three outlaws seek to set things right through very unsavory means. Jesse, Tulip and Cassidy encounter some incredibly disturbed villains along the way, including Jesse’s own family of backwater devils that include a tyrannical religious grandmother obsessed with maintaining pure bloodlines, a violent psychopath that brutally murdered anything Jesse dared to love as a child, and a crazed hillbilly with a fetish for farm animals. Then there’s a secret religious order akin to the Illuminati called The Grail, which includes the outrageous Klaus Starr whose violent antics along with his obsession of trying to use Jesse’s powers to fulfill his own plans usually end up leaving him with a few missing limbs and making a mockery of himself. There’s even a KKK loonie that built himself a giant sex doll made out of the severed, bloody body parts of butchered livestock. The violence is so outrageously gruesome that it somehow manages to be equally horrendous and hilarious. A lot of the dark and shocking moments in this series are delivered with heavy undertones of black comedy, making you laugh, cringe and gag all at the same time. It’s a wild ride that pulls no punches, and the scares are absurdly creative if nothing else. The three protagonists have a lot of depth to them, every villain is a wicked bastard and the side characters all have their own heartwarming struggles to overcome. The most notable minor character that I was rooting for from beginning to end was a mentally disabled boy nicknamed Assface. The boy idolized Kurt Cobain to an unhealthy degree and unfortunately, he thought that following in his idol’s footsteps by blowing his head off with a gun would earn himself the love and admiration he always wanted. After his failed suicide attempt, he’s left with a gaping hole that continuously oozes fluid from his now deformed face, which earned him the nickname Assface. Instead of letting his deformity bring him down, he goes on his own personal journey of self-discovery and finding comfort and acceptance through rock music. This is just one of many touching tales throughout the series. Preacher is outrageous, shocking, and it isn’t afraid of offending anybody with its sharp-edged humor, but it also captures the personal flaws and imperfections that every single person carries. The action is spectacular, the characters are heroic and monstrous in equal measure, and you can never prepare yourself for whatever bizarre travesties it will throw at you next. Stephen King even cited Preacher as being a big inspiration behind his surreal fantasy masterpiece The Dark Tower, and it’s not hard to see how. It’s the perfect blend of gritty western, dark fantasy, shock humor and over the top horror-fueled action sequences. It’ll definitely send you through an unforgettable trip through the wild west. *** My Social Media My YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCPPs... My Instagram Account: https://www.instagram.com/michael_sor... My Wattpad Account: https://www.wattpad.com/user/Michael-... My Twitter Account: https://twitter.com/SorbelloHorror My Facebook Account: https://www.facebook.com/michael.sorb...

  19. 5 out of 5

    Quentin Wallace

    The penultimate volume. We get to see Tulip's origin, as well as more of Cassidy's origin as well. Also, our crew is reunited, but Cassidy finds himself a little unwelcome. The character of Cassidy is probably the most complex of the series, as I find myself loving him, hating him, pitying him, and more. There's also a modern day western tale of Jesse, Tulip and Amy involving horse thieves which was a great story but had some disturbing scenes, even for this series. Great series, too bad the next The penultimate volume. We get to see Tulip's origin, as well as more of Cassidy's origin as well. Also, our crew is reunited, but Cassidy finds himself a little unwelcome. The character of Cassidy is probably the most complex of the series, as I find myself loving him, hating him, pitying him, and more. There's also a modern day western tale of Jesse, Tulip and Amy involving horse thieves which was a great story but had some disturbing scenes, even for this series. Great series, too bad the next volume is the last!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Britton

    Religion tends to be an easy touch point for satirists, so much so that it becomes dull rather quickly. We get it, religion has some rather silly concepts behind it, so much so that it almost makes fun of itself. With that in mind, I avoided Preacher for a while, fearing it would be another 'fuck religion' polemic disguised as a story (a la His Dark Materials), and while there are the 'fuck religion' moments layered in Preacher from time to time, Ennis never gets too lost in his message and allo Religion tends to be an easy touch point for satirists, so much so that it becomes dull rather quickly. We get it, religion has some rather silly concepts behind it, so much so that it almost makes fun of itself. With that in mind, I avoided Preacher for a while, fearing it would be another 'fuck religion' polemic disguised as a story (a la His Dark Materials), and while there are the 'fuck religion' moments layered in Preacher from time to time, Ennis never gets too lost in his message and allows his focus to be clear. Religious satire died with Preacher for me, as few others could ever get quite get as madcap, as strange, nor as deviously imaginative as Ennis' opus on religion was, and still very much is. I sometimes like to jokingly describe Preacher to friends as if Hunter S. Thompson decided to try his hand at writing a comic (without being Transmetropolitan), yet that comparison to too faint for this series. Ennis certainly shares Thompson's love for the demented and the depraved, but the vision that he dishes out for Preacher is purely his own. Ennis' satire is cutting, yet toned down in comparison to some of his other series' (I'm lookin' at you, The Boys), certainly his crass humor can become bothersome at times, but the characterization and the drama of the series are excellent. Many of the characters that are introduced throughout Preacher screams iconoclasm, with so many of them being unforgettable from Jesse to Ruth to Cassidy to The Saint of Killers and Preacher's version of God (who's not a very nice God to put it plainly), Ennis' talent for crafting interesting and well developed characters can sometimes be underrated, with most people focusing on his crass humor and dark intensity that would become landmarks of the series. But many forget the oddly heartfelt story that is told throughout the series I often point people to this series when people ask me what I find to be a golden standard for long form storytelling, there is never a moment in Preacher that feels like a misstep or a bit that's boring, it's a rare series where everything comes together so beautifully that I'll dare not ruin it for anyone. Despite the plot being very straightforward, much of the intrigue comes from the characters and their personalities, which are based on their history and psychologies, much like how real people form their personalities based on their life experiences. Ennis' keen awareness for characterization and conflicts arising from characters' motivations and desires is the crux of what makes Preacher compelling. Ennis does take his pot shots at religion, yet never tells you what to think and never condescends to the audience, as he can sometimes do. He allows himself to be utterly selfless with his pen and give us a good story, which is all what he could hope for nowadays. Steve Dillon's art is whole other thing entirely, and while I'm not always fond of his style (his characters often look similar), I find that the way that he and Ennis worked together was almost magical, something Ennis would lament. Ennis and Dillion's creative partnership is one of the great partnerships in comics, with few others being comparable: Stan Lee and Steve Ditko, Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips, Jeff Lemire and Andrea Sorrentino. Dillon almost pitch perfectly captures the depravity, as well as the heart that lies within Preacher's story. Their influences are clear, from Hellblazer (which was the book that they cut their teeth on State side with Vertigo), to Leone's spaghetti westerns to The Bible, but they bring their influences together in order to make something truly unique and original. This is a series that I love because of how creatively ugly it is. It is so vile, so tasteless, and so utterly insane that it's hard not to appreciate it. One of the reasons that I found that the AMC show failed is because it didn't share the original comic's sense of vulgarity. It's like if NBC decided to try and make an adaptation of Transmetropolitan, it's vulgarity is a part of the series' charm. Then again I suppose it's fitting, to make something that's so depraved and unpleasant, one would have to tap into something that's also extremely depraved and unpleasant. There's simply nothing else like Preacher. Preacher is truly a once in a life time series, and Preacher is one of those series' that reminds me why I love comics. While Ennis may focus too much on the sales numbers, I find that Preacher is his magnum opus in terms of artistic merit. Is it high art? No, I don't think so, yet I often look back to a particular satirical fantasist when I'm asked such questions: "Susan hated literature, she'd much prefer to read a good book."

  21. 4 out of 5

    David

    The penultimate book of this series is mostly an interlude showing some of Cassidy's past and how Tulip and Jesse met. Still brutal and often irreverent, but fun. Looking forward to the finale of this very well crafted story! The penultimate book of this series is mostly an interlude showing some of Cassidy's past and how Tulip and Jesse met. Still brutal and often irreverent, but fun. Looking forward to the finale of this very well crafted story!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Carrie-Anne

    This is the second to last volume, so there's a bit of wrapping up for several characters, meeting of others and some extra backstory for our main supporting cast. In one way not a lot actually happens - the main story doesn't really progress, and we do spend quite a bit of time in the past - but delve a bit deeper and this volume does put things into play for our final showdown and does end a couple of characters arcs. all in all a great read, can't wait for our finale! This is the second to last volume, so there's a bit of wrapping up for several characters, meeting of others and some extra backstory for our main supporting cast. In one way not a lot actually happens - the main story doesn't really progress, and we do spend quite a bit of time in the past - but delve a bit deeper and this volume does put things into play for our final showdown and does end a couple of characters arcs. all in all a great read, can't wait for our finale!

  23. 4 out of 5

    MissAnnThrope

    04 January 2013 Rating: * * 1/2 I think if I weren't one volume away from completing this series I would quit. Some of the things I originally loved about Preacher are the very things I can't stand now. Initially, I had mad respect for Garth Ennis for putting such shocking things onto paper. However, the highfalutin political rants divert greatly from a truly compelling story. **WARNING** If you easily get queasy and you are a wuss when it comes to animal suffering, skip pages 235-237. Preacher, Vol 04 January 2013 Rating: * * 1/2 I think if I weren't one volume away from completing this series I would quit. Some of the things I originally loved about Preacher are the very things I can't stand now. Initially, I had mad respect for Garth Ennis for putting such shocking things onto paper. However, the highfalutin political rants divert greatly from a truly compelling story. **WARNING** If you easily get queasy and you are a wuss when it comes to animal suffering, skip pages 235-237. Preacher, Vol. 8: All Hell's a-Coming begins with Tulip getting back to her good ol' self. I was cheering her on and felt happy to see her taking a stand. I enjoyed her backstory, and it made me like her character even more. I loved the image of her thrown into the snow from the recoil of the gun. The other strong point to the story were the parts with Herr Starr. That grumpy bastard adds just the right amount of insane comedy. The moving walkway and failed assassinations bits had me in stitches. I've come to really love this wackadoodle. I really hate what's happened with Cassidy. I don't mind turning a once beloved character into a douchebag to add drama to the story...if it's done right. This character twist just isn't all that interesting. Again, there were several diversions from the main plot that took away from being able to sink your teeth into the story. The hitchhikers and Arseface felt unnecessary. These interruptions felt a lot like being on a roller-coaster that suddenly stops before the big belly-dropping fall. The shock value feels forced now, whereas it naturally flowed within the story in the earlier volumes. Thank goodness there is only one volume left. Regrettably, I just really want this series to be over. It's not terrible, but it's starting to feel like having to listen to a long-winded relative. Memorable moments: (view spoiler)[ Herr Starr: MOVING WALKWAY, GRANNY FUCK! NOT MOVING FUCKING STANDWAY!! MOVING WALKWAY! MOVING WALKWAY!! MOVING FUCKING BASTARD WALKWAY!! Herr Starr: Well, I'm going to spend some time with my scrotum. We may as well enjoy our last couple of hours together. Herr Starr: My cock is in the bitch's mouth. And not in a good way. (hide spoiler)]

  24. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    This book is the weakest of the bunch so far, in my opinion. It had a lot of stuff happening but none of it really stood out as great. The beginning started with a little backstory on Tulip and Amy. Why she hates guns. I kind of liked this arc, but it almost was too cliched and too brief. After that there is an issue with Custer on the road picking up people that was more or less pointless. Then we have some reunions which were a little too saccharine to be believed. Then Custer goes on a little This book is the weakest of the bunch so far, in my opinion. It had a lot of stuff happening but none of it really stood out as great. The beginning started with a little backstory on Tulip and Amy. Why she hates guns. I kind of liked this arc, but it almost was too cliched and too brief. After that there is an issue with Custer on the road picking up people that was more or less pointless. Then we have some reunions which were a little too saccharine to be believed. Then Custer goes on a little history search of Cassidy. Miraculously bumping into someone that knew him, at a very opportunistic moment. I did like the history of Cassidy, though. He really can be a monster, as Custer initially said in the first book. The moment when Jesse (view spoiler)[catches Cassidy's (basically superman) fist was incredibly stupid, even with mention of broken bones. It has never shown that Genesis gave Jesse super human abilities besides the voice, but his fighting skills are just always over blown. He never takes a hit. (hide spoiler)] Which brings us to more history, of when Jesse, Tulip, and Amy did some bad things. (view spoiler)[ More super Jesse to the rescue. I get it, he's the epitome of Texas Man, right. (hide spoiler)] Intermixed is the demise of Arseface, who you just have to feel sorry for. But man, he's a dumbass just like his father said. Also, a little bit with Starr and the Grail. Despite being Allfather, he still has old ghosts to deal with. Most of this stuff was slap stick humor, which seemed kind of stupid. Reading my review, I maybe should have made this book 3 stars. It's almost like Ennis took a break and it was ghost written by someone else. I hope the next, and final, book makes amends.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Garrett

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This is one of the best volumes in the Preacher series. It opens with Tulip's backstory. Her dad taught her to be tough, how to shoot, how to defend herself and what it is to be a good guy in this world. This story also covers how she first met Jesse and later how she got away from Cassidy. There's a single issue covering Jesse's trip from Salvation to New York intent on finding Tulip. It's enjoyable for the commentary about America. Anybody who argues that this comic is jingoistic is apparently n This is one of the best volumes in the Preacher series. It opens with Tulip's backstory. Her dad taught her to be tough, how to shoot, how to defend herself and what it is to be a good guy in this world. This story also covers how she first met Jesse and later how she got away from Cassidy. There's a single issue covering Jesse's trip from Salvation to New York intent on finding Tulip. It's enjoyable for the commentary about America. Anybody who argues that this comic is jingoistic is apparently not paying attention. Several characters--mostly immigrants--speak of how this is a good country because it gives people hope and room to dream. Cassidy's backstory is revisited with an old friend giving Jesse the lowdown on Cassidy. All the parts that Cassidy left out are brought to light here and Jesse is left wondering if he even really knew Cassidy at all. Starr is not to be left out either as he deals with Eisenstein, the man who recruited him into the Grail, and who has been tasked with dealing with Starr's outrageous behavior. And yes, Starr does suffer dismemberment again at the end of this volume. This sets up well for the thrilling conclusion in Alamo. At times, I think like Amy does: "I wish I could be you. Either one."

  26. 4 out of 5

    Zedsdead

    Ennis finally sets up the end game while lobbing intermittent back- and side-stories at us. It's to be a showdown at the Alamo, naturally. This long, busy volume contains my single favorite panel of the entire run: a man who just learned that his wife died in childbirth sitting blankly in a chair in an otherwise empty white panel. In the next panel a nurse fetches him and we see that he's in a hospital outside the neonatal ward. Wonderful way to visually convey his state of mind. Plot points: (vie Ennis finally sets up the end game while lobbing intermittent back- and side-stories at us. It's to be a showdown at the Alamo, naturally. This long, busy volume contains my single favorite panel of the entire run: a man who just learned that his wife died in childbirth sitting blankly in a chair in an otherwise empty white panel. In the next panel a nurse fetches him and we see that he's in a hospital outside the neonatal ward. Wonderful way to visually convey his state of mind. Plot points: (view spoiler)[Tulip's excellent backstory, the way her father raises her a tomboy. Her reunion with Jesse. Jesse's cross-country trip picking up hitchhikers: Tom Cooze, Elvis, the Sexual Investigators. Hoover counts his three millionth grain of sand and rejoins the Grail. The despicable predatory side of Cass's backstory. Herr Starr's showdown with Eisenstein. He loses both root and balls. Arseface's agent runs away with his money and leaves him to face an angry mob. Flashback story in which the good guys take on horse thieves. (hide spoiler)]

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    I have to say my favourite bit of this volume is where we go into Tulip's backstory and how she is when she comes too after six months of drugs and booze with Cassidy - and man am I having issues with Cassidy. On one hand you have all these fun times and fun memories but on the other you're learning all this less than fun stuff over this volume and the last too. Just jeeze. I also love how Jesse stays out of it for the most part. He lets Tulip do her thing and doesn't fight the battle for her. H I have to say my favourite bit of this volume is where we go into Tulip's backstory and how she is when she comes too after six months of drugs and booze with Cassidy - and man am I having issues with Cassidy. On one hand you have all these fun times and fun memories but on the other you're learning all this less than fun stuff over this volume and the last too. Just jeeze. I also love how Jesse stays out of it for the most part. He lets Tulip do her thing and doesn't fight the battle for her. He supports her but doesn't do the work for her and that's a big step from earlier in the series. I almost don't care at this point whether Jesse and Tulip even accomplish the main goal of the series - I just want to see how the human drama plays out above all else.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ross

    One Hell of a ride. Absolutely worth it. Angels, demons, heaven, hell, feminism, deformed-from-a-failed-suicide teenager, gunslingers, global conspiracies, cannibalism, vampires, drugs, sex, rock 'n' roll, all centered around a mission to bring God to account for his creation. And yes, I left a ton of stuff out. One Hell of a ride. Absolutely worth it. Angels, demons, heaven, hell, feminism, deformed-from-a-failed-suicide teenager, gunslingers, global conspiracies, cannibalism, vampires, drugs, sex, rock 'n' roll, all centered around a mission to bring God to account for his creation. And yes, I left a ton of stuff out.

  29. 5 out of 5

    The Flooze

    This volume gives background on Tulip, delves into the darker side of Cassidy's history, and allows us to catch up with Arseface and Herr Starr. It also brings Jesse back on track for his quest to find God and give him a stern talking to. Although I enjoyed it, I'm ready for the big showdown! It's been an interesting trip and I'm anxious to see how everything gets resolved for the Preacher. This volume gives background on Tulip, delves into the darker side of Cassidy's history, and allows us to catch up with Arseface and Herr Starr. It also brings Jesse back on track for his quest to find God and give him a stern talking to. Although I enjoyed it, I'm ready for the big showdown! It's been an interesting trip and I'm anxious to see how everything gets resolved for the Preacher.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lynda

    Tulips back and she's kicked Cassidy to the curb. This one was pretty extreme. Still I really liked it. Tulips back and she's kicked Cassidy to the curb. This one was pretty extreme. Still I really liked it.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...